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The Ubyssey Mar 20, 1952

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 The Ubyssey
XXXIV
5 CENTS
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 20,1952
NO. 02
f~\
Fireworks Expected
At AMS Meet
RAISE IN FARES
DEBATE CANCELLED
The CCF Club's neon-hour
debate on "The Raise In Fares" between Mrs. Laura Jamieson and a representative of
the BC Eltetrle Co. was cancelled. Cause of the cancellation la aald te be tha lllnass of
tha i.C. Ileetrlo man. Let's
hope It was 'flu. net faar of
the Irate student body.
SUZANNE BLOCH, the outstanding interpretative musician, will perform a wide
selection of Music from the Middle Ages to the 18th century—at Brock Hall, Saturday, 8:30
in the evening.
HEADACHES
AMS Organizations Face
Serious Money Problems
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Today's General Meeting Is faced with the problem of deciding how the
dwiadifef AMft*eveiu» it to be divided. The following is an explanation oi the background of
three problems and suggestions that have been put forward towards solving them.)
$47,000 DUE FOR PA YMENT
Tha War Memorial Oym head-i
ache has turned again with even;
greater intensity. The $60,000 loin
which  was  taken  out  last  spring
on a 90-day note is being pressed
by the creditor bank.
Students are already paying five
dollars a year to cover a $108,000
mortgage.
JThe 147,000 still to be paid on
the note will, therefore, have to
come from other sources or larger'levies.
AMS treasurer, Gerry Duclos, fa-
vos a two dollar raise In the Oym
Fund fee, which would pay off the
deht in two years.
As a last resort the AMS might
dip into surplus funds and lend the
Oym -Trust Fund $10,000 free of
Interest. However, this surplus is
necessary to AMS operations as a
cushion against unexpected losses.
Another widespread proposal Is
the possibility of refloating the
loan on a long-term second mort-
Among the many unfortunate
results of a cut In AMS revenues,
will be a virtual elimination of
the LSE Special Events Series.
In previous years Special Events
received a budget on the order of
seven hundred dollars. With this
money they have presented students with .some of the finest musical talent available on this continent, Andres Segovia, Suzanne
Bloch. the Griller and Juilliard
Quartets.
In this progrm UBC has gained
admiration   and   recognition   from
York.
musicians from Vancouver to New
As a result many outstanding
musicians who had never heard of
UBC before are more than willing
to come here to perform, simply
for the pleasure of presenting
music to an understanding and receptive  audience.
Without an adequate budget,
however, the Committee will be
unable to continue its pioneer work
Musicians and concert managers
concert 'series.
This year the Special Events
Committee   will   over   expend   Its
MAD PERCENTAGE INCREASED
The Ositroin  Plan  is  coming  up ■
for  review  at   the   AMS   meeting.;
In. order to evaluate the plan, the
Ubyssey is presenting the Ostrom
Plan In a nutshell, and an evaluation of it. I
Tho Ostrom Plan did two things:
to change the 'athletic setup as It'
existed heretofore
ORGANIZATION:   We. abolished
the Graduate Manager of Athletics *
ahd replaced him with an athletic
director responsible to and paid by!
the administration. We set up an *
Men's Athletic Directorate,  and  u
Men's  Athletic  Council.  These organizations control policy and fin-!
ances   of   athletics.   On   all   these j
groups there is a balance of rep-11
resentatton  between  students  and!
faculty. j
FINANCES:   We   Increased   the:
percentage of the students fees go-'
Ing to athletics. II  the enrollment!
Is between 5(>00 and .1.1 no students,
athletics will Ret  2(>.:!1  per cent of
the total AMS fee or 30 per cent
of  the  not   10  dollar  AMS  fee.    ,
We abolished coaches honorariums and a hired secretary. From
the .'10 per cent, a fixed sum is paid
to the administration ($8000) to
subsidize coaches salaries and the
salary of«the thletic director.
The money for athletics is turned over to the administration and
all the bookkeeping and accounting is done by them.
The student council has the
right to examine the books, but
does not have control over the expenditures before they are made. A
budget is supposed to be drawn
up by the Men's Athletic Council,
which is in turn approved by Student Council. This year the Men's
Athletic Council did* not prepare
a   budget.
EVALUATION: The Ostrom plan
lias certainly improved the adminl-j
stration  of  athletics  on   the   cani-j
pus.
In getting this increased efficiency, however, the students have reduced their control somewhat over
athletic   unl icy   and   finances,   and
gage basis. The Interest charges
on such a loan would probably be
quite high.
The difficulty ln carrying out
this plan li) the fact that the Gymi
is now officially the property of
the university, and it would therefore be difficult, If not impossible
tor the AMS to obtain a mortgage
on a building Which it does not
own.
budget by a considerable sum.
This is due to two factors: jn
ambitious program apd lack,of experience. However, ln executing Its
program, the Committee has gain*
ed knowledge of virtually all the
factors requisite to a successful
and comprehensive program. Students voting on financial policy at
the AMS meeting will have two
alternatives in their attitude towards Special Events. !'iey can
wipe out the program by cutting
its budget, or they can utilize the
experience, dearly paid for.
tho administration has a larger
voice in athletic affairs.
In comparison to the rest of student activity we know that the
MAD gets 30 per cent of he cost
of the total student activity. Should
the students vote a two dollar increase in the building fund, then
tho percentage will rise to 36.5 per
cent unless some change Is made in
the original Ostrom plan.
The question many studenta are
asking Is: "Are athletics getting
more than their share of the AMS
fee?"
Tills coming year, unless students vote through an AMS fee increase, the major activities will
suffer severe cuts In budget. The
students must decide whether or
not they wish to continue athletics
at the same level while at the
same time curtail other student activities.
It depends of course on your
philosophy of the place of athletics in a university and how much
emphasis should be placed upon It.
UN Elects
New Prexy
Tom Franck, well known, law
student, was elected president of
the campus United Nations Club at
their general meeting Wednesday.
Tom has been an active member
of the U.N. Club for four years,
and has enlivened many of the
recent Model Assemblies. He was
treasurer of LSE and programme
director of the U.N. Club during
the  last  year.
Other executive members elected were: Ron Con, Esther Harrison, Ted Lee, Oeorge Rohn, Ken
Paris, June Stephens, Michael
Wertman.
The past year's program Included sneakers from the diplomatic
corps and the Army, as well as
Faculty members. In addition, two
model assemblies were held.
Mamie Wilson, Editor of the UN
Digest, the club bulletin, reported
that seven issues had been Issues,
despite rising costs.
AMS Funds/MAD, Greeks,
USC To Highlight Battle
Five major issues will probably turn today's Spring Gen*
eral AMS Meeting into one of the hottest verbal battles in the
history of the society—with most of the overtones of a three-
ring circus.
The long-brewing scheme to amend the status of the Greek Letter
Societies, which failed to pass in
Student Council In January, will
be pulled out again—this time to
stand the test against an organized opposition of the Greeks.
The fraternities and sororities
have rounded up their members iff
order to defend the status quo.
It is not known yet whether the
backers   of,  the   anti   fraternity
scheme intend to go all out In trying to ban the Greeks from the
campus, or whether they intend to
settle for a suspension of all discriminatory clauses in Oreek Society constitutions.
In view of the expected precarious financial position of the AMJJ
next year, the Men's Athletic Directorates' report on the progress
of the Ostrom Plan will'probably
draw fire from economy minded
sources.
A 30 PERCENT BITE
Plans have been drawn to either
freeze athletic funds on their present level, or cut down the 30 per
cent bite out of the $10 AMS fee
which MAD now receives.
Aware of the money-tight prospects for the future MAD President Bill Sparling had already previously shelved plans to ask- tor
$2.76 per head levy to subsidise intercollegiate athletics in exchange
for dropping entrance charges to
all UBC sports events.
However, In doing so, Sparling
already has his eye set oa another
plum.
In   its   Monday   meeting, *.ik*
1   '
dent Council discussed the possibility of levying another two dol*
lars ln addition to the already a*
isting five dollar gym fee, to sjwjad
the payment of a $90,000 loan takaii
out last spring to finish off tne
War Memorial Oym.
A $2,000BONUS
If this increase Is passed, the
MAD will benefit under an existing scheme assuring lt of a 20 percent cut out of AMS revenue, to
the tune ot $2000,
■MtAiD might also benefit If harassed AMS treasurer Gerry Duclos
finds lt advisable to ask students
to pay an extra dollar towards the
AMS budget to meet rising costs of
operation and supplement loss of
revenue due to the expected drop
ln  enrollment  next  year.
One of the few organisations oo
campus to take a voluntary budget cut tor next year, the U$C will
be out for a different New Deal. >
Incoming USC president Geoh
Prtngls ha. cdlwctsd ltt fin*-
tures to back his demand tor three
USC seats on Student Council Mid
disposing of the Sophomore and
Junior members.
Pringle's scheme, previously turned down by Student Council, will
also have to get the approval of
Council Motion On
Greeks Up Today
Movers of a "clean up fraternities motion" issued a call
this morning to all non-Greeks to turn out to the AMS Generul
Meeting to counterbalance anticipated carefully-organized
opposition from Fraternities and Sororities.
Informed sources said Inter-Fro-^—	
The report said that council felt
ternity Council has lined up well-
briefed speakers from each fraternity and sorority and ordered all
other members to remain silent
until the vote.
Motion will likely call on the administration to withdraw recognition from all Greek Letter Societies maintaining racial and religious
discriminatory clauses in their constitution. A reasonable time will
probably be allowed such groups
to remove offending clauses.
Some sources said, however, that
the anti-fraternity group — believed to include top Student Council
and Publications Board officials-
may ask for a general ban on fraternities or that they be taken under the Aim Mater Societies.
A spokesman for the group told
The Ubyssey late Wednesday
night that "our only fear is that
non Greeks may not turn out In
sufficient numbers to ensure a fair
hearing.
"There Is no way of organizing
the non-Oreek vote and lt remains
the duty of each individual student to  see  that justice ls done.
"We expect a large section of
the Oreek vote because, whatever
pressures may be put on such students, most of them are as opposed to discrimination as we are.
"But we understand that the
Inter-Fraternity Council Is opposed to anything but wishy-washy
changes in the existing situation."
A unconfirmed report said the
council Is prepared to back an anti-
discriminatory motion which gives
the Greeks five years to remove
tlio clauses.
such a time limit would be essential because most campus groups
must dicker with their Internationals before removing the clauses.
Council officials Issued only a
terse "no comment' statement
when confronted with the report,
however.
Members of the anti-Greek group
also declined to say whether or not
they would back such a motion.
A spokesman said only: "We
hope that the situation can be
cleared to the satisfaction of everyone. All we ask is a good turnout
and a fair hearing.'
Blood Flows
For Red Cross
AU students who pledged their
blood last February have a date
either this Friday or next Tuesday.
The Red Cross will be in tho Armouries this week and next week
to collect the promised pints. The
dates are Friday. March 21 and
Tuesday, March 25.
Any person who was rejected in
the previous drive because of colds
vaccinations, etc., will be able to
make their donations at this time.
Remember that we went over the
top because of our pledges and
we need 500 pints to fulfill our
quota. $t was our victory and is up
to us not to let the Red Cross down.
If you pledged' keep your word.
It's up to you.
Much Ado Show Adokg
In Auditorium Toby
The Player's Club annuel
production, Shakeepeare'e
"Much Ado About Nothing,*'
will ba performed for students
today at 2:4». Place: Auditorium; admission ag cents.
AMS Cancels
All Meetings
TICKETS FOR the Congress ot
Vienna Ball will be available at
the Bookstore and the AMS until
Friday, March 21. They may also
be obtained at the door.
* *       *
BIOLOGY CLUB Is sponsoring
Dr. C. Carl of Victoria who will
speak on the plant and animal
forms on the seashore In Bl. 100,
Wednesday. March 28th at 8 P«m.
Excellent films will be shown with
the lecture.
* *       *
VISUAL   ARTS  CLUB   presents
Mrs. Stewart Oalafres, well-known
European choregrapher, In a talk
"An Introduction to Ballet," on Friday noon, In Arts 100.
* *       *
THE INTERNATIONAL Student's Club ls holding annual elections In Arts 204 Friday at 1'2:30.
All members are urged to attend.
* *       *
THE UBC 8YPMH0NY will practice tonight at 6:15 in the band
hut. A full attendance ls absolutely necessary.
* *       *
CONGRESS BALL practice postponed  till  Friday,  12:30  G4.
* *        *
MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
presents the Symphony No, 4 In
G major by Mahler on Friday,
March 21 at 12:30 in the Men's
Club  Room  of  the  Brock, Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 20, 1952
THE UBY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRBS1
Authorised as second olass mail by the Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Stu-
tt subscriptions (1.20 per year (included ln AMS tees). Mail subacrlp-
i $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published throughout tne
university year by the Student Publication* Board ot the Alma Mater
Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
Serein are those of the editorial staff of tho Ubyssoy, and not neoeisarly
lose of the Alma Mater Society or of the university.
Offices in Brock Hall For display advertising
Phone ALma 1624 Phone ALma 8258
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LES ARMOUR
Executive Editor-Allan Goldsmith. Managing Editor—Alta MaoGIUtvray
News Editor, V. Fred Edwards; City Editor, Mlks Ryan; CUP Editor,
Bheila Kearns; Women's Editor, Florence McNeil; Copy Editors, Jean
Smith; Director of Photography Bruce J affray; Senior Bdltprs; Myra
Oreen, Elsie Gonbat, Joe Schleslnger; Editorial Writers: Chuck Cooh
and Dot Auerbach.
Letter* to ths Editor should be restricted to 150 words. The Ubyssoy
reserves the right to eu». letters Vnd cannot guarantee te publish all
letters received. «
TififieTd Speak Out
tudehts will be asked this afternoon to approve a $2
AMS fee boosts to help pay off the society's "interim"
$80,000 loan on the War Memorial Gym.
This loan—originally a 90-day note—has been left hanging lor almost a year and there can be no doubt that some
aetion must be taken in the immediate future.
Unless students meet their financial obligations, the society's credit will tailspin-—and a poor credit rating could be
a mapor disaster.
But Serious thought should K>e given to alternative methods of re-financing the loan.
Perhaps a second mortagage could be negotiated—payable after the major $160,000 debt has been liquidated.
Most of us have been paying a $S a year to build "western Canada's biggest house of sweat" for a number of years.
Many of Us have never been inside the place.
Better than 70 percent of the studerit body derives no
value from it whatsoever.
It's function as a memorial is not to be overlooked—but
we doubt that the dead of two wars are much disturbed about
memorials. They would undoubtedly rather See something
constructive done to keep the peace if they had any say In
%i matter.
It is dubious whether or not it is wise to saddle students
With another $2-a-year burden in a time of balooning cost-of-
living when education becotoes harder to obtaih eVery year.
The student body should demand a full account of investigations into alternative financing measures Wore they vote.
|f the alternatives are not feasible, they must vote the $2
If they are feasible, they should be utilized.
prmg
ITH the coming of spring, fraternity and sorority formals have gotten into full swing.
However, this is also the time to give the Greek question
a good spring airing.
The Greek Letter Societies have in the past defended the
discriminatory clauses in their constitutions by putting the
blame on their "brothers" in the southern states.
Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee, they claim, will not
listen to any proposal that might admit Negrpes to their chapters.
What magic is there in any particular combination of
three Greek letters to force UBC Greeks to stay in an organization whose constitution they do not approve of?
There is nothing in the way to keep the Greeks from pursuing their aims of fellowship and charity in an organization
known under some other combination of the Greek alphabet,
whioh does not entail subservience to an idea to which UBC
Greeks supposedly do not subscribe.
Financial Tightrope
In ODAY the Ostrom Plan is going to be reviewed. We will
be told by the MAD that it is a four year plan, and that
it is difficult to evaluate after only one* year.
It should be obvious, however, that the Ostrom Plan
has brought a big improvement in athletic administration.
That part of the Ostrom Plan has worked well and should
be continued.
But what about the cost of athletics? Next year we can
expect little more than 5,000 students. These 5000 students
>vill each pay an AMS fee to 10 dollars, plus an ISS fee and a
War Memorial Gym fee. The ISS and the Gym fee go into
separate funds and we are not concerned with them.
The 10 dollars per student will cover the cost of student
activity and we shall have $50,000 to spend. Under the Ostrom Plan about one third of this sum will go to men's
athletics.
Nearly one thousand students participate in the athletic
program, and about 2000 in Intermurals. The Intermurals are
largely self sustaining and draw a negligible amount of money
from the MAD. There are about 2500 students in club activities.
Look at the figures another way. Each student contributes $3.25 to athletics, but contributes only 85 cents to the
USC and 70 cents to club activities.
Next year we shall be facing a tighter budget, and student
activity will be forced to take a serious cut. There is no reason
why athletics should be in a favored position. They should
reduce their activity like all other organizations.
Since the AMS has certain fixed costs, it will be the
QSC and LSE that will take the beating.
To be equitably athletics should be prepared to take a
cut to at least $2.90 per student. With the excellent administration the Ostrom Plan has provided there is no reason why
they can't manage.
MISFIRED
kditor, the Ubysssy:
it is unfortunate that the
Ubyssey which tires its editorial guns so confidently at
American foreign policy, Canadian politics and university
administration, has to mils the
mark so widely when lt criticises ihe attempt ot USC to
change representation on Students' Counoil. <
If the editorial writers Will
let their typewriters cool down
a minute, and exafoine tome of
the remarks iu an' editorial in
Tuesday's Ubyssey entitled
"Schliofmrenie USC", they
might be more reluctant to go
off halt-oocked.
The remark: "One half of
our persons, affiliated with
USC, Is getting a rough treatment from our other half,
which holds an AMS card' is
ambiguous in meaning and falsa
In tact, With exception of
Arts, all students are represented on USC and all groups
represented on USC hold AMS
cards. As to What ls meant by
one half getting rough treat*
ment from the other half, who
knows?
The editorial goes on to
state that Student CouncU
seating is designed to give all
groups a chance to voice their
idea*. A nip up to a meeting
or Students' Council would reveal this isn't so. Just what
ideas ot what groups voiced
by the junior and tophombre
members? The campus ean
hardly be said to be divided
Into years but rather Into Undergraduate Societies, who
represent definite groups.
the students would be Wetter represented If the voice of
those representatives closest
to the undergraduate and other
grdup's was heard with greater
respect on Council,
As It Is now, Council's polloy
seems to be to Ignore any recommendations from USC i.e.
not to have a standard sweater
for the university.
The only way that USC can
make Itself heard on Students'
Council and to bring Council
into closer touch with tbe students Is to increase USC representation on Students' Council. The "Superficial strate-
gem" proposed by USC ls not
nearly as superficial as the remarks contained ln the editorial. Yours truly
Jack   Potter
*
DEAti HOUSE
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I woud not Uke tp "beat a
dead horse," but Mr. R. C. MacDonald, MLA, does deserve a
word of thanks from CCFers
for his services as a publicity
agent for us. As the CCP Club
is rather short of funds, we
are appreciative of the fact
that the taxpayers of B.C. paid
for Mr. MaoDonald's astute
comments in the Legislature.
However, money is #ot everything, ahd we hope that MacDonald receives a suitable reward on election day.
The OCF members, of course,
are quite aware ot the charitable work they did ln Open
House—providing a little election propaganda for the otherwise  barren  Tory Party,,
Late Plash: following on Mr.
Straith's mention of the "competition" among poUtical groups
on the Campus, "reliable sources" Indicate that a new group
has be,en formed within the
CCF 'Club. It is called "Soc-
iallstffor-Private Enterprise,"
and Its object ls to recruit
active members for tlje Lib
and Cons Clubs, who seem to
be private enough, but rather
lacking ln Enterprise.
Any members?
Yours  truly,
P. H. Thomas,
WHY THE FUSS?
What do you know, J.R.C.
About the "Laughter Faculty?"
Some of us do wear gold pins;
Some may even indulge In gins
Some "reach" upon the campus
Better than a grumpy grampus
Some of us are merely men
Some are women. We have
been
All  of  us,   but  long  ago,
Undergraduate like you.
Someday you will be like us;
Why then, tell me. all the fuss.
Anonymous.
Little Tin Gods
Student Council should not be a little set of the gods!
The constitutional amendment proposed by USC is not
designed to provide a power block; it is designed to make
Student Council more responsible.
Nobody feels that "one half of our persons affiliated
vMh USC; is gittinfc a £dtt|h treatment from our other half"
fctii iftihjr students do feel that thiey have little voice in their
dwn government.
A representative niay be elected by the whole student
body ahd still not be responsible, but a representative can
not iii himself on a pedestal every week to 20 other people
iz he mult explain his aetion representing a cross-section of
the students. ,
GEOFF PRINGLE.
\\
Much Ado' Scores Hit
|h pjrgt p§rformance
By G AiiTr* BRY ANS
Tonight to the strains of "Green Sleeve?" the Player's
Club carried an enraptured audience back to Elizabethean
times and held them there till the end of ihe sixth curtain.
Jessie Richardson's costum-   i
Clarified
TUTORING
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First and second year English. KE
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1st and 2nd year English. KE 770OL
TYPING
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TYPING BY EXPERIENCED grad
uate. Half block from UBC bus
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ELOISE STREET, NO. 7 DAL-
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essays, thesis, mlmeo, note*. A
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Phone CH 7205 evgs.
Ing sparkling with grslety and
colour mide the Skillful comedy a spectacle both eharminr
ihd harmonious, Bob Woodward as Benedick and Miss
Joanne Walker Is Beatrice if id
the brllUatit cp.st in a performance notable for its timing,
understanding of the poet's
afreantng and complete Elite-
bethan hunk>ur.
HtAHtV PBlNCI
Don Wlthrow's portrait of
Leonato was skillful and
Leonard Lauk as Don Pedro
was completely convincing as
the hearty prince. Nell Carson, though unsure of himself
at times, played his role with
sincerety and understanding.
Doreen Odling brought a charm
Innocence to her role.
The villains were marvelous-
ly villainous, and David Moll-
Met played a sinister and con-
ving Don Juan.
The performances of Bob
Woodward and Joanne Walker
were outstanding. Miss Walker
brought to her part vivacity, a
facility of handling her lines
and a femininity which captivated the audience.
PERFECT LOVER
Bob Woodward was the perfect fifteenth century lover.
Ills handling of Shakespeare's
wit, his stage presence and his
' grace made him a perfect counterpart of Miss Walker.
On the low comedy level,
Victor Mitchell as Dogberry
draw thunderous belly-laughs
and applause from the audience. He was ably supported by
Walter Pettis and a squad
of complete idiots called the
Watch.
Joy CoghlU's skill and knowledge of comedy direction was
a'pjfaifent throughout the play.
Her staging, movement and
timing of exits and entrances
brought the show up to a competent professional level.
MOOD AIDED
John Avlson't music under
the direction of! Teno Genls
complemented and aided the
mood and period of the play.
The sets were charming and
In exquisite taste and the scene
changes were completed with
no undue backstage commotion.
—tr in *     a Ktiui a^m.*. a, ■.■ •< *    « ,■ -
driginality, brilliance of direction and competent acting
made this shown one of ihe
very best to appear at the University.
Now Is The Time
For Your
GRADUATION
PORTRAIT
at
STUDIO
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Ave.   (Opp. Safeways at Sasamat)   ALma 2404
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APTITUDE TESTING
Wondering about work or studies? Professional testing
and counseling will help.
Institute
736 GranviUe, Room 1,
MArine 2859
Portable Typewriter Headquarters
all makes 16 models to choose from
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Special rates to students
renteaver Brownhe typewriters
529 West Pender
PA. 6445
Christian Science Organization
INVITES YOU TO HEAR A LECTURE ENTITLED
"CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
AND THE BUSINESS
OF LIVING"
by HERSCHEL P.  NUNN c.s.b.
of Portland, Oregon
Member of the Poard of Lectureship of thp MOTHER CHURCH,
THE FIRST CHURCH of CHRIST, SCIENTIST, In Boston, Mass.
On Friday, 12:30 March 21 1952
IN PHYSICS 201
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Consult any of thc following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience In budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
FRED McCOLL
JACK PEARSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE OFCANADA
*» Thursday, March 20,1952
THE UBYSSEY
Page Three
■*%■
LITERARY COLUMN
Pamela Steele - Editor
Ftir reasons best known to himself and the Psychology
Department, P.W.K. wishes to remain anonymous. Any
priittiilc explanitibh df thi symfcbttiMl ill ibis ioemf ilAlHi
wish te offer wlU be Welcomed by ike <Mo*. the bei* Utter-
pretatlon will be published in next week's literary page.
LiHii WHtfiii by ti foriflil hyihdldjy StU-
dtrtt now Majoring ih Animal Htitbttndfy.
(with apologia to Ezra #ound and his etght-ounce UBC
admirers.)
My love is
like *
Rorschach blot
in the great
-psychologist's
room. Sorhetimes
she's a.jug, sometimes
a cave, sometimes
a witch
on a broom.
Sometimes
she seems like
five tiny black holes
in a gleaming White
marble floor.
Once
ahe looked like
a monstrous ball-jiolht
pen.
Now I don't
go with her
any more. —P.W.K.
lhe Arbetus Ami The Up*
Orange burned into the mind
Cooled by green liaves
And the #
Grey also
Here and there
Came softly to the earth
Orange biased deified
Transmuting
The black
And shriveled
Membranes
To new life
Here was life
And seabious sides
Dropped
To give
Soft beds
And leave the flesh to flourish
Orange against the open glory
Of a hard mid-summer sky
• tJnfettered
First love was mine
To these
Womb-ripped from ro
Uke torches
Petrified
In full and searing flame
Covering the lonely
Hidden pile of rock
They screamed
GrOin-tensing cries
Of life
tn raucous stones of burning color
Soft the flesh
Plum dappled
Rotting flesh
Grey in texture
Grey to feel
As sand
Upon a seaweed bed
And Soaring sight
Has pustulated
The hard September sky
Old man!
Drop the bark, old man
Slough off the grey
Christ!
Are you green inside
Hard and orange
Or must your vision
And shatter rock to pus.
Embrace this tree old man
Crush it tigJjt
Take firmness from this tree, old man.
As you have rotted it     —D. GARTH BRYANS.
Suzanne Bloch
Iii thi short space of one term, LSE Special Events Committee has presented one opera', the CSrtadian Premier of the' B*r-
tok Quartete Cycle, the Griller Quartet the greatest guitarist
ih tiie world—Andres Segovia, and several loeal artists of outstanding merit. <
For the final and perhaps most
unique .ooncert by a world renowned artist, Special Brants will present Susanne Bloch. In addition
to beltig an outstanding authority
on music of the Middle Ages and
Renaissance, Miss «Bioch is an in-
terperatlve artist of the first rank.
The instruments on which she
Specialises, the lute, the virginal!
and the recorder, were the most
popular instruments of that fabled
era, the Elizabethan age. Prom
thehi have developed our present
day viblins, plaids ahd flutes. Mus-
bum pieces for the list 200 years,
these ancient instruments we otise
again receiving tiie enthusiastic
applause of select and advance audiences. This revitalised Interest can
tie attributed to the superlative
musicianship and acumen of such
artists as Susan? Bloch and An
ires Segovia.
tn her concert on Saturday,
evening, March ii Miss Blooh will
perform a wide selection of music,
from tiie Middle Ages down to the
18th Century. Brock Hall will be
filled with some Of the rtost exquisitely beautiful music ever written
and an audlenee aprroachlng the
record proportions of the Segovia
concerts ii expected to be on hand
for this exciting event.
f 6 Obtain her music, Miss Bloch
has poured through all the major
music libraries of Europe and ln
doing so gained recognition as
the leading authority on music oi
this period. On Saturday evening
Miss Bloch wiil intersperse the
musical selections with witty and
informative comments on the mus-
ic. A iir cry from the dull pendancy usually disbursed ln such talks,
iSusahne Blo'ch's commentaries
hate given immense delight ahd
amusement to capacity Net* York
audiences (or the past five seasons.
Miss Bloch comes by her musical girts honestly. She is the
daughter of Ernest Bloeh, one of
the three of four greats of 20th
Century composition. She Is at
present visiting her famous father
ih California.
'Her music lectures at Columola
University and neighboring NeW
York Colleges, usually keeps her
so busy that she has little time
for cross country tours. It ls good
fortune of the Special Events Committee and university students
that Miss Bloch has consented to
combine her holiday visit to her
parents with a recital on the campus. Miss Bloch's only other concert appearances on the Coast are
at Los Angeles and San Frnclsco.
AMS Calls Pot
Extra Dollar
Faced with a drop in Income due
to lower enrollment next year, the
AMS may ask for an extra dollar
raise in AMS fees at the Oeneral
Meeting today.
The fee hike question would
come as an ammendmeht to the
inotidn requesting a two dollar
raise' for the Oym fund. Treasurer Fhll Anderson told the Ubyssey
Wednesday,
With an enrollment not exceeding 5,000 in 1&52-53, Student Council will have a sharply reduced
btidget which would barely meet
fixed Costs (Office staff, equipment, etc)
Grants to clubs and LSE will
depend upon the proposed lnorease.
It such %- increase Is not forthcoming, Ahderhon explained, student extra-curricular activities
would be drastically curtailed because of insufficient funds,
0*
DON'T FORGET AMS
MEET NOON TODAY
mm
USC Challenge
AMSPesHhns
The two oft contested Student
Council sets for Sophomore and
Junior members are being challenged again—this time by tlte Undergraduate Societies Committee.
Last fall the student body turned down plans to change the seating on council to make room for
two representatives of USC in
favor of the status quo.
Now USC has bounced back with
a renewed request for representation on Student Council.
Incoming USC chairman Geoff
Prlnjgle maintains that the student body has no control over councillors once they are elected to office.
"USC representatives, on the
other hand, must report back to
the Individual undergraduate societies periodically," Pringle claims.
Opponents of the plan point oiit
that USC  iyr  gntslot a
that USC is trying to re-establish
some of its influence ou campus
affairs. They maintain that council representation will only be
an artlclllal stimulus to the commit
tee.
The defenders of the status quo
also pointed out that Student Council Is mostly concerned with the
extra-curricular activities of the
student body as a whole. Tbe individual members of council are
responsible to the club and organizations they represent.
The present USC representation,
they say, serves Its purpose In coordinating the activities of thc undergraduate societies and AM?
activities.
WIN A GALA TRIP
to NEW YORK .nd JAMAICA, b w.i.
int/ujiist
CANADIAN SWEATER QUEEN
CONTEST
An altexpefase trip to NEW YORK, where you stay at the fabulous Waldorf-
Aaorla-4nd JAMAICA, staying at the famed Hotel CasS Bianca, Montego
Bav as the guest of Grand'mere! A complete wardrobe of smart new clothes
*c take along! Every minute packed with excitement-luncheons, dinners,
Sieatres,TVap^arances-a chance to meet celebrities be a celebrity your-
seH! ^Vs juT^art of what's in store, if you win the Canadian Sweater
Queen Contest.
IT'S SO EASY! JUST READ THE RULES .
FILL OUT THE ENTRY BLANK AND-
YOU'RI ON YOUR WAY!
■*"-nd 24. ■"■
, « y„u «» the ** ** ^^ ^icaUons wMch best per-
•it v>e internauonauy
8. judges wtU b ^ iinal
-^ Ska s :* «^1
Weight
HelflW
Age
ioWbn or
tchool
Measurement**
Bust
FOR ADDITIONAL
ENTRY BLANKS:
Hips
Waist
—-go to the Sweater Department of any store that sells Grand'mere
Sweaters. For the name of the store nearest you write: Grand'mere
Knitting Company, Ltd., University Tower Bldg., Montreal, P.Q.
,____, Page Four
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 20,1952
Financial Statements
AMS Statement
Athletic Statement
SUMMARY
Admin 	
%g> ::=:
Publications 	
Uhdergrad Soc.
L.S.JB.  	
N.F.C.UJS	
Margin 	
Total
Estimated
Budget     Expenditure
... $16,500.00 $16,375.00
...   17,200,00   17,200.00
 1,825.00    1,825.00
 7,500.00    9,480.00
 ,.. 2,650.90    2,475.00
 3,745.00    4,614.00
....     1,050.00    1,113.00
. 2,530.00 NIL
$53,000.00 $53,082.00
ADMINISTRATION
Salaries	
Stationery & Supplies	
Audit & Legal	
Postage 	
Insurance 	
Telephone & Telegraph	
Brook Depreciation 	
Accident Insurance	
Honorariums; Students Council and
v    Conferences	
Mlscellaneuos    	
Musical Director	
A.M.S. Pictures	
TOTAL
$8,200.00
.. 2,000.00
200.00
400.00
370.00
800.00
800.00
.. 1,500.00
$7,216.00
1,946.00
700.00
458.00
485.00
470.00
800.00
1,500.00
2,000.00
..    230
1,887.00
378.00
  250.00
  285.00
$18,500.00 $16,375,006
£j£ft& Amin	
ijiBiAl Events
fB CLUB .
rlcal .Soc.
House 	
P Stadents  .
Hit Soc	
Jamooks   .......
lusical Soc
lUsic Apprec.
$ Forum  ...
lyers Club .
Psychology 	
Radio Soc	
Symphony Orch.
UM. Club 	
Visual Arts 	
OPF Club 	
Liberal Club   	
fmConi	
9.V.M	
Total
    $280.00
      700.00
40.00
       25.00
     270.00
5.00
       75.00
       25.00
       15.00
     300.00
     700.00
       15.00
300.00
500.00
       15.60
     185.00)
Loan 100.00)
       50.00
      100.00
25.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
$3,745.00
$236.00
1,713.00
26.00
23.00
265.00
5.00
82.00
26.00
11.00
315.00
563.00
♦   8.00
294.00
578.00
14.00
270.00
46.00
104.00
16.00
5.00
5.00
4.00
5.00
$4,614.00
A CUP FEATURE
ad lib
Sll XaAolcL SwduocddL
PARTY GIRL
WINNIPEG, (CUP)—"No, thank you, I think I've had
enough for one night. And besides, I don't think Don would
approve. Have you seen Don anywhere? I came with him
y'now....
"Oh well, If you Insist, but just p-
a teensy-weensy one . . . What's
th|t you say? . . . .No, that's right,
1 guess I haven't had a drink with
you yet, Harry. Well, this is my
lust one. Don is such a prude, honey. He spent Uie whole night tenter—-two glasses and she made a
lag me about the optician's daugh-
speotacle of herself. A Utile more
ginger ale, honey. Well, I  can't
help it If it's not funny; it's Don's
little joke . . . Harry, not so much
rye! You'll get me loaded, honey,
and   then  you'll  really be  sorry.
"Mere's te ua ... ©oh, WHAT
did you put In this I . . . Let's
danee, 'eause that's my favorite song. We'll just leave our
drinks right here, nobody will
touch them . . .
"Harry, honey, do you think I'm
a clinging vine just 'cause I like to
put my arms around your neck
and dance real close . . .My Glen
. . Well, some fellows do, and it's
just that I like to dance this way.
So much more comfortable . . .
Don't toll me that's Don over tljere,
actually dancing . . . Well, miracles will never cease. What a party-
pooper he Is. Y'know what, honey?
He didn't even want to come out
to the Bdgewatei. Just wdnted to
grab a bite and go home. Says he
has an early class. Some people
just don't, know how to enjoy
themselves at a party . . .
"I think Don is ashamed of little
ole me. He doesn't wanna be seen
with me and that's why he wanted
to go straight home. Pull up a
chair, Dick, I was just telling Harry that I think Don Is ashamed of
me . . . Dick, honey, It's so sweet
of you to say you'de be proud to
but I promised Oeorge I'd be
his partner for the next square
dance. Hang around, and I'll
see you a little later — maybe
In the kitchen ...
"Oh Oeorge, was that ever fun
... Wheeoo, I'm breathless . . .
What happened to my drink? Oeorgla honey, would you mind getting
me anpther. You're not supposed
to sit empty handed at these parties, are you? . . . Ah, you're so
sweet. I'll be holding my breath
until you get back . .
"Well. If It isn't Peter Pain!
Have you been here all night, honey
I bet that girl friend of yours
has been hiding you. And I don't
blame her . . . Let me have a drag.
He, he, now^the end's all covered
with lipstick. How are you going
to explain that? Here's a big kiss
on the forehead . . . Now how are
going to explain THAT? . . .
"Right over here, Oeorgie. You
know Pete Fain, don't you. Pete
was just sitting here looking bored .. . But I'm sure there's a chair
here someplace. Alright honey, I'll
sit on your lap, but you'll be sor*
ry . . . Flatterer! A hundred and
five, my eye—I weigh a hundred
and twenty-three, and you know it.
Let's start a sing-soat;, Oeorgie.
Pete will help us. ("mon. Pete,
honev . .
Away w» go with fv*f and drum
Here \>e come, full of rum,
Looking tor women whe,
Rlan.lH* What a lo" y dressj I
(,uppis> e'vi've come for your Peter. Willi, y.tu can ha/> him. He wns
signing flat anyway . . . Whatever
did rhe ■'. to her huir, George
Slip's b»en wearing It ;h!V. way for
three   months?   I   never   noticed
SUMMARY OF ATHLETIC FINANCES
Expenses to Feb. 29	
Commitments .'. ...
Subsidy to salaries
Total expenses	
Grant from AMS fees    17,475.05
Revenue to come    5,799.75
Prlvilidge cards ,    2,648.00
Expected surplus    ...
12,667.15
3,493.15
16,160.30
8,880.00
-25,040.30
25,922.80
882.50
ACTIVITIES TO FEB. 29,1952
Expenses
Revenue
Cost.
640.95
1,162.96
189.86
(cr) 16.24
4,607.95
1,105.9!
85.82
566.76
2,686.90
359.29
566.82
44.38
665.7f
12,667.19
Admin 640.95
Basketball 4,930.83        3,767,87
Clubs 828.01 638.15
Football 10,125.26      10,141.50
Ive-hockey ,    4,704.08 98,13
Minor sport 1,205.94 100 00
Publ. Relat 85.82
Rowing 666.14 99.38
Rugby 2,708.40 21.50
Soccer 386.60 27.31
Stadium 586.82
Track 44.38
Trainer 665.76
27,792.33      15,125.18
NB. These figures do hot Include coaches salaries, which arc
subsidised by the AMS, or the Football training table which
cost Approximately $2,000,000.
Birds Face Tough
Games, Sat. Sunday
The big games are on the weekend.
Which means that Ivan Carr's soccer charges must win two
games Saturday and Sunday to pull themselves closer to the
Pacific Coast B Division title.
If they lose one ot their fames, <t>
or   both,   the   Thunderbirds   will'
have counted 'Hen aad out" of the
league race.
Varsl^r meet last place South
Hill Saturday at Memorial Park
and Sapperton Sunday at Sapperton.
Birds should have little, trouble
with the 8outh Htllmen but that
Sapperton team ls as unpredictable as examinations. Last week
the lowly Saps whipped league
leaders Collingwood 84 to Mnder
the Collies' chances of a championship.
Varsity have six garaei to go:
Collingwood. Gams time tiavirday
at Memorial South Park Is 2:15.
CUS Elections
Hot Contest
Sixty-five per cent pt all Commercemen turned out to vote ln
the hotly contested Commerce Undergraduate Society elections last
Friday. This is the seoond year in
a row that the CUS has attacted
such    large voting turn-out.
Pete Day ls the new president.
He nosed out Lyle Ahrens by 112
to 105 ln the second round. The
first round showed Day and Ahrens tied at 91 votes each, with
Oreg   De Mon treve   running   third.
Steve Crease got in as vice-president by a comfortable margin of
133 to 84. Chuck Lew, Murray Martindale and Gary Shepard split the
remaining votes almost equally.
Next year's treasurer will be
Doug Dong who scraped ln by 103
to 111. Pat Blewett gave him close
competition while Bill Salter and
Jack Wolfe ran behind.
Louise Morris won the Secretary's position over Liz Booth by
131 to 99.
The election speeches, held last
that the candidates who made the
best speeches were well on their
way to winning. Almost 50 per
cent of the Commerce enrollment
attended the speeches.
Phrateres Girls
Plan Camp Night
Anticipating their session at
Camp Firoom, on Gambler Island
at the close of exams, members of
UBC Phrateres will hold a camp
night In Brock Hall, Tuesday,
March 25.
Batty Black, new Paratere president, is ln charge of arrangements.
TOURNAMENTS
Jr. Hoop Show
At City School
Unlike previous years UBC
is not sponsoring a full scale
junior high school tournament on the campus this year.
Instead, high schools ln the
province are playing off games
in different se'ctlons of the
land and the winners who emerge from these full scale
eliminations will meet for the'
title.
When winners are declared
they will play off for the title
as a preliminary to the gigantic senior high school provincial tourney,which UBC holds
here every year.
At present there are four
sections ln the province where
the play-offs are getting underway. Three are ln Vancouver;
being run off at Vancouver
College, Gladstone and King
Edward gyms,
the other ln Chiliiwack.
At Gladstone, South Burnaby, West Vancouver, Gladstone
and King Ed are the contestants.
*Favored In this tourney are
the kids from South Burna>>y
who have already jumped lnti
a lead via a win over King'Ed.
Affable Cyril Nixon, probably the best high school hoop
member In the city, ls handling
Gladstone juniors but he's not
too optimistic. His lads have
not fared too well this year,
being more Inexperienced than
the usual junior teams and
Nick, isn't expecting them to
pull any surprises.
Nixon, head of the school's
athletic department, was coach
of John Oliver high school
seniors for years before taking
the top spot at Gladstone, Vancouver's fast . up-and-coming
prep athletic Institution.
LEARN TO DANCE
•   QUICKLY
•    IASILY
•    PRIVATELY
3 Lessons 10.00*10 Lessens I1S.M
Frances Murphy
Donee School
Alma Hall     8878 W. Broadway
CI. 6871 — iA MM
It likes You
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
•It SQUARES
T-8UARE8, FROTRACTOR8
From $10.00
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASY SLIDE RULES
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
1IMBR   RINQ   tOOKt
Complete with Sheets aad Index
From 98,61
FOUNTAIN PINS
Clarke i Stuart
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS and  PRINTERS
850 Seymour St Vancouver, 1.0.
WINDBREAKER  and  SLACKS
be out with me. I just know you j before.
don't mean a thing you say when
you talk about how pretty I am
.... But, Dick, this isn't New
Year's. Why are you kissing mmm
. . . You need a shave . .
"Georgia,   where   have   you
been hiding? I'm sorry Dickie
"I'm glad they turned the
lights off. My eyes were beginning to hurt. I must be just
about breaking your poor old
knees. Just tell me when and
I'll get off. Your shoulder is so
comfy  mmmm  ...  If you're
so smart take a guess ... Of
eourse, It's not forty—it's Just
thirty-six . . . What's that you
mmm . . . Isn't this Just so funny ... ha, I came with Dan
and I'm necking with you. Oeorgie, ditch your girl and c'mon
ever to  my place. Oh, she'll
get over It . . . You get the
coasts and I'll wait right here.
Now hurry. Where's my drink?
"Whazzat? ... I must have dozed off . . . FOUR O'CLOCK . . .
Where Is everybody? Where's George ... He and Sheila went with
Pete  and  Blanche  How long ago
. . . And what happened to Don?
.... I looked so comfortable he
didn't want to disturb me? Of all
the  nerve?  .  .   .  Thanks  anyway
Ellle. If was a swell party. Would
you call mo a cab, pease, honey."
Made of Unisec, a sturdy rayon gab to
give cool, long wearing comfort in the
spring atid summer days ahead. Smartest
thing in men's casuals in a long time!
Tops for campus, ideal for golf . . .
all-round style in waist fitting wind-
breaker, pleated pants, either
matched or mixed. In beige, grey
and blue, sizes 36 to 46.
t
Unisec fabric is water repellent and
stain proof. It's crease resistant, too.
See it, and other smart new styles
as well, in our Men's Furnishings,
Main Floor.
Windbrcakct is 14.05
Slacks are 12.50
I
* INCORPORATED   8«» MAV I870 ~ *

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