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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1939

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 PROF. LASKI
SATURDAY
AUDITORIUM
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
"SERENADE"
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
AUDITORIUM
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1939
No. 35
PROF. LASKI
WILL SPEAK
SAT. JSIOON
POLITICAL.    THEORIST
AND   AUTHOR
Professor Harold Laski, economics
professor of the University of London, will speak to the university
students on "The Aftermath of Munich" tomorrow, Saturday, in the
Auditorium at 11:30.
Speaking on this i object ln New
York recently, Profe.sor Laski was
widely  acclaimed.
HUGE CROWDS
At present he ls a professor at the
University of Washington where the
interest shown is so great that students overflowed Meany Auditorium and the leotures had to be re-
broadcasted to Ouggenheim Hall to
accommodate the huge crowds.
Professor Laski, one ot the most
progressive thinkers of the age,
has had a carted life. Besides being
on tlie national executive of the
British Labor Party he la an outstanding author on political theory
and a widely sought lecturer.
LECTURES CANCELLED
So that all students will be able to
attend this leoture, which is another
pass feature sponsored by the A.M.S.,
all eleven-thirty classes have been
cancelled. Due to the interest already
displayed by students, all outsiders
will be refused admittance, .
The first five rows in the auditorium will be reserved for the faculty.
Studenta   are   requested   to   be
seated as soon as possible, before
Dr. Ivor Jennings Introduces Professor Laski.
Vote  of  thanks  from  the  student
body -will be moved by Darrell Braldwood, A.M.U.S. head; for the faculty
by acting president Dean Buchanan.
TO BE HONORED
Pictured to the left is Lord Tweeds
mulr, the Governor General of Canada, who will visit this University
on March 17, to receive an honorary
LL.D. A program has been arranged
for tho day of the Congregation,
whloh will Include the Inspection by
Lord Tweedsmulr of a Guard of
Honor from the C.O.T.C, and a reception In the gymnasium.
DR. SAGE ANNOUNCES
U. E. L. ESSAY TOPICS
Dr. Sage of the Department of
History announces that essays for
the Medal Competition held under
the auspices of the United Empire
Loyalslt Association of Canada are
due April 1. 1030
Essays may be written on any of
the following subjects:
(1) The United Empire Loyalists
and Education; (2) A comparison
and contrasts between the United
Empire Loyalists Settlements ln Upper Canada and In the Marltlmes;
(3) Egerton Ryerson and Joseph
Howe as types of U.E.L. Reformers;
(4)The U.E.L. Loyalists as a constructive  force In Canadian  history.
GOVERNOR GENERAL
WILL  RECEIVE  LL.D.
High Officials Attend Congregation in Honor of Distinguished Scholar and Statesman
A special congregation for the purpose of conferring nn
honournry degree, LI..D., on His Excellency the Right Honourable I.ord Tweedsmuir will take place in tho University Auditorium Maroh 17.
 —■PROGRAM
A
"TUUM EST"
TAKES A BIT
OF A BEATING
POLITICIANS DEBATE
UNEMPLOYMENT AND
LABOR CONDITIONS
Ted Strongitharn, Minister of Labor in the McOill administration, will
introduce for the Conservatives a bill
for "National Control of Unemployment and Labor Conditions" on Monday, February 27 when the P. D. C.
meet ln Arts 100.
Darrell Braldwood will occupy the
speaker's chair.
A part of Dean Buchanan's Wednesday address to the Board of Trade
brought forth a remark from a former bright spot of the Publications
Board which if not meriting serious
consideration, certainly deserves a
sympathetic hearing.
Pointing out that according to Its
charter, those attending this University should by rights not have
to undergo the painful process of
delivering fees galore to the Bursar's refuge, the venerable Head of
the Arts and Science faculties exposed the motto of the University
to some playful criticism.
"TUum est", "Here it Is"—with its
Implication of donating the University to the flowering youth of the
province to do what they can and
like with, has become virtually a fallacy, the Dean opined.
Up to the present, the original
Idea of free Unlveralty endowed
and financially supported has not
been fulfilled. Nor, according to
preaent Indications, does It appear
that It will be fulfilled for some
time to come.
In view of these distressing circumstances and by way of showing his
versatile wit, the afore-mentioned
bright one has suggested that the
motto be granted an epilogue, "Non
potest fieri," which, being translated
very freely, probably to the Intense
distaste of the Classics department,
could mean, "lt won't work."
Which seems to sum up the situation fairly accurately
"Curtain Rises" Ideally
Suited To Players Club
program has been planned to
begin on the arrival of His Excellency at the University campus in
the afternoon. Tentative arrangements are being made for the inspection of a Ouard of Honour composed
of the C.O.T.C. under Colonel Shrum.
Following this a procession will form
at the Administration Building and
proceed to the Auditorium.
The ceremony will begin with an
opening address by Chancellor McKechnie.    A  presentation  of Lord
Tweedsmulr   by   President  Kllnck
will   foUow  for  the conferring  of
the degree  by  the  degree   by   the
ohanceUor.   Immediately after, the
Governor General will address the
assembly.
Following   the   congregation   there
will  be  a  reception  in  the  gymnasium to which all who attend the assembly will be invited.
Invitations are being extended to
the Lieutenant Governor, the Premier, members of Parliament, Senators, Councillors, Mayors, members
of the Supreme Court and the Court
of Appeal, Church dignitaries, the
University Senate and Board of Governors, heads of the affiliated colleges, donors, presidents of Service
Clubs, etc., the University Faculty
and the Student body of third, fourth
and fifth years. The remainder of
the student body will receive a general  Invitation.
NEW RULE OBVIATES
CLASH IN MEETINGS
You didn't see Lunt and Fontanne
when Amphytrion '-i8 debuted ln
'Frisco?
You Just didn't get around to seeing "Once ln a Lifetime" when It
hit  the New York  boards?
And you wore lumbering around ln
the sticks when "The Curtain Rises"
plus Jean Arthur wowed Broadway
for   months?
Well, really it's your own silly
fault, but opportunity ls going to
take down its hair and knock twice.
The vehicle that swept La Arthur
to stardom is going to trek across
the great unwashed West arriving
at the University on March 15, 16, 17,
and  18.
The man wh owlll whip the team
Into shape is Sidney Risk, former
Thosplan himself who Is Just back
from  several  years  of  acting  and
directing In London, and who dropped In on  New  York on  the way
back   to   climb   Into   the   driver's
seat.
Pulling   the   vehicle   Is   a   pipe,   declare   the   energetic   team.   It's   light
as a feather, rolls smoothly, and It's
really fast. And It's no water wagon.
Nor  Is  It  a covered  wagon.  It's
the   1039   model,   streamlined,   lots
of   knee-action,   and   does   It   need
shock-absorbers.   But   underneath
the   shiny    exterior   of   chromium
there  ts a  solid framework and  a
hardworking   crew   of   Thespians.
Costumes,   make-up,  publicity,   financiers  are  slugging  to  make  the
wheels  go  round.
So when "The Curtain Rises" arrives on the Varsity stage you'll
have to stop ln yourself, because
there's more than one clutch but no
brakes  In  this year's vehicle
Students' Council on Monday night
decided that the larger societies,
which include the whole student
body, will be able to have their meetings free from the competition of
several other assorted ones.
The change was suggested by
Jean Stordy, who, as President of
the Women's Undergraduate Society, has sorely felt the need for
such a move.
TO CANCEL OTHER MEETINGS.
Notices of meetings for the Alma
Mater Society, Men's Undergraduate
Society, Women's Undergraduate So- |
ciety, Men's Athletic Association and
Women's Athletic Association will be
posted about two weeks ln advance,
so that other clubs may act accordingly.
Any other meetings scheduled for
those   times   will   automatically   be
cancelled.
This motion is expected to result
ln a larger turnout at these meetings. In adltlon, Jean Stordy pleads
for a more active response during the
meetings; that all those who have
suggestions should bring them up at
the meeting, Instead of speaking privately to the chairman after the
meeting.
"SERENADE"
SUPERLATIVE
PRODUCTION
ANNUAL.  PRODUCTION
AMUSING AND
BEAUTIFUL
The vigorous applause of enthusiastic "first nlghters" gave eloquent
testimony to the high atandard of
entertainment and artistry attained
in the premiere of "Serenade" Wednesday night.
The  opera  was   a   very   happy
choice since Its blend of color, song
and humor proved one   that   the
Musioal Society could handle more
than adequately.
Frank Patch realised to the full the
possibilities of an excellent role.   His
portrayal of the Duke was a splendid
combination of fine acting and singing.    His song "I am  a  Duke" was
one of the vooal highlights.
FRESHETTE SHOWS PROMISE
A voice of delightful sweetness was
revealed by Marygold Nash who was
heard at her best in the lovely "Cupid and I." Her high notes, particularly with the flute accompaniment,
were a treat.
Performances  of  tbe   principals
were very even.    Derek MaoDer-
mot's "Romero" was a fine Job and
Marjorie Usher aa "Dolores"  more
than satisfied.   Har duet with Alvarado   (Archie   Runcle)   "I   love
Thee" was deservedly appreciated.
,   Among the most amusing characterisations was Doug Ford's "Colombo."     "Lopez"   as   played   and   sung
by Oeorge Whltehurst was a splendid
performance   while   Tom   Robinson's'
"Gomez" and Adam Reld's "El Gato"
are worthy of special mention.
HUMOR  APPRECIATED
An uproarious note of levity was
sustained throughout the 'entire production by puns of an unusually high
order and frequency as well as Incongruous references to stockholders,
elections and other things not usually
associated with old, romantic Spain.
•Although the beginning of the first
act was somewhat ragged this weakness disappeared as the characters
found themselves and the last two
acts were done with the necessary
assurance.
The orchestra was adequate but
showed definite lack of practice. Instruments ln solo parte might have
been considerably Improved by more
work on the score.
The defects of the opera, however, were comparatively sUght
and stood out because of thetr
very rarity.
PINE  ACTING
The acting and gestures, usually
weak In a musical production, were
surprisingly good and Indicated careful training.
Worthy of the highest praise are
the  costumes.     These  were   really
beautiful and, combined with effective lighting, made a brilliant spectacle, particularly In the final scene.
The opera as a whole was  clearly
the   result   of  careful  work,  enthusiasm, real talent and genuine co-operation   among   all   departments.     The
high calibre of the "Serenade" proves
what   can   be   accomplished   by   concerted effort and team work.
STUDENTS' COUNCIL TO
HOLD ELECTIONS SOON
NOMINATIONS   MUST   BE   IN   SHORTLY;   DAVIS
PREPARES CAMPAIGN  RULES
Another year hatf rolled by on the Campus, and it is almost
time for the nine students who have led the student body during
this time, to lay down their gowns. Students' Council elections
will take place from March 14 to 21.
Jack Davis, M.U.S. president, has drawn up the following
rules for this year's elections:
 -a PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS.
1. Nominations must be In by 8.00
Boys Worry As
Girls Choose
"Co-ed"   Partners
Manly figures are seen these days
hanging around sorority tables, making themselves especially talkative
and Interesting, even giving the girl
a fling that they never deigned to
notice before.
What' can be the occasion for this
sudden evidence of Interest on their
part? Have the girls suddenly
achieved an extra dose of person-
aUty, or can tt be that the coming
Co-ed has something to do with It?
ONCE IN A YEAR. ,
For once the tables are turned and
the boy who got around a lot ls wondering anxiously whether fickle woman really favored him or whether
he was Just another date? He will
soon know, but the suspense is terrible.
Keep  your   eye    on    the  caUous
male who says he doesn't believe ln
Sadie   Hawkins'  day.   He   probably
hasn't been asked to the Co-ed and
his sentiments are aU sour grapes.
But   if   you   girls   think   that   the
chosen   is   popular   and  sought  after
don't waste  any  time for  the  night,
when "mamma  pays" is less than a
we'ek away. So get right in the flght
for those tickets—only $2.00 for Mart
Kenny and the Crystal Ballroom, and
a whole evening with that man you
have always wanted  to go out with.
MAMOOKS WORK WITH
CLASS EXECUTIVES
The "Mamooks", the Hear Ye, Hear
Ye'a of the cafeteria, are planning
to co-operate with the class councils
ln the supervision of class parties.
The "megaphone boys" have been,
since the beginning of the term, df
considerable aid in the presentation
of class dances. They have arranged
publicity, ticket sales, decorations, ln
fact all the tough details of our class
brawls. Now they are being officially
recognized by the council as part of
the working  machine.
Evan apRoberts, Junior Member of
the Council, and Ken Shaw, the
backbone of the Mamooks, have been
Instrumental ln bringing about this
change, Oreat results and novel
changes for class parties are expected
fro mthls coalition.
by   candidates  In  tho
19.30     noon,     Friday,
p.m., Wednesday, Maroh 8.
, 2. Oandldates wUl receive Instructions   and   must   present   proof   of
eleglbllity  at  A.M.S.   office   by   5.00
p.m., Wednesday, March 8.
3. Oandldates . may start offlolal
campaigning 8.80 p.m., Thursday,
March 0.
4. Speeches
Auditorium,
March io'.
0. Election day Is Tuesday, Maroh
14, from 10.00 ajn. to 4.00 pjn., In
the A.M.8. Office.
ELECTION  OF   OTHER  OFFICERS
TO STUDENTS' COUNCIL.
1. Nominations must be ln by 6.00
p.m., Wednesday, March 18.
3. Oandldates will receive Instructions, and must present proof of
eleglbllity at A.M.S. Offloe by 6.00
pan., Wednesday, Maroh 16.
3. Oandldates may start offlolal
campaigning 8.30 a.m., Thursday,
Maroh 16.
4. Speeches by candidates on Friday, March 17, 12.30 noon, and Monday, March 20, 12.30 noon.
8. Election day ls Tuesday, from
10.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. ln the A.M.S.
office, March 21.
Rumour  has  It  that the  oandldates for the office of A.M.S. president wtU be Johnny Pearson, Jack
Stevenson,    and    possibly    Darrell
Braldwood.   Pearson   was   defeated
for M.A.A. last year, whUe Stevenson was defeated for treasurer.
Possible  candidates   for   other  offices   are   as   follows:   Whichever  of
the two flrst presidential candidates
ls   defeated   will   probably   run for
treasurer. It appears that BasU Robinson and Len Zink may flght lt out
for the M.U.S. position.
It ls rumoured that the candidates
for the position of L.S.E. member
will be Osborne Durkin, and Darrell
Braldwood.
The only names mentioned so far
as possibilities for Junior Member,
are Jim Harmer, Bus Ryan and
Charlie Nash.
Five girls are in line for positions
cn Council: Ruth Hutchinson, Janet
and Betty Fleck, Pamela Runkle,
Biddy McNeill and Ruth Wilson, will
probably be candidates. Ruth Hutchinson will run for secretary; Ruth
Wilson will likely run as Women's
Athletic Member, as wUl Pamela
Runkle, and possibly Betty Fleck.
Biddy McNeill Is expected to run for
W.U.S. Janet Fleck may run for W.
U. S. or W. A. A.
Dr. G. M. Weir Adresses
Vancouver Board of Trade
REGINALD H. TUPPER
SPEAKS TO INSTITUTE
"Changing Views of Government"
will be the subject of Mr. Reginald
H. Tupper, barrister, when he addresses the Vancouver Institute at
Its regular Saturday evening lecture
ln Arts  100 at 8:IS.
Among other topics lt ls expected
Mr. Tupper will discuss the definite
tendency in recent legislation to give
power to administrative branches of
governments to make regulations
that have the force of law. This tendency will be Illustrated by recent
Provincial  and Dominion  examples.
"I don't think there are too many
people at U.B.C.," Dr. Q. M. Weir
told the Vancouver Board of Trade
when he spoke at their luncheon
Wednesday afternoon. "At the present rate of graduation lt will take
twenty years before 1 per cent, of
the population of British Columbia
can get a university degree." Dr.
Weir explained to the group of business men that 120 thousand young
people attended elementary school,
23 thousand attend secondary school,
only 25 hundred reach U.B.C. and
400 graduate.
VALUE   OF   UNIVERSITY.
The speaker went on to explain
that university Is "a means to an
end" rather than a value ln itself.
"It saves  time ln  getting  an  educa
tion;" non-university graduates
sometimes, have an education but lt
has taken them so much longer to
acquire it, he said. The university
students differ from non-unlverslty
graduates in that they are tough
minded and unemotional., they judge
from the facts rather than preconceptions.
In conclusion Dr. Weir surprised
the board by the statement that
students spent over one million
dollars with business men In
Greater Vancouver every year, and
estimated that if 25,000 students
should be excluded from attending
U.B.C, that is the present registration, much more than the yearly
university grant.
Dr. Weir's address preceded the
passing of a motion ln support of
National Student Scholarships. Two
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24, 1939
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offloe: 800 Auditorium Building - - • Phone Point Orey 206
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy  Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene Eedy
Friday
Jack  Mair
Sports Editor:  Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Lester Pronger Ted Underhiil
Associate Sports Editors:  Basil  Robinson,  Myrne  Nevlson.
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Ossy Durkin        Florence Hurndall        Helen Hann        Joan Thompson
Bill  Backman.
Assistant Sports Editors:  Lionel  Salt, Jim  Harmer,  Austin   Frith,
Charles Craig.
C.  U.  P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Van Perry
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
CIRCULATION  MOR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL  STAFF
Jack Margeson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haslam, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brita Vesterback, Bob Manson, Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Dick  Jarvis
ssEMBBBnBa_i_^n_^_M_^a_n9E-^-^-^-^-^-E_^_n-^-MB.^-^BSs_c_H-i_B_n_a----_-s
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.O.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
THE TIMETABLE
"Whether or not this year's timetable has been successful in
solving to any extent the problem of overcrowding, it is clear that
the present schedule has had numerous undesirable consequences.
Among these is the noon hour question. Intra-murals havo
definitely suffered as a result of the shortened noon hour. It is
quite impossible for a student to have his lunch, play a game, have
a shower and dress, all in tlie short  space of an  hour.
The choice before the student is to miss either tlie game or his
1.30 lecture.
The development of intra-mural sports, a very necessary sport
part of university life, was a direct result of the lengthened noon
hour and although they have carried on this year chiefly owing
to the momentum gained in the two preceding years it is becoming
apparent that under the present one hour noon period they will
soon die out.
Another defect of the present timetable is the deplorable
effect it has had on attendance at 8.30 lectures. Students have
been accustomed since public school days to beginning tho day
at 9.00. It is easy to change timetables but difficult to change
human nature—students just will not make the effort. A large
number are either late or miss the lecture entirely.
In considering next year's timetable it i.s well to bear these
facts in mind.
TOTEM INFORMATION
All Seniors Fill In—Puleeze
NAME 	
FACULTY 	
CLUBS BELONGED TO	
FRATERNITY or
SORORITY BELONGED TO
HOME CITY 	
HONOUR COURSE or
MAJOR SUBJECTS 	
PLEASE RETURN TO UBYSSEY OFFICE OR TO BOX
AT FOOT OF CAF STAIRCASE. THANK YOU.
Compiled by the editorial staff of the
Victoria College weekly  'Microscope'
COLLEGE FEUD
This week we are going to tell all
U.B.C. about a certain feud that has
been going on ln this hyar castle.
To acquaint you with facts we must
go back to the time when Victoria
College waa a hospital. The loon.8
were then of course known as
"wards." Two relics of this regime
remain—Ward 2 on the second floor
—now the Men's Commons, and-
Ward 0, on the third floor, now the
Men's  smoking  room.
Battles between Ward 0'ers and
Ward 2'ers are frequent and bloody.
They are usually accompanied by
mass   removal   of   furniture   from
one ward to another and back. It
Is during these battles that an old
college custom Is brought Into play
—that of forcibly removing a certain part of wearing apparel from
the protesting Individual.
This     unmentionable    garment    ls
subsequently deposited  in  the  Women's Commons, where lt ls obligingly
sewn up, top and bottom by the girls.
It ls then tied neatly in a package
and returned to the blushing owner,
Thia   ls   only  one   of   the   Interesting
forms  of  diversion  between  Ward  9
and 2.  Next  week,  perhaps,  we  may
recount  another.
THE  WOMAN   PAYS
Co-eds   learned   last   Friday,   that
It's   the   woman   who   pays.   Always
one of the  more popular  college affairs,  the  Co-ed  Dance  was  voted  a
greut-success by all. Even "J." "Pler-
point"   Williams,   Treasurer   of   the
Council   could   be   seen   gloating   ln
corners and  counting  of  his  Angers.
At midnight, Monsieur Le President,   stepped   modestly   Into   the
spotlight raised his hands for silence,  coughed  nervously and  said
that   the   dance   would   go   on   till
12.30,  whereupon   the  dusty  crowd
raised a weary cheer.
The   sterner   sex,   who    had   been
sulking   somewhat    previous   to   the
dance  brightened up considerably on
receipt    of    assorted    corsages    and
roses,   and   it   looked   as   though   all
would   be  well  for  awhile.
But all the same, It's a good thing,
that the Co-ed comes but once a
year.
NOTED RUSSIAN AT
SYMPHONY SUNDAY
GET   YOUR   TOTEM   IN   THE        THIS  WEEK  IS  DOLLAR
CAF, PUB  OFFICE OR j V/EEK. BRING YOUR TOTEM
COUNCIL OFFICE. DOLLAR TOMORROW
Qrlgort Oarbovltaky, Russian born
guest conductor of the Vancouver
Symphony Society's next concert, ln
the Orpheum Theatre Sunday, February 26, at 3 p.m., received his musical education at the Petrograd Conservatoire, and ls a former pupil of
Leopold Auer and Alexander Glaz-
ounow.
After   leaving  Russia,   where  he
was conductor of the Rostov Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Oarbovltsky
appeared   as   solo   performer   and
conductor  in Berlin.
For   the   past   twelve   years   he  has
beon  conductor  of  the Calgary Symphony Orchestra, which  owes  ita existence    largely    to    his    energy   and
ability.
MOZART
Mr. Oarbovltsky's programme includes Mozart's great Symphony in
C major, commonly known aa the
"Jupiter," Beethoven's Overture
"Prometheus." Tchalkowaky'a Symphonic Poem "Romeo and Juliet,"
Liadow'n "Klklmora," and Olazou-
now's   "Prelude   for   the   Moyen   Age."
Reservations for this excellent
concert should be made immediately
■it the M. A. Kelly Co., 659 Oranvllle
Street.
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
WIN OVER MISSION
Another victory was chalked up to
Ihe credit of the Senior A basketballers Monday when the co-eds
travelled to Mission and defeated the
local  quintette  44-27.
From the first the students had
little trouble and paced by Alice Kjos ;
piled mi thetr largest score of the j
year. Alice's shavpshooting accounted I
tor 12 points while Lois Harris sank j
U markers. Faye Burnham fi. and j
Ruth  Wilson   5.
ALONG J^-S
By PROXY
The  two most ambitious organizations   on   the   campus,   as   everybody
knows,   are   the   Players'
MUSIC Club    and    the    Musical
Scoiety. Every year these
clubs each do more work than several
others put together; this fact, perhaps, is not evident until one sees
the final production — the ultimate
proof of work well done.
Take this week's Music production,
Serenade. Those who saw the show
on Wednesday and Thursday were
delighted by the near-professional
presentation of a difficult Victor
Herbert comic opera. But how many
of the spectators realize that preparations for the show have been under
way since school opened last September? How many appreciate the
countless hours of rehearsal that
have threatened the academic standing of many of the cast? Or the work
of the Business Staff? Or the work
of—well, there's not room to mention
every department. It's sufficient to
say that the show couldn't have gone
on without the efficient co-operation
of all concerned.
Frank Patch, good-natured President of the Society, turned in his
usual exemplary performance as the
suspicious Duke of Santa Cruz—
whose chief concern ls the virtue of
his ward, Dolores. Patch's performance was rivalled by the outstanding
ability of Doug Ford, Musical Society
veteran, Marjorie Usher as Dolores,
and Marygold Nash, the Society's
freshette "find." Derek MacDermot,
as the bandit chief, showed voice
quality and stage presence that promise a very successful future.
But, having given credit to some
of the students ln the cast, what of
the "men behind the throne"? The
man who does most of. the work—
who berates temperamental stars,
who beats the chorus Into shape, who
rehearses musicians for the orchestra, who oversees practically everything the Society does, ls C. Haydn
Williams, well-known Vancouver conductor and musical director. Mr.
Williams has been director of the
Musical' Society performances for
thirteen years, and his record of successes ls an enviable one. Ills presence has become Indispensable to the
Society.
On the dramatic end of the productions, Mr. E. V. Young, whose direction of radio, Klwanls, and other
shows has made him well-known in
the city, has been doing an exoellent
work for the Musical Society during
the last three years.
Serenade, probably the most ambitious production ever undertaken
by the Society, ls definitely a success,
If you haven't seen it yet, by all
means do so. There are still two performances—and they should be the
best of the lot. . . .
With   Spring—as   the   Sports   Page
puts  lt—Just  around  the  corner,  it's
rather   surprising   to
SPRINO And   that   very   few
AND STUFF. thoughts in campus
minds are lightly
turning to romance. As far as I can
make out, most fancies are turning
somewhat heavily to thoughts of approaching exams. Academic administration ls such a brutal thing.
But ln spite of the approaching
horrors, a few studes are spending
their last free moments enjoying the
Spring sunshine of Marine Drive and
environs. A few, like a certain Bull
you've read about, are sniffing
flowers by the roadside. Yes, there
actually are a couple of flowers appearing here and there.
No one blames students for walking ln the foo, and what's more, nobody cares whether they do or don't
walk ln anything. Or walk. It's a
certainty that I don't cave whether
•students' fancies turn to thoughts of
leve, sunshine, work, exams, or suicide. But always about this time of
year somebody has to write something about Spring. There are so
many students who, through confining themselves to the Library, don't
realize that Spring Is Just Around
the Corner. Somebody has to tell
them—I guess. DePoe, Ken Orant,
Dorwln Baird, and Kemp Edmonds
used to do it. But the old order
changeth. So I've got to tell people
I ha;   Spring  Is Just   .  .   .
Aw, nuts! Oo and find out for
> ourselves! I
'lllllllllllllllltlllllllllfllllUIIIMIIIIIIIIItlllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIKIIIIIIillllllllllflMIMIIIIMMIIIIIIIMII-IIIIIIIKKIIIII*!!
A Birks Challenger Watoh will time your good times
and keep you on schedule all through the year
SILVERSMITHS
OOLDSMITH8
BIRKS
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
OFFICIAL FRATERNITY  JEWELLERS
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INTRAMURALS
The long awaited Intramural basketball championship tourney game
will come off today at noon. The
scrappy bunch from Arts '39 have
fought their way Into the finals with
Arts '41. The never-say-dle thlrty-
nlners came through the hard way
and are set for tbe noon battle. Since
Arts '41 are undefeated, they get another chance, even If they should
lose today.
The Intramural rugger battles are
quickly   eliminating   the  poorer  con-
LOST
Lost between 3rd and 10th avenues,
on Tolmie, one copy of Shakespeare's
'Othello". Finder please return tc
Mr. Home's office.
tenders, and referee Ranji Mattu has
the teams playing real classy games
now. The Frosh and Arts look the
best of the lot, but today the two
Arts fifteens clash and the winning
«quad will move right into the finals.
At present the Freshmen are leading
the Held with two wins. They blanked
Science '41 11-0 on Wednesday.
IT'S HERE AT LAST!
a place to
Eat and Dance on the Campus
ANNOUNCING OPENING
U.B.C.   ROOST'S
TUCK ROOM
a newly decorated addition to the Roost's
beautiful cafe.
SPECIAL!
ORCHESTRA
THIS SATURDAY
NIOHT
Meet
The Varsity Crowd
in the
Tuok Room
JUST VISIT US - - - YOU'LL LOVE IT!
OPEN   TILL   MIDNIGHT   EVERY   NITE
MENU
• HAMBURGERS
• HOT DOGS
• MILK SHAKES
• ICE CREAM
• SANDWICHES
CONVENIENT BANKING
for University people . . .
Students and members of the faculty of the
University of British Columbia will find the
West Point Grey Branch of the Bank of
Montreal convenient to the University, and
will find a friendly helpful service awaiting
them   here.
BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED   1817
W.-st    Point   a ••■■>•   lli-anch:    SASAMAT   AMD   TKNTH
A.   n.   MOORF1,   Maniiiiir
HOTEL
COFFEE SHOP
and
DINING ROOM
Fountain for
After Theatre
...fc-'^-'i]   JJ-t;«-,.,.s,A
,-  6ilikil->--',l| ■_ J iliJ.JJ,.;,;
M-s^'Sii^-'A- .!S-J-J.,'--Ml
GEORGIA
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
TEAS
DANCES...
formal  or  Informal.
SEY.   5742 Friday, February 24^1939
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
LAW SOCIETY
HAS FUN AT
MOCK TRIALS
"Mervyn Davis, not guilty on a
charge of assault and battery laid by
Darrell Braldwood; Pit Desjardlns
guilty of driving to the common danger." Such were the decisions handed by 'Magistrate' Milton Owen at
the Law Society's 'Police Court' trials
Wednesday noon in Arts 100.
Davis, president of the Deserted
Husbands' Club, was charged with
maliciously and forcibly ejecting
Braldwood from Arts 804, whloh
room the latter claimed had been
reserved for a meeting of the political Discussions Club of which he
Is the speaker.
VALENTINE PARTY
The Deserted Husbands under Davis were having their annual Valentine Day "get together" when they
were interrupted by Braldwood who
demanded  that  they  leave.
Witnesses stated that Braldwood
was forcefully ejected from the room
by Davis who refused to give up the
room.
Braldwood claimed physical and
mental anguish, and loss of prestige  on  the campus  resulted  from
this   ejection,   but   thla    was    discounted by Justice Owen who sympathised   with    Davis'    desires    to
keep   his    character    unblemished
and  also  his resentment nt being
called an 'unmitigated liar* and a
'damned blithering ass'.
The   case   was   dismissed   when   lt
was shown by defence counsel, Robert   Smith,   that   Davis   believed   he
had   the   right  to  the   room,  that  he
had not been shown proof that Braldwood  had   rights  to  lt,  and   that  he
had not seriously Injured his accuser.
In  the case of  Rex  vs.  Desjardlns, the accused was charged by
Constable   Don   McOlll   of  driving
to the common danger close to a
sewer  project on  Beaoh  Avenue.
McOlll claimed, under oath, that
the accused and a very charming
lady were the sole passengers In a
car that was erratically proceeding
west on Beach Avenue endangering
the lives of Vancouver cltisens and
watchman, Doug. McOlnn ln charge
of sewer project.
ONE ARM DRIVER
It seems that Desjardlns was
driving with his left arm.
Witnesses could not state where
his right arm was.
Justice Qwen, upholding the testimony of the Constable, judged the
accused guilty as charged by Crown
Prosecutor A. Sharp. Defence counsel Wlggs served notice of appeal.
COUNCILLORS DEGREE
ON CARE OF PATRONS
Inefficiency having accompanied
various aspects of University social
functions for some time past, one
of them, that of the care of patrons,
has at last come to the attention of
Students' Council.
At the last meeting of Council a
set of rules was drawn up which
was Incorporated In the Rules and
Regulations . for Social Functions
at this university. These are calculated to obviate misunderstandings and difficulties whloh have
arisen with regard to Invitations
and treatment of sponsors.
STRICT  RULES
The complimentary list must be
presented to the Alma Mater Society
Office at least ten days before the
event and the Invitations must be
Issued one week preceding the function. Theae Invitations shall require
an answer whereupon the tickets
shall Immediately be mailed to those
accepting.
The members of the exeoutive
concerned become a committee
which shall Im- responsible for the
reception and suitable entertainment of the patrons.
NEGLECT
This last ls an aspect of the situation which has been patently nt-glec-
ted at past fupnctlons, wheio patrons have been ushered in arcl then
allowed to amuse themselves 13 best
they   might.
Although a falling of all nfiilra it
was very evident at the recent Freshman clasa party where the patrons
were provided with no form of entertainment whatsoever for the duration   of  the   evening
The new rulings will give patron:*
a rensnnnble time in whieh to arrange fur the function and will give
them a more enjoyable time while
there.
TOTEM
Eunice Townsend ls wanted at the
Publication."-- Office to get a Totem
receipt.
t
Reservations are already pouring in at the Dolphin on Marine
Drive for dinner parties on the evening of theCo-ed Ball. . . . Extra
special menus are being arranged at seventy-five cents and promise
attractive dishes, served in attractive style. . . . Who was the Psi U cx-
councillor who insisted on two large sheets of paper, so that he could
list his Varsity activities in full for the Totem? . . . Due to the enlargement of the Dolphin (phone Point Grey 103) an additional fifty odd
people can be accommodated. . . . Even so, in order to be sure of a
place for your party, take a jaunt through the woods and along Marine
to the Dolphin, and over a pot of afternoon tea make arrangements
for dinner at the Dolphin before the Ball.  , . .
fi fi fi
Last opportunity for buying the fashion leading footwear of Rae-
Son's Mezzanine Floor Shoe Store at 644 Granville Street for co-eds . .
and all at the one price of $3.7$. . . . After Saturday Rae-son's will be
situated in their new quarters at Granville Street, one block from their
present store . . . then there are the two girls who are scared stiff to
go out with any Phi Kappa Pi lads anymore . . . since the Pi men
declared that they believed in free love. . . . Pumps, slippers, oxfords,
evening slippers and sports shoes and the comfortable platform soles
are all at 644 Granville until .and including Saturday of this week. . .
fi fi fi
We just had to tell you about the blouses at Mrs, Paton's Lingerie
Shop at 2793 Granville Street. . . . They are positively colored like a
flower garden . . . and in the most adorable styles, . . , There is a
dainty little sheer in Queen's blue with a square neck and dirndl
waist. . . . The Phi Kappa Sigma's are considering initiating a blonde
Alpha Gam who sits at their table and wears their pin ... a softly
pleated model in the new fuschia or powder blue is a delightful acquisition for the smart tailored outfit . . . and for sports ... do visit 2793
Granville Street and see these new styled blouses for sports which are
made in the new English fabrics which are popular this year. . . .
fi'       fi fi
Now we are sure that spring is here ... at least spring fashions
arc definitely here . . . reversible skirts if you please, are among the
styles to be found at Lora Lee Dress Shop, 2814 Granville Street . . .
and such dainty yet gay models. ... A one tone dress has a full length
buttoned skirt which can be unbuttoned and turned inside out ... to
show a riotously tinted print silk skirt, ... It appears that a professor's
past has caught up with him ... he received a summons for non-payment of two dollar poll tax from his former residential district	
Lora Lee is specializing in new spring light weight woolen dresses with
tailored tops and full pleated and flared skirts . . . colors most popular
are the suez rose and the new queen's blue. . . .
fi fi fi
And then there is the councillor, who can't take 'no' for an answer with an imposing bandage over one eye.
fi fi fi
Stunning men's dressing gowns in medium weight flannel are
just the thing for keeping warm and comfortable when writing
essays and studying into the wee sma' hours. . . . These warm and not
too heavy dressing gowns at Fred Holmes' 2 84J Granville Street, come
in a wide color range from wine to navy . . . pure wool English hop-
sack in midnight blue with attractive wine facings . . . cardinal wine
with satin lapels and sash forms a handsome robe . . . while the English
silk is not only becomingly printed in masculine designs but is also
easy to pack. ... If you are feeling really sophisticated silver grey
satin with a scaly black dragon for all-over design will be your choice
in robes . . . and will lend zest to your essay writing. . . .
fi fi fi
Came across the opera stage father and daughter helping one another
in a most devoted fashion off stage ... ah spring and music and . . .
fi fi fi
When Chang Suey turns to making poetry then we know spring
is not far off . . . and spring is in every shade of hosiery that Phoebe,
at 713 Dunsmuir Street, has displayed in her ultra modern setting. . .
For the new violet shades there is the soft rosy beige entitled animation,
while pagan is a vital shade that will harmonize with the new suez
rose. . . .
These hosiery are in the three thread chiffon at $1.00 per pair
and feature the mesh toe and heel, and are ideal for the open shoe. . . .
Before the pressure of exams and studies do not permit you to do your
necessary shopping stop in at 713 Dunsmuir Street and choose your
spring hosiery now.  .  .  .
The following conversation took place in the caf. on the first
night of the opera . . .
Stage hand (to petite brunette who was looking through a pair
of opera glasses) : Are you going to be there tonight?
Brunette: Yes.
Stage Hand: Do you want to see something funny?
Brunette (taking a sudden interest in the conversation): Yes,
where will you be?
-^a^A*ut
TRACK MEN PREPARE
FOR SPRING BUSINESS
With Spring just around the corner, the track men are cleaning up
the old spikes again, in preparation'
for the,coming season.
Although no definite ache'dule has
been worked out, practises will begin next week to get the lads into
shape, and soon you will see, streaking around the cinders, a few blurred visions which, on closer examination, can be Identified as members
of  the  Track  Club.
ROAD  WORK
Sometime around the first of April,
the U.B.C. men will probibly travel
down to Seattle to run against tho
University of Washington Frosh
tea m.
Nothing definite has been decided
as to who will he on the teams this
year, so all those who are Interested
nre requested to turn out for tile
dally practices at l o'clock which
start next week.
EX-KITSILAN0 HIGH
TO HOLD RE-UNION
Ex-Kltsllano'Hlgh School students
are looking forward to a gala reunion which will take the form of
a dance to be held at the Alma Academy on Thursday evening March 0th.
The ex-students will dance to the
music of Trevor Page and his orchestra.
The arrangements aro under the
convenership of Miss Frankie Davies,
assisted by a committee consisting
of Pat Bell, Margaret Davison, Mary
Dick, Kdni Lnngman, Dorothy Mulr,
Charles I-ighthall. John Falrburn,
Cecil C.osullch, Oeorge Muddockg.
Dorwln B.ilrd, Fred Owen, Miss K.
Coates   and   Mr.   H.   B.   Smith.
Dr. and Mrs. O. Weir, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Cordon, Dr. and Mrs, H. B. King
and Mr. and Mis, II, N. MucCorkln-
dalo ure lending thetr patronage for
tho   occasion,
Tickets may be obtained from
Ethel Katon, Cecil Cosullch. or Chas.
Lighthall.
Rodney Polsson and his players ln
"U.B.C. Presents . . ." And this
week it's the life of Rupert Brooke,
beloved English poet of the early 20th
century. The script has been prepared in a sympathetic and delicate
way by Dick Diespecker, genial Program Director of CJOR.
Members of the Players' Club are
co-operating with University Radio
In  the  production  of  "U.B.C.  Presents . . ." and their combined efforts   have   made  this   one   of  the
best University   programs   ln   the
West.
Rod   Poisson,   himself   an   accomplished amateur  actor,  takes on  the
direction   and   plays   a   role   himself.
While not  yet  comparable  to Orson
Wells, Rod ls going places fast.
Meantime,  the campus newscast,
edited by Van Perry, will continue
at Its regular time.   This particular
feature of University Radio has a
far-reaehlng  appeal,  and  members
of   clubs   or  executives  wishing   to
add to the already large amount of
publicity  the University Is getting,
would do well to contact the Radio
Editor.
"U.B.O. Presents .  . ." goes on the
air at 2:30 p.m. Sundays over CJOR;
the  newscast  over  the  same  station
on Fridays at 8: IS p.m.
NOV SHMOZ KA POP
Here Is an excerpt from Orantland
Lardner's new book on how to become a sports writer ln ten easy lessons. The following ls his version of
scmethlng or other:
"Smith ran down the floor and
threw the ball into the basket for
two points."   Oan be written:
"Smith scurried down the hardwood and plunked the sphere Into
the hoop for a double counter." Or:
"Bmitty sped down the old. gym
and whipped the Inflated hide into
the container for a twin marker." Or:
"Young Smith sprinted over the
waxed planking and tossed the old
balloon into the cage for a dual tally.
Or:
"Smith Minor precipitated himself
along the length of the indoor playing field, finally succeeding ln depositing the Jolly old pill into the receptacle provided for that purpose,
thereby raising the score by two
points in his favor."    Or:
"Smyth sizzled along the plancher
^^ It has a delightful satisfying flavour—
thi- new mixture of
choice Virginia and
Burley tobaccos,
blended with Perique
anil Latakla. Try it.
PHILIP MORRIS
PIPE TOBACCO
UNION BLDG.
TENDERS TO
BE  INJOON
The Brock Memorial Building will
soon be a reality, not merely a dream
of a few idealistic leaders. The Students' Council Committee on the Brock
Memorial Building will meet today to
discuss plans with the architects and
contractors.
Tenders which have been called
for the construction of the building
will be in on Saturday.
The   Student   Council   Committee
will submit plans to the student subcommittee,   which  has  been  recently
appointed.
COMMITTEE
The Brock Memorial Permanent
Committee, appointed ln December,
1035, consists of Mr. Sherwood Lett
(chairman), Dr. A. F. Barss, Miss M.
L. Bollert, Oen. V. W. Odium, Dr.
W. N. Sage, Dr. B. Eagles, Miss Isobel
Harvey, Mrs. W. L. Uglow, Mrs. W. J.
Baird, Mrs. H. J. T. Coleman, Dr. H.
F. O. Letson, Mr. J. N. Burnett, Mr.
B. Brunelsen, Mr. W. A. Wllander,
Miss Margaret Beaumont, Miss E. B.
Abernethy, Mr. E. O. Cullwlck.
The Sub-Committee for Building
and Plans includes Miss M. L. Bollert,
Mrs. W. L. Uglow, Dr. H. F. O. Let-
son, Mr. B. Brynelsen, Miss Margaret
Beaumont, General V. W. Odium,
Miss I. Harvey, Dr. A. F. Barss, Mr.
E. O. Cullwlck.
The Sub-Committee of the Permanent Memorial Oommittee to meet
with the architects includes: Pres.
L. S. Kllnck, Miss M. L. Bollert, Dr.
O. M. Shrum, Dr. A. F. Barss, Mr.
Carson McOulre, Mr. Evan apRoberts, Miss Jean Stordy.
and whammed the tlsketasket into
the old basket for a deuce."   Or:
"Schmidt plows a furrow down the
cedared stretch and hoisted the heifer
hide Into the lacework for a two-
spot."    Or we might retain:
"Smith ran down the floor and
threw the ball into the basket for
two points."
V/#
ANOTHER DAY;"
yawns Elmer. "Another Spring day
and here am I about to swathe
myself once more In my old fall
suit. That's what takes the Joy out
of Ufe. Monotony."
Elmer's partly right, at that. When
you look shabby you feel shabby.
Why not think this over and then
come down to us to ask about
prices, fittings, and so on. Well
deal gently with your pocket book.
BOND
CLOTHESSHOP
1ST    WrtI     MA.TINC-*
POEMS . . .
and STUFF
Compiled by LEWIS ROBINSON
ADVICE   TO   THE  LOVELORN
Oather ye rosebuds while ye may
With wine, women and song.
Think not of the future—just be gay,
And hope your days be long.
Pluck ye the flowers of today,
Dear time  is fast a fly ing.
You  can  never be  perfect  ln  virtue
they say,
So what ls  the use of trying.
So worry ye not of futuro life,
Nor burden your heart with care.
You   wouldn't   enjoy   it   in   heaven
because,
You'd be terribly lonely there.
Love  is  like  an   onion,
You  taste with  some  delight;
Then later on you wonder
Whatever made  you  bite.
Just between you and me: Compliments are like perfumes—to be Inhaled,  not  swallowed.
THIS WEEK IS DOLLAR
WEEK. BRINO YOUR TOTEM
DOLLAR TOMORROW
Above Is a picture of Joe College being naked to the CO-EO. He seems
to be surprised but we have a suspicion thnt he has been hanging around
Claris-til for the last month hoping for nn Invitation.
.l(tM,,,t,,,,,,,,l,,*,,,,l,,,(,,,,,,ll,,,t,,t,,,,,,,,,,,,,,l,,(,,,,,,*,,,l
I VARSITY SKRVIOK \
1 STATION I
I "AT   THE   GATES" |
I        "our srcnvici- means       I
I HAPPY MOTORING" \
1 3
,lMIII,IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM>,l,,lilM,,lll,l,,ll,,l(,llll,(ll,,t,t,,,l,r
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
LIFE INSURANCE
Exclusive  Camera  PORTRAITS
At  Popular  Prices
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
nt   tho   Spanish   Grill
------.m-l-lll-.HIIHI'HIIIIIMI.HIIIIIIIIMIIHIIMIIH Illll
1 H.   JESSIE   HOW,   B.A.
| Public  Stenographer
1 -4E1  Weat 10tl. Ave.
3 	
1 Bssays ana Theses Typed
>*ll,IHII,l,,ll,,lt,lt,NIIIIMHIIII(l,IIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMMIIII
New
Spring Samples
of Distinctive
TIP TOP CLOTHING
at
Esquire Men's
Apparel
3(1(11 Grniivllle
Ilny. 0GH0 INTERCOLLEGE SKI MEET   TODAY ON RIDGE
INTERNATIONAL
VOLLEYBALL TOURNEY
SATURDAY—3:00 p.m.
VARSITY QYM
INTERNATIONAL
VOLLEYBALL TOURNEY
SATURDAY—3:00 p.m.
VARSITY OYM
Four
THE    UBYSBEY
Friday, February 24, 1939
Lomas at Stadium in Miller Cup Game
VARSITY OUT
TO CINCH CUP
AT STADIUM
PLAY   MERALOMAS   IN
CROOSHUL   SAT.
With the possibility of a trip
to California and the World's
Fair English Rugby tournament
becoming gradually stronger,
Varsity's Thunderbird rugger-
men will attempt to cinch possession of the Miller Cup on Saturday at the Stadium when they
entertain Meralomas.
Should the Careymen come out on
top, they oan virtually sit back happy
ln the knowledge that they can't be
overtaken, and that onoe more they
have retained the venerable Miller
trophy. The Orange and Blaok laddies from Kltsy-town are the only
team challenging the supremacy of
the "Birds, and if they fall on Saturday they can pack up for the year
and not be any the worse.
MORE  MOORE.
In all probability, Manager BUI
Oalder will be chaperoning the same
team which went down to Vancouver
Reps last week, although there may
be one Important change.
Vlo Moore, the brawny Vlctorla-lte
who has had a continual string of
black-cat luck all season, will be back
for another fling at the hooking assignment. Vic will replace Andy Jenkins who played that position last
week, and will be flanked ln the front
row of the scrum by Jim Harmer and
Alan Oardner.
BACKS  SAME.
The back division will probably line
up in the same way as against Vancouver.
If Varsity is victorious tomorrow
she will only have to defeat New
Westminster and U.B.O. to be sure
of lugging home the trophy. The
Royal City boys shouldn't present
muoh difficulty, nor for that matter
should U.B.O., despite all the ballyhoo that has been recently broadcast.
THE MORNING AFTER
the Sclenoe Prom there was
a sophomore who was loath
to leave his bed . . . just
couldn't get started for his
early lecture. Fortunately his
oar. Ailed with Home Gas,
was not so languid, despite
the late night, and quickly
carried him to hla classes.
The moral Is obvious ... If
you need a quick start nil
up with
HOME
GAS
You  Can Buy  No Better!
A CINDER POUNDER - - - A TURF POUNDER
ALEX LUCAS, the lanky gentleman pictured to the left above Is weU-
known ln both traok and baaketball circles. Although Injured towards the
end of the season, he thade a good comeback In the laat game, and Is now
all set to help his mates run the legs off the boya from aoroea the line
In the coming meets.
EVAN DAVIES, to the right above, is a red-thatched packet of scrum
dynamite who wlU be playing for U.B.C. on Saturday at Brookton Point
against Rowing Club. An ever-ready hustler, Evann Is a real first-year
acquisition and oan be counted on to be around when they're giving out
berths on future Thunderbird fifteens.
'•ll'IIMMimMMIMIMIMIIMIIIMIMIIMHIIMIMI-IMMIMIIIIMMMH
CO-ED MURALS
By OERRY ARMSTRONG
MIHHHHIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIMIMHIIMMMIIMIMIII.MIMMIIimiMIM
MORE MIXED MURALS.
This week's Mixed Murals, again
functioning smoothly, ended with the
Aggies and Sophs ln first place, closely followed by the Theolog and Education team. Despite a slightly smaller turnout due to other noon-hour
meetings. Miss Moore and Maury
were well pleased to see the usual
players turning up for their teams.
It was observed that the girls' playing has improved immensely ln the
past few games.
The Aggies soored their second
consecutive victory by vanquishing
the Science and Nurses team in two
straight games by scores of 18-0, 18-5.
How those Aggies can play! Perhaps
It's the fresh air and oats.
SCHEDULES.
Arts '30 and Arts '41 fought for
points ln the flrst game which was
Anally won by Arta '41 by three
points. The Sophs won the second
game after a slow start that was
featured by the comedy antics of Lois
Harris.
Monday next, the Aggies and Sophs
meet to decide who will retain the
leadership while on the other court
the so-far luckless Sclencemen and
Nurses will oppose the second place
Theologs  and Education  team.
Women's Badminton on Tuesday,
February 28, 12.30. Seniors vs. Juniors.
TRACK NOTICE
Starting next Monday, track
practices wlU be officially held
dally at 4.30 In the stadium. Because of the short time remaining,
big block recommendations will go
only to those whose attendances
justify them! Those who And It
impossible to make these workouts, be sure to turn out at noons
and get In condition.
ut||M„,MIMIIH)HltlllllllHIMIIMI*IM(IIHlMMMMMIH1HMIIIIII
HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals of the Golf
Swing. The winter season Is the time to Iron
out your difficulties and
learn how to enjoy
Golf.
Hal Rhodes Golf School
HIIIHIIMMIIIIItmilllllHMIIIIIl
• IIIIMMMIIIII
1158 W. Pender Street
IMItHHMIHMIHMHHMIIMIIHIHIHtlHtHI.mil
Seymour 5333
IMHIIIIHHtHMMHHHHMHHHIMMHHIHHHHIIIHIHItHMIMHHHmHHHHHHM*
UBC TACKLE CLUBBERS
WHO FEEL FINE AGAIN
IN BROCKTON CLASSIC
The day It snowed (two weeks ago
tomorrow) U.B.C. were to travel to
Brockton Point to take on the Rowing  Club.
Needless to say, the scuffle did not
take place on that day and so tt has
been scheduled for tomorrow.
Behind all this there reposes a
story. Two weeks ago, to commence,
the Rowing Club were without at
least 7 of their regulars. The Ubee-
cees were all set to go down and
chew the Red and White boys ln
small pieces and even some of the
Thunderbirds conceded them a
chance to do ao
ROWERS  RIOHT AS  RAIN
And in itself that waa a concession. Anyway, to atop beating around
the stubble, lt has come to pass ln
the natural course of things that the
Rowers have become sound in body
at least, and are quite prepared,
think you, for the Invasion the U.B.C.
boys are set to stage.
No definite announcement of the
lineup will be made until late today
when lt will be ascertained whether
some of the boys will be able to get
the doctor's permission.
FREDDIE THE  FLIRT
And besides there ls a small hitch
ln proceedings ln the scrum lineup
on account of the musical ambitions
of the percussion man, Fred Billings,
who has been Serenading lately and
would dearly like to continue the
procedure  Saturday evening.
Mr. Billings told the Ubyssey in ah
absolutely tnexcluslve Interview that
he might become bodily disabled In
a rugby game against Rowing Club
to the point where his drumming
Serenade would cease Indefinitely.
Ergo, wanted a new scrum leader for
the U.B.C. team. But don't let that
deter you, the game will go on nevertheless and tho bqys would dearly
love to see a friendly face around.
TRACK SCHEDULE
The track season has arrived and
It won't be long now before the
three Campus meets will be staged.
On Maroh 7 the tough Arts '30 Mall
grind will be held and the Arts '20
HOLLYBURN
SCENE   FOR
SKI ARTISTS
More than 45 sklcrB, plank
artists of tho highest degree,
will swarm all over the byways
of Hollyburn Ridge today and
tomorrow when the Varsity Ski
Club intertains a galaxy of stars
from leading winter sports colleges of the Pacific North West.
Coming across the border to tackle
the downhill and slalom courses on
the Ridge will be Ave North West
colleges: Washington, who placed
first In the meet last year, Washington State College who came right
behind their brothers from Seattle,
College of Puget Sound, and Oregon
State College, and the Varsity squad.
Also a possibility is the University
of Oregon, who have not been heard
from yet.
VARSITY THREAT
Although Varsity were forced to
take a third place .in the meet last
year, there is every indication that
the Blue and Oold will be very much
In the running for top honours on
the snowy crests of Hollyburn this
year. The course on the Ridge is
quite different from those used by
the American College stars. Bumps
galore and plenty of trees in the
road are figured to upset many a
Collegiate  wonder.
And make  no mistake  about It
for   there   wlU   be   plenty   ot   outstanding   American   ski  artists   ln
the competition. For example, the
University     of     Washington     are
sending   up   their   ace   man,   Carl
Neu, who placed Arst In the slalom
event   at   the   Amerloan   National
College  meet  held  at  the famous
Sun    Valley,    Idaho,    resort    last
month.
Neu won the event from representatives of the best ski colleges ln the
States,   principally   those    of   Dartmouth   and    Yale.   He   also   placed
third in the downhill oontest.
From tiny College of Puget Sound,
whom Varsity beat on Mount Rainier
two weeks ago, comes downhill star
Bob Kemp who won that event from
the Varsity stars at a fast clip. Kemp
is rated a definite threat, not only
in the downhill but also ln the four-
event tussle, having acquired a lot
of seasoning while abroad studying
at the University of Munich ln Oer-
• many.
VARSITY'S VALIANTS
Varsity's representatives, who will
attempt to wrest the supremacy of
the North West hills from the University of Washington, present title-
holders, are Mickey Pogue, captain
of the team, and cross-country ace,
who placed well up ln competitions
held at Revelstoke, Allen Fraser,
Gerry Harkley, and Phil Thomas.
Much stronger this year, and accustomed to the terrain on the Ridge,
the Varsity squad is conceded a good
chance either to cop the meet or to
place second.
Lasting for two days, the competition will take ln all forms of the
well-known winter sport, and it is
tentatively set that a local radio
station will carry a line up to the
scene of the fracas to bring to the
Lowlanders glimpses of the day's
activities, and Interviews with the
individual stars.
Today, flrst day of the meet, the
foUowlng events are scheduled:
10:00 a.m.—Cross Country; 1:80—
Jumping.
On Saturday the meet wlU comprise the Slalom event followed
immediately by the downhill race.
jog Is scheduled for March 15. The
gala Inter elass meet will take place
on the 22nd.
 WAR   DECLARED	
on low marks at examination time by consulting "College Helps",
a catalogue listing over 1,000 titles to help atudent get better
grades. Write for your free copy nt-w.
THE BOOK EXOHANOE
••OanaAa's Book-Cleaving gonit"
870 Bloor St. W., Toronto,  Ontario
c.*n*>
CAMPUS SOCCERMEN
TUNED FOR JUNIOR,
SENIOR GAMES SAT.
There's activity plus on the soccer
front tomorrow as both the Junior
and senior team swing into more
league competition.
The seniors will be at Wilson Park
where   they   will   be   subject   to   the
butchery of South Vancouver United,
the operation commencing at 2.30.
FOUR POINTS WORTH.
The  Juniors,  just  to  be   different,
will oppose East Burnaby on the
campus at the same time. This game
is worth four pointa to the campusmen as two games are being counted
as one.
The Junior Line-up ls as follows.
Manager Yosh Hyodo requests a full
tournout and he does mean turnout:
Goodwin, Logan, Oordon, Hunden,
Hooper, Nlkaldo, Mahood, Clark,
Stewart. Walker, MoBujrney, Mini-
chlello, Abrams, McLaren and Ralph.
The Senior team wtll be picked
from the following: Leong, Affleck,
Croll, Mizuhara, Wallace, Rush, Sasaki, Irish, McMillan, Robinson, Todd
and Herd.
Speed. • •
Seymour 4484
Quality...
Service...
MITCHELL PRINTING and
PUBLISHING OO. LTD.
1037   WEST   PENDER   STREET
EYESTRAIN 18 COSTLY
GOOD LIGHT IS CHEAP
There are few things more
tragic than children with defective vision, for lt is often a needless handicap, caused through
poor lighting conditions. Allowed
to go unchecked poor light will
impair your youngsters' eyesight,
slow down their progress, detract
from their suocess. Save sight
with better light in the home and
school.
See the difference. There's
no sign of strain, the print
never blurs, the light Is
light—not dim, not glaring. Youngster-* will concentrate and absorb more
from their studies If they
have better light.
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC
RAILWAY COMPANY LIMITED
H

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