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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1955

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 THE UBYSSEY
'lir.:
VOLUME XXXVIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1955
Price 5c;
No. 53
WANTS   QUORUM   LOWERED
Committee Advocates Fall AMS
General Meetings  Be  Eliminated
Ron Longstaffe
... vics-president
Lively Third Slate
Closes Elections
By SANDY ROSS
In one of the most hotly contested AMS elections in
recent years, Mike Jeffery, Arts 2, defeated six opponents to
become next year's second member at large, as this year's
elections came to a close.'
This term's first-member-at-
large, Ron Longstaffe, became
new AMS vice-president by
narrowly defeating his closest
opponent, Jim Craig.
Victoria-bred Alan Thackray,
who was Open House traffic director, defeated Isy Wolfe to
succeed Dick Riopel as next
year's University Clubs Committee Chairman.
And Open-House co-ordinator
Don   McCaUum .defeated   B131
Gartside to become new co-ordinator of activities.
LIVELY SLATE
The lively third slate campaign, highlighted by an unprecedented numtfer of candidates,
rescued what elections committee chairman Ralph Sultan called, "the dullest campaign we've
ever had."
With no issues to arouse student interest, and no "goon candidates" — such as last year's
famous Baru — only about two
thirds as many students as last
year visited the polls.
And the apathy worked both
ways; out of the total of twelve
positions, four  went by acclamation.
SERVED ABLY
Mike Jeffery, who served ably
this year in the Pep Club, came
first in a seven-way preferential ballot to win his second
member post. His campaign
was highlighted by a calypso
type singing commercial played on down town radio stations.
Runner-up was freshmart John
Butterfield, who ran on the
rather cryptic slogan, "beat the
Machine." His seconder and
campaign manager was the famous Baru.
in the closest election on the
third slate, Ron Longstaffe, the
man who censured the Ubyssey,
defeated unsuccessful presidential candidate Jim Craig. The
count was 1063 to Craig's 946,
ONE OPPONENT
Ortly AMS post left to fill are
those of EIC of the publications j
board, and AMS Public Rela-!
tions Officer. This year's PRO, j
Danny Goldsmith, is receiving!
applications now at the AMS
for  this  appointed   position.
Al  Thackery
... UCC president
Constitution Changes
Proposed By Sutton
Abolishment of the fall AMS general meeting was among
the constitutional revisions proposed at Student Council Mon-
TWO DANCE CLUB CUTIES, Anne Riesterer left, and
Kay Piro are displaying their talent as a part of the dance
club extravaganza "Around Hollywood", in the auditorium! noon today. Admission 25c. The revue will also
be staged Friday night at eight o'clock in the auditorium.
—Photo by BRIAN THOMAS
March on Capital
Fizzles to Stroll
By JEAN WHITESIDE
SEATTLE—Only 26 Unvelsity of Washington Students out
of an expected 400 participated in the "March on the State
Legislature" at Olympia Friday to protest the university prexy's
decision to ban a lecture series by controversial atomic physicist
J. Robert Oppenheimer. * '	
Governor Langley refused to
Don McCalum
... co-ordinator
Mike   Jeffery
2nd  member  at   large
It Was No
Lie; Crabs
Invade Dorms
There are crabs in Mary Bollert Hall.
Not mice, ants, koala bears,
or thrill-seeking engineers; the
residence is infested by evil-
minded,  foul-smelling  crabs.
Rudely awakened by the stare
ol a million beady eyes, hysterical hordes of frightened females
fled to the safety of their rooms
drugging their modesty behind
them.
"There are spiders in the
sinks!" shrieked one mis-guided
prairie girl   in  naked  terror.
"Get   those . things out of
here!" cried another when she
had   recovered   her  dignity.
Latest reports confirmed that
thi> friendly marauders are now
on iheir undignified and indirect
ret urn to the sea.
Hut the mystery of "Who put
I the crabs in Mary Bollert's
'Cabin''   is  as   cd   unsolved.
take any action however, seeing only three members of the
delegation for five minutes.
President Henry Schmitz said
he had "studied long and carefully" before deciding to veto a
recommendation by the university's physics department to invite Oppenheimer as a guest
lecturer.
RELATIONSHIP
He said his action was based
on Oppenheimer's "governmental relationships" and "nothing
else."
Immediately following this decision an effigy of the president
was hanged during an open, forum called to discuss suggestions
on "how academic freedom can
be maintained on campus."
Students and faculty members
at the meeting viewed tht* hanging with disinterest and decided
that a, "gentlemanly" delegation to the state governor at
Olympia would be a more effective protest.
YES VOTE
An assembly of student representatives Friday voted forty-
five to thirty in favour of ask
ing for reconsideration of the
president's decision. Bul as the
Boajrd otf 'Regents (the body
responsible for all faculty appointments), supports the president a reversed decision is not
likely.
Petitions circulated in support
of Oppenheimer failed lo arouse
strong indignation against the
president's decision, with some
students not sure just what was
petit ton an.i who was Oppenheimer.
No further student action has
been   planned.
Teachers
Discuss
Shortage
The Western Canadian Student Teachers' Conference, held
at UBC this year, opened its
four day session on Monday.
Leon C. Mendoza, chairman,
and Dfcan Andrew gave the
welcome address to the dele
gates.
At the business sessions the
'topics under discussion were
the teacher shortage — its relation to standards; enriched
program for exceptional children; the problem of centralization and decentralization of educational administration and the
relative importance of theory
and practice in teacher education.
day night. *
Following are the changes proposed to Council by Vice-President Wendy Sutton, chairman
of the constitutional revisions
committee.
• Abolishment of fall AMS
general   meeting.
• 500 instead of 100 signatures required to petition a general meeting.
• Quorum at a general meeting lowered from 20% of active
student body to 1000 students.
• A quorum must be present
whenever a motion is voted on.
• Changes in the constitutions of subsidiary organizations
can be overruled by three- quarters of Student Council instead
of the present/unanimous vote
required.
DROPPED
• The section requiring a
vote be dropped altogether as
the AMS constitution already
states that subsidiary organizations constitutions shall not contain provisions repungant to the
AMS constitution.
In proposing that the fall general meeting be abolished Miss
Sutton contended that students
do not even bother to attend
these meetings which only serve
to approve the budget. "The
approval of the budget could
be done more efficiently by
Council." she said.
BUDGET CHANGES
Students vote budget changes
without properly understanding
the situation, said Miss Sutton.
Student Council studies each
club budget and is prepared to
discuss changes, she maintained.
Treasurer Ron Bray agreed
with Miss Sutton's proposal.
Club representatives arrange
their budgets with the treasurer
before the general meeting and
they would still have a right
to present disagreements to
Council or call a general meeting if necessary, he said.
TOO EASY
President Dick Underhill felt
that the quorum should be even
lower than 1000 students. PRO
Danny Goldsmith felt "it would
be too easy to load, a general
meeting with a lower quorum."
All the proposals will be finalized and presented to Council for approval Monday night.
All changes must be ratified at
the spring general meeting.
'twttn clams
PRO APPLICATIONS
AVAILABLE TODAY
Are you possessed of a pep-
sodent smile, a glad hand and
a desire to have a Student
Council crest on your blue
blazer?
Then pick up an application
for Public Relations Officer
which are available today in
the Student Council office.
VOC Holds Annual
Open House Party
VOC is having its annual
open house party at the cabin
on Mount Seymour, Saturday
26. Admission 80c single, 79c
a couple.   All welcome.        ''
ep ep ep
GLEE CLUB practice for
"Open House" show, noon to*
day in HM1.
tf, 9ft $ft
UNITED NATIONS CLUB
general meeting and election oi
executive for 1955-56, in Arts
100, noon Friday 25. All menv
bers urged to attend.
m,    »ft    ff*
WOMEN'! UNDEHGBADU-
ate Society presents a talk
and film* on "Your Future as
an Airline Stewardess," Friday
noon  in Biology  100.
if* 9ft tft
WEST INDIAN AND CAW-
bean Students Group meeting
in Arts 106, February 26, 1:30
p.m.
SIWASH MEETING, Friday
noon, in Brock basement. AH
editors and workers please at*
tend.
(Continued ea Page 3)
See CLASSES
Two New
BA Courses
Established
The Faculty of Arts and Science has widened its scope with
the establishment of two new
undergraduate programs in
Mediaeval Studies and Renaissance Studies.
The two new programs will
be open to Third-Year students
in the 1955-56 session. These
will be Honours courses granting the degrees "Honours B.A.
in Mediaeval Studies'' and "Hon*
ours B.A. in Renaissance Stud"
: „« t*
ies.
First and Second year students who are interested in either of the courses should contact either Dr. Cragg, student
advisor for Mediaeval Studies
or Dr. Grant, student advisor
for Renaissance Studies, as the
prerequisites   are   important.
Nine departments — Classics,
English, French, German, History, Philosophy, Slavonic Studies, Spanish and Architecture
— have joined together to set
up the two new programs.
HANDICRAFT  SHOW  IN  GYM
\msm %m        i
Treasure Van' Arrives
By SHELAGH LINDSAY
On Sunday, a young and
vivacious truck driver, named
Anne Wade, arrived on the
campus in i. blue panel truck
I a h e le d "Treasure Van,
World University Service of
Canada."
Miss Wade had brought
Handicrafts from many nations forthe annual exhibition
and sale ot crafts by the UBC
committee of WUS. The sale
be^an   yesli rrlay   iu   Ihe   War
Memorial Gymnasium and continues today and to-morrow.
Profits from each sale are
apportioned by WUS to uni-
vprsitik's in Underdeveloped
countries for hostels, laboratories and libraries. Profits
from the UBC sale will be
directed toward the WUS seminar  in  Japan.
Since    1952    the    sale    has ■
continued   lo  expand   so   that
it   may   no   longer   be   called
Handicrafts   of   India    but   a
Treasure Van ol World Crafts.
Each year a unique display
is included in the sale. This
year a remarkable exhibit of
Dolls of the World is being
shown. Over thirty five dolls
ranging in size from six
inches to two feet and dressed
in national costume have been
lent by royal households and
government officials.
Plan to visit the exhibition
and sale between the hours
of 1.2:30 noon and 10 p.m.
today or tomorrow. Admission   is  free. Page Two
THE     UBYSSE|Y
Thursday, February 24, 1955
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER. CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mall, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Mail subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published ln Vancouver throughout the university year by th'j Student Publica"ons Board of the
Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
the University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 1230
or Alma 1231. Advertising Manager is Geoff Conway.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Ray Logie News  Editor—Rod Smith
CUP Editor—Jean Whiteside Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Copy Editor—Stanley Beck       Executive Editor—Geoff Conway
Senior Editor DOLORES BANERD
Reporters: Sandy Ross, Marie Stephens, Valerie Haig-Brown,
Jackie Scale, Sylvia Shorthouse, Margo Hutton-Potts.
Sports: Bob Bergen, Pete Worthington,  Neil MacDonald
SECOND   REPORT   GIVEN
Czech   Freedom,  Politics  Described
GUEST   EDITORIAL
An  Opportunity
No man is an island entire to himself.
These famous words of John Donne are ever so much
more realistic in this day of nuclear warfare than they were
in the seventeenth century. Our concern with world affairs
is no longer of merely academic interest; it is a vital necessity.
But apart from this self interest, we as human beings
have a responsibility to our fellowman. It is on this principle
of the essential dignity of mankind that the World University
Service bases ts program.
It believes that we should help students around the
world not because they are anti-communists nor because they
are potential soldiers for the west but because they need
and deserve our help.
The annual Handicraft Exhibition and Sale is now on the
campus and its proceeds go to this international program.
WUSC needs your support in its fight against ignorance and
disease.
lt fights on the level it knows best—that of higher education. Every student on the campus contributes one dollar a
year to support exchange scholarships. Canadian students
last year raised $12,000 by this method. While this method
contributes much to international understanding, the crying
nee'd of Asia today is for health and educational facilities.
This is where our support of the "Treasure Van" comes
in. —World University Service Committee
hoots in hell
BY JOCK WHATSISNAME
/
I
MONTREAL—I sat In the austere offices of thc administration building here today and heard from the lips of the
University of McGill's top educator that UBC has become
one of the most Infamous truancy centres on thc North American continent.
I was shocked.
So bad is UBCs reputation that Toronto Deans bandy
the names UBC hooky players with the same familiarity they
mention big shots in the Toronto truancy racket.
McGill president Dr. F. Cyril James and his fellow educators told me that UBC is a key truancy centre for the same giant,
greedy, grasping, craving abhorrent, disgusting international
truancy ring that has turned Toronto into a nauseous battleground between professors and truants.
Much of what they told me, I, Jock Whatsisname, already
knew, of course. But the magnitude of the octupus which unrelentingly squeezes UBC in its grasp came to me as a new and
terrifying concept.
They named Elmer Schlunk. a one-time car-hop, and Heber
Geber, a Scotch morning paper thief as the kingpins of the
international ring with headquarters in Mount Allison University,
that is now supplying abominable, besmirched ideas to 2000
UBC students as well as the other major campi of North
America.
Snoek Brothers Known
Underlining the evil importance of the UBC campus to thc
syndicate is the clearly, positively established fact that UBC's
two notorious lecture skippers, the Sneek brothers, Freek and
Reek, were considered valuable enough to become top men in
the international evil conspiracy after the pair fled the president's
office in 1927.
How does the vile ring work? Who are the incorrigibles
behind it? What is their stake in the sordid truancy racket?
This is what I was told in a conversation with President
James: 'What tho hell do YOU want?"
From keyholes, I found that thc pestilential, depraved headquarters of the vice empire, which greedily milks hundreds of
hours a day from 20,000 students listed in attendance records, is
Mount Allison University in Nova Scotia.
But the insidious, corrupting, rotten practice stretches out
over Europe, the Near East, thc Orient and North America.
The malignant practice started in tiie arts faculties'but from
there it corrosively spread, poison-like, to clandestine laboratories in engineering buildings, where grim, "mad sciencemen"
transformed it into an odious., debasing, squalid, wretched occupation for street corners, pool halls, taverns and cheap cafes for the
living dead, the  truants.
The business of distributing flunking on the instalment plan
is complicated by Ihe fearless and earnest enforcement of deans j
and professors, working in fast-moving co-operation.
But, alas, there is many a slip-up.
Heiress Nearly Corrupted
I ventured out on one raid on a classroom with Toronto
professors. When we burst the door open with our powerful
shoulders, a shocking sight met our eyes. Only three students \
were present.
Ft is into the already mickey lined briefcases of these pariahs :
that UBC textbooks are evilly and scornfully tossed, costing
thousands ol dollars in wasted taxpayers' money, professors' man
hours, and the faithful work ol parents.
But the highest price of all is still to he paid by the college '
girl or boy who will soon be seduced by Ihe hooky habit, in order
lo slake Ihe truancy kings, vampire-like, venomous, pernicious,
rank, depraved, villainous, execrable, diabolic, virulent, insatiable thirst   for companionship
—Peter Sypnowich i
By  PAUL ROMERIL
Following ia the second
report on Csechoilovakla
written for The Ubyssey by
Paul Romeril, third year
Arts student who visited the
country tail summer on a
World University Service
study tour. Hta first article
dealt with economic and social life in Caechetlovakia.
The group interviewed Bishop Novae, head of the National
Czech Church, who, when Questioned about the church-state
rclattonship in Czechoslovakia
maintained that there was full
religious freedom. We told him
of our meetings with, school
children and informed him that
it was our impression that their
education encouraged materialism. This he denied, and stated
that school children got time
off for religious instruction.
He concluded by saying that
he did not consider the regime
anti-religious.
The Czech National Church
("The Hussite Church "(began
in 1920, and today, has one million members. Sixty-five to
seventy percent of Czechs are
Catholics, according to Bishop
Hovac, but the vast majority do
not practice the Catholic faith.
The third largest church in
Czechoslovakia ls the Czech
Brethren Evangelical Church,
founded in 1918, and now led
by Dr. Hrmodka. These 3, and
the other small Protestant sects
are all state subsidized. Two of
our group attended Catholic
services twice, each time observing that most of the congregation belonged to a considerably older generation.
Also in Prague, we saw the
recently opened "Jan Huss
Church."
It is impossible for us to
make any comment on the value of the programmes on the
state radio, because of the language barrier. The average listener can easily obtain the musical programmes of the U.S.
Armed Forces Station in Munich — it is interesting to note
the popularity of the American
"Hit Parade" in Czechoslovakia. We were able to tune into
the BBC (popular for its news
programmes), the Voice of America, and Radio Free Europe
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Monday thru Friday. Phone
AL. 3928R  before March   I.
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LOST
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man's.  If  found  please   phone
AL. 0927L.  Ask for Mike.
if.       if.       if,
BLACK WALET, BETWEEN
Borck and Library on Saturday, Feb. 10. Please return to
lost and found or Paul Ink-
man  2837  W.  21.   Reward.
T* *Tr •T*
A SMALL MAN'S SUPERVA
watch wilh brown nylon strap.
Lost at Memorial Gym Tuesday   night.   HA.   0!)!)7Y.
(which is on the whole received unfavourably). Members of
the group at various times
heard the BBC, AFN, Radio
Moscow, and le Radio — diffusion Franchise from Paris. In
addition? we saw in the Prague
press, the odd American film
being advertised.
This freedom is not true of
newspapers. The only foreign
editions we could obtain were
"L'Humanite," the "Daily Worker," and "Pravda." Apparently most of the Czech newspapers are controlled by organisations sUch as trade unions, political parties, and governmental departments.
.In the bookshops we saw
great selection of low-priced
volumes, devoted mainly le
the achievements of the "socialist revolution." Virtually
every edition dealt with political er economic matters,
or with the life of a great
Communist leader.
It appeared to us that in
Czechoslovakia one of the major, media of mass communication was the poster. More than
that, it was an effective method whereby the government
created in the minds of its citizens ■ certain attitudes conclusive to the development) of a
communist state. On every wall
every street corner and every
building, we saw huge full-
colour messages praising the
glOrles of the revolution, of socialism; of Stalin; Malenkov;
Gottwald; and Zapotocky; or
demanding peace; or urging the
worker on to higher production. Often, too, we saw anoth-
erer type of poster, designed
we thought to strengthen national solidarity by linking the
hatred of the Czech people toward war with a violent and
often cruel condemnation of
the Western Democracies, notably the United States. As a
result of these gross and often
mischievous distortions, the
Western World is frequently
misrepresented in the eyes of
the common 'people. In this respect, our group endeavoured
on every possible occasion to
present a true and balanced
picture of life in North America.
In Czechoslovakia, as in all
Communist countries, government is carried out through the
National Front system. This
means that all political parties
commit themselves to the same
basic platform, which is best
for   the   country,   and    differ
chiefly in their means to the
end. We were informed that
this ensures the maximum amount of party participation for
purely national reasons and eliminates a great deal of partisanship. They admitted that
our concept of opposition in a
political democracy is non-existent in their country because
as they viewed the purpose of
political parties, it was not thc
duty of any one party to oppose, but for all to work together for the common good.
Thc group does not feel that
an evaluation of this system is
necessary in this report, hut we
did let our hosts know that this
was a very basic difference between "democracy" as we saw
it and "democracy" as they understood it.
Apart from the three political parties in the National
Front which are: 1. the Communist Party, 2. the Socialist Party, and 3. the People's
Party, there are also such
organisations which are officially recognised by the
government as making a contribution to the socialist
growth of Csechoilovakla,
for example, the Revolution-
ary Trade Union Movement,
and Csech Youth Movement.
•The Czech Parliament is
composed of elected delegates
from 611 these organizations in <
the National Front. It meets
twice a year, for about a week
to a week and a half, in the
spring and fill, to ratify the
policy of the executive of the
government which is headed
by the President and the Premier.
In the nomination of these
candidates  by various organizations in the National Front
any number of candidates may
stand, and ballots can be cast
one way or the other, depending on the personal qualifications of the nominee, i.e., ability, integrity, etc But very little  policy  difference   can  en- j
ter into  the election  of nom-1
inees   except  on   the  basis   of j
the   policy   of   the   individual j
persons revealed in his speech I
requesting   nomination.   When i
a  candidate  is  nominated thc j
voters of the trade union, region,  town  or  whatever  body |
constitutes   the   voters   in   the
particular case  express  either ;
approval or disapproval of this
one   man,   but   they   have   no
choice of another candidate. If
he gets 51 percent of the votes
he is elected. If not, the organ
ization must start the whole
procedure all over again to
find another candidate. The
latter case is rare.
The executive, i.e., the President and the Premier, are
chosen by the elected parliament. We were not able to establish clearly if the executive
is then therefore responsible to
the assembly. At any rate in
Czechoslovakia this problem of
a changing executive has not
appeared as yet.
The group as a whole felt
that the Communist", Party is
by far the most influential
group  in  the  National  Front.
wit uif hand
Succint
Editor, The Ubyssey;
Those who think will recognize that the true humor in
pornographic comedy lies in its
false humor which relies for
its "punch" on a regression to
what has been called the anal
stage of childhood development.
We all think the first is funny. Some of us .think the second is uproariously funny—
but not all of us.
J.  Baker,  Engineer
Aptitude Testing
JOHN W A. FLEURY
Personnel Consultant
Industrial Psychologist
606 Stock Exchange Building
TA. 7741
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SUN LIFE  OF  CANADA Thursday, February 24,1955
TBE     UBYSSEY
Page Three
NFCUS Explained;
Should We Rejoin?
UBC students will be asked to decide whether or not they
want to rejoin NFCUS at a general meeting March 17.
Nine Years
Of NFCUS
Endeavour
NFCUS — the National Federation of Canadian Univxersity | among   all  Canadiian  unlversh
Students, has
In view of this the Ubyssey
has attempted to outline the
organization and purpose of the
federation for the benefit of
thoso students who do not know
what NFCUS is and what it
does.
NFCUS was formed "as a
means to promote ... a better
understanding among all Canadian students, a greater degree
of co-operation and correlation
—obtained a twenty-five per
cent reduction on round-trip
railway tickets for students, valid in traveling to and from
university.
—set up a travel bureau offering special low rates on trans-
Atlantic travel and European
tours during summer month's.
—set up a system of interregional scholarships entitling
a student to free tuition at any
university in Canada.
—sponsored national short-
story and art contests for university students.      <
—organized the Canadian
University Press.
—created a National Debating League.
Did you know that broken
beer, bottles, sandpapered and
painted in barber-pole colours,
make excellent weapons for
squashing bleeding and protruding crabs, if swung by a strong
right hand?
ties, for effective promotion of
student interests . . ." (from
NFCUS constitution).
Its main efforts have been
directed at attempting to lower
education costs for university
students. A brief prepared by
NFCUS was adopted by the Massey Commission in their recommendations to the federal government om education.
Delegations from NFCUS
have petitioned the federal and
provincial government for schol
arship aid, but without success
as yet.
Policy is set by delegates from
each member university at an
annual conference which is
termed the Executive Council.
This Council elects an Executive Committee to co-ordinate
and execute directives and policies set at the annual meeting.
The Committee is composed
of a full-time national president,
four regional vice • presidents,
and three "ex-officio" members
— an International activities
commissioner, a debating commissioner, and a full-time secretary-treasurer.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE STAFF
TO INTERVIEW JOB SEEKERS
Earliest applicants are sure of getting jobs this summer through the campus National Employment Service,
Many openings are available for students this year
in offices, hospitals, resorts and construction projects.
Those interested are urged to register immediately in
HM6.
Miss Esson, NES representative, will interview girls
. Wednesday and Friday afternoons, and Mr. L. Willoughby
and Mr. W. Donahue will be available to,interview boys
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.
* , *
ENVIABLE.   WHAT?
SWEET CAPS
add to the
enjoyment
FRESHER...MILDER...THEY'RE TODAY'S CIOARETTE
«J«
UNITED   AIR   LINES
invites
the women of the University of B.C. to a showing
of a color-sound motion
picture entitled,
"Scotty Wins
Her Wings"
This film depicts the real
life story of a stewardess
—her selection, her train-
in" and her duties,
I   Stewardess  Representative,  Betty  Hannemun,  of  United
*   Air Lines, will be on campus at. the same time to discuss
i Aussie College Enrolls
More Profs Than Pupils
By JACKIE SEALE
Among the many strange things found in the land "down
under" is a university which has a staff almost twice as large
as the student body.
R. A. Hohnen, registrar of
this unusual insitution, the Australian National University ' at
Canberra, visited the campus
last week as part of a tour that
will cover many of the larger
universities on this continent
as well as in England an Europe.
SEARCH CENTER
Australian National University, a research center founded
just after the war, has a staff
of 150 research workers and
te'ehnicians.
There are only to students.
Entrance requirments are at
least a BA. Most of the students
are either carrying on research
work for a MA, or are being
trained as research workers.
Chief fields of research are in
medical, physical and social
sciences and in the study of the
Pacific Ocean area.
Awards
List Closes
Monday
Nominations for Honorary.
Activities Awards, highest
awards on the campus, must be
submitted by Monday, February
28.
These' awards are presented
annually to six students for outstanding contributions in general student activities.
Qualifications for awards include: active participation in
extra - curricular activities at
UBC for at least one year prior
to submission of his or her name
for the award, outsanding contributions to the AMS in way of
service or leadership; nominee
must not have held council position during 54-59 term,
Nominations should be submitted on special forms accompanied by the signatures of
three persons willing to vouch
for the nominee's qualifications.
Awards forms are available
at the AMS office in Brock Hall.
Nominations can be handed
in either at the AMS office or
to a member of thc Honorary
Awards  Committee.
LSE AWARDS
Deadline for nominations for
the coveted L.S.E. annual awads
is   February  28th.
A U.C.C. awards committee
will select the winners on the
basis of number of executive
positions held, number or original programs introduced and
the amount of work done for
the   U.C.C,   and   U.C.C.   clubs.
Club presidents' are asked to
place written nominations in
box 2g in the A.M.S. office as
soon as possible.
HOLDING TWO EXAMPLES of the native craft shown
today^and tomorrow at the "Treasure Van" display in.
Gym is Louise .Watts, a pretty young lass who will direct
you about the interesting handicrafts of many countries.
Handicrafts are also on sale.        —Brian Thomas Photo
Browse at
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOK STORE
337 W. Pender
BEST IN BOOKS
BACKGROUND
Much work is being done
in the field of nuclear physics.
"However," said Mr. Hohnen,
"we have nothing to do with the
actual atomic blasts that have
been set off in Australia, Those
experiments are carried on by
the government. Our work provided the background material."
Hohnen, as guest of the Carnegie Institute, will study work
being done in an effort to broad
en the scope of the Australian
National University.
Students
Oust Prexy
NAGOYA, Japan— Students
and professors at Meijo University have forced the resignation
of university president Juichi
Tanaka.
Students  went  on   a  general
strike in protest against his dictatorial methods and self-cenred
administration   policy,   claiming
that  ho  appointed  his  relatives
to important posts and was planning to have the university entirely   in   his  own   power.
I     To  end  thc  strike  the  president   promised   to   allow   each
i faculty to  manage   its  own af-
ifairs,   but   failed   to   fulfill   his
promise.
Dramatic Impact, Charm
Promised For 'Barrets'
A  unique combination  of charm  and dramatic impact
against an early Victorian setting, will highlight the annual
production of the UBC Players Club. '*
The   timeless   love   story   of* '        '
Robert and Elizabeth Browning
and the despotic but futile attempt of Elizabeth's father to
separate them, will be told in
Rudolph Besier's "The Barrets
of Wimpole Street."
To be presented March 10,
11 and 12 under the direction
of a well-known actress and
director Phoebe Smith and assistant director Margaret Robertson, the play will spotlight
the debut of a new face on
campus, FLUSH.
Leading roles will be taken
by Doris Chilcott as Elizabeth,
Gerry Guest as Robert and John
Whittaker as Elizabeth's father.
Reservations ton* tickets selling at $1.00, $1.25 and 50 cents,
can be made at Modern Music
Shop or by calling Alma 3062.
I
Commerce
To Offer
Lectures
The School of Commerce is
offering to help aspiring fin*
anciers decide what aspect oi
making money appeals to them
the  most.
A series of ten lectures for
all commerce and pre-commerce
students will begin Monday.
The lectures will cover all the
options offered by the school
and reveal all the pertinent
facts about each one.
The lectures will be held in
room Gl. These are the titles:
Feb. 28, Accounting, Mr.
Fields: March 1, Commerce and
Forestry, Mr. Burke; March 2,
Production, Transportation and
Public Utilities, Mr. Hall; March
3, Activities and Society Program of School of Commerce,
Labor Progressive Party will i Mr. Gourlay; March 4, Market-
form the government with the! in«- Mr- ©berg; March 7, Fin-
Social Credit official opposi-! ance. Mr. Wong: March 8, Com-
tion i merce and Hospital Administra-
mi     r> it       ii   j    i       4u   *u   'tion, Mr. Wilson March 9, Elec-
Tho  Bill   will  deal   with   the i _     '
CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
MOCK PARLIAMENT scheduled for today has been delayed  until March  10.
i
MARDIS GRAS RAFFLE
WINNERS
a Stewardess career.
f
f
i FILM: "Scotty Wins Her Wings"
' Time: 12:!H) noon, Fridav Feb. 2'5
PLACE: Biology 100
FOR  FURTHER  INFORMATION   CALL THE
t j
I   I
I
iii
ii!
M
U
n
M
I I
H
iii
j UBC NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT OFFICE j|
j lint M« j   !
! ALma 1101 I   ,
PRIZE
Squirrel Stole
Man's Watch
Three Portraits
$25 Gift Certificate
Viyella Shirt ..
Cigarette Case
Ladies' Handbag
$10 Gift Certificate
Radio Wave
Two Blouses
$10 Gt't Certificate
$10 Gift Certificate
Sport  Shirt
Gift Corsage
Record Album
$15 Gift Certificate
Ladies' Necklace
$5 Gift Certificate
Corsage
$10 Gill Certificate
WINNER
J. Horsman
J. Foestrain
C. Hulbert
    Mrs. D. Coulter
Pam Gray
Mrs. C. R. Featherstone
K. Mori,soued
G. Legge
C. Munro
Mrs. Remphrey
A. Woolen
Lome Vaughn
D. Banerd
Ladine Hovartson
•   .   Bettv Esselmont
  '. Olive Day
D. Boulding
G. Dalby
. D. Coburn
M. Moonev
conservation of Natural Re- j
sources and industrial develop-j
ment of British Columbia, \
MATH   CLUB   announces   its
annua}   competion         o:
annual competition, open to all
undergrads. Problem sheets
may be obtained from the AMS
office or any member of the
club executive. Competition
closes March 21. A member
of tiie club will be in hut M13
Thursdays 1:30-2:30 to answer
questions.
*V *f* if*
PARLIAMENTARY  FORUM
will hold a debate entitled "Resolved That the Claims of Religion are Unfounded." Danny
Goldsmith vs Foster Isherwood,
today noon in FG 100.
it -k -k
PHRATERES is sponsoring a
Barn Dance in ihe Women's
Gym, Friday 25, H-12. Everyone welcome, especially men.
Admission: Boys 25c. Girls 35c.
Refreshments and Entertainment   provided
tion speeches for Commerce
Undergraduate S o ci e t y Positions; March 10, Teaching, Commerce and Economics, Commerce and Public Administration, Commerce and Science,
Commerce and Actuary, Mr.
Thomas, March 11, Commerce
and Law, Mr. Loffmark.
Fellowships
Awarded To
Engineers
Four engineers were named
as winners of Athlone fellowships   Wednesday.
Boh Affleck, Ed Wright, David Guthrie and Walter Die-
tiker will join 34 other Canadians in two years of advanced
study' in United Kingdom Universities and laboratories, next
year.
Any prize not yet received may
AMS office Fridav or Monday, he
be picked up at the
hveon 12:.'iO and 2:."M».
«>
Suppliers of UBC laboratory  manuals,  graph  paper,
and law-easeliooks.
Best Mimeographing
C6. Ltd.
TA. 11742
ir»i w
Muslim's
Free Purl;mi1,
GRADUATE
Guthrie is a graduate student
j who  will   be  awarded  his  Mas-
I lers   this   May.     Last   year   he
; was   the   winner   of   the   $1,000
Cominco 'fellowship for advanced studies in the field of metal-
urgy or chemical engineering.
Affleck, a  fourth year chemical engineer was winner of the
; Association   of   professional   engineers Bonk prize this year.
Winner el Ihe California
Standard undergraduate scholarship. Dicliker will receive his
decree 111 elect rnal engineer
inn   'hi:--   spring Page Four
THE     UBYSSEIY
Thursday, February 24, 1955
LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO GO
SATURDAY? TRY SOCK DANCE
It would seem that this weekend seems to be shaping
up somewhat as belonging to the Rowing Club (currently endeavouring to raise money by which to go to England and
the Henley regatta.)
Keep the club in mind Saturday night when you're thinking of where to go for a good time. The scullers will be having
a wee bit of a bash, commonly called a sock dance, Saturday
night in the gym after the game.
good.
50 cents per head will be the tariff. The music will be
ESTIMATE   RAISED
Rowers Nearer
To Henley Race
By KEN LAMB
Henley, England, the home of the wrong length course
and seat of the international proving ground for the best of the
world's scullers, moved a bit closer to UBC's rowing crew
Tuesday night as the chairman of five fund raising committees
pledged strong support to the crew.
BANQUET
At a banquet at the faculty
club the speakers, Col. Doug
Forin, Frank Frederickson, Ron
Bray, Luke Moyles and Art
Sager, chairman of the sub-committees, reported plans and progress of the money raising endeavour.
But the fund received aa
Immediate boost when coach
Frank Read told the combined
committee press and radio
audience that the $20,000 formerly established as a minimum would probably reach
328,000.
Col Forin, chairman of special
names, reporteg "unqualified
support" from the letters he had
sent and expected little trouble
ih reaching the objective for
his group—half the $25,000.
SPECIAL EVENTS
The remaining money will
come from students and special
events. Treasurer Ron Bray said
a referendum to transfer $3,000
of the AMS surplus to rowers
would be put before the stu
dents this Spring.
First cash to reach the coffers will come this Saturday
from a silver collection to be
taken at the Varsity-CPR soccer
game.
VRC MEMBER
Nellis Stacey and trainer John
Warren will appear at half time
on the television broadcast of
the game.
OUTLINED PLANS
Special events chairman Frank
Frederickson outlined' plans for
other money raising events. He
said he hoped for an old-timers
hockey game and a possible
game featuring the Penticton
Vs when they return from Europe.
He also spoke of a rowing
display on Lost Lagoon, with
"lots of pretty co-eds" taking
a silver collection.
Rowers   will   also   be   publi
cized  during  Open  House.
Big
On
For
No. 3
Top
Birds
lappy'Guest
Speaker At
Banquet
Charlie Lappenbusch, inventor of the straight line defense,
and Bellingham's loquacity version of Annie Stukus, will be
the guest speaker at UBC's second annual football banquet, to
be held Tuesday, March 1 at
6:15 in Stanley Park Pavilion.
In his quieter moments "Jolly Cholly" doubles as athletic
director and football coach at
Western  Washington.
Entertainment wise, the $2
per studenti, $3 per outsider
price is worth Charlie alone,
without   the   banquet.
Also on the agenda is the
presentation of the Dr. Burke
Inspirational Award to the most
inspirational player on the
team.
The winner will be chosen
by the team members.
It is hoped this years banquet will be even bigger than
last year's, and a good evening
should hi' had by all,
The shiny floor of UBC's War
Memorial gym will rock and
bounce to the rythm of gyrating
Thunderbirds for the last time
this season when Jack Pomfret
sends his Birds out in* an effort
to break their own conference
win record.
Opposition (for the attempt
will be third place Central
Washington Wildcats. Clawing
will commence about 8:15.
Pep club has promised some
fine half time entertainment
with a buzzing model airplane
show — brirfg your own airraid shelter. And the rowers
will hold another of their famous sock dances after the game.
But all that is merely incidental. This, so we are told,
(and we belive it,) is "Big Number Three" night for the Birds.
With two conference wins this
season, the team will be out
Saturday night to make it three
and beat their own record.
Being the last game of the
season, it is the last chance for
the Pomfret-led gladiators. Unfortunately, the other team will
be the third place Wildcats, who
are anxious to. remain above
and aloof from the three teams
clustered below them.
But a win would be a fine
way to close the season. Do not
be at all surprised to see one.
It would also be fitting to hand
a victory to Buz Hudson, Qary
Taylor, Ernie Nyhaug, and Jim
Carter.^ four Bird stalwarts who
will perform for the last time
on the old home floor.
Jayvees Advance To Finals
With Fourth Quarter Win
Beat Adanacs For Right
To Meet Eilers Tonight
Sports Editor—KEN LAMB
ALL SET to derail the CPR express when its 11 members
play the Thunderbird soccer club -at 2 p.m. Saturday in
Varstiy Stadium will be Ernie Kuyt, star goal tender for
the Birds. Silver collection will go toward the Rowing
Club's Henley fund.
World  Cup  Hopes
Leave  Tomorrow
Albert Laithwaite bundles his 18 Thunderbirds into a plane
for the first time Friday morning when the Birds head for the
wild blue yonder and California in defense of the World Cup.
Standings
W L Per. F.    A.
Whitworth
10 1 .909 848 654
ULC
9 2 .812 734 653
Central
5 5 .500 697 679
Eastern
4 7 .364 738 741
Western
4 7 .364 643 724
CPS
4 7 .364 699 793
UBC
2 9 .182 606 673
FIRST  TWO
They play the first two games
Saturday and Monday. The Golden Bears return to the Owen
Bowl March 10 and 12 to decide
the holder of the cup UBC has
won for the last two years.
Coach Laithwaite, battling
with a budget that will limit
him to only three extra players,
is counting on what he calls
"the strongest team in years" and
the lack of fatigue of the air
ride to give him the advantage
over the powerful Bears.
BOUND TIGHT
In fact, so tight is the team
bound by finances, that each
player has contributed $5 to supplement the kitty. This is a new
twist in the popular malignant
theory that college athletes are
rewarded.
At UBC, evidently, so unath-
letically-scholarship-minded are
we, that our athletes pay for
the privilege of representing the
old school tie in international
competition. Such devotion.
Though   Albert    is   taking   a
strong team, California also promises to be very tough. And
further injuries to the walking
wounded — Ted Hunt, Donn
Spence, Derek Vallis, and captain Doug McMillan could hinder our chances.
But the air ride, shorter by
many hours than the long and
exhausting train trip, is expected to improve the Birds' stock.
And the series will not be
without its bit of drama. Assistant UBC coach Max Howell,
one time Wallaby and longtime member of the Bears, will
be helping Albert match wits
with the men he played beside
only last year.
CAMPBELL
CLEANERS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2460
Discount for Students
AQUA  ROOM
for private parties, dinner
meetings, banquets, etc.
at the
Dog House Cabaret and
Drive-in Co. Ltd.
1601 W. Broadway     BA. 1310
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.   Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned and Operated by
The University of B.C
JAYVEES 60 • ADANACS 52
By BOB BERGEN
The surprising Jayvees continued their winning ways Tuesday night when they upset New Westminster Adanacs to win
the rubber match of the Senior A semi-finals, and earn themselves a chance at the Eilers.
First game of the finals goes
tonight at 8:15 at Lord Byng
Gym. Eilers became the official opposition when they beat
Cloverdale last week in two
straight games.
CLOSE GAMES
In a season characterized by
close games time and again, the
Jayvees have managed to come
up with the extra point that
has meant victory. So it was
Tuesday night.
They were one point down
going into the fourth quarter,
managed to get only a slim lead
and it was not until the last
few minutes that they managed
to build up their eight point
lead.
GIMPLE LED
'Gordie Gimple led Dick
Penn's men with an 18 point
performance. Mike Fraser and
Ted Saunders followed with 13
and 10 points.
UBC — Fraser 13, Drummond
9, Tarling 6, Saunders 10,
Gimple 18, Schilling, Gunning,
Gustin, Kosich 2, Redford 2,
Holt.
ADANACS — Jobb, Cather-
all 11, Tole 9, Lewko 8, Ramsay
12, Berge 8, McComb 4.
4>-
IMPORTANT MEETINC
FRIDAY FOR MAA MEN
All members of the Men's
Athletic Association will attend an important meeting to
be held Friday noon in Arts
204.
Secretary Bob Hutchison
has advised it would be well
for all to turn out to discuss
a couple of somewhat important topics.
Bring your own lunch.
Shuttle
Team
Upsets
The UBC badminton team
swatted its way into first place
in Vancouver B division badminton league Sunday yvith a upset
8-4 win over the Quilchena
club.
TEAMED UP
The wir gave UBC a strong
chance of winning the league.
Ken Noble, Doug Whitworth,
Pete Godfrey and Chuck Forbes
swept four games of doubles to
lead the UBC team to victory.
* Noble and Whitworth teamed
with Joan Van Ackeren and
Mary Jean Levirs to win three
of four games of doubles.
The girls teamed up to Win
one of three doubles matches.,
The C team is on top of the
league and with one game left
is sure of the championship.
CANCELLED TUESDAY
Because of phys-ed practisfe,
there will be no Badminton
Tuesday night. Tournament,
however will continue all this
week. —~
And all badminton players
are advised to keep right on
winning, as there is ar rumour
about that they will get a whole
page in the Totem this year.
10th   AVENUE
B. A. SERVICE
10th Ave. & Discovery
GORDIE  MeCORQUODALE
JACK McCOLL
AL.   1136
Hie Day Begins "Divinely i
0lt<s
Orion
Look for  the name  "Kitte
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an exciting bouquet of now colours
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Green, Chamois, Chartreuse, cm wel
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Pull-fashioned, hand-finished,
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simple to care fori **t
At good shops everywhere.
$0.95, J7.95, $8.95.
><U£M4VA>

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