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The Daily Ubyssey Mar 3, 1949

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 The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1949
No. 77
SOUVENIR ISSUE
OPEN HOUSE MARCH 5, 1949
To the people of British Columbia to whom the University
each year sends its graduates,
this  issue  is dedicated. The
campus, still raw-boned, but
slowly maturing, lies behind
these gates that never close.
Its resources belong not to a
privileged few but to all.
*
OPEN HOUSE 1949 The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B. C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1949.
No. 77
    _  tritre fm*r Foom
NtoVV LIBRARY STACKS" are viewed with glee by pretty   RUTH SIMS will be featured   HOME TOWNS are pointed out by John Robertson and Dave
coeds.  New stacks allow more room to browse around and   pianist at a Slavonic. Circle   Wilson, Open House officials, as maps showing "origin of
make more books readily accessible. Ubyssey Photo By Mickey Jonei   concert on Thursday. Students" are set up. Daily Ubyssey Photo By Doug Barneti
Open House To Be Gala Show
20,000 Expected
To Visit Open
House Saturday
More than twenty thousand
are expected to attend Open
House, scheduled for Saturday
on the University of British
Columbia campus.
Several hundred displays prepared
by the various faculties, departments
and clubs of the campus will be exhibited in the many university buildings.
In the main concourse of the library will be displayed exhibits ranging from postage stamps to ecological
maps relating to such topics as juvenile delinquency  and  divorce.
Visitors to the physics building may
see the appearance of the human voice
as an electric current sees it, glass
blowing, apparatus used in the studies
of nuclear physics such as geiger
counters and cloud chambers, and
| numerous other exhibits relating to
I the physics field.
In the Applied Science building will
I be displayed numerous glimpses of
life in the fields of the biologist,
[forester, geologist, civil engineer and
| others such as skeletons, rocks, fos-
|sils, and bridge models.
The chemistry building will display
Imany phases of the chemist's world
with such exhibits as models of plants
I for producing gasoline from coal, ex-
Ihibits of chemical engineers and bacteriologists.
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE '20,000 EXPECTED"
AGGIE FRANKENSTEINS present Elsie, the mechanical cow.   Monster is said to produce
more milk and eat less hay than any pedigree d bovine. Pretty girl is spokeswoman for Aggie
Engineers. Photo By Bob Steinei
Cosmopolitan Campus
Students From Thirty
Count ties Study At UBC
UBC is Canada's most cosmopolitan university.
Students from over 30 countries
have flocked here since the end
of World  War II.  From  all  over
the British Commonwealth, South        and the newly-formed Internation-
America,   Europe   and   Asia   UBC
has attracted.
UBC's    International    Relations
Club,   United  Nations   Association
al Students Club have been sparked by foreign students with a first
(Continued on Page 9)
SHE "COSMOPOLITAN CAMPIJi
Premier To Preside
At Official
Opening Here
Premier Byron Johnson and
Finance Minister Herbert Anscomb will officially open UBC's
Open House activities Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. in the Armories.
Also at the ceremonies will be
Lieutenant-Governor Charles Banks,
Education Minister W. T. Straith and
Chancellor Eric W. Hamber.
Members of the Provincial legislature will be flown here by special
chartered plane.
The day's special events will include official opening of the Anthropological Museum in the new wing
of the library.
Acadia Camp will be open for inspection from  1:00 p.m.  to 5:00 p.m,
Starting at 2:00 p.m. in Brock Hall
lounge will be a musical program by
the Music appreciation Society in cooperation with the University Radio
Society.
At 2:15 in the stadium, visitors will
be able to see UBC sportsmen in
action when the Thunderbirds battle
Victoria Crimson Tide in the McKechnie Cup English rugger game.
At 3:00 p.m. in Brock Hall a musical program will be presented by the
Varsity Band, followed at 4:00 by
a concert by students of the Department of Music.
At 8:00 p.m., again in Brock Hall,
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE "PJtEMTER OPENS"
Six Million for UBC Buildings
New  Beauty For 'Cinderella'  UBC
Students hurrying daily to lectures across UBC's broad campus
are new inured to the sight of
armies of sweating workmen engaged in construction work.
A new million and half dollar
grant for permanent building's announced in Victoria last week
brings to six and one half million
the amount allocated to new construction on the campus since war's
end.
UBC first began to look like a
campus ot excavations, skeleton
buildings, and scaffolding when
the postwar boom sparked hurried
erection of hutments  to serve  as
spare lecture rooms for the swollen
enrolment. ,
The activity continued into 1947,
as UBC began a five-million dollar face-lifting operation^ that
promised to make her the "fairest
of all" among North American
campuses.
First step in the "beauty facial"
Ireatment was opening of the sleek,
new $800,000 Physics building in
Homecoming Week of 1947, by
Him. John Hart, then premier of
B.C.
The ultra-modern permanent
building, first one erected at UBC
for 20 years, now houses a Vander-
graal' generator and other Buck
Rogers devices of nuclear physics,
making this university an important link in Canada',1! atomic energy
program.
SEEN SATURDAY
Its wonders of the natural sciences will be thrown open to public gaze during Open House Saturday March 5.
Knowledge-seeking students in
tlie depths of the Library were exposed to the strident chatter of
pneumatic drills and cement mixers
for months,
To relieve overcrowded conditions in the reading rooms, a new,
ultra-violent-lighted wing was added, to increase facilities two and
one-half times. The new green and
buff section includes an art display room, a shiny new reference
room, an enlarged reserve reading
room, and staff rooms.
It is now possible to get a book
out of the Library without waiting
in line for 20 minutes or more.
TOP FLOORS
Light summer drizzles during
1947 filled with mud and water a
new excavation just off the Main
Mall. Out of this quagmire there
eventually rose the slick ultramodern   $750,00   Applied   Science
buildings,   two   storeys   of   which
have now been completed.
Top storeys containing laboratories, offices and lecture rooms,
were temporarily left unfinished
due to lack of funds, but soon will
be completed.
Meanwhile a cluster of spanking
white frame buildings went uu
opposite the present Chemistry
building as the temporary heme of
the department of architecture
and drafting experts. Nestling in
the orchard lands, a .similar grc.up
of whito buildings formed the
Agricull'iri' Pavilion.
(Continued  on Page  2) Page 2
THE DAILY U£YSSEY
Thursday, March 3, 1949."
New Buildings Still
To Come On Campus
(Continued from Page One)
NEW GRANT
A new squad of muscular, oil-
carrying workmen established a beachhead on the campus in February, 19-18,
when sod was turned for the new,
Ihree-storey permanent Pharmacy,
Biological Science and Preventive
Medicine building.
The imposing, modernistic structure
will, when completed, contain four
separate wings. Situated at the Main
Mall and University Boulevard junction, the building will be architecturally designed to dovetail into its corner
site. The "hub" unit will contain two
lecture rooms, a main amphitheatre,
seminar rooms and a library, to
house students of biology, nursing,
zoology  and  pharmacy.
The $1,500,000 allocation announced
in Victoria February 25 is expected
to be used partly to complete both
the Biology and Applied Scienca
buildings.
GYM ON WAY
Latest project of "let's build it
ourselves"-minded UBC students, and
object of an extensive student-conducted funds-raising drive is the
half million dollar War Memorial
Gymnasium.
Dedicated to the memory of the
province's   war   dead,   the   structure
will be ready for use by 1950. Located
at University Boulevard and Wcs-
brook Crescent, the gym will be surrounded by 510,000 worth of landscaped playing fields gloping down
to  Chancellor  Boulevard.
The gym will contain a glassed-in
alcove and lobby that will be consecrated to B.C.'s fallen soldiers. Sod
was turned during a simple ceremony on Remembrance Day, 1947;
financial complications have since delayed the starting day of actual construction work.
SOON BEST-DRESSED
On the planning boards of the future is a $50,000 agricultural engineering and mechanical building,
for which tenders have been called.
Last but not least, the $650,000 girls
dormitories, long a pressing need on
the campus, are scheduled to be ready
for occupation by the fall of 1950.
Girls coming to the campus for the
first time will be given priority in
obtaining boarding facilities at the
"dorms."
Long range plans for erecting other
permanent buildings—sometime in the
future—are also being considered,
plans that are designed to transform
the one-time ragamuffin UBC into
"one of the best-dressed" campuses
in Canada.
HOLD YOUR SHIRT!!
See the new gripper waist band slack.
Keeps your shirt neatly in place. Grey
gabardine $18.95
S£»ortCoats-Valuesupto$37.50
special  :. $14.95
Top Coats, gabardine and covert. Reg.
$55 00 for $37.50 - $47.50 for.. $32.00
M-iga Shirts, Windsor collar in white, also
M ijntbatten in plain shades .
'■ —a>;> Cable Knit Sweaters
$3.95
n rrrned in UBC Colors  $11.95
VERN'S TOGS
4571 W. 10th—Just West of Safeway
ALma 1863
COMPLIMENTS
From
CITY   CONSTRUCTION
Company   Limited
and
CAPILANO   CRUSHING
Company   Limited
r 3202
107 E. 1st Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
FAir. 4662
Library Rooms Close
Early Friday Evening
In view of the coming Open House
activities the Library will run on
restricted schedules.
The main reading room and the
circulation desk will be closed to
students at 6:00 p.m. Friday but the
reserved reading room and the Ridington room will remain open as
usual till 10:00 p.m.
On Saturday the whole Library
building will be closed to students
from 10:30 a.m. onward.
May Your
UNIVERSITY
WEEK
Meet With
Every Success
CEDAR COYE
MILLS LTD.
Lumber Manufacturers
General Millwork
1101 W. 6th Ave
CE.4171
Compliments To
The University
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR
UNIVERSITY
WEEK
From A U.B.C. Supporter
We've Got The Blues!
Yes, if it's Navy, Royal,
Powder, or any of the
other blues you want in
your spring suit, we'll
have it.
KIRK'S CLOTHES
301 West Hastings St.
4444 W. 10th Ave.
EVERY  SU
apa-i
m
U
Bpf g*\
'W.-'wif ,.»s*i«# Bi*e?
TO   THE
Universit
1$,'
IV-
British Columbia
SHARP and THOMPSON, BERWICK, PRATT
ARCHITECTS frsday, March 3, 1949.
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
dentists Will Show
Latest Inventions
Demonstrations In Chemistry
Building This Saturday
How to turn your coal bin into a gas station will be exiled Saturday in the Chemistry building.
|>ng with this exhibit on the firsts — •
chemistry   students  will  show
20,000 Expected At UBC
rating measurement equipment,
|rch laboratories and a model of
3t plant fractionation columns for
fating liquids.
"the second floor an enterprising
In may be able to amass a small,
pe if he (or she) is able to apply j
various  techniques or  analyzing
bhemical  properties  of  charcoal,
|tes  and  metallic  sulphides.
REDISCOVER
inventor too will bo on hand to
Iscover" new compounds between
lite and metallic chlorides. There
|o to be a demonstration of new
(iques   in   analyzing   small   vol-
of gas. ' *•';
t>aratus in use will include an
knock machine for testing gaso-
Dctane ratings, and a plant that
lake the gas to be tested from
engineers will have in operation
Actional distillation column like
used'" in industry to separate
Ifarious components of crude oil.
Jdition, the extremely high tem-
|ure electric furnace may be used
the day,
MOUS GOOS"
»re is also an industrial type fil-
|ress used for separating "various
chemistry department has ar-
bd demonstrations on every floor
|,e Chemistry building.
first   floor   contains   research
[engaged  in  various projects,  as
|as the Chemical Engineering de-
nent.
floor up, students are probing
broperties of charcoal, silica, and
(metallic   sulphides,
by are also developing new tech-
^s of analyzing small volumes of
1NIC LABS
third  floor  holds  the  organic
rch labs, working at the moment
Lmthetic isoprene rubber and an
Ipt to determine finally the struc-
|of morphine.
floor is the headquarters of the
leal chemistry research students.
by are engaged mainly in radio
Ileal work and derivation of new
Itical methods for uranium, van-
l,  tungsten,  zinc,  and  the rare
-Page Booklet
Is Visitors
Open House
long  the  attractions  pre-
for Open House visitors
Ibe a 32-page booklet pro-
Id especially for the event.
pnty thousand copies of the boo.<
(been printed for distribution to
lublic on Saturday.
|tents of the book include a map
campus,  a   complete  program
Ithe events of the clay, and notes
I'ning all exhibits and displays.
included are a brief history of
liversity  and  pictures  of  most
buildings.   There are also bits
[forma tion    regarding   cafeterias
lhe   special   nursery   and   play
booklet was compiled by Ernie
lilt, university information offi-
|publicity chairman for Open
Bob Currie, Open Houss
I chairman.
White Elected
Redshirt Prexy
President of next year's Engineer's
Undergraduate Society is Cyril White.
In his platform White mentioned
the establishment of a "new 'esprit de
corps' throughout the entire Engineering Faculty" and "a new pin for
the Engineers with the word 'Engineers' printed on it in place of the
present word 'Science,."
(Continued From Page 1)
One exhibit which should prove
extremely interesting is the model
of the fish ladders at Hell's Gate on
display in the north end of the mining building.
In the agriculture building and on
the UBC farm will bc displayed a
large number of agricultural activities
ranging  from   horticulture,   dairying,
food technology to the farm.
In Brock Memorial building, student
owned building, will be exhibits by j
Student   Council,   the   International '
Students Service, Mamooks Club, the
University   Radio   Society   and   the
Publications Board.
Council display is a chart showing
lhe organization of student government and the activities of the Alma
■Mater Society. The ISS will''present
lectures by delegates to last year',
seminar in Germany. Mamooks and
URS club rooms will be open for inspection.
In the editorial rooms of The Daily
Ubyssey will be displays of the various student publications.
Premier Opens Display
(Continued From Page 1)
Professor Harry Adaskin and Frances
Marr  will  give  a  violin  recital.
Rounding up the special events of
the day will be a talk by Dr. Davidson of the University of Washington
in Physics 200. He will speak on "Aus-
The university cafeteria will remain open all day and tea will be
available in Brock Hall lounge from
2:00 to 4:C0 p.m.
The   university   health  service  will
remain  open  all afternoon and  eve-
tralian Aborigines and their culture." , ning   and   with   the   co-operation   of
First Aid posts situated at all information centres will take care of
any possible accidents.
Also available to visitors will be
a nursery in the care of registered
nurses where parents may leave their
children.
WOODWARD'S FASHION NEWS
THE   FASHION   SKIES   ARE   WONDERFULLY
blue
THIS   SPRING
From the top of your head to the tip of your toes . . . you'll be
wearing ,BLUE this spring!
BLUE, dark, light or bright, on its own or with color added.
Choose it from our  Ready-to-Wear and Accessory  collections
. . . chosen with BLUE in mind.
COATS         Slim and as fittecl as a dress, or full and sweep-
-   ing to suit your %M A 50 to $*9A 50
taste. From        TtJ- Iff*
SUITS W^h a^ ^e latest fashion ideas . . . box jackets,
caped shoulders, classic designs are all represented. MQ 50 to $£fi *o
Priced from        *t/#
69!
HATS       That "just right" touch of col
or can
be added in a
pastel felt 	
$•7 95 to $
13.
95
Crisp   BLUE  straw,   flower   trimmed   or  plain
gives an air $4* 95 to $4 O 95
of spring  M.\M
SHOES |
The youthful grace of a calf opera  (
i i
pump, in Navy BLUE. '  i
SIZES 4V2 TO 9V2.        $4 ff 95
WIDTHS AAAA TO B.
15.'
HASTINGS AT ABBOTT
rf-**imrtr-.rt.niivt-%at.i* * ««r-j?««w.*»(
r..'.*''n.»:«w»'«w-fir.'r;-»-.-^«!<.^S',*!»rt»»«>iieii«s>fi(.. * ni«»a>f •*,*,#- -«».&.. 1848-1949
A CENTURY
OF PROGRESS
Ever since the first lumber was sawn in British Columbia, in 1848, the record of
the forest industries has been one of steady expansion and development. Today, to
a greater extent than ever before, these industries form the foundation of our
Provincial economy.
The people of British Columbia cannot afford to endanger the future of their
forest resource — so vital to their continued prosperity.
Protect Your Greatest Asset!
PREVENT FOREST FIRES
W
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS
Hon. E. T. Kenny,
Minister
CD. Orchard,
Deputy Minister. mrsday, March 3, 1949.
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
(President MacKenzie A Host Too
Page 5
Open House'!hank You1
For 33 Years Of Growth
By DR. NORMAN MACKENZIE
President, University of B.C.
The student body through the
.Student Council initiated the idea
lot holding an Open House on
i" March 5 of this year. The faculty
and administration were happy to
Lassociate themselves with the stud-
lent body in organizing the occasion and arranging exhibits. The
Board of Governors contributed
a grant towards expenses. For tho
past few months a very energetic
and efficient committee under the
Chairmanship of Bob Currie has
been busy with the arrangements.
It is apparent from the program
which has been drawn up and
which is now in the hands of the
printers that an  extremely  inter-
See For Yourself
ATTEND OPEN HOUSE ON MARCH 5
at the
University of British Columbia
"FOR BETTER EDUCATION"
Use the Famous
SOUNDMIRROR"
Tape Recorder
Distributed in B. C. by
RADIO SALES SERVICE LTD.
780 Beatty St. MAr. 4435
fit
esting and representative number
of   exhibits   are   being   assembled
through the joint efforts of students and faculty.
The purpose of Open House i.s to
return thanks for thc interest and
support which the University has
received and is receiving from the
community   of   British   Columbia.
Open House will officially begin at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday,
March 5. Lectures have been cancelled as from 10:30 a.m. on that
duy. There will be a brief ceremony in the Armories at 11 o'clock,
at which the Premier of the Province and others of our guests will
be present,
From that time on throughout
the day all of us as members of
the University will be hosts to out-
friends who come to the campus.
I hope that everyone who can
possibly do so will be present in
the Armories and will see to it
that our guests are well looked
after.
I think all of us can be proud of
the progress this University has
made in the past 33 years and will
be glad to help communicate that
pride to those whose support ha.s
fostered our growth and strength.
Lost
BLACK PARKER 51 LOST ON SAT-
urday morning, February 26. Will
finder phone DE 1430R.
YOU'VE GOT MY MONEY, BLACK
morocco billfold and papers stolen
from machine shop February 22. If
you aren't a complete s.o.b. return
papers and wallet to Walt Tims, 4367
West 15th.
BROWN  WATERMANS  PEN,   FEB-
ruary 18. Phone KE 3849Y.
GOLD LOCKET AT SCIENCE BALL
Thursday   night.   Valuable   keepsake.
Reward. Phone N1185R.
STOLEN DARK GREY GABAR-
dine trenchcoat; basement cloakroom
physics building between 2:30-4:30
March 1. Please put back.
GOLD SET GARNET RING LOST
Saturday. Please phone KE 3126R.
Majoring in a Language?
Investigate   the   world-famous
LINGUAPHONE RECORDED
COURSES
B. C. Representative
1394  W.  59th  Ave.        KE.  2103R
ANNUAL ELECTIONS FOR PRES1-
dent and executive of the pre-med
society will be held Friday 12:30 in
app. sc. 100. A medical film will also
be shown. Everybody out.
(ME LIMITED
PLUMBING and HEATING
SUPPLIES
Wish Every Success
to
UNIVERSITY WEEK
S40 Beatty St.
MAr. 0511
COMPLIMENTS
oi
SHELL OIL COMPANY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIMITED
YOU CAN BE SURE OF SHELL Page 6
THE DAILY UpYSSEY
Thursday, March 3, 19|
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian Univerilty Presa
A uthorlxpd sw Second Class Mail. Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mall Subscriptions—$2.50 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
*p *f* *p
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and
not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
v v *fr
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF .... RON HAGGART
MANAGING EDITOR - . - - VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Laura Haahti; News Editor, Bob Cave and Novia Hebert;
Features Editor. Ray Baines; CUP Editor, Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall;
Sports Editor, Chuck Marshall; Women's Editor, Loni Francis.
Editors This Issue: LES ARMOUR, PETE HEPHER
Associate Editors: MICHAEL BLAGG. MICKEY FYNN
Attention - Youth At Work
It wasn't so very long ago that you were
standing at the back of your kid's "home
room" on "visitors' day" watching him. ambitiously coloring Easter eggs in his five-cent
scribbler . . . with far more* artistry than
anyone else in the room.
He's come a long way since then—but he's
doing just as well.
Now he has thousands of dollars worth of
scientific equipment to work with, half a million books at his disposal, and some .of .the
best brains in the world to teach him more
in one day than the whole world knew two
centuries ago.
On Saturday you will be standing at the
back of the room again, perhaps the same
room you yourself worked in a few decades
ago—and you're going to see a big change.
The first thing you will notice is the size.
The university, Canada's youngest, has grown
An Obvious Step
The problems and inadequacies of the
United Nations have been made indelibly
clear to UBC students in the past few days.
Monday the Ufiited Nations Model General
Assembly developed into the east-west deadlock so familiar in our daily headlines.
Tuesday, Elmore Philpott, nationally-read
newspaper columnist and one of Canada's
ioremost authorities on international affairs,
illustrated the situation admirably in likening
the present state of world anarchy to the
wild west of a century ago.
As he pointed out, as long as U. N. delegates
represent their governments and not directly
their peoples the present condition will prevail. It is also true that the present U. N.
serves as a "steam ;valve" and a means of
bringing international disputes out into the
open.
It is obvious that, at present, it is quite
impossible to change the system of representation in the U.N. Closely integrated
regional associations of nations must constitute Iho first step towards real world government. .     ,
out of its swaddling clothes in the last few
years so fast that it is now the second largest
in the Dominion,
Then, if it's a clear day, you'll notice the
view. If you've never been on the campus
before it's going to take your breath away
and you'll understand why it's famous all
over North America.
Then you'll meet the students. Rumors that
90 percent of the women in British Columbia
are beautiful and the other 10 percent come
to UBC have been officially denied by the
Women's Undergraduate Society. You be the
judge.  We think they are terrific.
There is really no need to apologize for the
Sciencemen, their contribution to society is
sufficient reason for their existence. |
We hope you'll enjoy yourself on this
"visitors' day" as much as that other one.
We know you'll be just as proud of your son.
The British Commonwealth, the Western
European Union, Pan-American Union and
the group of nations held together by the
Cominform are the nuclei of such associations.
These, of course, are themselves in various
stages of development.
The oldest and perhaps the most stable of
these is the British Commonwealth (now
often Called, simply, the Commonwealth).
Association within the Commonwealth is, of
course, informal and even haphazard.
As an example to the rest of the world it
might be wise to establish a Commonwealth
Parliament, elected directly by the peoples of
the Commonwealth rather than appointed by
the governments of the Commonwealth countries, which would decided matters affecting
the group as a whole.
Opposition to such a step would be loudly
voiced by those who still cling to the outmoded creed of nationalism. But, in the interests of eventual world government, the step
•is an obvious one.
letters to trie edito
Editor, Daily Ubyssey, Sir:
In reference to tho article on
page 'A of your February 4th issue under the heading of "Looking
Back," I wish it he known that my
personal integrity is above reproach. I object most .strongly to,
.and I quote, "John Kellman a fixture of the store is reported to have
doubled his take home pay.".
As a well known Commerce
student closely associated in the
used ear business, black market
iu nylons, bootlegging and sundry
other lucrative businesses, I feel
that double should be changed to
tripled or quadrupled. Otherwise
my associates,jn said businesses
will feel that I lost my touch.
Therefore I ask you to retract this
damning statement which casts
reflection-   upon   my   well   known
sharp   practices.
Yours Truly,
Honest   John   Kellman.
"11 you can't get it at a fair price
be sure and see I am sure
lo   be  able  to  get   it   for  you  and
triple the price."
UNCLE  B, LASHED
Editor,   Daily  Ubyssey,  Sir:
By now, most students will have
read, in The Daily Ubyssey (Tuesday, February 22) the attack on
I lie campus Civil Liberties Union:
an attack by one who, in his column professes to be someone's
uncle. Whatever the relationship,
(and I don't think it involves
either children or, uncles) tbe coin,
umn is an offensive one.
While it is true that the membership of the Civil Liberties Union is
nol large on paper, it is also true
that it can boast of hundreds of
supporters on the campus who, although they are not active themselves, show by their interest m
its meetings that they are iu sympathy with the CLU's jealous
guardianship of civil liberties.
As an active member of the CLU
I would like to ask all those who
sympathize with Ihis organization's
efforts, to crystallize that synv-
pathy into action by joining and
becoming active in the CLU, Activity in this club docs not conflict
Willi that of any oilier club on the
campus, for civil liberties are esteemed equally by all thinking
.J'coplcj,. The mo^t effective ..answer
to your cynical "Uncle" will be
to fill in a membership card at
the next CLU meeting.
Ed Nelson.
BEST SUCCESS
to
UNIVERSITY -WEEK
KEnnCTH ROSS
Piano Studios
570 GRANVILLE
PAc.2513
SUCCESS
TO
UNIVERSITY!
WEEK
COMPANY LIMITE
Sll West Pender St.
TAt. 151
Executaries and Trustees Thursday, March 3, 1949.
'fife DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 7
Library Main Concourse
Houses Many Exhibits
Weird and wonderful exhibits ranging from soap to national
costumes are on display in the main concourse of the Library
during Open House.
Among   the   most   interesting   ex <•>
hibits will be British Museum replicas
BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN, culturally speaking, will be
treat offered students and visitors Friday night by agile Peter
Efimoff whose program of Russian songs and dances presented
by the Slavonic Circle as part of University Week begins at
h p.m. in Brock Hall.
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Campus Representative
BERNARD BEESLEY
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of ancient coins, manuscripts, Greek
and Roman pottery, set up by the
C: assies department, and several
frames of stamps exhibited by UBC
Fhilatelic  Society,
Exhibit of foreign moneys frcm t'he
collections of Prof. Joseph Crumb,
:.nd graphs of practical uses of economics are to be sponsored by the
Economics department. The Commerce
faculty displays r»n organizational
chart depicting the Commerce graduate:,' place in business and industry.
Fasc'nai'ing and artistic camera studies done by UBC students are exhibited in the Camera Club salon,
lower main hall, while the Art centre
and gallery will give a current exhibition in the Library wing basement.
Research work in mathematics will
bo demonstrated with soap film, refraction and mechanical models, and
includes unsolved problems that have
been plaguing math wizards.
The language of early B. C, is
prominent in Spanish and French displays, illustrating Roman language
influences. B, C. books will be shown
in   the  history  section.
Life woiks of Gcei'ho and pictures
will bo arranged in a German department dis.Liy illustrating tho life of
thc great writer. A "UBC niche" will
contain books and these written by
UBC graduates.
Graph of the provincial cducai'icnal
system and the place in it of the UBC
education graduate, sociology maps
linking delinquency to divorce, and a
table display of Social Work project j,
pamphlets, photographs f,nd the placo
of the Social Worker in t'he community  will  be  set  up.
Anthropological museum is to set
up a display in basement wing of the
Library. Slavonic culture will be illustrated by costumes and books in
the Slavonic Studies and Slavonic
Circle displays.
THURSDAY AND
FRIDAY PAY DAY
FOR VETERANS
DVA cheques will be issued in
the Armories on Thursday, March
3 and Friday, March 4, from 9:31
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. thc UBC Veterans'
Bureau announced yesterday.
Veterans whose surnames begin
with the letters A to M will be paid
pn Thursday, those from N to Z
on Friday.
'COMPLIMENTS
of
UNIVERSITY
TRANSFER
4217 W. 13th
ALma 1005
A STORY OF INCREASED SERVICE
TO THE PEOPLE OF AN EXPANDING PROVINCE
Remarkable expansion of services is the post-war
story of both B.C.E. and U.B.C. The expansion of each is
designed to keep pace with current growth and to initiate
further growth of Canada's most enterprising province.
During Open House Week, visitors to the University
of British Columbia campus will see for themselves results of the vigorous building program that has been
undertaken since the end of the war. They will see evidence of the new and beneficial faculties, courses, and
services that have been added, and they will be shown
plans of new improvements that are planned.
In the same enterprising spirit, the B. C. Electric began work in 1945 on a ten-year program of expansion
and modernization of transit, gas and electric power
facilities. So vigorously has this program been developed
that most of the improvements will be completed by 1950,
five years ahead of schedule.
S.&Sfoc&ric
j Page |
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 3, 1949.
GLEE CLUB REHEARSAL THURS-
day, March 4 in HM1 at 12:30. Come
and add your voice to our song.
UBC   DANCE   CLUB   THURSDAY
.Oil   fi.
practice session 1:30-3:30 in HG4. No
noon hour instruction. Friday, square
dance, noon arid tea dance 3:30 Brock
lounge. Free.
torlum, presented by fine arts committee.
3:30 p.m.—Free tea dance presented
by UBC Dance Club.
6:30 p.m. Gym display in gymnasium by physical education department
and Pro-Rec.
8:00 p.m. Russian choir in Brock Hall,
Slavonic Circle.
Compliments of
SHANAHAN'S LIMITED
CHEMICALS
Sponsors Of
Shanahan's Limited Scholarship
Success To
UNIVERSITY WEEK
Northern Construction Co.
and
J. W. Stewart Ltd.
724 Vancouver Block
MAr. 4535
Vancouver, B.C.
What's On Today
Here is today's program for University Week, which ends Saturday with
Open House' invasion of campus by
an expected 20,000 visitors:
12:30-Social Problems Club presents Dr. Hawthorne in Applied Science 100.
8:00 ..p.m.-Mock Parliament in
Brock Hall, a full scale parody of
Canada's House of Commons.
7:30 p.m.—Inspection of Canadian
Officers Training Corps in Armories,
reception in Officers' Mess.
What's On Friday
12:30—Dr. Earle Birney, Dr. Roy
Daniels and Dorothy Livesay in audi-
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NEXT WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY at 8:30
Matinee Wednesday at 2:30
Margaret Webster's Shakespeare Co.
in
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Matinee: Wed., Wed. Evening, Thurs. Evening
"Miavo seen every major "Hamlet" staged In this country, and not
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"Under Margaret Webster's direction, "Macbeth" lias meafting and
clarity and cumulative force, and comes through vigorously as
theatre."—Louis Kronenberger,   New  York  PM.
SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS
On presentation of Student Registration Card, students will receive
a reduction of 25c from the %\M tickets, and 60c from anv other
ticket.   Box office in Kolly's Music Store, Seymour and Georgia Sts.
GENERAL   CONTRACTORS
ERNEST DANN LTD.
3285 Nanaimo St.
HA. 1944
Contractors for Extensive
PLASTERING AT U. B. C.
CONGRATULATIONS
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Compliments On
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Johnston National Storage Ltd.
MOVING
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STORAGE !rbiirsday, March 3, 1949.
THE. DAILY UBYSSEY.
Page 9
OUR
BEST WISHES
For A Successful
Cosmopolitan  Campus
(Continued From Page 1)
hand   knowledge  of  international
affairs.
In a model General Assembly
held this week by the United Nations Association the majority of
tlie 57 member countries were represented by nationals or former
nationals.
With 50 members already enrolled Ihe International Students Club
hopes to establish an international
house as a residence  for foreign
students.
Two members of next year's student council, Margaret Low-Feer
and Peter de Vooght are drawn
from the university international
community.
Frene Ginwala, who was defeated
in the race for Sophomore member
of council by only a handful of
votes is typical of the hundreds
of foreign students.
Born in South Africa, she went
to India in 1942. Owing to shipping
tie-ups caused by the war she re
mained in India until the cessation
of hostilities.
In 1946, Frene went to England
to study Chemical Engineering.
Owing to shortage of university
accommodation she was unable to
gain admission to a British University.
She had heard that UBC was one
of the few institutions which had
no objection to women engineers, L
and  applied  for  admission  here.
Her application was immediately!
accepted.
REAL   ESTATE
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MEMBER VANCOUVER REAL ESTATE BOARD
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VICTORIA, B. C.
The Hon. Frank Putnam.
February 21st, 1949.
Mr. Ron Haggart,
Editor-in-chief of
Publications Board,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, B. C. I
1;
Dear Mr. Haggart:
Thank you for the invitation to contribute to thc special edition of
"Tho Ubyssey" and I hope it will be an influence for good in the lives of our
thinking people,
'    >'.
Two weeks ago, speaking at- our Resources Conference, Dr. C. A.
Rowles, professor of soils at U.B.C, said, "Soil is basic to all other resources
and industries, it is the basis on which the welfare of the Province is built."
There wasn't any life on this old planet until there was food to sustain
:t and so long' as the earth yields her increase, there will be life—what is the
outlook?
Has civilization maintained in good tilth the land which it has brought
under cultivation? Vast areas of waste land, including the Sahara Desert, tell
a sorry story .of man's waste through ignorance and carelessness of his very
source of livelihood,
This Department welcomes any method of emphasizing the need for
soil conservation, and enlisting an army of intelligent agriculturists to fight
erosion, the arch enemy which is stealing our good farm land. It must be
stopped—or we starve.
It is not the purpose of this letter to go into details but to call attention
to the imperative need of an awakened public opinion to the necessity of
conserving the only source of their food supply—the soil of our farms.
Yours very truly,
FRANK PUTNAM,
Minister. *tm—
The Government
of the Province of British Columbia
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
The following are some of the activities of social and
educational significance under the administration of
this Department
1. University Educotion:
Financial support to the extent of over a million
dollars yearly.
2. The Public School System;
Elementary, secondary and rural education in
the public schools of the Province.
3. Correspondence Instruction;
For seven thousand students of all ages, from
six years to adulthood, who are unable to attend
regular schools.
4. Night School Instruction;
For thirteen thousand adult students in Night
Schools conducted by School Boards throughout
the Province.
5. Technical Education;
Courses in Industrial Arts, Navigation, Vocational Training, Supervisory Training for Industry,
Urban and Rural Training, Apprenticeship Training, Re-establishment Training.
6. Student Bursaries and Loons;
To students requiring financial assistance for
training in Universities, Normal Schools, Nursing
Schools, Technical and Vocational Schools, Art
Schools.
s.
I
/
The Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.
Minister of Education.
7. Handicapped Children;
Residential School for the wholly or partially
deaf and blind children, who could not secure an
education in the regular schools.
8. Guidance Services:
Educational and Vocational Guidance and Counselling provides to all students occupational information showing the many and varied opportunities in British Columbia.
9. School and Community Drama;
Advice and assistance to school and community
drama groups in providing worthwhile leisure
activiites.
10. Physical Education and Recreation;
The "Pro-Rec" provides a programme designed
to maintain and improve the physical fitness
of the people of the Province.
11. Visual Education;
A recently established agency to provide films
and other visual instructional aids for use in
school and community.
12. Education on the Air;
Radio programmes in music, history, geography,
current events designed for school listening.
F. T. Fairey, B.A., LL.D.
Deputy Minister of Education. The Daily Ubyssey
Second  Front Page
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B. C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1949.
No. 77
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS are on the road to bigger and better
stinks. Here they experiment with gasoline. Photo By Bob Steinei
'Foreign' Chairman
Heads Open House
Calgarian Currie Works Hard To
Uphold University's Reputation
A Calgarian who is proud of his association with B. C.'s
university is chairman of the University Open House Committee
Bob Currie.
Much of Currie's enthusiasm for
his job of showing UBC off to the
public comes as ;i result of trips
he made in 1947 to the ISS conference in Winnipeg and the NFCUS
in Toronto.
"I saw the great esteem in which
UE'C was held in other parts of
Canada," said Currie. "I feel we
should uphold that reputation and
get the same feeling towards the
university throughout the whole
of British Columbia."
ACTIVE CAREER
The 27-year-old fourth year Arts-
man has already had an active
career at the university.
Last year he was chairman of
the International Student Service
committee and vice-chairman of
the Undergraduate Societies Committee. He was also president of
Acadia Camp for two years.
Thi.s spring he broke campus precedent by running for election as
secretary of the Student Council,
a position which has always been
held by women. Tradition proved
too strong, however, and he was de
feated by Kay MacDonald.
"I feel this Open House is one of
the biggest things that ever happened to the university or myself,"
says Currie. But he is modest about
his part as head of the committee.
"I would like it well understood
that every member of the committee has done his or her utmost
for the success of Open House," he
stated.
CREDIT TO CURRIE
However, AMS President Dave
Brousson gave much of the credit
to Currie. "I can't give him enough
praise for the job he's been doing,"
said Brousson.
"Those who were here before me
tell me this will be the best organized and most successful Open
House ever. I think a great deal
of the credit should be given to
Currie."
"He has managed to bring together nil Ihe various elements
concerned with arranging the event
in a co-operative team," Brousson
concluded.
Mock Parliament Heads
Pre-Op
Guide Service
Prepared To
Aid Visitors
Visitors to UBC's Open House
on Saturday will find an efficient and accommodating guide
service ready to help them
nake the most of their day at
the university.
Backbone of the plan ia a force el
some St'O to 1000 volunteer student
guides prepared to sho.v the public
everything from the flag polo overlooking the Strait of Georgia to
the  re mc test barns.
Co-chairman of the guides subcommittee of the Open House Committee, Bill Haggert, describes the
service as "the most comprehensive
scheme of its kind ever undertaken
at UBC."
TWO CENTRES
Visitors arriving on the campus will
be directed to one of two centres—in
the Applied Science building and the
Armories—from which all tours will
start.
From these centres groups of visitors will be conducted by students
around the campus. Routes have been
designed to include all important
buildings and places of interest at
the university.
In addition, each building will be
staffed with a number of guides ready
to assist those who wish to see more
of the interior than may be possible
in the larger groups. Having seen all
he wants to in a particular building,
the visitor will be able to join another group and continue his trip
through the grounds.
en House Events
Saturday Lectures End Al 10:30
As University Opened To Public
All 10:30 and 11:30 lectures on Saturday will be cancelled
to allow students to view the start of the highlight of this
University Week's activities—UBC's Open House.
   —_— _ $   Apart   from   Saturday's   activities
many interesting events still  remain
Pro-Cons Call
For Tax Cuts,
Free Speech
University authorities and
leaders should encourage a
realistic approach to public affairs by allowing students to
lorm political groups on their
own campuses.
That was one of the resolutions
passed by members of the national
Progressive - Conservative Student
Federation at their annual conference, which ended last Sunday.
Sixty-nine student Progressive-
Conservative delegates from 13 Canadian   universities,   attended   the   an
to students today and tomorrow,
Today at 12:30 in Applied Science
100 Dr. Hawthorne, professor of anthropology, will speak under the auspices of the Social Problems Club.
MOCK PARLIAMENT
At 8:00 p.m. today the campus political clubs will hold their Mock Parliament in Brock Hall lounge.
COTC inspection will take place in
the Armories at 7:30 p.m.
At 12:30 tomorrow in the Auditorium   the   Fine   Arts   Committee   will
present Dr,  Earl E'irney,  Dr. Daniels
and Miss Dorothy Livesay.
TEA DANCE
Also tomorrow the newly formed
UBC Dance dub will present a tea
dance in Brock Hall, open to all
students. Program will include rrnim-
bas, sambas, tangos and other dances
besides the usual run of foxtrots.
Tomorrow evening at 6:30 the Physical Education Department will pre-
nual   conference,   held   this   year   at  sent a gym display in the gymnasium
McGil*. University. j
In a strongly worded resolution, the
student P.C.'s resolved that "as this
Federation believes in and stands for
the basic freedoms of a true democracy, freedom of speech, freedom
of association, freedom of the press
and freedom of worship, this Federation believes that these rights should
not be denied to university students."
Other resolution passed by the
student Conservatives called for:
The establishment of a Royal Commission to consider the matter of
Senate   reform;
A system of federal grants in aid
in the form of national scholarships,
designed   to   assist   young   Canadians
and at 8:00 p.m. in Brock Hall the
Slavonic Circle will present a Russian Choir.
tn overcoming handicaps created by
"financial or geographical" conditions;
Further assistance to provincial
governments in the financing of medical research on an extensive scale, in
Canadian universities of recognized
standing;
Increase in income tax exemptions
for dependent students from the present $300, up to an 51800 minimum exemption;
Repeal or reduction of present 15
percent federal tax on air, land and
sea  travel rates.
UBC Growth Brings Money Problem
Population of UBC has increased more
rapidly than that of the province of British
Columbia, according to statistics compiled
by Dr. Hurry V. Warren, professor of geology.
Dr. Warren's figures <;how that while
R. C.'s populat'un slightly more than doubled
between 1910 and 1948 that of the university
jumped from less than 400 students to 9,001)
in the .same period, an met ease of more
than  22  times  the  original   figure.
As a result there wa.s in 19-10 one student
far tveay 150 residents of thc province. This
compares with c ne for 550  in  1921.
The figure of 150 citizens per student compares favorably with that in other western
provinces. On the other hand it' is considerably higher than that of the United
Slates, which had (ii) people for each uni-
ursitv sludenl in 1947, and much lowi r
Ihaii that of Britain, which had one student
for every 720 people in the same year.
"""".'Mintlar TB the relntive-prowth of student
population to toial provincial population has
Ik. en that of the university lo the public and
high school  enrolment,
In  1921 there were 90 students in British
Columbia's lower schools for every one ai'
UBC. Today, however, there are less than
20 public school students for eevry university  undergraduate.
Tht phenomenal growth in the university's
population lias also affected its relation lo
t'he strength of the faculty.
Dr. Warren's charts show lhat, even omitting altogether tlie critical condition arising
during the last three years, when veteran
Si'udents swelled the studen body, the faculties at UBC have been carrying a steadily
increasing load.
Number of students per faculty member
has grown from 21 in 1927 to 27 in 1937 and
"15 in 1947. "Many universities," states Dr.
Warren, "insist on a student to faculty ratio
of 20 to one or less, and of students to total
staff of from 10 to one clown to seven to
one."
Number of UBC st'udents to total academic
,-taff, including assistants, in 1947 was one
to  13.
Ratio of students lo faculty members in
recent, years at, McGill, Columbia and Toronto universities was 25, 18 and 20 to one,
respectively,
Co-incident with the growth in the student
body has been ihe increased portion of the
university's cost coming from student fees,
and the decreasing portion made up of government grants.
Whereas in 1925 student fees comprised
only about one fifth of the total university
budget, in 1948 they made up more than
three  fifths.
The effect of this change ha.s been to condition university entrance more by financial
means and less by the student's ability, Dr,
Warren   points  out.
F.nal set of figures supplied by Dr, Warren
concerns the relation ol! the university's
budget i'o the student population, or, in
other words, the amount spent by the university per student.
In Lhe years following the establishment
( f llie- university this amount was considerable, running over $600 at times, During the
li)20's  it averaged  between $490 and $501),
However, between  1931 and 1945 the aver-
"age 'experfditure per- student dt'erppod" below
$400.  Since the war there has been a further
fall,   the   1948   figure   being   approximately
$300,
Is,   comparison,   Dr.   Warren   stales   that
"few. if any, first class universities attempt
today i'o educate their students for less than
S500   per   year."
This figure fails to take into account medical faculties, where they exist. The estimated cost of educating a medical student
for one year i.s $1,500, he states.
In discussing; the importance of his figures,
Dr. Warren notes that the present overcrowding is not merely due to the influx of
veterans in recent years, but has been increasingly evident since 1920.
So far the university has been able to
maintain its standards, largely because of
tlie magnificent job done by the faculty and
administration in the face of this condilon.
However, states Dr, Warren, in order to
continue to provide the services expected of
it the university must possess a revenue of
from five to six hundred dollars per student
per year.
Further difficulties are encountered in the
fact that, a.s yet. there are no substantial
endowments available at" UBC.
Therefore, the increased revenue necessary
if UBC is to maintain its pisiliun must come
either from bigger government grants or
from higher student fees, Page 12
THE DAILY U3YSSEY
Thursday, March 3, 1949.
'Build The Gym' To Come True
With Latest Government Grant
Campaign Started In 1946-47 Term
Will End In Opening Of Gymnasium
At last the slogan "Build The Gym" is coming true. When
the Provincial Legislature, passed an additional $200,000 grant
to the B. C. War Memorial, gym construction was assured and
present estimates are that the gym will be ready for use by the
fall of 1950.
Students started building their War<£-
Memorial   Gym   in   earnest   during
$-
the 1945-47 term.
Termed the "Hall of Heroes" the
$500,000 gym was to be built on the
corner of Wesbrook Crescent and
University Boulevard. Plans also
included a $10,000 expenditure for
landscaped playing fields stretching
from University Boulevard to Chancellor.
SKY CASTLES
In  the  first  year  of the campaign
most people thought the students were
looking  nt  castles  in  the  sky  when
' they  pledged  the collection of $100,-
0C0 for the Gym Fund.
Students proved them wrong. They
planned a "mile of quarters," kissing
sales, milk bottle funds and giant
public    campaigns    for    raising    the
needed thousands of dollars. Latest
statement of the Memorial Gym fund
shows that students have raised over
$289,000 by their own efforts to which
is added $136,000 subscribed by student campaigns among the public.
Estimated cost of building the memorial entrance lobby and making the
main gym serviceable has risen to
a little over $700,000.
TENDERS CALLED
"Arrangements are now being completed for calling of tenders," Dave
Brousson, AMS president has announced "and there is every possibility that the gym will be fiinshed
by September 1950."
First reference to the building of
a war memorial gym was made at a
Student Council meeting on Novem-
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CONGRATULATIONS
for
UNIVERSITY WEEK
ber 26, 1945.
The  motion  read  as follows:
"That the War Memorial for the
students of the university who served
in the second great war be a modern
gymnasium complete with swimming
pool and other facilities."
This motion was later changed to
read, ". . . for the men and women of
British Columbia who served."
Instigators of the campaign were
AMS president Allan Ainsworth and
Treasurer Garry Miller who were in
office during 1945-46 along with Bob
Bonner, Betty ©uckland, Mardie Dun-
das, Frank Turrier and Art Sager who
burned the midnight' oil in the Publications Board on January 30, 1946
preparing the first press release. Public support rallied behind the campaign and many of the province's
businessmen made contributions.
BEHIND CAMPAIGN
Student- administrations over the
years have been behind the campaign
with full force. UBC Alumni Association and faculty have put their
whole weight bebind the campaign
from its start.
Much of the credit is due the man
who originally moved the building of
the War Memorial Gym, Ole Bakken,
present graduate manager of athletics, along with the seconder of the
motion Miss Norton, '45-46 WAA re-
preservative on Counr.l
METALLURGY MICROSCOPE is pride of student geologists.
Metals and alloys are readily distinguishable under its powerful gaze. Photo By Bob Stetnej
We have cap, gown
and hood
Studfo
for your
GRADUATION
PORTRAIT
4538 West 10th
AL. 2404
(Opp. Safeway at Sasamat)
Wishing A Very Successful
UNIVERSITY WEEK
To The University Of British Columbia
R. E. JOHNSTON
COMPANY LIMITED
HEATING and  PLUMBING
EQUIPMENT
1070 Homer St.
MAr. 8454
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, March 3, 1949.
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 13
A Forthright Student Speaks Out
We're Scuttling Our Architects
UBC students ore thinking.    He
prepared for the campus magazi
ByR.G.LECKIE
In the world today, the buildings in which we live,
work, worship and play are the most conspicuous
man made elements in our environment. In view of
this strong influence of architecture, what is to be our
attitude towards the work of the men and women
of that profession?
The university student of today must realize the
responsibility he assumes when he becomes the city
dweller tomorrow. To many of us will fall ihe task
of choosing the design of our public and private
buildings. Other men and women will have to decide
on the most suitable design for their own home.
Will we be willing to accept contemporary design,
which is the only truthful way in which the modern
architect can express himself?
In contemporary design, the architect attempts to
express the physical, social and economic needs of
contemporary people and t'o satisfy their aesthetic
needs in relation to their philosophy of living and in
relation to their natural surroundings. Many people,
however, are unwilling to accept contemporary design
and demand of the architect that he retain in his
design certain characteristics of the architecture of
the past. When the architect is thus forced to deviate
from his original interpretation, his design becomes
a false expression of the needs of contemporary people.
re's a challenging article by a third year arts student
ne of creative writing, The UBC Thunderbird.
Campus Out Of Tune
We have only to look around us today to see how
often this demand for a reproduction of the past has
manifested itself. When we stand on our campus today, can we honestly see a relation between our outlook on life as twentieth century si'udents and the
buildings in which we work? Can we relate the bold
moving sweep of color, line and mass which naturally
surrounds us to the tired Gothic facades of our principle buildings.
To many students, the fact that there is no relation
suggests no great wrong. Indeed, one student expressed himself as follows, "This is the most beautiful
situation for a campus in all the world. If they could
just construct duplicates here of all the buildings at
Cambridge, the whole effect would be perfect."
Original  Gothic  architecture,  which  arose  out  of
the religious fervor of the middle ages is probably
the most perfect expression in stone of any generation's attitude towards life. The original parts of the
Gothic cathedrals which stand in Europe today serve
as an example of what can be accomplished when
the architect' and his fellow men are united in feeling.
Had some of the spirit and feeling which characterized the opening years of this university been allowed
to come into play upon the architectural aspect's of
the new seat of learning, who can say what might
have arisen on this magnificent site?
Love Of Post Fading
When we turn towards our city what do we find?
Tlie beauty of its natural setting seems to emphasize
every architectural wrong we have committed. We
have debased every one of the great styles of architecture in a futile attempt to bring them alive again
in an age completely alien to them. There is however
a refreshing sign of change. As more and more people
realize the great city we owe ourselves, the architects
are finding freedom of expression possible. The
danger of our failure to produce the city we should,
lies in the minds of those who think size alone will
make us great. One hears too often "Vancouver will
soon be bigger than Montreal," or "Just wait a few
years and we'll have more people here than Toronto
and Winnipeg put together." Surely the development
of one of our city blocks to nerfection would make us
greater than the addition of thousands of people.
With regard to their individual home, men and
women are showing an increasing willingness to work
with the architect in solving the problem of relating
their home to their peculiar needs. In the furnishing
of these homes however we see some peculiar tendencies. Young women who scoff at every aspect of
their Victorian counterparts' outlook on life and who
pride themselves on their earnest modern philosophy,
fill their contemporary homes with Victorian divans
and knicknacks. Then again there are many people
Who agree Vo the most functional design for the interior of their homes but insist that the architect
give them a Colonial or a Tudor exterior. This is like
asking that the engineering wonders of the Queen
Elizabeth be placed in the type of hull which served
the Mayflower.   Period furniture and traditional de
sign have great beauty, but like Gothic architecture
they should stand as examples. If we go on demanding period furniture the full creative powers of our
contemporary designers will never be brought in'.o
action.
Architects Without Honor
Strangely enough successful contemporary design
seems to appeal to many Canadians from a distance.
When it is produced in Brazil or Sweden it is greatly
admired, but the thought of similar structures arising
in Canada seems to worry many people. What' is the
reason for this reluctance to strike out boldly? One
answer given is that in clinging to the copies of past
works people feel a security against the troubles and
difficulties which beset them in the present day.
Surely this is a shallow reason.
On our campus today a group of men and women,
born with creative ability, are subjecting themselves
to the most rigorous education in order that they
may serve the community of tomorrow. A sad disillusionment' awaits these architects if our desire for
a false security or our preconceived idea of design
frustrates them in their attempts to fill our need
for order and beauty.
The architects have a solemn duty t'o perform in
leading us towards the very fullest enjoyment of
daily living. Let us make sure we stand behind
them.
Clair deLune
What stirs in the shadow, mother, down the hill?
Only the wind in the bushes, child, peace, be still.
Who is it crosses i'he river, mother, all in white?
Only a herd of cows, child, in the moonlight.
What is it rings a bell, mother, rings so low?
Only the old white cow, child, stepping slow,
But what reaches up to the window, mother, touching
my hand?
0 Christ!   Come  back—'tis  the Unclean,  child,  the
leper band!
—Godfrey Heam
COTC Inducts Cadets
At Ceremonies Tonight
UBC's unit of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps will
be inspected at 7:30 tonight in the Armories.
— ®   About 80 present members will par-
President Speaks *d'' with"" '5"" """"b<™ wh0
Hams Span Nation
With FM Apparatus
Ham radio club has spanned the
continent to bring together two old
friends at UBC and University of
New Brunswick.
By means of new FM equipment,
the hams made it possible for President MacKenzie to speak to President
A. W. Trueman of UNB.
The amateurs will be on duty all
day during Open House to demonstrate the equipment that makes such
contacts possible.
Most of the equipment now in use
was loaned to the club by members
and friends following the disatrous
Home Ec huts' blaze which complete-
are to be inducted.
Taking the inspection is Brig. M.
P. Bogart, DSO, OBE, Commander of
the B.C. Area for the Canadian Army.
With him on the reviewing stand
will be Col. the Hon. E. W. Hamber,
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, Brig. J. W.
Rockingham, Brig. W. C. Murphy,
Comm. W. R. Stacey, RCNR, Lt. Col.
R. F. Webb, Lt. Comm. F. Turner,
Sqdrn. Ldr. A. R. Haines, Lt. Col. G.
M. Shrum, Lt. Col. R. B. MacDougall.
After the parade, there will be a
reception  for  guests  in  the  Officers'
Mess,
letters to the editor
ly wiped out all possessions of the ham
club.
The short wave enthusiasts also hope
to have a number of "walkie-talkie'1
type transceivers at various points on
the campus during Open House Day.
'BABY PARKING' SERVICE
WILL HANDLE YOUR CHILD
UBC's student nurses will operate a "baby parking"
service on Open House day, Saturday.
The playroom, supervised by registered nurses, will
be located in Hut B6, south of the bus stop.
Parents may spend a thrill-packed clay while their offspring entertain themselves.
The children will have toys at their disposal and milk
will be provided.
the nursery is to be open from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m.
and all clay "checking" is invited.
Editor,  Daily  Ubyssey, Sir:
First of all, I would like to
thank Mr. J. V. Macdonald for enlightening us so well with regard
to the "Palestine Situation." There
are however, a few points that I
feel are not expressed clearly enough by Mr. Macdonald, and which
I would like to enlarge on.
Clearly, Mr. Macdonald is confused over the phrase: "anti-semitism." He claims that the Arabs are
more Semitic than the Jews, and
that since he is for the Arabs, he
should be called "pro-semite." Far
be it for me, at this point to say
what I think Mr. Macdonald should
be called . . . but as long as it will
satisfy him, I shall no longer consider him as being "anti-semitic,"
but  instead  , .  . "anti-Jewish."
Another point that Mr. Macdonald twists around with amazing
dexterity, is "that the Jews from
Europe are being driven to Palestine by the political Zionists" in
order that they may work for the
"Big Business." It is not a new
story or an invented fantasy that
the Jews in Europe were bitterly
persecuted: crematoria, gas chambers, cattle cars, starvation; there
is proof of all this, proof in the
form of huge, grass-covered
mounds of earth with simply worded signs: "Here Lies Buried 5,000
Bodies." Newsreels show the photographs of the starved bodies, piled
like cordwood . . , people who were
murdered because they were Jews
. . . homeless, wandering, nobodies.
The poor few that remained alive
could not return to the ground
where their mother, father, or
children were persecuted, starved,
buried . . .These "D.P.'s" as thoy
were  labelled, sought to emigrate
• to any country that would accept
them as human beings. But all
doors were closed to them, so they
turned to the land of their fathers:
Israel.
farming. Is this "being driven?"
Has this suffering any remote connection with "Big Business?" The
money that American Jews have
contributed to "their own deception," as Mr. Macdonald so sweetly
puts it, went towards the buying
of land for the Jewish settlers.
They drained swamps, cultivated
deserts, even made the arid salt
soil of the Dead Sea bear crops.
The Jews have developed land
where not even an animal or insect
could live. Is this contributing towards Big  Business?
Incidentally—tfhe Big Business
referred to by Mr. Macdonald, is
The industry of the Dead Sea. Palestine Potash, Ltd. and Palestine
Economic Corp. which is run not by
"leading American financers" but
mostly by the Histadrut, the organization of co-operatives made
up solely of citizens of ihe state of
Israel. Indeed, if there is such a
vast wealth in the Dead Sea why
didn't the British develop it when
they had Palestine as a Mandate?
Why didn't the industrious Arab
nation develop it, they have been
living there for 1300 years?
In closing I would like to ask
in  all  sincerity;
"Is Mr. Macdonald a Christian?"
"Is he a democratically minded
man who examines all sides of a
question before announcing his
convictions?" If so, then I fail absolutely to see the connection (in
view of the previously mentioned
facts*,   between   the   spiritual   and
moral ties of tlie Jews towards
Palestine—Zionism—and communism or fascism—as stated by Mr.
Macdonald.
Most Sincerely,
Thelma Barer.
1st' Year.
OPEN HOUSE
Editor, Daily Ubyssey, Dear Sir:
The university, including the administration, the faculties, and the
Alma Mater Society, have urn •
barked on the most ambitious p,o-i
gram of Open House ever attempted at UBC.
Every effort is being made to
exemplify for the public our slogan "A Progressive University
Serving a Progressive British Columbia." Months of planning by
hundreds of people have gone into
this project, under the capable
chairmanship of Bob Currie, and
I, urge, all njembers of the Alma
Mater Society' to do everything
they can to assist on Open House
Day, March 5th.
Remember    "Every
host." Tuum Est.
student    a
Yours   Sincerely,
Alma   Mater   Society,
David  M,  Brousson,
President.
CONFUSED
Editor, Daily Ubyssey, Dear Sir:
Can you explain a deep mystery?
Tired and confused from a hard
da's study, I wandered down to tin-
basement of the libraiy for a moments relief from the strain. Tlie
usual pictures were there, bul
some one had erased the poems
and made off with the fixtures.
What is behind all this?
Dazed  Engineer. Page 14
THE DAILY UpYSSEY
Thursday, March 3, 1949.
COACH AL LAITHWAITE gives final brush-up instructions to Eric Cardinall and Bill Dunbar,
two veteran players, who need little urging in a rugby game. The two stalwarts will be in
their regular positions when the Thunderbirds tackle Victoria Crimson Tide at the Stadium
Saturday afternoon.  Game time is 2:30.
'Birds End Long Rest By Dick Blockberger
Rugger Underway As
Crimson Vide Invade
'Bird Basketballers
Tangle With 'Leafs
Tonight in the UBC Gymnasium, Vancouver Cloverleafs
and UBC Thunderbirds will play an exhibition game starting
at 8:30.
This game has been long awaited by all fans who follow
basketball in the city, for it will be the logical conclusion to the
controversy as to which team is the best in Vancouver. Last
year the 'Birds edged out the Dominion champions and were
therefore chosen for the Canadian Olympic representatives.
Campus rugger fans will get a
chance to see their undefeated English rugger squad in action at tho
Stadium, Saturday, when the Blue
and Gold aggregation takes on the
Victoria Crimson Tide at 2:30 .
OLD FEUD
The game will see tlie renewal of
the   age-old   feud   between   the   two
bitter   antagonists.   Last   year,   in   a
match   played   at   the   Island   City,
the Tide proved to be anything but
gentlemanly foes, and in the process
of playing dirty, handed the Thunderbirds their first defeat in two years.
The   'Birds   aren't   quick   to   forget,
however, and the return match played
in the stadium saw the Islanders virtually  brought to  a standstill while
the campus aggregation scored almost
at will.
In the preceding contest held Boxing Day, the thundering Thunderbirds again proved that the Tide was
on their blacklist. Playing inspired
ball, the campus ruggermen scored
a convincing 22-0 victory on their opponents'  home  grounds.
CONVINCING RECORD
In   10 Miller  and  McKechnie  Cup
tilts that have been played this season, the 'Buds have racked up a convincing 131 points over their opponents, while only having nine markers
scored against them. Tlie Thunderbird
line has not been crossed once this
season,  all  nine  of  their  opponents'
points   having   been   scored   via   the
penalty kick route. The great majority  of  the Thunderbird games have
seen the 'Birds on the right end of
a goose-egg score.
TOP SHAPE
The Thunderbird roster will be at
full strength, with the team in good
shape despite recent snows, Coach
Laithwaite has been holding frequent
indoor practices, and the system has
paid off. The campus fifteen has retained their fine point of training,
and should experience little difficulties in that line.
Among the experienced veterans
playing Saturday will be Bill Dunbar, reliable back, and Hilary Wotherspoon, whose gifted toe scored many
-of the Thunderbird points in the last
contest.
Dougie Reid of American football
fame will also be playing for the
campus team.
COMPLIMENTS
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BALL PENS
, The jacket is anodyzed
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Western Representative
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<»»«. .^^^j^..,.,..^^.. - Thursday, March 3, 1949.
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 15
UBC Plays Alberta U.
Sports Editor: FRED MOONEN
„rt»«(tiwMWw
ORDERLY CONFUSION is evidenced in the above picture of
the University Gym Club in one of its famous pyramids. The
club is best known to the public and students because of its
conference   basketball  games   this
Ubyssey Photo By Denny Wallei
half-time  performances   at
year.
Gym Club  Show Stunts
To Open House Audience
UBC's talented Gym Club performers will be in action
again this Friday, March 4, when they compete against Physical
Education students in the Gym at 6:30 as a regular part of the
annual Open House festivities.<?
Up to this point, the hard-working
gym club has done mostly display
work, helping out during intermission
of basketball games on the campus,
together with a few members of the
Physical Eds.
TALENT
was completed recently where the
club put on an exhibition with Pro-
Roc for the benefit of High School
students in the district proved successful,
The thirty members which include
twelve girls, although heard from very
Issue Challenge 1
Through Bakken
UBC's Senior B puck stars
are dickering for a two-game
total-point series with the University of Alberta to mark the
first time a student squad has
entered in competition with
any prairie hockey club.
Tlie Albertans, currently in charge
of the Western-Canadian inter-collegiate puck title, will fly to the coast
in  the  near  future to battle  Frank
Frederickson's   subjects,    providing
challenge is accepted.
CHALLENGE
Through graduate manager of athletics Ole Bakken, the UE'C contingent issued their intentions to the
prairie sextet Tuesday.
If accepted, the series will likely
take stand in Vancouver's Forum during the absence of that city's professional Canuck squad.
Slightly deflated after having defaulted Senior B playoff series with
the Nanaimo Clippers, Frederickson's
charges are all enthused over the
whole deal, officials say, Albertans
will be no pushover, however, having
already racked up Western Canadian
championship over thc defending
University of Manitoba crew,
WIDE AWAKE
During their recent lay-off from
the ice rink, the Blue and Gold
aspirants have been wide awake in
planning   future   exhibition   contests.
The team is currently dickering to
bring thc Whitchorse Merchants to
the lower mainland for a one-game
stand, next Wednesday night. The
game is dependent, however, on how
the prospective visitors fare against
Nanaimo   Clippers   in   the   Coy   Cup
The Yukoners appear to be a fairly
playoffs.
popular contingent. Team is planning
a pair of exhibition tilts with Okanagan aggregations, and is completing arrangements for matches with
both  Kemloops  and  Kelowna.
Bids will be accepted providing the
Northmen are eliminated by Nanaimo
during cup play on the Island.
NOTICE
There will be a track meeting in
Hut L2 at noon on Friday. Will all
sprinters make a special effort to be
present.
■*"
Now they will come into their own  seld°™ are doing a fine job a"nd should
to show the university what kind
of talent they have to show and how
good they can show it,
Although the club gets little recognition on the campus, they do not
seem to feel that it is necessary since
the main purpose of the organization
it to help the individual to build up
his body.
Inactive interest is taken in the
sport by most spectators of recent
hoop contests in the gym. Displays
of the powress of club members on
the parallel bars and the high bar
have created interest to watchers on
the sidelines but even they don't
realize the practice that goes into
the stunts.
CHAMPIONSHIPS
All the practice which club members receive from their half-time performances come in handy for the B.C.
Championships which get under way
on Saturday, April 2,
Sponsored by the Varsity gymnastic organization, the purpose of the
match is to encourage and facilitate
gymnastics in British Columbia,
Under the leadership of president
Al McMartin and the able coaching
of Doug Whittle and coach Hislop
of the Engineering Department, the
group has indeed helped to put across
the idea to the youth of B.C. of the
importance of body-building.
EXHIBITION
Annual   trip   to   Cloverdale   which
be given praise from the entire university,
NOTICE
All Open House guides arc requested to meet in thc Auditorium today
at noon (or briefing.
Our Employment
Department Needs You!
Individual Instruction permits enrolment at any time..
Unprecedented demands for our graduates—train now!
Night Classes Mondays and Thursdays, 7 to 9:30 p.m.
SPROTT-SHAW SCHOOLS
OF BUSINESS
Head Office: 812 Robson St.      Phones: MA. 3038, 3023
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There is an old.ifying that history repeats itsetf'and in the 1949
versioh of the "Thunderbird" rugger fifteen, history is doing just
that. It is just over a decade since
Major Dobbie produced his great
"Wonder Team," and now, eleven
years later, Albert Laithwaite has
again produced a Varsity rugby
15 worthy of this unique appellation.
This year's "Wonder Team" have
tun up the amazing total of 131
points "for," with but nine points
"against" in play to date. 109 of
these points were garnered in tho
the January jaunt to Victoria when
and the other 22 were collected on
pre-Christmas , Miller Cup series.
The Birds whitewashed the vaunted
Crimson Tide to the tune of 22-0.
They have yet to taste defeat and
they have yet to see their line
crossed by an opposing player.
Wonder Team
Shades of the past indeed, for in
place of Howie McPhee, Joe Roberts, Johnny Bird, Stratt Leggett,
Bob Cross and a dozen others who
made up the first Varsity "Wonder
Team" a dazzling new crop of
"wonder players" have come along
Today it is Stan Clarke, Hilary
Wotherspoon, Les Hemshall, Alex Carlyle, Hartt Crosby and half
a score more who go to make up
perhaps the finest rugger fifteen
the campus has ever seen.
In the next few weeks through
this column you will be introduced
to all members of the new "Wonder
Team." First, meet Alex Carlyle
who is the driving captain of this
year's team. Alex is a former
Byng and Vancouver Rep player
who is presently holding down the
"hook" position in the front row
of the scrum.
Any Position
He is a coach's dream not only
because of his speed and hard
tackling, but because he can play
almost any position in the scrum
and can even make his weight felt
in the backfield. Alex was recently
married but even that has not
detracted from his abilities on the
rugger pitch.
Vice-captain of the new "Wonder
Team" is Big Bill Dunbar. A Commerce man, Bill's assets are limitless as far as the rugby balance
sheet is concerned. He is a sure
tackier and his long kicks to touch
in the classic Wallaby game last
year were typical of his talents in
this department. The sum total of
Bill's abilities rate him as the best
fullback Varsity has seen since
Johnny Bird booted his way into
the hearts of Varsity fans back in
1937.
Educated Toe
And while we are talking about
''booting" a ball, meet "Mr. Boot"
himself. In case you haven't guessed, his name is Hilary Wotherspoon.
"Spoon" as he is known to his
teammates is presently  displaying
the most educated toe seen in Vancouver rugby circles since the celebrated Maori player, Nepia, barefooted them through the uprights
from fifty yards out for the visiting New Zealand "All-Blacks"
away back in 1927.
"Spoon's" talents are not confined to kicking alone. His speed
and footwork mark him as a real
triple threat man for any opposing
team.
This Saturday the 'Birds make
their McKechnie debut against Victoria Crimson Tide in which promises to be one of the best games
of the year. A large "Open House"
crowd is anticipated to see the new
"Wonder Team"   in   action.
Totem Sports Editor
Gives Reasons, Excuses
By FRED MOONEN
Marshall packed his grip, clutched his bottle and took off for the
University of Washington, to edit
the sports' sheet of that school's
daily newspaper. It's just for one
issue, but before he left he lured
me out of the cubbyhole of the
Totem office and said, "Fred, take
over the sports' desk for tomorrow
and Thursday, write a column, and
have fun."
Magnanimously, 1 said okay,
turned complacently back to the
Totem office and was about" to continue my nap, when Marshall gave
me the big chop, "Thursday is
Open House edition—only 16 pages
and you've got three." I swore, I
ranted and I raved, but I had given
my word to help out, so I hurried
down to the print shop, and asked
them to put all the ads on pages
14, 15 and 16.
The above is a concise reason
for the three sport pages' being as
they are.
Getting   on   to   the   purpose   of
Open House, it's easy to see that
the Province as a whole, and the
people of the city of Vancouver in
particular, have a right to see what
goes on behind the covers of all
those notebooks they see on the
streetcars heading east on Tenth
Avenue.
In their travels around the campus, the expected horde of 20,000
people will evince some interest
in the athletic side of our education. It might be an idea to show
them that we have that facet of
life on the campus. It shouldn't
be left to the fifteen men on the
stadium field to show that UBC
has a rugger team.
The stands should be full of students who, by being there, will
show their interest in, and knowledge of,  UBC's Thunderbirds.
Tonight, at the gym, you'll be
able to see the best basketball in
Canada—intercollegiate champs vs
Dominion senior, champs, and on
Saturday in the stadium, probably
the best rugger team in North America will swing into action—a
team Which holds the World Cup,
McKechnie Cup and has had but
nine points scored against it this
season,
Page 16
Thursday, March „, 1949.
THE DAILY'UBYSSEY
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The University of British Columbia
from
The Home Of
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
MOTORCYCLES
Western Canada's
Motorcycle Headquarters
FRED
DEELEY
LIMITED
901 W. Broadway
BAy. 3544 The Government
of the Province of British Columbia
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
The following are some of the activities of social and
educational significance under the administration of
this Department
~»
1. University Education:
Financial support to tho extent of over a million
dollars yearly.
2. The Public School System:
Elementary,   secondary   and   rural   education   in
the public schools of the Province.
3. Correspondence Instruction:
For seven  thousand  students of  all ages,  from
six years to adulthood, who are unable to attend
regular schools,
4. Night School Instruction:
For thirteen  thousand  adult  students  in  Night
Schools conducted by School Boards throughout
the Province.
5. Technical Education:
Courses in Industrial Arts, Navigation, Vocational Training, Supervisory Training for Industry,
Urban and Rural Training, Apprenticeship Training, Re-establishment Training.
6. Student Bursaries and Loans:
To   students   requiring   financial   assistance   for
training in Universities, Normal Schools, Nursing
Schools, Technical  and   W'utional  Schools, Art
Schools.
The Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.
Minister of Education.
7. Handicapped Children:
Residential  School  for   the   wholly   or  partially
deaf and blind children, who could not secure an
education in the regular schools.
8. Guidance Services:
Educational and Vocational Guidance and Counselling provides  to all students occupational information showing the many and  varied  opportunities in British Columbia.
9. School and Community Drama:
Advice and assistance to school and community
drama  groups   in   providing   worthwhile   leisure
activiites.
10. Physical Education and Recreation:
The "Pro-Rec" provides a programme designed
to  maintain  and   improve   the   physical  fitness
of the people of the Province.
11. Visual Education:
A recently established agency  to provide films
and  other  visual  instructional  aids  for  use  in
school and community.
12. Education on the Air:
Radio programmes in music, history, geography,
current events designed for school listening,
F. T. Foirey, B.A., LL.D.
Deputy Minister of Education.

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