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The Daily Ubyssey Jan 20, 1949

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 The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1919
No. 51
Stc't/ejii-Co/mcr Photo
KAY WOODIIEAI)
. . . alpha phi
BOOK EXCHANGE
PAYS OFF TILL
FEBRUARY 15
Students who have hooks or money
coining from the hook exchange may
collect them at thc AMS office now.
Those who do not pick up tlUBlr
hooks cr monies by February 15th
will forfict it.
Stefjens-Cohnei  Photo
SHIRLEY  SELMAN
.   .   .   alpha   gamma   delta
Crosby's Sister
And Maybe Crosby
Coming To Campus
Sydney Foster, noted American
concert pianist, who is to play with
thi Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
Sunday, will give a concert sponsored
hy the L.S.E. in the Auditorium at
noon   on   Friday.
Mr. Foster has given seven completely sold-out concerts in Carnegie
Hall and has completed five transcontinental tout's during which he
hi'' been ioloist with the 12 top
symphony orchestras of the North
American continent. His most recent
successes have been with the New
York and Chicago Symphonies.
Roger Pedersen, L.S.E. prexy, informs us that there will bo a 25-cent
charge   for   this   concert'.    The   pro-
I icods will be applied to feature Bing
C osby's sister, Florence George, who
1 will sing in the Auditorium on Febry-
.  y 17. subject to Council appoval.
Derek Inman, Vancouve Symrphony
manager, says that it is highly likely
that Bing will accompany his sister
during her visit to  Vancouver.
Speculation Prominent As AMS
Election   Dates   Draw   N
ear
BIOLOGY, BIVOUACS MEAN
BLESSED UNIONS AT BAY
SEATTLE, Jan. 20—High birth rate in student-veteran
families at the University of Washington poses a problem
for campus housing authorities.
"It seems that a couple no sooner gets into a small
housing unit than it is time to start looking for a bigger
place," officials here complain.
The complications have arisen at the Union Bay Village, a university run project for the students.
ft
Graduating Class Elect
Executive In Aud Today
The Class of '49 will elect its representatives today at a
mass meeting of the class to be held in the Auditorium at
12:30 p.m.
Addmglon Photo
BETH MCEACHERN
. . . alpha delta pi
Daily  Uhyswi  Photo
BETTE RUSSELL
. . . kuppii kappa gamma
Tween Classes
Forum Debate
Set For Today
The Parliamentary Forum
will hold a debate in Arts 1,00
at 12:30 p.m. today.
, Subject of the debate will
be "Resolved that coalition
government is in the best interests of B.C."
The speakers will bc Howard Day
rind  Frank   Lewis.
This debate, originally scheduled for
'as! Thursday wa.s postponed because
nf Pivmiei Byron Johnson's appearance  on   the  campus.
if. if.* if.
The tea which was to be held tomorrow for out-of-town girls on the
campus has been indefinitely postponed.
Dean Mawdsley, who was in charge
of the arrangements, stated that further arrangements will be announced
later.
if, if,        if,
Phrateres is collecting old spectacles
for Sir Charles Tupper I.O.D.E. chapter. The metal from the glasses is
melted down and sold, the. money
being used for various service activities and the two scholarships sponsored by thc I.O.D.E.
Classes   may   be   deposited   in   the
containers around the campus.
if, if, if.
There will be an architectural display at the Vancouver Art Gallery,
.'.taiting January 24th which will include a scale and model of the Gymnasium. Details from Prof. Larsere of
the   Department.
Mardi Gras Raffle
Tickets Come In
Mardi Gras raffle tickets must'be
turned in today.
Mardi Gras officials announced today that if raffle tickets are to bc in
the draw they must be ruined in at
Mr.rdi Gras committee room as early
a.s possible today.
This year's Mardi Gras prizes are:
Kirks Clothes, Cashmere sweater: R.
H, Marlow Photo Service, S25 certificate; Tweed Shop, skirt length certificate; Graham and Vick Ltd.. man's
scarf; The London Shop, man's sweater; Jermaine's. $25 certificate; Marty's
sweater; Madame Runge, evening
dress; Hudson's Bay Co., S10 certificate; Famous Players, theatre tickets;
Odecn Theatres, theatre tickets: Coca
Cola Co., two cases of coke; Saba Bros.
Li*d., lady's 'suit: W. and J. Wilson,
lady's plaid slacks; Calhoun's Ltd.. Silt
certificate; Henry Birks and Sons Ltd.,
lady's watch; Pacific Meat, ham; Vancouver Stationers, desk mm: Welch's
Chocolates. chocolates; Ing'edevv's,
SI 2.50 certificate; Dean's Chocolates
iTeeolaies; Western Mieic, record album; Thomson and Page. Victor record album; Firbanks Ltd.. silver
cocktail shaker; Edward Chapman
Ltd., lady's pullover sweater: Rose
Marie Reid, lady's bathing suit: Tooke
Shirts (Roy C. Sims'), two Tooke sport
shirts; Jantzen, lady's and man's bathing suit or sweater: O. B Allan, sterling sail' and popper set: Army and
Navy, shaving kit; Sweet Sixteen,
lady's suit; Plants, $5 certificate;
Famous, lady's house coat; Globe
Ladies' Wear, $5 certificate; Palomar
Supper Club, four tickets; Roselawn
Florist, corsage; Vern's Togs, man's
bathrobe; Henri's Charcoal Grill, four
dinners; Columbia Record Shop, record album: Potter's Ltd., lady's compact; Campus Flower Shop, corsage;
Franklyn Floral, orchid corsage; Wilson's Hosiery, nylons (one pair>; R. J.
Pop, squirrel cape; Suzette':-:. lady's
sweater; Eatons, $20 certificate: Hilker
Attractions, two tickets; Dorothy
Fletcher, wool dress; Woodward's Ltd..
afternoon dress; Betty's, dress; Cave
Cabaret, four tickets; Madame Hilary;
Edith A. Carrothcrs, blouse: Western
Music,   two   tickets   to  Tex   Beneke.
This is the first assembly of the
class held this year. It i.s being held
to elect a representative for the class
of   '49.
Chick Turner, social co-ordinator.
said that it was imperative that all
hopeful graduates should be present
at  the meeting,
The  executive elected  at   the  mce'-
ing will formulate the activities of the,
graduating    class   for    the    next    few
months.
Engineers are asking all their members to turn out in full force at the
meeting to revive t'he tradition of a
redshirt   graduating  president
Canteen Carries
Legion Finances
Branch 72. Canadian Legion, is receiving little financial support from
student  veterans at UBC.
Figures presented to yesterday's
Branch meeting showed membership
ie, eipts for the period October 1 to
November III), li)48 ai $175, This compared wilh $1511(1 for Ihe corresponding  period in  1947.
The stalement of thc Legion Can-
liin fund showed a sizeable profit,
however.
"Il is obvious thai the canteen is
carrying the Brunch financially," said
Treasurer Ed Sugars after prescnl-
•ing his report. Similar comment mu
made by Mike Lakes, president of the
Branch.
Plant For President" Boom
Only "Big Boss" Indications
Preparations are now under way for the annual election of
AMS officers for 1949-50. Although nominations are not definitely announced yet, much speculating and prognostication
is running rampant in the caf and quad.
There   is   a   "Plant   foi    President" '•'•    —	
Extention Man
At Conference
Douglas Clarke of i'he Extension
Department will be going east to attend the Conference of Western
Teachers   shortly.
Mr. Clarke is a graduate of UBC
and for some time instructed in the
History   Department.
The Eeducation Class: had much
trouble in getting funds to send their
representative to tho conference. They
were refused help from council sev-
eial times. Then last week it was
found that the Northwestern Conference of Teachers had been called off
and council had a surplus of funds.
Council relented at this point and
a arced   to  supply   Ihe  necessary   cash.
is   a
rumor which appears to be the onl.\
suggestion for AMS boss for ihe next
year. Paul Plant, treasurer of the
AMS ih is year, has had ample executive experience for such a post.
Last year his duties included being
treasurer of MAD. If Plant should
run for president, it would entail his
return next year for post-grad, work,
since, according to the most reliable
sources, he will graduate this year.
Walt Ewing has been suggested as
a candidate for AMS treasurer. Ewing
ha.s made a name for himself in rugby
thi'- year, and was very successful
as MAD treasurer.
George Cummings. a member of
the Open House Committee, and shining light of the Mardi Gras Committee may enter thc running for AMS
co-ordinaior.
The position of secretary is current-
a topic of great controversy. About
five girls have been suggested for the
running. Among these are Claire
Greene and Shirley Manning. Miss
Greene has for the past year devoted
Ik rself to the Undergraduate Societ'ies
Committee as activity co-ordinator.
and Miss Manning has been active
in  Raclocs.  activities.
Alex Freeman, the sophomore member for thi.s year, will probably run
I'or  the post of junior member.
Speculations seem to be the most
prominent opinions on the subject
Time alone will tell the outcome of
the momentous issues at stake. Elections will be held on February 2. 9
;.nd 10. Vox populi will out. and may
ihe   best  man   vein.
Somerset To Speak
In Victoria School
Miss Dorothy Somerset, drama ex-
I oil with the staff of the University
of British Columbia, will speak to
Victoria Extension audiences: on January 24 at 8 p.m. in the Victoria Normal School auditorium. The topic of
lie address will be Dramatic Criticism—Old and  New.
Miss Somerset has been a leader of
amateur theatrical activities throughout ihe province for many years and
is a strong advocate of, a Canadian
national   theatre.
Under Miss Somerset's direction, the
UBC Players' Club and Summer
i School of the Theatre have won high
acclaim for their productions and
have contributed several outstanding
'directors, actors and actresses to Canadian Theatre.
'LOST'
Poor Freddie has- lost his girl friend,
A classified aclvt. in today's Daily
Uhyssey requests that if any one
finds a blonde girl friend lost by
Freddie please phone him at His
home.
Please "blonde girl friend" make
up with poor Fredclo. He is pining
for vou.
Legion To
Offer New
Scholarships
Unanimous Support
Of NCSV Motion
Student veterans at UBC
will be asked to lend a helping
hand t^o the children of their
comrades killed in the war.
Unanimous support was given at a
meeting of Branch 72, Canadian Legion, yesterday to a resolution calling
for the circulation of cards to veterans on the campus "to obtain an
indication gt their intentiori to'support a scholarship plan for the benefit of children of war dead''.
The resolution was adopted after
'he meeting had heard the report of
Don Lanskail, UBC delegate to the
National Conference of Srudent Veterans  in  Kingston  last  December.
NCSV endorsed a proposal put forward by Lanskail for the establishment of scholarship funds at all Canadian universities.
Under ihe plan every veteran will
he requested to agree to contribute
ui the fund at his alma mater as soon
il'ter  graduation  as  he  is  financially
; bio   tn   rlo   so.
Adoption of thc scheme al UBC
.sill depend on Ihe support it receives
imong veteran students now at the
•ni,\ ersity. and their response t'o the
.; iris lo he circulated. Cards will
niohably bo distributed at the next
:a:   parade,   Logioiv  officials   said.
If established. UBC's scholarship
fund will be handled initially by the
Ligion. However, administration will
eventually be taken over by ihe
Alumni Association. The latter has
expressed its willingness to do this,
■.ho meeting was told.
In his report on the^NCSV, Lanskail
v.iid that a letter had been received
at the convention from Veterans' Affairs Minister Gregg staling that "no
increase in giants for student veterans
was contemplated in the present'year."
Nevertheless, the NCSV expressed
general support for a blanket increase
in grants, said Lanskail, and had decided to make ii uniform survey of
a1!   universities.
Future of the NCSV was doubtful,
Lanskail indicated. He said there wa.s
a general feeling among delegates
tha! there would be no more conferences, and that the Legion, with which
the NCSV was now affiliated, would
have  to carry  on.
CUIUS   WINOEBANK
.  .  ,  alpha  omega  pi
Big Question Answered Friday Night
Which Candidate Will Rule Mardi Gras ?
•'llllil.r.Y   i'.linKll AN
,     .     ,     tlell.l      psi     ('J)siltiU
Photo  by  Tom    y   lb"! ' i
ci.ohia PHILIPS
.   .   .   kappa   alpha   thcal
Stcffeiis-CiilniAr Photo
IV   lUNIT.l,
,   ,   ,   gallium   phi   I'i'la
nan ii.vitnn:
Tonight is the big "first night" of the Harlem Mardi Gras.
The affair is held annually under the sponsorship of the Greek
Letter Societies on the campus. All proceeds go to the Community Chest, "Tmler  cn-chaumen  Joan SrlTand
. Inl ,'duer the committees have been
'I'-orkmg and planning on this party
far almost I wo months. Other execute- are: Secretary. Folly Lane; troa-
■o--cr. Cieiige Cummings: dee arations,
Nancy Hus-i-il and Arnold Ilough-
lainl: islunie-a N'ini Sei 11 and Knthie
i lav, aia!,  models. Joan Vivian; chorus,
Willa MacKinnon; puhlicil... Loni
F: aiu-is', I',. .ctl\- Roberts and Joan
VVi eden; a; Mviiie-'. ' Don Ui'ipiharl:
i.i I-1 K Rahih Diamond and Allen
Km'h.-h; chaining. Shirley Chisholm
,-inl Neil While, programmes. Joan
Tail   i   .a,.!   Ila's   Wilson:   sponsorships,
| ),  ,.,;     fa   ,h|;'   a       .Old     clonal ioll.-'.     Roll
The   I'loorsiiow   will   include   ohorii
gels,   model.'-    and   queen   candidates.
Candidates fur queen will be keoi
>n s-iisponse unlil Friday night when
ih.e  decision   will   be  announced.
Cuds v:cing for Iho honour are
Chris Wiiicic nbank. Nan Hardie. lie:I.
McF.achein, lav Dilutee. CPnrai Phillip a Slurb Weoclhank, Belle Kus-vll.
Shu ley    Selman   and    Ka\    Woadhead
Winner of 'The Dail\ Id.ysses
"V.uich Ihe Leg-; Conlesi" v.as ,hm
t'.ii-aii,   iluid   sear  arls  ^ludeiO
I la     received     I u o     I ickel ,     Id      Ihe
-   delta   minima    |; ,, I,..,,    !\|,,,,|i    (da Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday,   January   20,   1949
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
Authorized a.s Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year.
Published throughout the.university year by the  Student Publications Board  of  the  Alma
Mater   Soeietv   of   the   University   of   British   Columbia.
if, if. if,
l.dilorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of Tlie Daily Ubyssey and
not necessarily  those  of  the  Alma  Mater  Society  nor  of  the   University,
if, if, if,
Office-; in Brock'Hall. Phone ALma 1024 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF - - - - RON HAGGART
MANAGING EDITOlt -  .  - -  VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF; Copy Editor, Laura Haahti; News Editor, Bob  Cave and  Novia  Hebert;
reatures Editor, Hay Haines; CUP Editor, Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall;
Sports  Editor,  Chuck   Marshall;  Women's  Editor,   Loni   Francis.
if, if. if.
Editor   This   Issue   -  ART  WELSH
letters to the editor
No Leftovers
In regular, cyclical pattern, Student
Council elections seem to shape up into pretty well predictable camps: Councillors seeking reelection to preserve "continuity" and
new aspirants demanding "fresh blood" ui
campus   government.
This year's strong( aggressive, tightly-
knit council is in itself conclusive proof that
newcomers to student administration can be
as capable and efficient a.s the old hands who
laik glibly of the value of their "past experience."
The problem of tethering runaway AMS
finances fell this year on a council newcomer
and none can.deny that the duties of treasurer have been ably and conscienciously dispatched.
This   year's    treasurer   campaigned    last
On C
ounci
ii
year on a "new blood" platform and soundly
defeated his "continuity" opponent.
With the exception of one member, the
president of the Women's Athletic Association, every member of council is a freshman
in government, yet UBC has enjoyed sound
and constructive student administration.
Had "continuity" triumphed last year, the
errors*which this year's council has rectified
might well have been perpetrated in continuing blindness.
A new slate of councillors each year provides for UBC the system of "checks and balances" of government which the campus system otherwise lacks. This year's blunders,
and undoubtedly they will come to light,
will need the vigorous review of fresh and
enthusiastic councillors.
A Boy and His Book
Way back -in 1947 when Donald Orvillo
Stainsby was a little boy he began to write
a book.
Orville worked and worked and worked,
in fact sometimes his«leachers didn't see him
for weeks, which made tl\em very happy,
But Orville never finished his book,'
When he grew up and left school he left
his playmates with a great fistfull of pictures
and millions of words that had to be made
into sentences.
"Finish it for mo, fellas," Orville said,
wiping the foam from his month.
So  all  his school  chums  put  aside  their
frivolous pleasures to work on Orville's book,
for they all loved Orville dearly.
All the other kids crowded around watching them and asking them when it would be
out. But Orville's chums just smiled and
said, "The middle of next month for sure."
Middle of the months came and went until at last in the winter of 1948 Orville's book
was finished.
It is a wonderful book full of glamorous
pictures and sparkling prose. You can pick
up your copy in the AMS office next week.
Tt would make Orville very happy.
letters to the editor
DEFENDS   RECEPTION
Editor, Thc Daily Ubyssey; Sir--
The more we hear of the iVon/ied
Mr. Greer, l he more we an- reminded of that ancieni moitu: honi .--oil
qui may ye pi.ii.-i--' or evil .n him
who   evil   flunks".
Ignoring the faint possibility that
Mr. Greer's unexpected, i'renelic and,
Mispicious-minded outburst mifilit
be inspired by his rage at tlie cordial and attentive reception accorded fo Mi'. Drew by the 1000 students
who attended our reception Monday
fcicspile the frantic efforts of Ihe
CCFfci-s to convince UBC Mudent-
that there is no Prn;;ros.dve-Ci n-
sorvntive Party, and that this nonexistent party consists of only evil
old reactionaries) we would draw
to his attention  the following facts:
1. A social reception is never a
'•ubstitui'o for ii political speech,
nol is it intended to he. The rules
of good taste usually indicate lhal
when   a   man   is   invited   to  a   social
affair, he does not offend his hosts,
nor trespass upon his invitai'ion.
by launching into a political stump
: pooch. Of such unwritten rules.
Mr. Drew i- well aware; and these
la- invariably and properly observe:-.
If this is nol "acceptable* to Mr,
Cheer, wo are sorry. But what is
, icoptablo to Mr. Greer is often repugnant   to  a  great  many  people.
2. Mr. and Mrs. Drew were delighted to accept an invitation to
visit this university, although this
acceptance involved a considerable
addition to their extremely heavy
.schedule of public appearances in
the one day at their disposal in
Vancouver.
.'!. Both Mr. and Mrs. Drew, with
•peaking engagements downtown at
noon, and a full calendar of after-
neon engagements, thus were able
In appear on this campus only in
llie   morning.
4. After consultation with bath
ihe President and Dean' of Inter-
Faculty   Affairs,   it   was  found   both
impractical and inadvisable to cancel morning lectures in i'he auditorium. To have done so would
'quite properly i he to have'invited
I iiblic criticism. UBC is. after all,
an educational institution; and not,
ii: Mr. Greer seems to regard it,
merely a forum for political stumping.
* 5. In other and more fitting circumstances, Mr. Drew would be
mere than pleased to make a political speech. He makes a good one,
as Mr. Greer's CCF candidate discovered at Carleton, when he opposed  Mr.  Drew  last month.
(i. Mr. Diefenbaker's reason for his
inability to speak at UBC were, as
Mr. Greer so graciously suggests,
entirely "egitimate".
7. Mr. Fuh'on, to be polite about
it. made no such categorical statement as Mr. Greer describes.
Si. And yes, considering Mr. Greer's
boorish   attitude,   he   will   be   quite
I encath  our notice  in  this respect.
R.  W.  STEPHEN.
WHY ARTHUR MURRAY?
Editor, Tbe Daily Ubyssey: Sir—
I; has tome to my attention that
Ari'hur Murray's Dancing School
has been given permission to hold
their session on a commercial basis
;n one of the huts here on the
campus. I feel that the AMS or else
thc Students' Council should have
been approached as to whether the
student body as a whole wished i'o
have this commercial outfit appear
on.the campus to teach dancing—
especially in view of the fact that
a new UBC Dancing Club, has recently been formed with competent,
instructors who are willing to give
their services free. I» Arthur Murray to be the first of many?
GEORGE.
CHALLENGES  CONSERVATIVES
Editor, The Daily Ubyssey: Sir—
The social reception staged by the
Pressive-Conservative Club for
George Drew is no acceptable substitute for the public meetings t'he
Club seems afraid to hold. The
Club's excuses that Diefenbaker and
Drew were too busy to explain the
Conservative program may bc legitimate, but oh how agreeably these
excuses coincide w'n'h the Club's policy. Not since Davie Fulton spoke,
over a year ago, in the Auditorium
and admitted that the party knew
of no way to forestall a depression
lias the Club presented a speaker.
Since the Conservatives won't appear voluntarily, to draw them out
of their hiding, and to expose the
tawdry skeleton of their program,
I challenge them to choose a representative t'o refute, the resolution;
"That nothing whatsoever in the
Progressive-Conservative program
may be construed as favouring free
enterprise."
Should they deign to notice this,
and consider me not beneath their
effort's. I shall be pleased to prove
thc validity of the resolution..
Yours truly,
CLIFF GREER.
RELIGION
Editor, The Daily Ubyssey; Sir-
As a frequent visitor to your Campus with film's of a religious-scientific nature, "The God of Creation",
"God of the Atom" and "Voice of
the Deep", perhaps you will allow
me space to comment on an article
in today's Ubyssey which concluded   as   follows:
"Emofionally the average student
is hungry for some sort of faith,
but intellectually he is unable to
accept any of the current religious
beliefs."
Where Is thc UBC student tor professor) who, on purely intellectual
g'-ounds, will reject thai' which has
been believed by many of the greatest scientific minds of all time, Sir
Isaac Newton, Michael Faraday.
Louis Pasteur, Lord Kelvin and
numerous others right down to the
present day? Where is the student
who will match his intellect tnot to
say experience) with that of some
of the outstanding legal minds,
Simon Grcenleaf, William Black-
stone, Daniel Webster and others
w ho, after the most searching investigation, accepted the truths of
'uistoric   or   Biblical   Christianity?
May I say, in all sincerity, thai' it
is: nol his intellect which renders
f.ny student unable to accept such
iruths   but  his   ignorance.
Please   note   that   I   do   not   refer
The Children's Hour
Back lo booze and blondes,' two commodities wilh which he is indeed, only too
familiar, your old Uncle B. lakes up his old
stand today on the windswept corner of humanity lo peddle a raging, hohendeel lot of
papers.
But if it is any consolation to his I'ile-
loolher, asphalt hearted, cement souled detractors, hc is far loo poverty stricken, these
days, to engage in his old pursuit of the
blonde boozes and boozy blondes of this
world.
He mtisl, instead, I urn lo such loss expensive sporl.s as trams, birds, diet ministers
ai-cl   things.
This is in keeping wilh perhlips the wisest
slateinoni over in:ide on this campus,which,
il we l ciiiember, was tin' work ol one I). K.
Paul, i dilor of the "Thunderhird." Il wis
l.)ei' Paul who .'..'id: "All love is free, and
nub. ot:r ciisloi!)- make ii expensive.' There
is i he Mann Act, too, old boy.
Well Mann acK po\erly, cries of well,
war, aianims el war, windswept corners or
not. yum old I'ni'le B. lell a warm Utile "JoW
in his he.'.rl, iho oihor day. when he read in
bis even in:', in ». -| ia| wr the ,--l i ry id  tlie Kobhi
Wiio   Wo-   !„■!'!    B. hind.
.- i • 111 e o n i'   I ii 1111 d   a
a-.i    a'-, i ■( t, ,    11    ;-(a i
Little Robin shivering in the Winter Cold.
ThisThis little Robin had a broken wing. All
of its fellows had long since flown away to
the sunny south, leaving the Little Robin
behind.
Then lo and behold! Along came a kindly florist. And what do you think this kindly
florist did? Well, we'll tell you. He picked
up that Little Robin, placed it in a wicker
basket, and air expressed the little so and so
right down to Florida.
And if, dwelling upon that thought for
a moment, you don't get a little warm glow
right down there under the south corner of
your heart, you may as well proceed to the
nearest rock pit and become the stony souled
so and so of a geologists dream that you
probably are.
Now," perhaps your old Uncle is just being
too, loo fantastic about all these things, but
it seems lo him thai somewhere, somehow,
(here is a great Thawing Process now going
on.
Valid or nol, he is about to throw clown
on the suggest ions table the happy thought
thai humanity, hitherto caught up in a sort
of a spiritual lee Age till of it's own, now
shows signs of dripping al the edges. And
just   like   Spring,   you   can   almost   hear   the
Vo religion in general, or to the
emaciated forms of Christianity so
much in evidence now, which deny
the diety, the incarnation and the
resurrection of Jesus Christ, but to
the historic Christian faith which,
against' the opposition of the Roman
Empire, "turned the world upside
down" and has revolutionized countless lives in the intervening years;
that faith proclaimed in tbe films
mentioned above, which has its
beginning and completion in the
person and work of Jesus Christ,
a li.ith i'o live by and a faith to die
ity.
Witness Professor Samuel F, B.
Morse, Fi*ner of the American
Telegraph System. "The Saviour
daily seems more precious; His love,
His atonement, His divine power,
no themes which occupy my mind
." and Michael Faraday, who
when asked when he lay dying,
"What are your speculations now?"
replied, "Speculations I have none,
I thank God. I am resting on certainties, 1 know thai' my Redeemer
liveth, and because He lives, I shall
live also!"
We have no hestitation in saying
ihat every intellectual doubt may
be solved by the honest seeker who
will make the effort Vo examine any
of the voluminous evidences available but may no one", without such
an examination, say thai his intellect forbids him to accept the Christian religion. Tlie essential issue
with respect to such acceptance is
not ultimately an intellectual one
but a moral one, involving not
merely the mind but the complete
personality, yielded to the lordship
of another personality, Jesus Christ',
"God manifest in the flesh."
Trusting that you may find space
for the above in an early issue,of
your paper. I am
Yours   sincerely,
FRASER McRAE,
Extension   Department,
Moody Bible Institute of Chicago.
♦	
Accommodation
MALE UNIVERSITY STUDENT DE-
siies room and breakfast and supper.
Basement room preferred but not a
tecessity. Preferably in Kerrisdale or
University district'. Contact Jack at
KE. 2823-L. References if required.
DOUBLE ROOM AVAILABLE, FIVE
mins. from UBC. Board if desired.
ALj 0333-L.
SIGNBOARD
Meetings
GLEE  CLUB   REHEARSAL,    HM   1
at 12:30 Thurs., Jan. 20. New members mest welcome.
SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE CLUB
meeting at noon today Hut G4. Stock-
ink' soles or running shoes necessary.
All welcome.
EXCERPTS FROM LA BOHEME
will be presented at the M.A.C. conceit   Fri.
Lost
ONE BLONE GIRL FRIEND. Mislaid somewhere. Phone Freddy. AL.
0403.
ONE PAIR OF MEN'S TAN KID
gloves on Fri.. Jan. 14. Finder please
phonephone John. AL, 2935-R. Reward. ,
Rides
WANTED: A RIDE FROM 49TH AND
Knight Rd„ 8:30's Mon., Wed. and
Fri. Phone FR. 3085. Ask for George.
RIDE FOR 8:30 LECTURES MON. TO
Fri. inclusive. 13th and Courtenay.
C. J. McGuire. AL. 0723-R.
RIDERS WANTED FROM 41ST AND
West, Blvd. Phone Dave Little. KE.
3082-L.
RIDE WANTED FROM 22ND AND
Cambie or 22nd and Main. Model of
car not essential but reliability of
driver is! Only sincere drivers please!
Mon.  to  Sat.   FA,  5613-L.
Miscellaneous
TWO UPSTAIRS ROOMS FOR RENT,
housekeeping or some meals may be
arranged. Suitable for two male or
female students. 2420 E. 8th. Phone
HA 5899-R. evenings.
ANYONE HAVING THE.FOLLOW-
ir.g English 100 books please phone
FA, 5240-L after 7 p.m. and ask for
Ross: Eleci'ra-Euripides; School For
Scandal; Doll's House; 20th Century
Verse,
IF YOU WANT A NEAT, ACCUR-
iite job and quick service on your
essay, report, thesis, etc., .phone Helen
Morgan, BA. 4199-R.
'     .For Sale
LADY'S GOLD MUSKRAT FLANK
itted coat. Size 14. Good. condition.
S20.   BA.  2469-L.
TUXEDO IN GOOD CONDITION.
Size 37. KE. 2513-Y.
SNAP! RCA VICTOR PUSH BUT-
ton car radio. Top condition. $40.
Reason for selling—no longer have a
car. Phone PA. 0551. Ask for "Howell".
LADY'S BLACK COAT, LINED, SIZE
20. Blue gored wool skirt, size 20,
waist 31'', length 30". Excellent condition. Also electric automatic iron,
good condition, $4.00. Boy's rubber
raincape. Phone Mrs. Thornton at
V.A. 9530-M.
RCAF (MIX) UNIVERSITY FLIGHT
Authority has been received to increase the Strength
of the RCAF (Aux) Flight
Rank-Right Cadet (Officer Status)
Pay-Summer pay $208.00 per month
(Clothing provided)
Summer-Contact Training
Upon completion of the three-year course Flight
Members qualify frir commissions in the RCAF
"Regular" "Auxiliary" or "Restrve".
Enquire now at the Flight Orderly Room,
University Armouries
running of the Little Brooks.
In support of this happy and probably
romantic theory, he advances as unlikely a
lot of evidence as this world of mad philosophical carpenters has ever seen.
One little brook (or drip) he thinks, was
the action of a middle-aged Japanese whose
name he cannot rernember.
But he does remember (indeed, if he lives
to be three hundred, he will never forgt)
that this man, a member of the Japanese
Diet, a man who more than most was caught
up in the cold fastness of the New Human
Ice Age, suddenly thawed, forgot hil preoccupation with Japanese yen, found a new
(but older) yen; threw his unburdened arms
about a tellow female Dieter, and said: "To
hell with national budget; I love you."
Well, you may call that irresponsibility
in office, if you like. To your corrupt Uncle,
it was the biggest thing since Edward and
Wally. It probably is irresponsibility in of-
i'ce, too; but it sure is a Little Brook, in the
great Coming Spring Scheme of things, ns
well.
And then, coming nearer to home, there
was the story which appeared the other day,
about the local Man Who Said Goodbye to
The Streetcar.
by les bewley
Most people hate streetcars. Some people
(this is a fact) spit at streetcars, as hey pass
by. Needless to say, streetcars, being better
Christians, do nothing of this sort. They just
look sorry, and pass on by, a little red in the
face, and considerably embarrassed, if you
must know.
But this man who said goodbye to the
streetcar, (another little brook, remember)
did nothing of this kind.
You may remember seeing his picture,
standing there on the old Kitsilano Trestle.
He was an old man, and he had a warded
hankie to his eye; and he w*as crying because
Old No. 12, on which he had ridden back
and forth to work for 35 years, was on its
last ride across the trestle.
Well, your Uncle salutes that old man. For
ho is the sort of a man who remembers his old
I'riends; and who isv faithful to them for 35
years; and who, instead of spitting a,t streetcars^ ha.s the decency to shed a tear when a
Iriencl goes on that long, last ride.
And that makes another warm corner
in your corrupt old Uncle's heart.
And if those three little brooks, with
other little brooks, ever get together, they
will make a Big River. And then, suddenly,
il  will be Spring. Thursday,   January   20,   1949   '
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
ONE OF UBC's most famous landmarks has fallen by the wayside, The famous "old Pine
tree" which while a giant fir in reality was termed a menace to the students and passing-
traffic. On the left are John Kimbell (L) and David\Raltery who felled the tree for Mr. Jack
Lee, building superintendant. In the right hand picture a Daily Ubyssey photographer snapped
his shutter just as the tree was falling.
Woodsman Axes 'Iree'
As Student Crowd Sobs
iny   height.
Deai'li-blow fell when Callers David
Rattery and John Kimbel dropped
•he tree's 215 remaining feet last
Tuesday,
EAGLE'S ItOOST
Pile tri'L' was twice climbed by students, the last time in 1941 by "Eric
Dennett,  who carved  i'he  well-known
fly VIC HAY
While assembled students muffled sentimental sobs, ^nd
blotted real tears, fallers axed the Big Snag, age-old campus
landmark, and sent it crashing to earth.
The   big   tree   was   felled   Tuesday i •
afternoon  under  the authorization  of   b,(;w ., ;j5.foot s(y,rion f,.om Us t()We|.
Piofessor Knapp, director of the University Forests.   It was thought to "be
a  potential  menace  to  the  hydraulic
model   of   i'he   lower   Fraser   River,
whose construction on  the tree's site
will   commence   shortly.    The   model
will   be   constructed,  with   university
co-operation, by the National Research
Council for the Federal Public Works
Department.
SENTIMENT LOSES
Professor Previous of the Department of Civil Engineering, has been
apopinted to head the project. He
built the successful Hell's Gate model
Ihe International Pacific Salmon Fish-
ai the University of Washington for
cries   Commission.
The progress, whether we like it' or
not,   must   triumph  over  sentiment.
The big tree's destruction brought
tears to eyes that first saw its green-
try when the University moved to
Point Grey in 1925. and who remember when its last leaf fell in 1941.
The first serious ill to the main bulk
of the 400-year-old Douglas Fir came
lot  year,  when  the  February storm
Playright Will
Speak Friday
I Robert Greer Allan will take on the
•."eft of radio playwriling -Friday.
January 21 al ?:X.',i) p.m. in the The-
aire   Room   of   the   Brock   Hall.
H" is a ssicci'.-'-i'iil dramatist, having
had plays produced on CBC's Stage
"17" and "48". Formerly with i'he
la.lcrnational Short Wave Sivvice in
Montreal he has arrived recently in
V; nccuver to produce (he "■Vancouver
Theatre" series of half-hour plays
over CBC.
notto "4S tree 40" in the bark about
half-way  up.
Long a resting place and tvantage
po.nt for eagues, the tree bad many
victors. A few minutes before the
tree fell, a flicker alit on it momenta i ily.
Entries Wanted For
Bowling League
Fraternities, clubs or other Campus
groups interested in entering the University Bowling League are urged to
immediately contact Bob Crompton,
HA. 3059-L or Perth -Webster, CE.
2256.
Teams will meet at thc Varsity Recreations on the afternoons that are
found convenient. The charge i.s G5
cents for three games. Of this. ID
cents will go to defray the costs of
purchasing cups and prizes and to
cover  other   organizational   expenses,
Cups will he presented ai the end
of the season, laround the middle of
March) and a dance will be held,
The proposed league is something
new to the UBC campus and its sponsors are hopeful it will become a
university   institution.
>
■\
PUSHED TO RCA
VICTORS N£W
YORK STUDIOS
AS SOON AS m
RECORDING BAN
WAS LIFTED.-H£
AND "ROWS BEGAM
RECORDING AT 2AM
NOW,'D01«€Y FANS EVeRYWWEKE
AKE SCRAMBLING FOR TOMMY'S T|T*ST NEW
RCA VICTOR CUTTING"DOWN BY THE STATION"
COUPLED WIT+f+tOW MANY TEARS MUST FALL
cj
FIRST TO fcCCORD AFTE*
BAM LIFTED WAS
PERRY COMO WHO
WAXED T++E POPULAR
'FAR AWAY PLACES "AND
* MISSOURI WALTZ".
ALSO ON WE RUSH LIST WAS
VAUCSMN N\ONRO£. HIS FANS ARE
GREETING'RED ROSES TOR A BLU|
LADY "AND "MELANC4I0LY MINSTPEL"
WITH OPEN ARMS. RCA VICTOR STUDIOS
A"R£ REALLY BUSY PLACES THESE DAYS.
po$n
ir HOW MANY TEARS MUST PALL
DOWN BY TKE STATION
Tommy Horsey anil bis Orch. - 203317
ir LAVENDER BLUE
(from the Willi Disney's "So Dear
To My Heart")
DOWN AMONG THE
SHELTERING PALMS
Suing anil Sway wilh Sammy Kaye
20 3100
• FAR AWAY PLACES
MISSOURI WALTZ
Perry Como - 203316
ir N'YOT N'YOW
(The Pussycat Song)
ROSES OF PICARDY
l'err\ (omo with 'ihe iontane Sisters
20 3288
• JOE
WHY IS ITT   Iran Warren - 20 3318
L
THE STARS WHO ^AK£ t*EHirS A& O/V
fie* Victor records
Lumbers Barons
'Denuding Forests'
MLA Charges
Charges that H. R. MacMillan and other logging interests
will have denuded this province |
of its Douglas fir within 30 j
years, were laid by Herbert
Gargrave, MLA and longtime
trade unionist, Wednesday.
Gargrave wa.s addressing the
student CCF club.
: Speaking before a meeting of the
CCF Club, he staved that he was
. . interested in Professor Mahon-
ey's words for Standard Oil and his
i'lea that students attended University to emulate such greats as Rockefeller,  etc."
BEST USE
He went on "The besi' use to which
higher education can be put is to further thc progress of society as a
whole.'1
Tracing the progress of Mr. MacMillan, he stated that in 1912 the timber baron was B. C.'s Chief Forester.
anrl a good one at that. In this capacity ". . . he took a trip to England
for the government. On his return.
be went into business for himself on
the strength of the contacts made.
Since Vhen and by ruthless means he
has reached the top of the heap; he
intends to stay there."
"A.s long as he re-invests he will
help the province," Gargrave continued, "but he is no philanthropist, he
ro-invests to avoid the income tax.
Good luck to him as long a.s free en-
tei prise  lasts."
CCF   "FOOLISH"
He referred to the optimism of certain young Tories a.s being ill-con-
firlored in spite of "gorgeous" George
Drew.
Dealing with CCF policy be said
that Socialists are "foolish" if they do
"ol give capitalism its due. "Mass-
production and our high standard of
living have come through capitalistic
methods . . . but the problem of production has been solved and the
problem of distribution must now be
attended to."
"Our economy Is subject to the
same evolutionary changes that effect
other aspects of life,"
WANTED: PASSENGER FROM WEST | SALESMAN WANTED: Good corn-
Van. Car leaves 29111. Phone Wcm. , nii.-.-ioiis celling well-known maga-
87*J-Y. | /ii.cs   lo   your   friends.    Contact   uni-
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:3fl SIX | vorsily Periodical Service at the cam-
days. Vicinity 20th and Arbutus, j pps Employment Bureau, or phone
Phone Bill at CE :ti)26. I Bill  ("•■■.w'.hcr, 7   9 p.m..  AL. 0071.
UBC SONG BOOK
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CO CD CD CD CO CD CD CD CD
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LOcoi/it/icoc/ii/iooc/)
• Songs Of UBC
Songs Of The Greeks
Songs Of Faculties
More than 200 pages of music, words
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ON SALE NOW
At UBC Bookstore — One Dollar
Typed Lectures For Easier Reacting!
Ask for STUDENTS' RATE at
FONTAINE'S  STENOGRAPHIC  SERVICE
"oil   Ford  Building,   Vancouver TA. 5550
MEDICAL PAPERS typed here.
L'^T^^m____tlKiiT__*Mm*>m*mt
■tc?>r~dmxz&mi'<i!!^^
VISIT WOODWARDS
WlAtfCEOFTEA''
EXHIBIT ON'THE THIRD FLOOR
JAN. 20th to 29th
(10:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.)
MOVIES . . . PRIZES ... TEA TASTING
DEMONSTRATION ... TABLE SETTINGS . . .
"TEA QUIZ" BOARD
Some oi' thc highlights of thc show consist of thc showing of (hc
Tea Bureau's new 20-minute sound film documentary, "Story
in a Teacup," a tea-tasting and blending demonstration by a
tea expert, paintings of famous tea drinkers, the largest tea-pot in
thc world, an exact model of the last of the famous tea clippers,
"Cutty Sark," an ever-pouring teapot, antiques and curiosities
collected from out of the pasl in the art of growing, making and
drinking  tea.
THIRD H.OOR
iiwiiiimiiiii«w*»^wn»wi)lw.ill Page 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY,
Thursday,   January   20,   1949
The
Armchair
Athlete
By CHUCK  MARSHALL
Now that the smoke from UBC's
grid wars has cleared away somewhat and the final reckoning has
been made, a very interesting fact
has  been  brought   to   light.
For the first
. time since it arrived on thc campus football has
f paid off. The 1948
season shows a
healthy profit and
^while it does not
compensate for a
winless year, it does mean that a
host of the small, non-paying sports
will continue to thrive, even though
times  are  financially   hard.
Final figures for the season show
that the game netted the MAD
approximately $2300. This in itself
if fine but when you consider that
the year before lost about $900,
there would appear to be a total
improvement of 3200 skins; and
thai' ain't hay.
However, lest anyone jump to the
conclusion that this mana fell directly from above like Vancouver
sunshine, we should hastily interject here that such is not thc case.
Brain Work
Quite the contrary. Football's initial financial success was the result
of a lot of long and careful planning on the part of MAD, Ole
Bakken and Bob Osborne.
The grid story, however, is just
one part of MAD's overall determination to make sports on the campus function as per usual despite
rather drastic cuts in income.
The result has been that every
brass farthing passing through the
directorate's coffers has been weighed carefully before being handed
on. Each sport was given, not perhaps as much as it wanted, but as
much as could be squeezed from the
deflated MAD budget.
Chief perpetrator of the organization's complicated finances has
been MAD treasurer, rotund, jovial
Walt Ewing who doubles as captain
of the UBC rugby team and member in good standing of the VOC.
Almost as soon as he took over
the reigns of the cheque book. Walt
was faced with the interesting task
of pulling funds out of the air to
feed the insatiable appetite of campus athletics.
Not a whit disturbed by it all,
he put his small but sturdy foot
down and looked around to see
what could be done.
By dint of hard work he calculated MAD's total assets and liabilities and then matched one against
the other. Each sport was (old
gently but firmly what it could expect from the coffer. They coulrl
spend it as they liked but When it
was done there would be no more.
Ewing brought with him several
new ideas which have helped spread
the scarce MAD dollars and show
where they go.
Each organization was asked to
hand in a budget of its operations
for the year from which its grant
of funds was made after careful
weighing of the pros and cons of
each.
Charted Costs
In his spare (?) time, he compiled
a large chart which showed each
athlete how much he cost Vhe MAD,
how much of that cost he paid himself and what his spectator value
was.
The graph helped to show where
thc money was going and what the
pain   was  from   it.
As if this were not enough, i'he
indomitable Mr. Ewing. sei about
to answer any of those who thought
that athletic fees on the campus
were   too  high.
By writing i'o nearly all of the
ether universities in Canada he uncovered the amazing fact that the
fees at UBC are only about half
«is much as anywhere else in the
Dominion, and with the figures lie-
fore him no one could argue the
tact.
Hat. off vhen to Walt. Ewing and
his financial wizardry which ha.s
helped pilot: MAD's uncertain ship
past the reefs of bankruptcy to its
P'csent  point  of clear sailing.
OOLF NOTICE
Watch this space next week for a
notice concerning the first meolinj.;
of   tlie   UBC   Golf   Club.
HOCKEY MEETING
There will bo a meeuny of tin
hockey loam Thursday none m i'lu
double committee roam smith i■ 11< 1 nf
the   Brock    upstairs.
All   mil.
'Birds Meet Wildcats
Tonight At Ellensburg
IN ACTION TONIGHT with the rest of the UBC Thunderbirds
is lanky rookie Art Phillips whose newly improvised hook shot
is helping to make him one of the squad's biggest scoring guns.
The 'girds left yesterday by car for Ellensburg where they
meet the Central Washington Wildcats tonight.
Rugby Union Announces
New McKechnie Cup Dates
'Birds To Meet Vancouver
In Brockton Point Next Month
Final schedule for the remainder of the McKechnie Cup
series has been arranged by the Vancouver Rugby Union officials, placing the rest of the games at Vancouver.
Totem Queen To
Liven Sports Events
Next contest' of the series will see
Vancouver and Victoria battling il
out at Brockton Oval on February 11)
for the temporary lead in Ihe finals,
a win by either team putting Vhem.
foi the time being, ahead of the top
place UBC fifteen.
Vancouver and Varsity clubs tangle
the   followinq   week.   February   21).   on
the Stanley Park grounds again, March I campus in the near I'uturr
i 5. the student's come to play on theii
own field when Ihe visiting Victori;
team meets UBC in thc Stadium. Finally the 'Birds play host to tlie Vancouver club in the lasl scheduled con-
U'.-,i' of the series on March 1!) in tin
Varsity Stadium again.
UBC Hoopsters Start
Two-Game Road Trip
By GIL GRAY
Revived by their initial win
in four conference tilts, UBC's
basketballing Thunderbirds
continue their quest this week
for a first division berth in the
Evergreen loop.
Four teams are lied for first place
in the league at the present time.
These include CPS, Central, Eastern
rnd Pacific  Lutheran. I
MEET   CATS I
Tonight the 'Birds will meet the
Wildcats of Central Washington, at'
Ellensburg, Washington, on the Wildcats'  home  floor.
Tomorrow night the 'Birds will move
to Parkland, Washington, where they
will tussle with another league-lead-
in? club, the Pacific Lutheran Gladiators.
Again the 'Birds will be counting
heavily on the dead-eye loop shot
of lanky John Forsyth, who has proven himself 9 tower of strength for
the 'Birds on all their road trios to
date.
SHOOTING ACCURACY
'Bird fans will be looking for more
of the same drive and shooting accuracy thai McLean, Mitchell and
Munro displayed Saturday when they
drew first blood in their Whitworth
ih at UBC,
Guard Dean Nicholson appears to
be the most powerful scoring threat
that the Wildcats have to offer. Last
year Nicholson was picked as first
team all-conference guard in the
WINCO loop.
His past experience includes a trip
to the Kansas City invitational tournament with a Navy aggregation in
1945. One handed shots from Vhe front
court are rated as his specialty and
the 'Birds will have to keep hopping
to stop him.
LARGE SIZE
Eleven lettormen are also included
in the Wildcat lineup for this evening's play. And all the boys are a
little on i'he large size.,
Heights of six foot three appear all
too often for comfort, and the odd
six five is also there, Weights up to
220 are recorded and team average is
about the 190 line.
SPORTS EDITOR   -   CHUCK MARSHALL
Editor This  Issue  -   RAY   FROST
The sultry beauty of UBC's 1949
Totem Queen Jan Olsen will grace
a   number   of  athletic   events   on   the
At present, the defending champion
UBC Thunderbirds are ahead of the
[lack with one win to Iheir credit
and no losses to account for. Vancouver has a draw from the last game
with i'he Victoria squad, while the
latter team has one loss besides theii
saw-off    with    Vancouver.
Grass Hockey Team
Back At Work
With poor weather condiiions finally leaving ihe campus. UBC Grass
Hockey stars are preparing once again
lo get' back to business and make their
hid  for the B. C. Mainland  Trophy.
The leam. which is currenlly tied
for top spot wilh the North Vaneou-
ve>' Bulldogs, ha.s been working out
strenuously throughout Ihe cold sped
and will he in lop shape for menial!! debut. Paced by such stars as j
Bob Ross. Paul Jones anrl Roger Fox.
the hockeyists stand an excellent
chance lo cop ihe silverware these:: son.
The central theme of practice sos-
skins has been dhecU-d towaarl ihe
pievineial playoffs in Victoria. The
game, which will decide grass hockey
supremacy in B. ('.. is scheduled for
sometime   in   February.
Vancouver Island All-Star scpiad
includes' siieh former ITK' players as
N'en   Larson   and   Leo  Bullen.
Miss Olsen wil! kick off at the
McKechnie Cup rugby game hetween
Victoria Crimson Tale and the Thunderbirds when the two clash hej'c on
March   :>.
Also she will appear at an Evergreen conference basketball game soon
i.i.d get the contest under way by
Ihrowing the ball  in.
fl.W<i»«. ^    ssV.sv'
Photo  I),i  Tommy  Hatchet
JAN OLSEN
. . . Totem Queen
CKNW.. NOW
1320
01) V0UR DIAL
i Big Block Club To
j
I Hold Meeting Monday
i      Then-   wall   l-i-  a   Hireling  of   Ihe   Be:
I Block   Club    in    ArK    IMS   on    Manilas
'
.kmnary    a'I
' I ! , - hi.pea :■ I I i'.a ! al! O! rli'i'is ]w
1 ■! s -1. Ii' I a .■ i -- : ] a a a . : iai i \e 1 ! 1 1- '
1   i . I ii      'II'      ai  III erilllli: V e.ile, -,      all   '
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Roast Turkey
PRIED   CHICKEN
Malted  Viig.  Ham
Crab  Salad
Sliced  Hani
$105.00
$97.50
$90.00
$72.50
$175,00
$167.50
$160.00
$142.50
it
$200.00
$185.00
$170.00
$135.00
$270.00
$255.00
$240.00
$205.00
$295.00 I $365.00
! $272.50   $342.50
$250,00 1 $320.00
: $197.50    $267.50
$390.00 | $460.00
$360.00 | $430.00
$330.00 | $400.00
$260.00 | $330.00
Sliced Turkey
Basket   Chicken
Roast Sirloin Tip
Hot Turkey Sand,
Hot   Beef   Sand.
$77,50
$80.00
$85,00
$80.00
$52.50
$147.50 ; $145.00
$160.00 k $160.00
$155.00    $160.00
$130.00 ! $110.00
$122,50     $95.Q0
$215.00
1 $240.00
$230.00
$180.00
$165.00
$212.50
$240.00
$235.00
$160.00
$137.50
$282.50 | $280.00
$320.00 | $320.00
$305.00 ! $310.00 |
$230.00 | $210.00
$207.50 1 $180.00
#350.00
I $400.00
$380,00
$280.00
$250.00
1 Denotes: With Orchestra
ALL PRICES ARE FULL COURSE AND INCLUDE TAX
The Famous Claude Logan Trio
wilh
HANK SCAMMELL
FURTHER SELECTIONS ON REQUEST Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press *
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Depl., Oltawa. Mail Sub.scriptions-$2„r)0 per year.
Published  throughout  the  univcn-ily  year  by   Ihe  Student  Publications  Board  of  the   Alma
Mater   Socio! v   of   tho   University   of   British   Columbia.
.y. •■'■ -Y-
Editorial opinions expressed herein are I hose of the editorial staff of Thc Daily Ubyssey  and
not necessarily  those  of  the  Alma  Mater  Society  nor  of  tho  University.
if. if- *
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1024 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EniTOK-IN-CIHEF - - - - KON HAGGART
MANAGING  EIMTOll  -  -  -  -  VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Laura Haahti; News Editor, Bob Cave and Novia Hebert;
Features Editor, Ray Baines; CUP Editor, Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall;
Sports  Editor,  Chuck   Marshall;   Women's  Editor,   Loni  Francis.
if. if. if.
Senior   Editor   This   Issue
JIM  HANIIAM
The Great Divide
One of the more fortunate aspects of
Canada's vaslness is the lack .of inter-university competition. Great distances, in the west
especially, preclude the possibility of intercollegiate sports and cultural events on a
practical basis.
As a result the last few years have seen
the western universities competing with
American schools in order to stretch their
thin finances. At UBC in particular this
feeling of separation has been mental as well
as physical.
That is why the McGoun Ctip debates,
which go on tonight simultaneously in four
western cities, are so important.
Among tlie last remaining links between
the University of British Columbia, Alberta,
Manitoba and Saskatchewan is this annual
activity. It gives the few students an opportunity to see other's campuses and conversely
the campuses of other schools have a chance
lo see the visitors.
Tonight at 8:30 when a team from Manitoba faces representatives from this university in Brock Lounge the debate itself will be
secondary.
If UBC wins it will be third time since
the Cup was first given that it has come to
the west coast but win, or lose the cause of
Canadian uniy is being served.
letters to the editor
'•UNKNOWN FRIEND"
Editor, The Daily Ubyssey: Sir-
On Monday, January 17. between
the hours of 9 a.m. and 2; IK) p.m.
somebody "removed'' a valuable
text book from my car. 'east of the
Mall). This book is only cf use to
a third or fourth year student taking Ec. 323. My earnest hope is.
that' an "unknown friend" rummaging through my car, mistook the
book for his own. My name and
address are inside this text. The
colour is blue, and the author is
Lester.
•'Dear, dear friend, whoever you
arc, please return that damn book
—to me, to the Lost and Found -
or just leave it in sonic deserted
classroom, A real student will cany
the ball from  there,
VIC BLOCK.
Little   Mountain   Camp.
ANCIENT ARGUMENTS
Editor,   The   Daily   Ubyssey:   Sir-
Since Mr. Drew's sole argument on
the question of Dominion-provincial
relations is based upon purported
political concepts of 1867 and since
Mr. Drew's outline of those concepts is wholly incorrect, someone
should question his deliberate persistence, if nol his: honesty. This i.s
mi' the f'i'sl occasion on which he
I'v stated that the Canadian con-
: ihution was patterned upon that ef
mo United Shifts in the sense that
iho ] rovir.iss were intended to retain the greater proportion of power.
Two references are sufficient. The
fiist is the crim reality of the American Civil War which was taking
place at the very time of the negotiations leading up to federation.
The second is a quotation of the
future Conservative Prime Minister.
Sir Jo I in A. MacDonald speaking to
tl-e Parliament of the Province of
Canada on February 3rd, I8(i">. upon
Uu. matter of general power vesting
in the federal body as set out in the
Quebec Resolutions: "This is precisely the provision which is wanting in the Constitution of the United
States. It is here we find the weakness (f the American system—the
point where the American Constitution breaks down. It is in itself
a wise and necessary provision. We
thereby strengthen the Central Parliament and make the Confederation
cm- people and one government instead of five peoples and five governments with merely a point of
authority connecting us to a limited
and   insufficient   extent."
If Mr. Drew must use ancient
arguments, then let them be reasonably accurate. It would not bc
unreasonable, however, to ask Mr.
Drew to consider thc application of
the federal constitution in the social
'i i vice state of the present and
future.
H. E. HUTCHESON\
Law 2.
Signboard
rai
I'A
Accommodation
FOR     RENT-BRIGHT     P.ASI.MKN'T
room   on   McDonald    bus    line.    Su:l-
oble for one. KE. 4125R after six.
MALE UNIVERSITY STUDENT DK-
sires room and breakfast and supper.
Basement  room  preferred   but   not  ,i
laeccssity. Preferably in Kerrisdale or
University   district.    Contact   Jack   at
KE.   2823-L.    References   if   required
DOUBLE ROOM AVAILABLE. FIVI'l ; FA
mills,   from   UBC.    Board   if   desired.   R"k
TWO l.TSTAIKS ROOMS FOit KENT.
I-.('a].      |  I a III Oil II'        UK       li I
i.ar|,    Suimblo   for   I'.v"   r
o   . tiidaris;.    1M20   Iv   Kill.
.'■S'lll-l?,   evenings.
Miscellaneous
('HAOIllNC;    IN    MATHS    10(1.
■ 'imible  rite:-'.  Phone  Bill,   MA
ANYONE,   HAVING   Tl
lag   Ene.lMi    1(10   hooks
2-IO-L  after  7   p.n
Fie: I'ra-Euripidc:
Phone
RFA-
::%s.
V'
For Sale
I.AItlK'S GOLD MUSKRAT FLANK
f:lied coat. Si/e hi. Good condition.
S20.  HA. 24li!»L.
SNAP!  RCA VICTOR PUSHBUTTON
car  radio.  Top  condition, $40.   Reason
for    selling—no    longer    have   a    car.
K   FOLLOW-j Phone  PA.  0551.   Ask   for  "Howell."
plca-c   phone   MAN'S TWF.ED OVERCOAT . BLUE
and   ask   for | wilh    herringbone   stripe,    good    con-
School    For   dilion, si/.e Mil. $8.   Man's green tweed
AL! 0333-L.
Scandal;   Doll's   House;   20th   Century   topcoat,  si/e 3(i.  $3.  Phone AL. 0448L.
SIGNBOARD
TUXEDO    IN   GOOD   CONDITION.
Si/e 37.   KE. 2M3-Y,
SNAP!    RCA   VICTOR   TUSH  BUT-
lon car radio. Top condition. §40.
Reason for selling—no longer have a
car. Phone PA. 0551. Ask for "Howell".
Rides
WANTED RIDERS FROM 41st AND
West Boulevard. Phone Dave Little,
KE. 3082L.
WANTED-RIDE FOR 8;30'S EVERY
morning from vicinity of 49th and
Main, (58th and Main). Please phone
Olive at FR. 5475,
RIDE 8:30 LECTURES - MONDAY
to Friday inclusive. 13th and Court-
enay. C, J. McGuire, AL. 0723R.
RIDE FROM 4264 NAPIER ROAD
Willingdcn Heights or anywhere close
by Phone Boiling, GL. 2335R. All 8:30
lectures.
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:30 (
days, vicinity 20th and Arbutus, Phone
Bill, CE. 392G. *
WANTED ONE PASSENGER FROM
West Vanvouvcr. Car leaves 29th.
West Vancouver. Car leaves 29th.
RIDE WANTED FROM VICINITY
59th and Granville for 8:30's. Monday
to Friday. KE. 0599R. Jack.
RIDE WANTED FROM 41st AND
Knight Road 8:30's Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Phone FR. 3085.
RIDE FROM 41ST AND DUNBAR
district for 8:30 lectures. Phone Marg.
KE.  2083-R.
Meetings
MEETING OF STUDENT PROGRES-
sive-Conscrvativc Club in Hut LI Fritf
noon.
MAMOOKS   MEETING   FRI.   NOON.
All  members please turn  out  >
GIRLS IN ARTS 2 INTERESTED IN
swimming  in   infra-mural   meet  Sat,.
Jan.  22. write names on Gym  notice
board.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGAN1ZA-
tion. YBC welcomes: ycu to attend it''
Fri. noon meetings which include
'ostimonies cf Christian Science healing. Arts 207, 12:30,
IRC. INVITES YOU TO COME AND
express your views on China at a
~(ncral discussion, in Hut AG Mon,.
"Mill. noon.
THE   UBC   FILM    SOCIETY    PRE-
cnts "Moonlight Sonata" featuring
'.jnace Paderewski playing music by
Chopin. Beethoven. Liszt and others.
Tues1.. Jan 25, University Theatre.
vcur shows: 3:45. 5:15, 6:45, 8:15.
'JN C! UB MEETING TUES., JAN. 24
Arts 100, 1?:30. Panel discussion on
Human Rights and Religious Freedom
Chi is McDavitt and Bruce Mickle-
bi'iger will present their views followed  by  two student speakers.
M. REUSCH, FORMERLY OF CKMO
"Name It Play It" program, will be
the guest speaker at the rociila''
ueekly meelillg of lh" UBC Ja'/
Society on Tuesday, al 12:30 in tlr
cliib i(i)m behind Iho Birvi; Tl:,
program promises to be very inter-
eating and all members and olhoa1
interested are invited to attend.
GENERAL MEETING OF UBC
Film Society Friday, January 21. l^.'l'l
in   Arts  108
IMPORTANT MEETING OF SCOUT
Club in Arts 104 Friday noon to discuss. "Is the Scouts' Allegiance Na-
f I; I'd or International?" Fore'gn
Scouts   especially   welcome.
Lost
Friday,     January     21,     1949
 ■■il-.. i.  ■  ■! | I...  I—... .   I.ILI.I.I |#|——g—i
j leave at Lost and Found. J
'RONSON LIGHTER AND PARKER
A BLACK PARKER PEN WITHOUT pen in Brock Hall. Finder please
cap. Lost Tuesday noon around gym. tarn into Lost and Found.
Please return to Lost and Found. ONE PAIR OF MEN'S TAN KID
1 BADGER and MCCABE CHEMICAL ' i,lu\ es on Fri.. Jan. 14. Finder please
i nginccring text in room 200 Chem- phonophone John. AL. 2935-R, Re-
ical Building January 17, Finder please ' ward.
In This Corner
The labor pains oi' "A 8011,14 Is
Born," currently playing in Vancouver,
must have been terrible. Despite the
doctoring::, ol' script writers anil ilu;
banal touch of Sam Goldwyn, thi.s
symposium of jazz stars turns into a
misscarriagc.
The picture i.s simply a recasting of
"Ball of Fire," which slurred Gary
Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck some
years ago. Jn Gary's case he was compiling a dictionary of slang and in this
case, recluse Danny Kayo loaves the
study atmosphere of tlie Tolen Foundation to revel hi the white glare 0!
Broadway night life lo find out whal
jazz is all aboul. The sex for the film
is supplied by Virginia Mayo, who i ;
wanted by the police lo supply a lew-
answers al.uil her gangslor boylriend.
She holes up hi the Tolen Foundation
where she proceeds to enliven the old
boys to the ox'eul ol ;i \ 111 ■.■,; 1.■ ri million ol the "Anvil ('horn ;,' and loll in
love  wilh   nanny  Kaye.
In ihe course ot the picture Kaye
invites an array o- iaa,', .sis;', to t! 1 ■ •
Foundal ion to m.il-m recur' I ; illte-l 1 al -
ing this loi'tn ol American loll; son",.
An exee!!"!',1 chance was hear al hand
lo display ju-sl \\ hat 1 ; happci iiii", in
Jazz these days bul Ihdhv. nod Ion.a
everything on wit h il ':■ 11 no! Mid , ■
touch. '1 he jazz. .Ian, ,>. i;o ,1!" an. :;• .!
include Fenny Goodman. Ale) IV'v.vlh
Lionel      1 lampion,      I 'h.arhe      I 'Israel.
Louis Arnr-f rung, Ihe Golden Gate
Quartet, and a few other uniclenlifi-
ahles who are never introduced.
One tune saves the picture. It is
"Stealing Apples" which has some fine
back and forth playing between piano,
clarinet and vibes. This is the only
niece of music you get to hear in its
entirely during the whole  picture.
The only motivation for playing the
old. jazz standard "Flying Home," is
lo have a heavy piece of decorative
brass fall on the head of a gangster
who has Ihe good guys cornered. The
camera gets tired a few times during
the playing of the tune and is forced
to lake a look at other parts of the
house where Virginia is being forced
In marry her gangster friend. But jus-
lici prevails; the ornament drops, the
marriage is foiled, ihe gangster is debated, and the hero and heroine live
happily ever al tor,
'I'he original picture. "Ball of Fire,"
l'-'d ailermite moments of warmth and
humour at least, but Danny Kayo's
hap.tick enmneinga and Virginia
M,-i\o's sexy torso-twisting can be
1 d . led nol hint; more than ham.
• • •
It's nol very often this column wander-' ol'l the beaten track into the
realm of Canadian literature — none
. 1 ii 1., wni'ih talking about much in
iii" long run anyway — but an enjoy-
ah'e evening can be spent for a mere
iv enp, • five   cents    if   you   pick   up   a
by jim banham
novel entitled "The Long November"
by James Benson Nablo. It can be
obtained as a pocket book published
by an organization called the News
Stand Library. The book is full of
typographical errors and transposed
lines, but it's worth it.
Joe Mack, a private in the Canadian
Army is wounded in Italy and crawls
into a deserted house to await nightfall so he can return to his lines. At
first, the bullet in his shoulder is a
ticket home for little Joe who wants
to return to the security of Canada.
Here Nablo employs a technique
thai, has been seldom used before.
Through a succession of smells, Joe
Mack i.s taken back over bis entire
life and relives his experiences during
ihe depresson and the pre-war years.
Most of the life is not a very pretty
one and the book can't be recommended lo you if your a WCTU member
or a strict moralist.
Finally Joe realizes that he is no!
lighting so much to preserve something but lo keep that something wilh
Ihe hope of improving it. It's worth this
thought thai (he bonk ends up a.s Joe
crawls out into the Italian night wilh
a sackfull of grenades under his arm
lo blow up a German barricade and
himself,
The book shows lhal Canadian
novelists are finally beginning In show
some   originality   and   vigour.
rf%ou«tclt6e (fattfute
xxA
^'
r***"
^^^-^^m^.
$
/
;»?','^v
'&" 00* "Maybe 1 should have
taken 'Sleeping Habits oj the
Human Young' as my subject"
That baby is putting quite a "damper"
on ligbert's baby-sitting enthusiasm, not
to mention that home assignment he's got
to hand in tomorrow.
But one thing that can dampen your
spirits even more is the realization that it's
the day for the big prom, and you're fresh
out of that stufj that gli/iers.
Get that money from your spare-time
job into a "MY BANK" savings account.
You'll find your Jittle red passbook just
as useful as your little black book.
V
\
\
Bank of Montreal
\, . N
WORKING      WITH      CANADIANS
EVERY     WALK      OF     UFE     SINCE      1817
!***"
U3-10 "'v-..i '.'V,''.V..'v'o'"-"'
Your Bunk on the Campus
Tn the Auditorium Building
FOR CLASSES AND HOMEWORK
tlie
actually
fA  V*®'
pfOces'*d'
IP<
5*
m
x\
"*°«*«ji
VTNUS  PENCIL CO.  LTD.,  TOKONTO,  ONT. Friday,     January     21,     1949
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Pago 3
« the
« caf
« crowd
By LONI FRANCIS
While watching my cat and dog
romp about tho living room the
other night I was reminded of thc
sight before one's eyes at the Roof
or the Commodore or any oi'her
place of relaxation falling in that
category,'
When  you  think
about it that really  isn't as confusing     a     statement
as   it   seems.   The
cat   is   a bony   an
eighth  of  the  size
,->f    the    clog    and
each   tries   to   copy   t'he   antics   of
the   other.   The   clog   attempts   the
kittenish tricks of the cat and  the
cat attempts the dignified aloofness of
the clog.  The result?  Both are ridiculously  funny.
And to draw the parallel. What
young thing hasn't cringed under
the attack of an unbelievably heavy
male heel placed directly on her
corn as a beefy old gentleman hop-
s.kippity-jumps to the tempo of
Dai's "hot" numbers. And what
promising young Engineer hasn't'
f?lt the impact of an animated
elderly female elbow in his ribs
a; he waltzes about the crowded
Commodore  floor. '  ' >
But these pumpin' jivin' members
jf the elder generation are a little
pathetic compared with the sophisticated high school crowd that frequents the local nights spots. TJhese
sixteen and seventeen year olders
get themselves all fixed up fit to
kill and off they go trying to look
and act like the movie ideal of the
age of 25.
And there they are — like the
clog and the cat — these two groups
Viying to be something they aren't.
The pitiful part of it is that we
were part of that high school
"sophisticated" crowd once and we
will probably become part of the
hop-skippity-jump crowd of the
mid-forties.
Meanwhile we, the Varsit'y crowd
—ch that hallowed name—merely
have a rip snorting good time and
act ourselves. And speaking of fun
see you at the Mardi Gras on the
big  "first  night",  Thursday.
I guess with all thc prattle about
ail's and dogs, animated elbows and
fat old men this column will continue to come under the category
of "guff" in Letters to the Editor,
Sorry   Mr,   Broderick,
womms ni.i;
Loni Francis    '
"Thrill
Show
Women's Editor
First Nighters
To Mardi Gras
Queen Candidates' Gowns
Accentuate Their Charms
Hy SHIKLEY FINCH
Candidates for the coveted position of Queen of the Mardi
Gras paraded their charms last night in front of the "first night"
audience. The gowns created for the nine beauties are glorious
in line and fabric.
Alpha   Delta   Pi   Beth   McEachern $	
wore  ice  blue  strapless  taffeta,   the
institute
s!!i
March Gras "first nighters" thrilled to the sensuous rhy-
thmns of the Harlem chorus floorshow last night at the Com-
joAop « s'pe'iu -sn.ioip di[\ uijbs 3uuaiuunqs ui passaaQ a.iopoui
background lor the excising dancing of soloists Diane Cox and
Billy Petch.
Responsible for thc "be-bop" Harlem music was Al MacMillan and his
bearded orchestra.
The rwo chorus lines are a regular
feature of the Mardi Gras. In this
show the slinky tall girls' chorus,
wearing rose and black satin dresses,
brought rounds of applause, as did
the perky short girls' chorus.
As another feature of the floorshow
•affle prizes were modelled in a short
fashion show. Squeals of delight and
aweful "ohs" were punctuated by
wild applause when Model Hank
Sweav'man took the spotlight. He
modeled  a  dressing gown.
Queen candidates made their first
formal appearance. Crowning of the
Queen of the Mardi Gras will take
place tonight. The crown will be
presented by Mayor Charles E.
Thompscn, who will then receive the
firs'! dance with the Queen. The
Queen will also pull the first prize
winning raffle ticket.
At Ple-jbauce PtvUq,
Mardi Gras committee members will
entertain the patrons tonight at a
cocktail party at the home of Miss
Polly Lane before the dance.
Pai'rons are Lieutenant-Governor
and Mrs. Banks, Chancellor, the Hon
orable Eric Hamber and Mrs. Hamber,
resident and Mrs, N. A. M. MacKenzie, Mayor and Mrs. Charles Thompson, the Honorable and Mrs. W. C.
Woodward, Mr. and Mrs. G. T, Cunningham, Dean and Mrs, F. M. Clement, Dean and Mrs. George Curtis,
Dean and Mrs. S. N, F. Chant, and
Dean Dorothy Mawdsley.
Seated at the head table with the
patrons will be the March Gras com-
mii'tco and their escorts and friends
and Mr, and Mrs. David Brousson.
bodice of which was embroidered
with rhinestone leaves. The waist
has a slight dip in front with a
panier effect on the hips. Her accessories are in rhinestone and she
wears white lace gloves.
Shirley Selman of Alpha Gamma
Delta looked striking in her Chinese
ice blue brocade strapless gown. The
bodice features a cuffed effect and the
skirt has hooped paniers. Rhinestone
accessorize the whole effect.
Alpha Omicron Pi's candidate,
Chris Windebank, wore a very different style in «nelon chiffon. It i.s
strapless with a silvered black lace
apron. Her gloves are also in black
lace and rhinestones are her accessories.
Kay Woodhead of Alpha Phi looked lovely in her off-the-shoulder
gown of blue, brocaded with shimmering sliver lame, The bodice is
fitted and the skirt billows out in
fine folds. A wristlet of flowers finished off the effect.
Delta Gamma's Nan Hardie was
elegant in pale yellow lace, styled
with three tiers in the skirt, the
lace making an overskirt over eggshell satin. Tho bodice was the off-
the-shoulder effect. Nan wears gold
Grecian bands in her dark  hair and
a deep red wristlet,
i
Ev Dunfee, Gamma Phi Beta candidate, wore white moire with a
double cuff over her sholders. The
very full skirt is taken up in a
drape at each side and is drawn in at
the   waist.   Rhinestones   are   her   ac-
Throngs of eager dance enthusiasts filled hut HG 4 for the |cessories'
first dance session of the newly formed UBC Dance Club, at
1:30 p.m. on Thursday afternoon.
Enthusiastic
New   UBC
Response For
Dance   Club
tJfaldL jbeutee
"Mucker's Frolic" will be held on
Saturday, January 21), at the Stanley
Park   Pavilion.
The  dance   is  under   the   sponsorship of i'he G. M. Dawson club.   Admission i.s $1.50 per couple.
Tickets Go On Sale
For Engineers Ball
Tickets for the Engineers' social, the
"Ball of Fire", go on sale next week,
and can be obtained from any class
representative,
The Ball will be a featured attraction of a February round of events,
committee chairman Doug Lamb announced today. "Ball of Fire'' will beheld in the Commodore night, club on
February 23 and 24 at approximately
9:30  a.m.
The week of events sponsored by
the Engineers will inclule everything
from the printing of a special edition Ubyssey to a model competition.
Prizes for the latter, which usually
wci'k, will be awarded  to winners,
Eng
ineers To Aid
Children
Crippled
UBC Engineers are out to aid the
i" Maple,I children by staging their own
March of Dimes on Ihe campus. Dale
for the ei.Heet'un of money I'as been
■-fi as Tuesday, February X I'ruin 12:30
lo 4  p.m.
Chairmen of the function is Danny
Williamson, president of thc Engineers Undergraduate Society. Persons wishing details of i'he function
can contact Williamson at GLcnburn
IS10-T-.
Soc ety estimates, they can collect
ten cents from 700(1 .-Indents on the
e nipus to swell I lie Vancouver Sun
spi nsorod  affair  by S7WI.
Campaign will lie publicize ] by a
public address helons'.iii", lo -si 11< 11 nt
Ti" ry Lynch and will have ihe support of Student  Council  and  USC
Get The Tea
Dance Habit
UBC is gelling tlie "Tea Dance
I'ahir". Every Friday ihe Women's'
Ui'.dorgradllale Society will .sponsor a
Ira dance In be held ill Ihe Hi nek
ft.in   3:311   to   3:30.
Dancing is lo AI 'MacMillan'.; oreb-
alia.   The Snack  liar remains open.
Club oflieials were overwhelmed
Ly the response to the new clubs'
activities.
Men outnumbered the women at
ica-t five to one. Club officials made
a plea for more girls lo turn out to
even the balance a of the sexes.
The club plans ,to offer instruction
in four types of dancing: old time,
modem ballroom, jive and South
American,
Instructors and instructresses have
been recruited from members of ths
club to teach in each of the types
of dancing.
The club fees have been set al 3.1c
for  the  term.
Music wa.s provided by the record
player borrowed from the library.
Chick Turner for the ue of the Brock
Hall since the size of thc membership tends to exceed the capacity of
HG  4.
Men Go On The Run
During "Women's Week"
You missed your mate in '48;
Bale your line in '49.
This is the cry for all women next weekend when UBC
women will take thc spotlight.
Kappa Kappa Gamma candidate
Bette Russell's gown is of white net
ever white satin. In a strapless style,
it has a bouffant skirt which is
spangled with silver sequins. Her
accessories are of brilliants.
Delta Phi Epsilon's Shirley Bookman wears pale blue satin, the off-
shoulder .style featuring a bertha effect. There arc small buttons down
the front of the bodice and the hip-
line is padded. Rhinestones make up
her accessories.
Gloria Phillips. Kappa Alpha Theta
wore a gown of white silk draped in
Grecian style, with a swath of material  across one shoulder.
Canada has more than 125 species
ef trees, of which 33 are "softwoods".
Only obout a dozen of the "harcl-
w'oods" are of much commercial importance and about 80 per cent of
our merchantable timber is of softwoods. |
Dance Club
Needs Women
Girls   here's   your   big   chance    for
your man if you missed out in Leap
In the initial dance rrteet of UBC's
latest club, the UBC Dancing Club.
at least five times a.s many men turned
out as did women.
Apparently the well known "Daisy
Mac" type gal is absent on ihe campus.
So come on out all you gals and
grab yourself a partner for the next
two step, quadrille, schotisshe or plain
ol-.! jive.
The UBC Dance Club expects every
gal  to "hop" to her duty.
ives
Speakers At UBC
Speakers for the Spring session of
the Vancouver Institute were announced today by officials of the
organization,
First lecturer to the group, which'
meet's in the new Physics building of
'he University campus, was Professor
Basil Mathews, eminent- writer and
authority on conditions in the Far
East. Topic of discussion was "Asiatic Independence—Its Present Ordeal."
Other speakers include Dr. Alec
Lord, principal of the Vancouver Nor-
lv.ay School. Having attended sessions in Europe last summer, .Dr. Lord
is a well-informed lecturer on his
subject "UNESCO". The doctor will
speak before the Institute on January 22.
The following week, the Honourable
H, I-I. Stevens will address the group
on "Canadian Citizenship". Mr, W,
J, Phillips. B.Sc, formerly with the
British Colonial Office, will discuss
"Nigeria" on February 12.
Dr. Joseph Crumb of i'he Department of Economics at UBC will lecture the assembly on "Canadian Lifelines-North, South, East and West"
on  February  26.
Most Canadian shopping centres in
krger towns and smaller cities are
possible because of the presence in
those centres of retail establishments
owned   elsewhere.
TYPEWRITING
Essays, Theses, Notes
Manuscripts
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
41X0 W. 11th Ave. ALma 0915R
FOR  FAST
PRINTING
SERVICE
For   Any   Campus   Activity
College
Printers
Printers of The Ubyssey
4136 W. 10th ALma 3253
Half   Block   From   Sasamat
A.s a highlight of the ''women's
weekend" the Women's Undergraduate Society will spo'.sor the annual
WUS informal coed. The dance will
be held In Brock Lounge Saturday,
January 29, with the orchestra of
Al MacMillan in command. Admission  will be $1.50 a couple.
A general WUS meeting in Physics
202 is scheduled for Wednesday, January 26 when schemes will be drawn
up for catching those elusive men,
All coeds out!
This i.s thc gals chance to dale
the boy at the next table in the,Caf,
her Chem. Lab. instructor or any
other strapping young specimen of
manhood she might be interested in,
It's also a good chance to show your
March Gra.s date how much you appreciated the good time he .showed
you. Start your campaigning now
girls.
Friday. January 28 i.s women's day
on Ihe campus. Here's your chance
boys--make your girl do all the
work. She will buy your coffee,
swing the Library do*r for you, carry your books, shine your shoes, and
do all sorts of fantastic things for
you. It's a real Sadie Hawkins affair.
The Sadie Hawkins theme will be
tarried on at the coed dance on thel
Salurday night, Schmoos will be
prevalent. Something new in fashion
.-hi ws will be presented by eommen-
lator Dick Penn. Members of the
boy Big Block Club will do a takeoff m the WUS fashion show which
wa.s  held   this fall.
To start off the svomen's weekend
there will be "big doings" in the
Caf on Thursday when members of
the WUS executive will start the !
race tor available men. 'Ti.s rumor,"I
lhal   Iheir  choice  is  Dick   Penn.
MILWISS
COOtMSS
JHSTi
EATON'S presents
.    .   .   a    campus   favorite
... by NANCY
The formals you wear through the social whirl
must, he as fascinating, as festive as the occasion
itself. With shoulders bared for beauty,
waistline minimized to a whisper, with the
rustle of taffeta, or the shimmer of satin you
will be an Invitation to Enchantment,
Dramatic sophistication in black satin. Side
hoops to accent hips . . . to introduce soft
hilling folds. To be worn with or without
shoulder straps. Each 30 50
('anacla's |c.\ ! 1I0 in- Ium'i \ is I , ge-
l> deeenlrali.-e.-d. h.r.v.ig li.Vi planl -.
di ■ 11 ibuleii   ainoiing   2011   ci iiiir.unil e .
d    vil
li', my   1 I    I hem      mail    lour
a-T EATON C°
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VANCOUVER CANADA
A.
I Page 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday,     January     21,     1040
Luths Will Be
Toughest Yet
For 'Bird Cagers
If past performance is any
indication, UBC's hoop stars,
the 'Birds will face their
toughest opponents of the current season when they tangle
with the Pacific Lutheran
Gladiators in Parkland, Washington tonight.
Last year it was the Lutes that led
the WINCO conference basketball loop
and took the title with only three
losses in all 15 games of the schedule.
YEAR'S RECORD
However, just by way of encouragement of those 'Bird fans that think
the UBC boys are completely clueless
this year, it must be pointed out that
tho total year record for the Gladiators was 17 wins and 15 losses.
Clearly it was the extra-season
games against fairly tough opposition
that brought the PLC club into shape
for  the WINCO fixtures.
Once again it will be centre Harry
McLaughlin who will load his team
in attack. For the past two seasons
the lanky pivotman has been leading
scorer for the Gladiators.
The Lutes boast some other pretty
fair ball handlers besides rangy McLaughlin who counted for one thousand pointe for the Lutes in his first
two seasons.
STEADY  PLAY
Speedy six-foot-three forward Gene
Lundgaard is rated as second man
on the club and is noted for his
steady play and accurate shooting.
Top quarter-mile runner Del Schaf-
er stars at guard for the Gladiators
and will provide the speed for thc
club.
All in all, it' looks as if the 'Birds
are going to have to hustle to keep
up to tonight's opponents. If the 'Birds
do manage to come through with a
win against the Lutheran team when
they are on the road, a usually disastrous time for the team, prospects for
a first division berth will look better
and better.
Mardi Gras Raffle
Tickets Come In
Mardi Gras raffle tickets must be
turned in today.
Mardi' Gras officials announced today that if raffle tickets are to be in
tlie draw they must be rumed in at
Mardi Gras committee room as early
as possible today.
This year's Mardi Gras prizes are:
Kirks Clothes, Cashmere sweater; R.
H. Marlow Photo Service. S25 certificate; Tweed Shop, skirt length certificate; Graham and Vick Ltd., man's
scarf; The London Shop, man's sweater; Jermaine's, $25 certificate; Marty's
sweater; Madame Runge, evening
dress; Hudson's Bay Co., $10 certificate; Famous Players, theatre tickets;
Odeon Theatres, theatre tickets; Coca
Cola Co., two cases of coke; !5aba Bros,
Lrtl., lady's suit; W. and J. Wilson,
lady's plaid slacks; Calhoun's Ltd., SI!)
certificate; Henry Birks and Sons Ltd.,
lady's watch; Pacific Meat, ham; Vancouver Stationers, desk set; Welch's
Chocolates, chocolates; Ingle-dew's,
$12.50 certificate: Dean's Chocolates.
chocolates; Western Music, record album; Thomson and Page. Victor record album; Firbanks Lid., silver
cocktail shaker; Edward Chapman
Ltd., lady's pullover sweater; Rose
Marie Reid, lady's bathing suit; Tooke
Shirts (Roy C. Sims), two Tooke sport
shirts; Jantzen, lady's and man's bathing suit or sweater; 0. B Allan, sterling salt' and popper set; Army and
Nrvy, shaving .kit; Sweet Sixteen,
lady's suit; Plants. $3 certificate;
Famous, lady's house coat; Globe
Ladies' Wear, S5 certificate; Palomar
Supper Club, four tickets; Roselawn
Florist, corsage; Vein's Togs, man's
bathrobe; Henri's Charcoal Grill, four
dinners; Columbia Record Shop, record album; Potter's Lid., lady's coin-
pact; Campus Flower Simp, corsage;
Franklyn Floral, orchid corsage; Wilson's Hosiery, nylons (one pair); R. J.
Pop,   squirrel   cape;   Suzctt.e's
Chiefs Nip Braves Again
For  Hfth  Straight  Win
WiWfSHiK Of I'HE TROPHY is theme of this picture as one of
UBC's top skiers, Gar Robinson, poses with the silverware that
he won by coming in first in the down hill event at the recent
intercollegiate meet held in Rossland. Robinson and the rest
of the 'Birds plankmen are already preparing for the next
meet which is coming up in the near future.
Braves Blow Late Lead
As Boulding Leads
Seniors To Victory
By RAY FROST
The inability of the UBC
Braves to stall in the last 30
seconds of regular play cost
them the ball game Wednesday night when the Chiefs
broke through their rival's
defense to force the game into
an overtime period which
proved the downfall of the
luckless Braves.
Chiefs, looking like the winners in
Ihe first part of the contest, managed
to keep a good jump ahead of the
Brave quintet, leading them 14-7 at
•he first quarter breather. Widening
their margin slightly in Vhe second
canto, the Whittlemen still showed
the way in scoring and floor play to
rest during the half intermission with
a comfortable but not impassable 26-18
lead,
SCORING   EDGE
With the third period play running
about even and Ole Bakken's charges
taking a two-point scoring lead over
their Varsity opponents, Braves began
to look like the team of before
Christmas, narrowing the edge to 33-27
at the end of the third quarter stretch.
Their sixth straight defeat facing
them in the last canto, their instinctive nature to fight back, and the
angry stares coming from Bakken's
direction all contributed to egging on
the underdog Braves to make a match
GHOST HOOPSTERS MAY
APPEAR AGAIN THIS YEAR
The Sioux City Colpred Ghosts, who last year convulsed
campus hoop fans with their zany basketball antics, may be
back in the UBC gym again this year if present arrangements
are completed.
The Ghosts' manager has written to the MAD announcing
that the travelling >club will be in town within the next few
weeks and asked for>a noon-hour game on the campus.
«
Last year the coloured pranksters edged- out the Chiefs
in one game that they played and then were beaten soon after
by the Thunderbirds.
SPORTS EDITOR   —   CHUCK MARSHALL
Editor This Issue - RON  IMNCIUN
Rowing Team Plans Meets
With Washington, Oregon
With an eye open to Pacific Coast competition sometime
in the future, UBCs Rowing Clubbers are planning a meet
with thc University of Washington Jayvees and the University
of Oregon Seniors on or about March 1.
Working out steadily under the skil-• 	
fill   coaching   of   Bill   Bishop   at   the | ■»■      »      CI»AC*»I%
Vancouver Rowing Club, the team is
fast  becoming a  top-notch   unit.
TRIP SOUTH
Officials of the MAD have rrantcd
$:JIM! expenses for the trip sou tli Tli'-
Thunderbird entry in this Sveep-e,,!
competition will e-tablish tli'Miiselve-a
ir   the race  in eight-man  shells.
Bishop, who has been training the
boys gratis, feels the team i.s just
about ready to make their bid in
f.ill-acale competition. Their battle
in the States this March will be an
indication as to how they would stand
up   in   the  Pacific  Coast  League.
UNLIMITED MATERIAL
Numerous aspirants from all classes.
including a large number from the
Freshman Year, have provide.! Bishop
v. ith unlimited material from which
io  choose.
Special student rates at the Vancouver Rowing Club make for simpler
financial problems for ony interested
persons. Special accommodating facilities provide room for 1.10 ruwer.-..
and anyone who i.s particularly enthusiastic about this field of sport
should net in com'act with Bishop at
the Vancouver Rowing Club on prac-
iiie X'a.va or sa-e the club executive
on   the  Campus.
TENNIS CLUB  NOTICE
Tennis  Club  meets  eveuy   Saturday
ifternoon   i\[   1:30   in   Field   House.
sweater; Batons, $20 certificate: tlilker
Attractions, two tickets; Dorothy
Fletcher, wool dve^s: Woodward's Ltd..
ifternoon dress; Betty's, dress; Cave
Cabaret, four tickets; Madame Hilary:
Edith A. Can-others, blouse: Western
lady's  Music,   two   tickets   to  Tex   Beneke.
EVERGREEN HOOP SCHEDULE
Friday, Jan. 14        Eastern Washington College; Van.   B.C.
Saturday, Jan. 15 Whitworth College Van.  B.C.
Friday, Jan, 21        Whitworth College Ellensburg, W.
Saturday, Jan. 22  Central Washington College   Parkland, W.I
, i
Friday, Jan, 28       Pacific Lutheran College Van. B.C.-
Saturday, Jan. 2!)  Western Washington College Bellingham, W.'
Friday, Feb. 4
Western Washington College
:;: Van. B.C. L",.
Saturday, Feb.
5
Seattle  University
* Van. B.C.
Friday, Feb. 11
Seattle University
Van.  B.C.! do-,
Saturelay, Feb
j.'
C >!ie;oa ut' Puget Sound
Chaey, W.!":'''
Friday. F^b, IS
S    'Mo rib i.s College
Van.   11C;     '
Saturday.  Feb,
L.I
Eastern  Washington College
Spokane, W.
Friday, Feb. 25
Central Washington College
Van.    B.C.; a,  '
Saturday, Feb.
:?n
Paeil'ie  Pulheraii  College
Van.   B.C. !■'•■'
-  Non-Conlereiiee
S, i; i
X. Oil
King And Queen
To Rule Over
Rugby Jamboree
Biggest sport jamboree of
the season will be held on this
campus when the visiting California Bears play a special two
game exhibition series with
the UBC Thunderbird rugger
learn.
Varsity Pep Club are intending to
sha'w the southern visitors the large
economy si/e of northern hospitality,
going all out to put on an unequalled
poi formance  for  the occasion.
The   UBC   Stadium,   io   be   renamed
;li'   "Evergreen   Bowl"   for   the  scries.
i
"> 111   be   ringing   to   the   sound   of   as
many different bands as can be mus-
'.erecl  for  the show.
The   Canadian    Legion   Pipe    Band
r    all    their   traditional    regalia,   are
siiic-   to   be   a   part   of   the   festivities
as will  the Military Band.
Sludents wil! choose a King and
Queen of the Evergreen Bowl to preside over the activities, having the
Frosh Queen, Betty Philips, the newly
chosen Totem Queen. Jan Olsen, and
the next Queen of the Mardi for
nliendants.
Full festivities will he carried ,out
lor boll) days of die rugby  meet,
Special invitation has been made
to the High Schools I'or a full pres-
i illation of ihe UBC student.s-of-i'he-
I'ula.e la ba on hand (or (he action
packed games
Along with (lie invitation, Ihe MAD
!i; ■■ '■el a '-■pecial price for ihe High
School kiih, io attract as many a.s
'oa.vib'e I'or what will undoubtedly
!1i the K'-l rug-cr games of the year
a.",   this campus.
Price.-' were announced  by ihe MAD
cine.  7a cents  fcr  adults,  50  cents
he  UBC sludents. and the special
oed  pi ice , f :',"> cents for the si'u-
T.ckow    will    be   on    advance
at    (ho    oi'Vue    of    ihe    Gradual..:
"■■   a    ol    Alhlelks.
'■' laai.a of I lie meat v. ill bo
■■I oi i'naia,- ;,,,, ;\IarVh 24 at \2XM
ir 'davoa'M ei-ii Bond", while Ihe
id    malcii    will    be   played   on    tlie
CHIEFS
HIGH
SCORERS
Nrnnc
Games
Played
Points
Boulding
13
101
Hudson
14
90
Rnptis
!)
71
Hindinarch
14
71
Mitchell
14
49
cf it l^efore bowing down to the winners.
FORCE   AHEAD
Coming back fast on the heels of
the disorganized Chieftains,'the losers'
firing attack never ceased, forging
tlu.m ahead in the ball game for the
first time of the night, when the clock
showed only a minute and a half of
regulation time left, by a 38-3G edge.
A free toss made good and a well-
placed field goal by Braves afs-wrjeci
by one basket from i'he Chieftain
crew brought the score to 41-38 with
only 4!) seconds of time left to run
out.
Mair sent Chiefs closer al the 30-
second mark with a shot which gave
new heart to I lie winners and a little
fc.i to the losers. With the ball in
theii possession, Braves failed to follow up their advantage and stall the
fwial whistle, but instead went out'
in search of the extra basket which
would put the game on ice for them,
WINNING   BASKET
With only scant seconds remaining
in the game, Boulding slipped away
to sink what should have been i'he
winning basket for the Chiefs, but
fate decided to give the paying customers a break when Ostrosser- eased
his free shot through the hemp to end
the regulation game time with a 42-42
saw-off, throwing the contest into
overtime play.
Boulding opened the overtime scoring with two much-needed points
foi the winners, followed by another
gift toss by Ostrosser, Cook and
Swenson matched baskets before
Swenson broke loose fcr two more
mrrkers lo move Braves ahead, 47-46.
But victory slipped out of the hands
of Bakken's hard-fighting squad when
Boulding took advantage of an opening to sew up the game for Whittle's
Wonders with a 48-47 final score.
Intramural  Schedule
Won,  Jan. 21 Field House
1 Phi Delt, "B"  v.s Forestry "A"
:  3rd Engineers vs Phys Ed l'C"
Lues. Jan. 23 Field House
I. Teachers Training v.s Lambda Chi
2 Phys Ed "B" vs Fiji "A"
Thurs. Jan. 27 Field. House
1. Beta '"A" vs Vikings
2. Kappa Sig "B" vs Newman "A"
Gyin
1. Kappa Sig "A" vs VCF-4-,30 p.m.
Fri. Jim. 28 Field House
1. Kats vs Phi Kappa Pi
2. Beta "B" vs Alpha DeJt "B"
NOTICE
Swimming Team
All members; are requested to attend
an important meeting to be held today at 12:00 noon in the training room.
Please be on time.
BIG  BLOCK   CLUB
There will be a meeting of the Big
Block Club in Arts 108 on Monday,
January   24.
It is important that all members be
present because information will be
given out concerning sweaters and
awards.
»■ t
Save Time
Save Money
While you sleep we'll put
your car in shape—engine,
brake, steering, body or
trim. We'll wash and paint
and lubricate—make special
installations and perform
many other services. You
can have all this done at
minimum inconvenience on
budget terms as low as $10
per month!
EXPORT
CANADA'S; ftlNMt
CIGARETTE     '
DUECK
CHEVROLET 01DSM0BIIE
GIHWAL   MOTORS
WttOliSALl MKTS P/SW8UT0RS
1360 BLOCK'msl mMWAV   ■   flp**-
Yours Free!
Arrow**   new   booklet  in  handy
pocket size... "The What, When
and Wear of Men's Clothing".
It  tells you how to dress for
practically every occasion—hatsj
suits, shoes, Arrow shirts, collar
styles, everything!
Get your free cdpy today. Write
Advertising Dept., Cluett, Pea.
body & Co. of Canada Limited)
330 Bay St., Toronto.
Look for (ho Registered
Trade Mark ARROW
ARROW SHIRTS
TIES . HANDKERCHIEFS'
^:ss::a'v^W^V;:::::;.':::a:;,^ss';.s^.;
M,
Drill 111! MR'. Page
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday,    January    25,    1941*.
t'}., $ ( I -.
i-,
• 'a
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian  University Press
Authorized ns Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa, Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year,
Published  throughout the university  year  by  the Student  Publications  Boaro!  of  the  Alma
Mater   Society   of   ihe   University   of   British   Columbia.
if. if. if,
Kdilurial opinions expressed herein are those of thc editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and
nol   necessarily   those  of  the  Alma  Mater   Society  nor  of  the  University,
if. if. if.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1024 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF - -  -  - RON HAGGART
MANAGING  F.piTOit  -  .  -  -  VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor. Laura Haahti;  News Editor, Bob Cave and Novia Hebert;
l'eatuics Editor, Hay Baines; CUP Editor, Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall;
Sports  Editor,  Chuck   Marshall;   Women's  Editor,   Loni   Francis,
if. if. if,
Senior Editors - PETE  IIEPHER and  DOUG  MURRAY-ALLAN
Assistant Editor — MARI IMNEO
UBCs Surprising7 Tolerance
In commenting on the rather harsh words
of Rabbi David Kogen last week, President
Norman MacKenzie says he finds UBC ".surprisingly free' of racial intolerance.
Rabbi Kogen told the Civil Liberties Union
on the campus that Greek Letter Societies
are the "epitome" of anti-semitism. and although he didn't say so specifically, implied,
of course, that UBC fraternities and sororities
are as guilty a.s any.
It is quite true, as Dr. MacKenzie declares,
that UBC has been free of the baser brands
of bigotry, no one has thrown rocks through
the windows of Hillel House or the Newman
Club, but it is hardly, lo say the least, "surprising" that a university should he any less
socially mature than society itself.
Rabbi Kogen points out that open anti-
Semitism ha.s now gone out of fashion, to be
replaced by a more subtle variety.
It is here that Dr. MacKenzie leaves himself a loophole by adding: "What private laws
thc fraternities have, I don't know."
These private laws, written or merely
understood", divide UBC students with cruel
ai curacy into castes of the economically,
socially or racially acceptable. They do not
belong in universities, which should choose
Ihe best, not the worst, facets of culture.
Amherst College seems to have found the
answer. A faculty-alumni committee, composed mainly of fraternity men has told the
Amherst Greek Letter societies; "Clean your
own house or get off the campus."
Communists, Christians and the SCM
, Members of the Student Christian Movement have been stewing in a broth of their
own making since the highly-respected journal Toronto Saturday Night reported last
week that Communists in Canada regard the
SCM as a prize target for "the development
of unity".
"Unity," of course, is a neat Communist
cliche for obtaining a stranglehold on susceptible liberals and naive adolescents.
i
Dr. Watson Kirkconnell, president of Acadia University and an avid student of Communist tricks, secured his facts from an
official Communist documenl, the report oi'
an LLP students' conference in Toronto last
autumn.
"Aside from the CCF, it was felt that tho
body with which the greatest degree of unity
could be achieved, especially on the peace
issue, was the Student Christian Movement.
This body includes a large number of genuine
left-wingers . . .'' the report declares.
Neither Saturday Night nor the LPP stu-
ii. 'ds themselves claim the Communists have
l.?en successful in attaching themselves to the
SCM, but even to a casual observer it must
. ("?m an odd coincidence that the attitude of
the SCM on material matters seems always to
parallel the official left-wing stand.
Joyce Elliott, president of the SCM at UBC.
believes the movement is "not even left-wing"
i,m\ thai Ihe group, rather than echoing Red-
tinged sentiments, presents the Christian
approach lo world affairs. True as this might
be, the SCM has never yet revealed its attitude towards Communism and Christian principles, a fundamental problem which aU who
.seek  Christ must  ponder.
This, it seems, i.s the problem: "Does the
SCM believe Communism and Christianity
are incompatible?"
By its silence on this basic problem, and
ils outcries on others of less significance, the
SCM seems to give tacit approval to the philosophy of the Dean of Canterbury and others
who most certainly are not allied intellectu-
; !!y with the more orthodox churchmen front
whom  the SCM draws its financial support.
Rides
WANTED: PASSENGER FROM WEST
VAN. Car leaves 29th, Phone W,
879-Y.
WANTED: TRANSPORTATION TO
Mt. Baker and return, for two men,
leaving Saturday. Jan. 29, or Sunday,
Jan. 30. Phone Ken Watts, AL. 0071
evenings.
RICE WANTED. VICINITY 22ND
and Renfrew to 8:30 or 9:30 lectures.
Re.'urn 3:30 to 5:30.   Phone DE. 3011-M.
Accommodation
WARM,    BRIGHT    ROOM    WITH
board.    1 or 2 girls,  vicinity  10th  and
Alma,    BA.   2865-L.
LARGE   SLEEPING   ROOM:   SUIT   1.
or 2 gentlemen.   Breakfast  if desired.
Near   MacDonald   bus   and   4th   Ave.
.'licet  car.   BA.  2239-Y.
TO RENT: CABIN ON HOLLYBURN.
Phone West. 122-Y.
For Sale
POCKET STARK, VOOLT, OHM,
milliammeler. Fori' Camp Hut a, Rm,
If! after ft p.m.
Signboard
l!'3i) PONTIAC COACH. EXCELLENT
mechanical condition. S215. $20 license
h"' S19,"). Full price. Phono DE.
1:43-Y after five. Ask for Bill.
LADY'S COLD MUSKRAT FLANK
iiucd ei ai. Si/e 14. Good condition.
X.:o    BA.  24(i9-L
MODEL -T" FORD TOURING WITH
Huxle axle. New typo timing; -1 excellent tires. Body very good with
original paint job; top is torn and
windshield broken. Very good motor.
G'led transportation for UBC students.
l.'M W. 14th Ave. Stc. No. 2.
ML LIABLE TRANSPORTATION. $125.
Uriel "T'a'Ferd coach; 2 new tires;
riixle overdrive; self-starter; tested.
i.i.orl paint. Over-hauled at Christmas.   Phone Jim.  DE.  1543-Y.
Miscellaneous
PASSENGER WANTED TO SHARE
light plane to Victoria Friday morning. Phone Ron. AL. 1024 or AL.
108.1-L.
WANTED: A SCREWBALL I CAN
'. ke to the Shmooball Saturday night'.
BA. ,")4.-)9-R.
Lost
WOULD THE PERSON WHO LIFTED
ivw> cartoons—Buzz Walker originals
— from the Brock men's washroom.
phase return lo Publications Board.
ONE STRAND OF SEED PEARLS.
Would finder please phone Pat at
BA.  33(il-R.
LADY'S BROWN LEATHER GLOVES
with cream stitching. Please return
to Last and Found.
LARGE RED KERCHIEF DURING
esa.m.s in Hut HB4. 'Please return.
Phyllis. AL. 0668-R or Lost and Found.
ALPHA DELTA PHI FRAT. PIN
during noon-hour Friday, Jan. 21 between And. parking lot and Caf.
table. Finder please phone AL 0010.
Dave. «
IN VICINITY HB 5 OR LAW LIB-
rary, a gold ring with crest of clove
with olive branch in mouth. M. H.
Davidson. Fort Camp, AL. 0071.
BROWN LEATHER GLOVES IN CAF
or between Arts and Chem. Friday
noun.   Phone Andy.   DE   3345-L.
The Children's Hour
If for no other reason than that he has
never written an open letter to the president
of a university, Old Uncle B.. chinning himself on his typewriter bar and avoiding the
sum ga/.o ol 13o/.n Ilaggarl, herewith write-;
an open letter Ui a university president.
This is the way it goes:
Mr. President, Sir: It is. of course, impossible to know whal is in your hear!; bul,
believe me, soiiu- of u- wonder what thoughts
lie there  betimes.
We wonder aboui ibese ihings when, we
read in our downtown daily ivw-uinper-, (ha1
m me ol your students (ihey arc ivyanlerl a';
yours, you know, ahhoii'.,ii yai are in no
way responsible ''or iheir aeiiou ) have been
eaughl   and   held   in   the   politic   eye.   lor   all
lie   world
o   :iei    lance      I )i
like    I'"-
V'ildol ed ' tllol 11 ■■    111    ri  I nor -.ei
l..\J> or Tlllfa J)AV
e- ■■    llioi i| idea I lis.
And    We    \\ i Jlli le
ol i icl mu
when you pick up your evening newspapers,
at the end of a hard clay's work, and read
that "your" boys (or "your" girls) have been
aarested I'or speeding, or have flung themselves in front of street-cars, or have been
up out. of human skin.
''or (hey are your boys, and no matter how
cracked, twisted, repressed, schizophrenic,
moronic, unfortunate or just plain unlucky,
i.oimal or gifted, they were before they came
lo you, to the people downtown, they are
'your'    boys.
'I lli>] ANIMAL KINGDOM
And when lit lie folk, who are not human
beings al all, but rather political animals,
; twister at your institution, and then spend
• eiy -spare hour (hey have in the political
, mnial sport nl "inlillrating" .student clubs,
a, order In produce resolutions which will
A     iiilerpi eled   downtown   a.s   ;m   indication
letters to the editor
DON'T STOP  ME
Editor, The Daily Ubyssey: Sir—
During my two and a half year? on
the campus I have often been tempted to write a letter to the Ubyssey.
hut have never done so. My chief
complaint (insufficient circulation
of the Ubyssey) has long since
ceased i'o bother me. After all, one
copy every two weeks is almost
satisfactory. 'However after viewing the 1948 Totem. I can restrain
myself no  longer.
Never, in all my life, have I seen
a worse abortion than the long-
overdue '48 Totem. My friends will
tell you that I am an unobservant *
person, bin1 even I cannot overlook
the glaring errors in the book.
I glanced al the Totem for about
an hour, and in that time I noticed
that my name has been changed
to Alec Light-body, and 10 acquaintances have had their names changed similarly. Some others are not
even given a name. Several friends
o'o not have their pix in the class
section, although they appear elsewhere.
Pictures of 29 members of my
fraternity (Sigma Phi Delta) do not
appear on our page. Fortunately,
they were not lost entirely! Bob
Mills turned up on the Zeta Psi
page, as did Wally Winter on the
Delta Upsilon page.
I noticed, among other things, that
a Royal Flush in clubs is labelled
"Minor Clubs"; the A.R.O.A.. with
call LETERS (sic) V27ACS (sic)
occupies "Huti" L22. which does not
exist; Bert Shcre (chemical engineering '48) appears in a picture of
the A.L. of CIVIL engineers; the
American Society of Mech. Eng. has
mysteriously become t'ae American
Institute of Mech. Eng. Typographical errors are boundless: in one
quarter of a page, one can see
"Mhieftains", "Tudent", and "vice-
president"; elsewhere one sees
"vice-presdent". "god-farce", and
"School for Scandall". "Sleping
Gods".  'Lambdachi".
On secrnd vhouaht. maybe I
should not be so critical—Donald
DID accomplish his object. Everyone will agree that the '48 Totem
.'■ure is "different"
ALVIN  S.  NEMETZ.
Ap. Sc. '51.
DIF.TY  OR  DAMNATION
Editor. The Daily Ubyssey: Sir—
UBC students, awake and learn of
the gravity of your perilous plights!
An incentive which prompted the
writing of t'ie abeve introductory
siatcment was the following quotation which appeared in a recent
Ubyssey:
"Emotionally, the average .student
i hungry for some sort of faith,
but intellectually he is unable to
accept any of the current religious
beliefs."
Surely the writer of this quotation does not mean to reject God's
plan of salvation. Nebuchadnezzar,
king of Babylon, rejected Gcd.
Eventually, however, despite the
fact that Nebuchadnezzar was a
king, his "dwelling was with the
wild asses: thoy fed him with grass
like oxen, and his body was wet
with the dew of heaven; till he
knew that the most high God ruled
in the kingdom of men." No. it
isn't good  to  reject God.
Perhaps thc writer pf the quotation hasn't become acquainted with
the vitality of genuine Christianity,
lt seems as if there are many "lukewarm" forms of so-called Christianity prevalent today that aren't
Christian at all. Beware of these!
Test them by using the Bible as
your   basis   for   judgment.
No, fellow si'udents. don't let your
intellect make you turn yaur buck
on   God.    "Except  ye  be  converted.
and become a.s little children, ye
shall not enter into the kingdom of
heaven.1'
Search thc scriptures wherein
there is life. Observe the lives of
true Christians—not the lives of
hypocrites. Have those true Chris-
ti.'-ns "got something" that you haven't got? They trust in Christ as
their Saviour. We all can do the
same as they have already done.
Sincerely,
A   UBC   STUDENT.
MISTAKEN   IDENTITY?
Editor, Tlie Daily, Ubyssey: Sir-
In the column "And All That" in
thc issue of Wednesday, January 19,
there was a flippant remark on a
matter which, in my opinion, is of
sufficiently grave concern to all
freedom loving people to warrant
bringing tie true facts of the case
lo the attention of your readers.
The juxtaposition of two quotations
in that column, one from the "New
Republic", and the other from
"Soviet Weekly", apparently was
intended to convey the impression
that all is well in the world of
Soviet science, in spite of what the
"New Republic" has to say on the
subject. This impression was achieved either by miscopying or by reproducing errors existing in the
original sources. The Soviet geneticist reported by "New Republic"
.' y. having been dismissed from his
post for holding "bourgeois scientific views" is Nikolai (and not
Sergei) Vavilov. It might be added
that Nikolai Vavilov was not merely dismissed, but placed in a concentration camp where hc died in
1942, (sea article "Tlie Crushing of
Genetics in the USSR" by the Nobel
prize winner H. J. Muller, p. 369 of
the December 1948 issue of tne
"Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists").
Sergei Vavilov, who is reported by
the "Soviet Weekly" as having been
appointed President of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, is
not the "world famous Soviet geneticist" as your columnist indicates,
but his physicist brother. Thus,
rather than meriting the flippant
remark ''A swift kick upstairs?"
made by your columnist, the juxtaposition of the two quotations
should serve to emphasize the following two extremely unfortunate
points: (1) science in the USSR is
being made subservient to political
dogma with deviations from "orthodoxy" punishable by imprisonment; (2) the "leadership" of science
in thc USSR is entrusted to an in-
didvidual who not only docs not
protest against this state of affairs
i n general principles, but acquiesces
in it even w'lcn it leads lo the dis-
t'uclion of his own brother. For
details of the present attacks on
"bourgeois" influence in Soviet science see the article by Muller referred to above,
G, M. VOLKOFF.
Professor  of  Physics,
STRANGE  BEDFELLOW'S
Editor. The Daily Ubyssey: Sir—
I was somewhat startled to find
I hat the editors of the 1948 Totem
have included me among the members of Phi Delta Theta fraternity.
After careful consideration, and
against the advice of my friends, I
have decided not to sue for libel,
since I wish to avoid further notoriety. However, I wislh. to state
i mphalically that I am not, and
have never been, a member of Phi
Delta Theta or any other fraternity.
I trust that publication of this
It Iter will clear up any misunderstandings which may have arisen
out of thi.s horrible mistake, so that
I may leave UBC with an unblemished   record.
Fraternally  yours,
D. A. NICHOLSON.
Sham Arrest
Of Cardinal
'Slap  In  Face'
iAs background to a debate sponsored Monday in Arls 100 by the UN
C/id). officials of the com pus Neic-
liuin Club prepared tlie jollonXiny
article ichicli explains circumstances
of tlie widely-publicized arrest in
Hungary of Cardinal Minds'entry.
Inter-faith council oj Hillel Founda-
tioti backed up tlie article,I
By  HECTOR MACRAE
The recent arrest and imprisonment
of Cardinal Mindszentry of Hungary
is a symbolic slap in the face of all
Christendom. Nothing that has happened to Canadians and Americans in
1948 was as potentially ominous as
this   event.
The Cardinal's arrest followed a
scries of bitter propaganda attacks in
the newspapers. He wa.s successively
denounced as a "reactionary" and "an
opponent of thc people's democratic
regime."
The formal Government charges
were treason, attempting to restore
f"ne Hapsburg monarchy, and foreign
currency abuses. Former Undersecretary of State cf the U.S. Robert
I.ovett termed'these charges "a sickening sham". The real issue is the
Cardinal's resistance to thc seizure
by the Government of schools run by
Ihe  Catholic Church.
COMPETING IDEOLOGIES
At the root of the matter lies a conflict between two competing ideologies, one I f which denies the existence of Cod and the other which
ho'cls Him to be the end of mankind.
That such a conflict should centre in
()'c field cf the education of youth is
not surprising, nor were many people
amazed at the methods used by one
sioe.
It was also said about tho Cardinal
that he co-operated with the Nazis
during the war. This in face of tho
well-known fact that he was imprisoned by thc German contrclled
Government of 1944. It is by no means
coincidental that the present regime
'■hould use the same method of fe-
iM-essif.n as that which was used by
I'n- dictatorship of thc Nazi puppet
s'atc.
NOT  ISOLATED
The imprisonment of Cardinal
Mindszentry is not an isolated occurence, It is not oven restricted tJ
Hungary; Archbishop Stepinac of
Yugo-Slavia is now serving 16 years
imprisonment with hard labor. Nor
;t it limited to Catholics: two weeks
he'erc the arrest Lutheran Bishop
I, uis Oleics/ was sentenced to two
yi .nas in pi isnn. It is a story that is
..Paul t i he repeated in Czechoslovakia. It is a story that will end
only, when we. as citizens of a world
aommunity understand that what is
:i reality in Hungary today is a possibility   in  Canada   tomorrow.
Cardinal Minds/entry's arrest is a
direct violation of the Declaration
if Human Rights which guarantees
p( liticid and religious freedom to all.
Canada should lake an active part in
cny proceedings iwt only because she
i- a member of the U.N, but also on
Ihe grounds that the peace treaty with
Hungary to which we were a signatory  contains  the  same guarantees.
A world organization which fails to
protect human rights can only result
in world disorder. As stated by the
Ottawa   Journal:
"That is what has come to so much
of Europe which is the essence of
its tragedy. War, famine and pestilence have wrought their havoc, but
more awful than these things has been
the murder of justice and liberty,
wilh tyrants Tree to ply their trade of
violence and cruelty, and men no
longer compelled to face their opponents, to listen and learn and mend
their ideas in the light of the ideas of
others."
that the "University" is all in favour of those
political thoughts , . . well . . .
Well, how are you going to tell thc folks
downtown that the "University" did not pass
a resolution that the Prime Minister is a sound-so; but that a well-meaning group ol
150 students, whipped on by It) political
animals, did?
DIRTY FASCIST TOOL
And how are you to explain to the legislators (who on the one hand are responsible
to Ihe majority who look askance al such
goings-on; and on the other hand, are the
group to whom you must look for financial
support) that, because you believe in as much
freedom a.s possible, you would rather not
seek to control the people who often make
your oflice embarrassed, to say the least'.'
licensed of foslering and harbouring secret
societies, with a fair implication (hat such
MH'iolies an- lit by lumps bearing shades madi
by les bewley
And how are you ever going to get it across
to the political animals that you are not a
reactionary tool of Fascist Wall Street money-
mad war mongers, if you ever venture to
remind them of the responsibility that goes
with freedom, and you point out thai you,
as the man under the gun, are in a sense
responsible to a democratically-elected legislature lor what goes on at "your" university'.'
Perhaps the best way would be to ask
"Your" boys to slop and think, once in a while,
that you have your cares of otfice, too; and
. ..>me of these ihings don't make it any easier
lor you. Bul being less concerned with airing
your own troubles than doing a good job, you
l'i';ihably   won't.
So I guess that's about all, Mr. President;
e .cept that we'd like to say, it's no easy job
>"U have up there—and if you vvci>.' a lesser
-'<>rl ol man than you are, we might say, al
I lines,  we re  sorrv   lop  you.

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