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The Ubyssey Oct 19, 1949

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 IT'S YOUR DUTY
Give Your Blood
NOW
The
VOL. XXXII
IT'S YOUR DUTY
Give Your Blood
NOW
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19. 1949
No. 12
Final Arrangements Made
For Campus  Symphonies
Photo Courtesy Extension Department
MYSTERIES OF POTTERY making and Ceramics are imitated to a group of Vancouver
citizens by instructor Miss Hilda Ross. This eo urse is just one of the many being given by the
UBC's Art Centre this winter.
Pure or Applied
Painting, [Pottery and Weaving
Courses Offered To Students
Without leaving the campus, UBC
students are now able to take courses
in almost tiny kind of art—pure or
applied at the University Art Workshop.
These eight courses bring the es(-
tablishment of a fine arts department
on the campus another step nearer
reality.
Last term, the workshop offered
courses in painting, pottery and weaving. The enthusiastic response to these
courses has encouraged the workshop
to enlarge the number and increase
the variety of the courses offered.
EIGHT COURSES
Altogether there are eight courses
to oheotie.'-from, designed to accom*
modate both beginners and advanced
students: Beginners pottery, advanced
pottery, chemistry of glazes, painting
and drawing, wood carving and turning, clay modelling (sculpture), weaving, history of art, and industrial design.
The instructors in all of these subjects arc distinguished practicing artists in their respective fields, and the
registraton in all courses is limited
to a size that will permit personal
and effective instruction for each
student.
Although these courses arc open to
the general public, they have not
yet been widely advertised off the
campus, in order that students may
have first opportunity of registering.
If by the end of this week the registration is not sufficiently heavy for
the courses to carry themselves, they
will either be filled from sources off
the campus or cancelled.
ALREADY FILLED
Already the extension department
announces that the beginners pottery
course is over-registered and operating, that the courses in advanced
pottery, chemistry of glazes, painting
and drawing, and wood carving and
turning, have already commenced
but are not yet fully registered.
The other courses will begin when
registration warrants it.
IN LIBRARY
The Workshop is located next to the
university art gallery, and together,
these form the University Art Centre,
the nucleus of the proposed fine arts
department.
These valuable art courses now give
those students who are interested in
thc arts and their future on the campus a chance to benefit both themselves and the university.
Registration, which must be completed on the campus before the end
of»the week, is supervised by the
extension department in Hut L 10,
behind and south of the library.
Play Casting To
Begin On Friday
B.v   BOB   RUSSEL
Masses and Man, expressionist playwright Ernst Toller's
masterpiece to be presented by the English Department this.
January, is particularly suited for university production.
Down-Under Art To Show
Here Until October 25th
A display of Australian Aboriginal art and an experiment
in Visual Education will be feature exhibits at the University
Art Gallery from today to October 25.
The aboriginal display entitled.
"Down Under" consists of panels prepared from the photographs and field
research studies of Martin Metal.
The items have been obtained
through the cooperation of the Australian   Commonwealth   Government.
Beaver Club Awards
Open to Veterans
Beaver Club Scholarships will again
the San Francisco Museum of Art and   be  awarded   in   1950  by   tlie  trustees
the City College of Can Francisco.
"Elements  of  Design,"   the  title  of
the visual education display, is spon
sored by tho Museum of Modern Art,
New York City. It illustrates thc use
of fundamental principles in all fields
of design.
Gallery    hours   are   10:30   a.m.    to
4.30  p.m.,  Monday   to  Saturday.
of the Beaver Club Trust. Thc scholarships are open to all Canadian ex-
servicemen and their sons. Applications must be forwarded to the secretary of thc Beaver Club Trust by
November 15, 1949. Application forms
may be obtained from Dean Walter
Gage's office, room 10,  Arts building.
The original German presentation
which caused storms of protest, was
cast almost entirely with younger
actors. The directors felt that more
seasoned actors had lost their faith
in ideas, and were too well versed
in the traditional tricks of the acting
trade to adapt themselves to this
exciting new drama form.
The play promises o be one of the
most provocative of the artistic events
on the campus this year, both from
the points of view of the ideas presented and of the highly original staging required.
Gables artist Cliff Robinson, who is
doing the sets for the university of
Toronto's major presentation "Fortune My Foe," has been engaged to
design the sets for this production,
and Dorothy Somerset will direct.
Casting will begin in the Brock
Stage Room. Friday at 3:30 p.m., and
since the play has a cast of 50, a large
turnout  is  requested,
And Free Bread
Budapest City
01 Dancing and
Singing Youth
Budapest is a city of "singing
and dancing youth" and bread
will be free at the end of the
year in Russia, according to
Norman Penner, leader of the
national federation of labour
youth.
As a result of the revolution, pleasure resorts are available to the workers at a dollar a day, barns and houses
have been distributed among the
Hungarian peasants, students receive
free education, and 80 percent of industry has been nationalized,
NOW BOSS
One old lady who had spent 30 years
scrubbing thc floors of an elite hotel
was made the manageress. He did not
reveal what happened to the former
owners of the hotel, however.
"Communism has released the creative energy of the people who are
now performing miracles or reconstruction,"   he said.
MOVE TO CENTRE
Labor temples, stadia, and flats are
being constructed, streetcar tracks are
being moved to the centre of the
streets in B'udapest.
"Budapest is pulsating with life,"
he said.
Ninety percent of the people support
the government, the other ten percent
are waiting for the American army
to liberate them.
Eastern Europe is "enthusiastically
guiug forward." Each farm has its
cultural unit and there are more
Shakespear performances than in
Western countries, according to Penner.
THANKS RUSSIA
The Hungarians thanked the Russians for liberation and they are now
receiving raw materials and machinery from her.
There is no possibility of unemployment i'or the next 15 to 20 years,'and
personal income taxes have been abolished.
Jacques Singer to Swing Baton
At Two Concerts Before Xmas
Jacques Singer's concert baton will again call forth great
music on the campus.
The Vancouver Symphony, under the direction of Mr.
Singer, will play the first of two pre-Christmas campus concerts on Wednesday, November 2nd, it was announced yesterday by LSE president Margaret Low-Beer.
.  Miss    Low-Beer's    Special    Event.''*'
Committee, operating on a drastically-
slashed budget, has been negotiating
with the symphony for some time, and
its efforts were rewarded by the
group's consenting to donate their service free of charge to the university.
The noon hour "pops" concerts will
this year be held in the auditorium,
where accoustics are better and seating more comfortable. Student attendance will determine whether or
not a proposed set of three post-
Christmas musical presentations wil!
be held, as a nominal entrance fee
must be charged to defray the expenses of visiting musicians.
This term's second symphony session will take place on December 7,
also at 12:30 in the the auditorium.
HAZEL HARRISON COMING
In addition to the Vancouver Symphony, many other entertainers, some
of international fame, will be brought
by LSE to the campus. Outstanding
amongst these is Miss Hazel Harrison,
brilliant concert pianist, whose talents will be heard on November 2.
Miss Harrison occupies an enviable
position amongst the continent's great
pianists, and critics have greeted her
performances with universal acclaim.
COLEMAN BROTHERS ALSO
On a different nature, but equally
palatable, is the Coleman Brothers'
quintette, the "Million-Aires" whose
unique musical accomplishments will
be brought to UBC on November 15.
The Coleman brothers are making
their western personal debut; on tour
from New York for the first time,
they have previously been heard here
only  on   recordings.
Additional entertainment for students will include a jazz concert and
a student talent show. The latter,
which will feature the piano artistry
of Colin Slim, and the voices of Mila
Andrews anci George Jones, will be
heard in tlie auditorium at noon on
October 21st.
New Rules
Girls Out, Men In
By One Each AM
AT UW0 Frats
LONDON, Ont.-(CUP)-New regulations for fraternities which seriously
restrict their social activities are to be
introduced this week at Western. Tho
new regulations crack down on the
number and variety of dances, the use
of liquor, and will even exclude wives
of members from the male fraternity
houses.
Students at Western feel that the new
regulation may sound the death toll
of fraternities here. Saturday night
parties, traditional at Western frats,
are no longer permitted.
A spokesman for the university administration said that Western was
just falling in line with tlie policy
established at several other universities.
'Tween Classes
Barbara Ann Scott May Appear On Campus
"If everything goes as planned,
Barbara Ann Scott will appear |
on the campus this Thursday," |
said   Walt   Ewing,    treasurer,
AMS, in an interview with the
Ubyssey. j
"We will know for sure late this
afternoon" he stated, i
If Miss Scott, does appear on the
campus she will appear in the Armories if it is raining, and if by chance
the sun is out the meeting will be held
in  the stadium.
tf tf tf
ANY STUDENTS WISHING to take
the St. Jonh's First Aid Course, are
asked to attend a meeting tomorrow
at ta.'SO p.m. in HB ?.
SCHOLARSHIP and B"rsary winners
(except special B'ursaries and Dominion-Provincial Youth Training Bursaries) are asked to call at the Registrar's office I'or their scholarship
cards, When these cards have been returned with instructors singnature,
cheques will  be  issued.
tf tf tf
MUSIC OV MOZARD (Symphony No.
39 in E flat) and of Brahms (Tragic
Overturei is to bo be presented by the
Music Appreciation club tomorrow at
12:30 p.m. in tire Men's Club room in
Brock Hall.
tf tf tf
WUS HI-JINX will be held in Brock
Hall at 7:30 p.m. tonight. Theme of
iho affair is :i  nie.hl   iii  residence   Co
eds will sport retiring garb such as
pyjamas, nightgowns and curlers. Admission  is twenty-five cents.
tf tf tf
WELL-KNOWN MARXIAN Socialist
George Weaver will speak on "The
Hand of Karl Marx" at a CCF meeting
to be held in Engineering 200 at 12:30
p.m.   tomorrow.
'  tf tf tf
GENERAL MEETING of Canadian
Legion will be hold in Applied Science 202 a I 12:30 p.m. All in embers
are asked to attend as the year's program will be presented for ratification.
tf tf tf
DH. LOTTA IHTSCIIMANOVA a well-
known UNNRA worker will speak to-
<l;iv  al   12-30  p.m.  in   Arts  100.
At present she is chairman of the
Unitarian Service Committee.
It is expected that her address will
be on conditions in Italy, Greece and
France because she has just recently
returned from there.
tf tf tf
BURT TAYLOR, well-known collector and musician, will be present at
the regular meeting of the Jazz Society at 12:30 p.m. in club room behind Brock Hall.
tf tf tf
K. M. BRAGSHAW. university bursar announces that all recipients of
Dominion-Provincial and University
Special Bursaries must call at hi.s office this week. If they do not their
awards  will  be cancelled.
Glee Club Plans
Entertainment at
Homecoming
One hour of musical entertainment
I will   be   presented  by  the  University
Glee Club et the annual Homecoming
Dance, October 29.
Baritone George Jones, playing the
lead role of the Musical Society opera,
Tom Jones, ani soprano. Milla Andrews, starring opposite as Sophia, will
be featured as soloist on thc program.
Glee Club president, Earl Jorgenson,
urges that all members attend rehearsals held Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12:30 in Hut M 1, in preparation for this show,
The solo artist series, usually presented at Glee Club rehearsals, has
been suspended for the next four
practices to insure work on the Homecoming program.
•4
,.fc*2&
.a**"'"
Cast For 'Tom
Jones' Picked
By Mussoc
Williams Named
Director For
Twenty-fifth Year
Well ahead of last year's
schedule, the Musical Society
has announced the cast for its
forthcoming West Coast premiere  operetta  "Tom  oJnes."
Starring in the title-role Is baritone George Jones (no relation). A
well-known Vancouver vocalist, Jones
is in his second year wilh thc society,
and this is his first leading role. Playing opposite him as the beautiful
Sophia is soprano TVTilla Andrew. Mil-
la will be remembered as Iolanthe in
last year's show.
VETERAN PLAYERS
Veteran members Hank Naylor and
Bob Faulkner appear as Partridge and
Squire Alworthy. Rita Loiselle sings
Honor, Sophia's maid and confidante.
Newcomers Megan Lloyd-Jones (Sask.)
and Glyn Yeomans (Dalhousie) appear as Miss Western and Lady Bel-
laston. John Dobbie is the vallanou.s
B'lifil. Hal Harvey i.s Squire Western.
Paul Yu/.wa is the Officer. John
Downs is Grizzle. Barry Larcmy is
Dobbin,
Dorothy McPhillips plays the role of
Hostess, Victoria David of Betty, Beverley Harris—Peggy, The Men's and
Womens' chorus bring the total east
up to 44.
WILLIAMS DIRECTOR AGAIN
C. Haydn Williams is again Mussoc
musical director; this i.s his 25th year
in this position. E. V. Young is in
charge of the dramatic department.
Rehearsals are in full swing, and
the various production departments
have begun work on what promises
to be the most successful and proficient of Mussoc's previous 20 productions. However aspiring campus
vocalists, whether presently members
or not, any especially tenors, are cordially invited to come to rehearsals,
which are daily at 12:30 in Hut M 1.
Sedgewick Memorial
Planned By Friends
An unofficial gesture is being given
to   the  late Dr.  G. G.  Sedgewick.  by
j hi.s  friends  and colleagues  across  the
country,   although   the   shape   of   the
memorial has not yet been decided,
j     Kay   MacDonald   and   Eileen   Moyls
( have been  chosen  from the students'
council as a committee to work  with
the   members  of  the   faculty  and  the
rest of Dr. Sedgewick's friends.  Suggestions  have  been   made  concerning
scholarships,  book  funds and  various
other ways to commemorate this well-
remembered man, but no definite con-
to carry out. tlie plans.
X.. .^s>st*£*sSs   ,.&a:ss
-v^Pfc*.
-■■s**
mi
Pliulii  C'otirtc.si/   I', atcil.slioi   DcpnrOncnt
IMPRESSIVE GATES will adorn the lomMorRol1on main
entrance to the university. Presented by F. Ronald Graham,
the entrance pillars will stand 100 feet apart on the etlye of lhe
roadways and w>l! he flanked by attractive granite buttresses.
Floodlights will illuminate Ihem al  night. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,    October    18,    1949
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Oflice Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions-$2.00 per year.
Published  throughout the university  year by  the  Student Publications Board of  the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of Thc Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of tlie University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1(524 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JfM   BANHAM
MANAGING  EDITOR CHUCK  MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vic Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Asst. Les Armour
Senior   Editor   This   Issue- HUGH CAMERON
Associate   Edilor-BETTY   HORTIN
The Gong Has Rung, Mr. Hunter
The bookstore management seems, to use
a colloquialism, to be hiding its talents under
a bushel.
It knows, by this time, that students are
not satisfied with its operations. It knows
that these students are its sole source of
revenue. It knows that these students could
take their business elsewhere.
But it is too shy to offer any defense.
It would rather go out of business, apparently, than come out from hiding and declare
its intentions.
In some circles this attitude might be
called  cowardice.   It  might  well  be   called
lhat, if we imply from thc management's
silence that they admit the truth of the
Ubyssey's charges.
Surely if a man refuses to defend himself it is fair to assume that he committed
th eoffenses with wh\ch you charge him.
But it might still be the case that the
bookstore has a defense but is too lazy or
too indifferent or just plain too lazy to give
that defense.
If so, then this is an offense in itself
just as serious as those with which the
Ubyssey charged the store. For to ignore
one's customers is the height of poor business.
Come out and fight, Hunter!
Letters To The Editor
JUST FUN?
The Editor.
Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Your tirade on October 14 against
the engineers banquet just shows that
you don't know how to have a good
time. The curriculum in engineering
demands long and concentrated hours
of work, so hours of relaxation must
also be concentrated. I am not down
on Arts courses, but it is a fact that
their course work isn't nearly so
heavy as in engineering, consequently
they can't be expected lo understand
our attitude. It seems to me that a man
is missing a lot al university if he
can't sometimes let himself go. and
have some good clean fun.
L. S. N.
3rd Mechanical.
Ubyssey Classified
r.
Meetings
PRE-MED GIRLS-there will be a
meeting  of  pre-med   girls in   A   102
on   "fhursday,   October  20. Everyone
out.
MEETING OF SCOTTISH country
dance club Thursday in Hut G 4 at
12:30. Everyone welcome.
CCF CLUB MEETING Wednesday
12:30 in Engineering 200. George Weaver on "The Hand of Karl Marx."
RADIO SOCIETYY's Drama Group
forming this afternoon at 1:30 in Studio B, Brock south basement. Those
interested will be trained for a drama
series to be presented next term.
JAZZ SOCIETY presents Burt Taylor, well-known collector and musician in a program of modern music
at the regular Wednesday meeting.
12:30 in club room behind Brock. If
you haven't joined up yet, turn out
on Wednesday.
WEEKLY MEETINGS of Alpha
Omega (Ukranian Club) are changed
from noon Friday to noon Tuesday.
Arte 103. Guest speakers and discussions every meeting,
NEXT MEETING of the Psychology
Club will be Thursday, October 2"
at 7:30 p.m. in thc Psychology lab,
E, 203.
UNIVERSITY Symphony rehearsal
in UBC Auditorium every Wednesday
at 6 p.m.
"THE PSYCHOLOGY of Christian
Redemption" is to bbe the topic of
Rev. Elbert Paul who will speak Wednesday, October 19 at 12:30 in Arts
204, under the auspices of the Varsity
Christian Fellowship.
UNITED NATIONS CLUB presents
Latta Hitschmanova speaking on 'Europe Today." Tuesday, 12:3(1 p.m. Arts
100,
THE CAMERA CLUB will hold an
outsoor session  this  coming  Sunday, i
weather permitting. The time is 2
J p.m., the place, Stanley Park streetcar terminus. Wo should have a lot
of fun so come along and bring your
wife, husband, girl friend et al. P.S.
A camera might be useful too.
JOIN THE' UBC Badminton Club-
12 courts for play in gym or field house
every Thursday at 8 for SI payable
at AMS office.
"CHRISTIAN SCIENCE: Tlie Religion which teaches true spirituality"
will be the title of a lecture given by
Elizabeth F. Norwood, CSB of Brook-
line, Massachusetts, in Physics 200 at
12:30 Tuesday.
Lost
RED IMITATION ALLIGATOR SKIN
wallet, near or in Cafeteria Tuesday.
Reward. Phone KE'. 2971.
RED CAR CUSHION on Monday nigh'
parking area near Brock. Please phone
AL.   0196L.
WRIST WATCH, Tavcnne. broken
strap.   Reward.   Phone   Dexter   192!"iT.
THURSDAY NOON. October 12, in
Caf or Hut AG—"Sociology" by Cuber.
Finder please phone AL. 1722Y.
PAIR RIMLESS GLASSES in black
ease. Name inside. Vicinity '[' hnie
and 1,'Sih. Reward. Phone AL. 2MT2Y.
CLEAR, lIORN-h'l.MMKI) e,la:,,e'. j„
ease near ."'ggie building. Pliene A!,.
OaHOR.
ALPHA GAMMA HELTA sn.orjiy
pin. Name on back. Reward. Phone
Lorraine, Kerr. 2IS7Y.
WILL YOUNG LADY in Plymouth
coupe who gave lift to student Saturday around noon please ph me AL.
0G38R.
WILL THE PE'RSON who found
"Simplified French Review" in Hut
L3 please phone Muriel at  AL. 13J5L.
IN ARTS OR CAF-Thursday, natural kid "love. Phone Jan, AT.. lfiMM,
HEBEL    and    HUDSON--"Poetry    of
thc English  Renaissance."  In HM   1
(I   think)   on  Monday.  Please phone
Jim Wilson, DE, 1543Y,
CHROME  PLATED  HUB-CAP   with
centre reflector. Phone MA. 1601.
Room and Board
ROOM FOR ONE OR TWO students.
Light housekeeping if desired. 4755
West 4th Avenue. AL. 0375L.
TWO BOYS WANTED to share room
with    board.   Apply   Mrs,   Yates   at
4413 West 10th.
COMFORTABLE   ROOM    for    male
student. Two meals. Reasonable. AL.
2023R.
SLEEPING ROOM suitable for 2 boy
students,   twin   beds.   Close   to   UL'C
bus. AL. 1209R.
COMFORTABLE ROOM for male-
student. Two meals. Reasonable. AL,
21:23-11.
COMFORTABLE        BED-SITTING
room with food breakfast for one
male student. Close to UBC. Ride
far 8:3()'s. 4000 W, 10th Ave. AL. 3459L,
ROOM AND BOARD for one male
student sharing. Near UBC gates.
Phone AL.  1239-M.
ROOM AND BOARD for one hoy
student.    453G    W.    13th.    Phone    AL.
Illtla-L.
COMKORTAIH.I', ROOM for two
male .'-'Indents, fil'eplaee. private loilci.
\ear ULC lues. Bit ikfast and packed
lunch.  S35  eech.   Al .  OlifiO-L.
ROOM AND BOARD for one male
sludenl. i'o share large bright room
i twin he;]s> with 4th yr. Eng. student.
I! oakfast and dinner and 3 meals
S il. and Son. Laundry. $5;).00 pea
mrrith. 4,wi   '   '".  ""    in-.  AL. 0474-L.
room ,\v> (   ':;o-;\r   board
in    refill1 d    Jewish    ha : e    in    T';'.iie
Granville dislrie'  r.o-.r  l'':h A a;
srnable   rent'.   2937  Hemlock.
ROOM AND BOARD for quiet man
in   nice   home.   AL.   2896-R,
BE A BLOOD DONOR!
YOU  ARE ASKED  TO
CONTRIBUTE JUST ONCE
IN  A YEAR!
100 Pinfs of Blood Are Needed to Supply the
Hospitals in Vancouver Alone - Every
Day - 7 Days a Week!
REGISTER NOW!!
It Takes Just 30 Minutes of Your Time
NO DISCOMFORT - NO DIETING
VISIT THE RED CROSS CLINIC   IN
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YO
LIFE!
EDITOR UBYSSEY,
I On behalf of tho other foreign stud-
[ ents at UBC I take the liberty of expressing our sincere appreciation for
the very enjoyable Tea Party on
Friday, held under tlie auspices of the
International Students' Club.
It was delighting to meet students
from all over the globe. From Trinidad, Peru, British Guiana, Barbados,
and Brazil. From Malta, Egypt, The
Sudan, South Africa, Ethiopia, Palestine, Pakistan and India. From England, France, Latvia, Poland, New
Zealand and Australia. Indeed, there
were even guests from such distant
lands as Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta
and B.C. We were glad to meet someone from Alaska, and were further
honored by the presence of some dignified representatives from that far-
off island of "Victoria."
The party was a success—and the
executive deserves to bc greatly complimented for all the arrangements.
But had all the remaining foreign
students been able to come to this
afternoon tea, the party would have
been a still more colorful assemblage.
We are all deeply appreciative of the
very warm interest and hospitality
shown to foreign students by all at
UBC. We hope to be able later to
reciprocate the hospitality in our own
respective lands.
Taffara De Guefe,
(Ethiopia)
TYPEWRITING
Essays, Theses, Notes  ^
Manuscripts
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
4180 W. 11th Ave.       ALma 0915R
Ma$Mfiu&
\^m**^^e00^^^'%'^gflfifi
'' *$M
0
o you know the
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programme?
The lesson of how to manage
money successfully cannot be
learned too soon.
Many a young man has found
that when he takes out his
first life insurance policy he has
discovered the finest method
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Only personal consultation with
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thc type of policy best suited
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You should call in your local
Mutual Life of Canada representative today. He will consider
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well as your income, before
advising on the policy,
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MUTUAL llfE
^%.i^&& a A DA
WATERLOO
Vancouver Hianih Ollico
ERIC V. CllOWN, LL,
- -102 W. IVnder Street
IJ.   Branch Manager Tuesday,    October    18,    1949
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
•*?.»-
COTC  SUPPLEMENT
Editors This Page      Chuck Marshall - Don Robertson
____Wtp*?j*J* t j
*____W    <s     \>iT 'i
___WL-.    s  !A!s     ' ♦■
■KS% s   ■■ VV
■ggjy J1; »»      e
BACK
lllr^'''
kP^*'   " x '                 »     ,
8H&8      pli'M,             s          s     ,
*
'
BACKBONE OF THE ARMY
Composite COTC Program
Appeals To All Students
Travel, Training,
Pay Offered
Applicants
No Lonser The PBI, Infantry Is
The 'Queen OF The Battlefield'
Basic fighting troops of every army
are the men of tho Infantry.
All other arms and services support
and maintain the infantry in action.
Hence the title "Queen of Battle"
recognizing the role of the foot soldier.
The PBI is no longer the PBI under
the present diversified setup. Today's
infantryman is no longer merely a
foot-slogger but rather en efficient
craftsman in his particular line of
combat.
MASTER OF ALL
Diversity is'the keynote in thc infantry   training.   An   infantecr   is   a
paratrooper, a ski-trooper or a member
I of an airborne unit, he can drive a
snowmobile, a "gin-palace" or somc-
I times even walk. He must bc a master of all basic infantry weapons and
be able to take over any job in a split
second.
I
i     The   infantry   regiment   is   in   itself
a complete and self-contained unit
maintaining transport of over 100 assorted vehicles, six pounder anti-tank
guns, three-inch mortars, flame throwers plus the normal infantry weapons
such as rifles, machine guns, machine
carbines and the like.
The COTC?
Pictured by the average civilian
the infantry battalion appears as a
mass of marching troops ca'-ryirg
rifles whereas the a;. v. A cue is far
from that envisioned.
ACTIVE FORCE
In the Canadian Army Active Force,
are three infantry regiments forming
one infantry brigade bolstered by the
permanent corps school at Camp Borden. Of the permanent fore* units,
the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light
Infantry, stationed at Calgary, were
the first to complete jump training and
sire being followed by the-Royal Cnr.a-
dian Regiment, Brockville. Ont.. and
the Royal 1:2 Re,'.;in\ent stationed al
Valcartier. P.Q. On completion of
this trainbn; the Canadian Army will
have a .striking force of one airborne
infantry  brir-'ide.
COTC scheme
Trainim; for a eammis.sinn in tin
Royal Canadian Infantry Corp.
throughout Ihe COTC' schema 1. c; i •
ried on al Currie E'ensicks, Calgarv.
and the Royal Canadian School of Infantry. Camp Borden,
At Calgary, the home of lhe FPCT.I.
first and second year officer c,ul"'s
take Iheir training. Banff, Lake Louisa
and Edmonton are favorite weekend
haunts of UBC contingent  men.
Third year training takes cadets
to Camp Borden for more specialized
instruction. Student officers attending thi.s phase last summer qualified
for both wheeled and track vehicle
operation and conducted several
schemes involving the use of armour.
Graduates from the COTC infantry
are to be lound in local regiments,
the Canadian Scottish, the Seaforth
Highlanders, the Westminster Regiment (Mi and the Rocky Mountain
Rangers as well as in the Canadian
Armv  Active  Force.
The Canadian Officers' Training Corps is an organization
set up at each Univorisly to allow male sludents thc opportunity to qualify as commissioned officers in the Canadian
Army.
Il i.s not an aggressively militaristic institution, Persons
so minded are not encouraged to join. Tlie COTC is part ol
our insurance for peace.
Twice in our time we have been forced to d'.'.end ourselves!
against unprovoked aggression. On both these occasions we
have been able to hold ihe enemy a! arms reach. This has been
our good fortune. The Western World has been reliably and
adequately warned that the threat of attack again looms.
Should it come, attacks would be made upon our vitals and
with incredible force. There would be no time to leisurely
prepare our national defences.
The Minister of National Defence and thc President of the
United States have both stated that the only way to avert
assault upon us is to show aggressors how foolish it would be
to attack us.
Of all the major countries, Canada is the only one which
has not recognized the need for conscription. Our strength has
always laid in a system of voluntary service. This system will
serve us well only so long a.s volunteers come forward to train
themseves before they are required.
The UBC Contingent of the
COTC has upheld the finest traditions of our University. First
formed during World War I it was
reactivated under Lt. Col. H. T.
Logan in 1928 by a farsighted and
public minded Senate. Great difficulties were encountered, at the
outset, partly due to shortage of
funds.
Such, however, was the spirit
of  those  who  volunteered,   thai   they   turned   in   their   pay   to      ^ .^ ,, ^ ^.^ ^ ^ ^
keep the Contingent going.  Among the- ollicer cadets of those   ,,,. m/:,(,; ,m(|i,,. ,,K, (;OTC scUip ,t,
days  were  numbered   many   whose   names   became   lamous  as j f|,lirf,..   ^..^.-^i   phases    of    sixteen
senior officers during; World War II. jwiolss  each  summer   in  addition  to
In  1!U1  the  UBC  Contingent   built  the   yroscn'   Armoury ; ;u-My  campus parades.
at   a   COSl   of   over   cUOO.000.00   and   presented   it   as   an   outfight !     Firsi   year  training  is  carried  on  at
.        -rr   ■ ■ m !    ,,,.,..   tl-,,-.   t,.n.   Inmnrl    the   HCASC   Selr. ol   at   Camp   Borden
oift  to  the  Universitv.   Ihe  money  used  was  the  pa,\   turned >     ,    ,
»'u   u ' . moo   ,       m-11     ''md   :s   nnmanlv   concerned   with   the
back  into the Contingent  by  it.-; members  Irom  1J2S  to  D41.   |i]v:.k;m,_in t.Mli;> sUldent  (0 anm.
Cadets were poorly paid in ihose days. Today they receive —
and retain — the equivalent or more than they could earn in
industry.
Since the vsi   lhe Contingent has filled  its quotas as set
,kw il,,, rVivirtmeul  of National Defence each year. It has con-,
•by Hie  D< .paitmna   oi ,.       I DRIVING AND MAINTENANCE
Unued U. produce a h:,h standard ol odicers lor the Canadian , ^ ^ ^ . ^^ ^ ^ ^^.^
At'tny.'Duriii- tin past summer's training lhe teas clltcer cade's jKi,. M ( ,li(, ,,l7t,rl. ,,„!,,, willl ;il|
at   five   diffe.vm   Corp.,   Schools   were   selected   from   aniom;s
UBC men.
Students  wh..  have joined   ihe  Conliugein   <!u
were lursiehtrd .-md public spinled cili/ens. Tie y brought a ueh
,umi)lll. tll |h,s Cnive.-aily. They did much io lil-hiv ihe pre ,enl
peace and pn^pn-ity of Canada
Our I'utUM' i..si-, wilh y<m.
A combination employment
bureau, school .travel agency
and fraternity was the way
that one offic • cadet attempted to sum .rize the program
of the C". .dian Officers Training C ,.i recently and whether
hr i.ew it or not he came
■ y close to hitting the nail
jn the head.
The only point that he missed in
his des-ariptisn was perhaps the most
impoimnl of all, considering the present international situation, that the
COTC provides the student with the
skill and knowledge t'o defend Canada if ever she were attacked.
REAL PROBLEM
To some that may smack of war
mongering but to those in Corps who
from time to time come into contact
wii'ii Canada's ten .Hilary men, realize
frr m .'._ r concern that the probability is not so remote as some would
have us think, and the students are
glad to have the training that will
allow them to meet the crisis successfully if ever it should arrive.
On the more practical side, thc
Corps is a God-send to many university student's for it not only provides
them with pleasant employment for
their entiie summer holiday but
>\s.. pays them for the one night a
week that I'hey turn out during the
school   term.
The S15'J, plus room and board, plus
A. thing, plus medical and dental
(aire provide a combination that can't
be Loitered anywhere for advantages
■nd  opportunity.
n\ mailer what branch of the COTC
he s'udenl may join, whether it 'us
•■lira arul. artillery or ent'ineei's. ha is
gouig to learn tilings that will bc
ii e'nl lo him for ihe rest of Irs life.
l-'IUS'k  CLASS TRAVEL
Tea iVnvel agency part of the
'■' r" , appeals to many undergradu-
i.e-. To those who have never been
alius' mviij from h. me than Clulli-
s ""k, tli" presuecl of being sent to
'. .i!",.n\, , Winnipeg. Toronto, Kins's-
'.oi>. i r Montreal, first class with all
:• "'"rises pai.i, is die chance of a
'ife  time.
Wh le a'/  UBC,  the members of  lhe
•erj.'S  have  at   Iheir  disposal   the  best
.■fficers    n.ess    to   be   found   at   any i
imivi rsitv    in   Canada.    Here    just   a!
i
lew : te: s  from  the class  rooms, they
can    i'lua;    in   pleasant   surroundings
la  read, play cards cr chat wil'li  their
friends.
Al   summer   camps   tlie   opportuni- ;
li'a   .-ne  even   more   varied   for   there!
uni-'crsity   sludents    from   all   across
Canada   gather   I'or   training   and   the
nasal   twang 'of  Newfoundland  mixes
wii'ii   the   French   accent    of   Quebec
; nd    (he    clipped    tones    of    British
Columbia.
RULES OF ELIGIBILITY
FOR ADMISSION TO C.O.T.C.
UBC students considering applying for the COTC are
urged by the lesident staff officer, Major W. W. Mathers,,,
to come to the orderly room in the Armouries xtnd fill oyt
an application as soon as possible since the Selection Board,.'
which must examine all applicants,  will begin to sit this
week.
All  undergraduates  who  can  fulfil  the  following  requirements are eligible for admission:
1. Must  be  a British subject.
2. Registered in a course of which JuniorJMatriculation
is a prerequisite.
3. Must be at least 17 years old and not more than 26.
Army's Junior Corps
Celebrates Birthday
The Corps of Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical
Engineers celebrates its fifth anniversary this year. In comparison to the age of other army corps it is still in its infancy, but
in organization nothing i.s further from the truth.
The forma;i.;n of lhe RCEME Corps'1
was a  direct  result  of the mcchaniz- ]
thoroughly   trained   en   the   various
army   equipments.
Sumner training as a RCEME'Officer Cadet of the COTC is accepted
l:v 'lie (Jr.iversity as required summer training towards a degree' in
e!e..,i(.il   cr   mechanical  engineering.
ation of tlie modern army. To aceom- | REQUIRED TRAINING
plish its la:!; tlie Corps was organized as unit:, of inspection teams and
workshops io check, repair and maintain all types of wheel and track
vehicles, telecommunication equipments, armaments, small arms and innumerable auxiliary equipments.
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
To keep pace with the scientific
advances and meet furure requirements in army equipments separate
units were organized to engage in
Ihe design and development of new
equipments and the modification of
machines  now  in use.
I.hes, . h'wever are very ably as-
s s'e.-l hy a .-.mail *:;'"iip of assistant
i nai'i'i i". cnm.i n-.Mone ! from 1 he
'.'a  :a.n'   i . uc    s   ■ ,'   i'"    C a   ..  ,a;d   !
MORE FUN
IN BED
FOR
•^ EVERYONE
Service Com Work
A ttracts Commei cernen
Supply,   transport   and  catering  are   the  three   main   responsibilities of the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps.
Iho  ri»ht   thine:  at  the  right   moment
life. Hi hi weeks is devoted lo genera1 miihary training, followed by
,,n inl rorluelii n lo the wort: of i'he
Service Corps in its three main cap-
acil ies.
' ■\'X,C    vehicles   including   amphihi-
l..n tn:;  ci all.   Drivim;  and  main-
I'jno   pic   MpM   'nai   n   e   , f   the   vehicles,   and   convey
i i
, a,     I hi ou'iheul  (Inlario prove  tlie
• '     i'.'i re  im»   as   i els   i f   Pic   Corps
I'or   tlie   maintenance   of   an   army   in
I lie  'field   as   in   peace-l'ime.
PRACTICE PROBLEMS
Scci nd practical phase I.s also held
a! Piorden with extra emphasis of the
problems of supply and transport and
the practicing of these problems iu lla
loi'in of schemes, including the establishment of ammunition, supply and
poind points under as near wartime
condition   as   possible.
Alt.ichivienl to active force units
or die third pln^-v brings to reality
.'.io problems learned during lhe previous i\\ a yaaie- and ei s e - X. e s-l U-
Ynl i T1' "it an eppo. I uni!;. te nip
id ,   Paining   i:i!o   use.
!1    a\':k ' Panning is paiaislilarlv henc-
I'n ial   to   I lie commerce  Mil. lei;',.     I'd ■
m     an   oapailtmu.s    lo  prac'ise   knmv-
U   iae   e mu d   al   imivi'i'-il v   a\\X   i . ;ip-
PRACTICAL     EXPERIENCE
of the type valuable to engineering students such as Ernie
Creber is offered in the well
equipped workshop.-. i*f Upe
RCEME Corps.
iiiie.meiit   ail'il'ireis  specially  selected
.rom   die   hoi   artisan   tradesmen   and
■■'J \ \sW/'rl
SHIRTS
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combines a true-toned quality
radio with a scientifically
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From  S2.6!)
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'wtibtwma
R.    W.    iiOXNER.    LT.    OOL.
I •■ a ins  .    en    s iiji|il> im;    army    l»i
.... ..-■   i    in:    or    i lie   immense   I.e.'
le'ei Lilian In   ihe 11.-'- ASC' in -- llpl'l1. n
i;     ,'     \w n     a;
!   le.ra,    la    -1111
i .    era,Illation.
■N|il I'a'llce
OPTOM ETR ISTS
HERBERT C   AF;'
ROSS F. Al,*.n
CFnAF*   1611
1322 W. BROADWAV
AT GRANVILLE
Vancouver, BC, Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,    October    18,    1949
Burke's Birds Look Good
Against Stylish Vikings
Plenty of Guts
But No Weight
By RAY FROST
Underweighted and understaffed Thunderbird football
team played their best game of
the season Saturday when
they held the stylish Western
Washington Vikings down to
a 21-6 win at Bellingham.
Thoroughly inspired by their
win of the previous week, and
undismayed by their ever in
creasing injury list, 'Birds
showed a near-record crowd
of UBC Bellingham Invasion
supporters they had the guts
that makes them a fighting
ball club.
Head coach Orville Burke said ho
was "more than satisfied with the
team's improvement so far," after
Saturday's game was  finished.
''If we had just 10 more pounds per
man on the Thunderbird team, we
would be a power in the conference,''
he said.
Offensive play being called by
diminutive quarterback Leo Lund.
who successfully mixed up his sequence of plays t'o keep Western
Washington guessing, UBC was always a threat when they took possession of the ball.
Defensive team fought Vikings to
a standstill in the second and fourth,
quarters, paving the way for thc
offensive eleven, although they were
slow in starting in the first five
minutes of the game.
DOWNFIELD MARCH
Western Washington scored on one
complete march down the field after
receiving the opening kickoff from
the UBC side.
Quick downfield march of W W almost broke the morale of UBC's defensive line but their spirits were
immediately lifted when UE'C gained
possession of the ball after kickoff.
Fleet Georgie Puil, who scored both
touchdowns for 'Bird's only win this
season, took the lateral pass on an
end sweep and raced 55 yards for
the only UBC score of the game.
Perfect blocking by Doug Reid anci
Don Knight opened up the way for
Puil's t'ouchdown, but his own agility
kept him from being caught. Convert
was blocked.
KARNOFSKI AGAIN
Before the end of the first quarter
Vikings had again pressed hard and
through a series of successive first
downs, set up Karnofski for another
end run touchdown, making the
quarter score 14-6.
Second period saw UBC's defensive
string hold Western Washington to a
standstill, while the 'Bird offensive
tried .hard to bring the score a little
closer.
Reid picked up a charleyhorse when
he ran back the third quarter kick-
off and was out of action the entire
period.
Burden of the attack was taken
over by fullback Don Lord, playing
his most outstanding game this year,
Utile Georgie Puil and Dave MacFarlane.
Taking his share of line plunges as
well as the bigger backfield men,
Puil kept the 'Bird attack going
strong on one occasion when on a
fourth down he picked up the necessary two yards to go by driving
through Viking's hard wall with a
Washington lineman hanging on i'o
him all the way.
PENALTY  DISATROUS
Penalty against UBC placed Vikings
in position to score their final TD
when a fifteen yard gift put the
ball on Thunderbird's one yard line.
Tom Taylor carried the ball across
for the winners. All three converts
were good.
Final period saw UBC trying some
desperation passes, but with regular
flinger Hugh McArthur out of action,
the  attack   was   not  successful.
Notices
There will be a meeting of all soccer
players in the Double Committee room;
of the Brock Hall at 12:30 on Friday, '
October 21.
If anyone is  interested  please come
to   the   meeting   or   contact    Gordon
Baum in the Brock or south end of
the stadium at noon. !
* * *
A MEETING of Ihe Track and Cms.s
Country group will he held in Hut
HL ii at 12:30 on Wednesday, October
10, Purpose of the meeting is to arrange for the tennis in llu1 half mile
relay for the font hull emue Setiiniea
unci tn arrniu'.e lhe handicap'. I'm lie
three   mile   h.mdic.m   on   Oelnhei    :!li
Sports Eklitor — RAY FROST
Notices
Mural Soccer
ARTSMEN   soccer   players   wanted        WEDNESDAY,   OCTOBER   lDlh
for   noon   hour   intramural   program. ' I.  Fiji  v.s Newman
Phone  Vern   Arclial.   AL.   llliJR   after! 2.  Deke.s vs ATO
34 years of service
to the University oi
British Columbia,
its Fraternities
and Sororities.
THERE'S A REASON
5 p.m. as soon as possible.
THERE WILL BE A meeting of the
Tennis Club  Wednesday,  October  l'J
in  Arts 104.  All those interested  are j 1. Engs. 2 vs Koots
invited.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20
1. Chem Engs. vs Kappa Sig
2. Phi  Delt  vs Lambda Chi
FRIDAY,   OCTOBER   21st
I 2. Trail  v.s Termites
Dnmuno  /STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD.
TEIEPHONE      PACIFIC   OI7I
Hi SEYMOUR ST.   VANCOUVER. I, C,
Ubyssey Photo 6iy Doug Burnett
FINISHING OFF one of Western Washington's tricky plays is
UBC fullback Don Lord who played his best game of the season
Saturday. Lord on top of the ball carrier wa.s helped by one
of his teammates who can be seen underneath hanging on
IT PA YS
TO ROLL YOUR OWN WITH
British Consols
Cigarette Tobacco
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©IF   A<C<e®Jffl[PILIISIffl.'J!ftE
1889 m± 1949
Riir
In early clays, cream was skimmed from the top of milk left standing overnight in pans in a cool, deep cellar.
Or cans of milk were immersed in cold water from tke well or spring. When the cream had risen to thc top,
the milk was drained out of the bottom of the can leaving the cream, which was then churned in a dash
churn or barrel churn. Today in modern dairy plants no care or expense is spared in protecting the purity of
milk, cream and other dairy products. Nickel alloys are used in pasteurizers, coolers, bottling machines
and other equipment, because these alloys are corrosion-resistant and easy to keep clean and sanitary.
Canadian Nickel sold Abroad brings in US. Dollars
Since more than ninety per cent of the
Nickel produced in Canada is sold to the
United States and other countries, it brings
a constant flow of dollars back to Canada.
In fact, Canada's Nickel industry is one of
our chief sources of U.S. dollars so essential
at the present time to maintain our foreign
trade and make available products not
produced in this country.
These dollars help pay the wages of the
14,000 Nickel employees, and help provide
the dollars which make it possible to pay
millions in freight to Canadian railways, to
buy timber, steel, coal, machinery and supplies amounting to many millions each year.
These millions, flowing into all industries
through the length and breadth of Canada,
help create jobs for Canadians.
:•*«*«
Canai
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FIRST   PRODUCED    IN    CANADA   IN   1889
THE   INTERNATIONAL   NICKEL   COMPANY   OF   CANADA,   LIMITED,   25   KING   STREET   WEST,   TORONTO

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