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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1949

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 Ut's Go Pubbing
(See Page Three)
The Ubyssey
Let's Go Pubbing
(See Page Three)
VOL. XXXII
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1949
No. 3
Ubyssey Photo by Bob Steiner
SHOW STOPPER at annual Frosh Smoker was  blonde "dancer," Cecilia. She left freshmen
guggle-eyed and limp after rendition of "Blue and Boogie." Singers, accordionists, other dancers
and free cigars filled out program for appreciative Frosh who whistled and howled through  stm looked down upon in football
three-hour show.
f
Five Dollar Fines To Be
L
evie
dF
or
arking
Reid To Ploy
-4>
Whitman Gridders
In for Surprise
Whitman College Missionaries are walking into a cleverly
laid trap by coming to play
UBC's much improved Thunderbirds.
Preachers don't know it, but Burke
and his crew of players have been
practicing hard, and have a surprise in store for visitors.
IN LARGE NUMBERS
With a far greater number of plays
on hand than Vhey ever even dreamed
about having at last week's encounter
together with a greater number of
players than they have had to date,
UBC is going to win this football
game.
Whitman are probably expecting the
'Birds to be another average club.
Even though these two teams came
through their last encounter with each
other   with  a   13-13   sawoff,  UBC   is
Cafeteria Authorities
Order 'Keep Moving
No Discrimination, But No
Again
Policy
.1 iii
.1
Rule of "keep moving" will be enforced by commissionaires
in the cafeteria this year.
Following the fracas last September, a policy of "no dis
crimination" against the Greek letter societies will be" followed
by Caf authorities.
 ^s   "whjig we will prevent the students
'Tween Closses
SCM Sponsors
Bible Readings
For the third consecutive
year, SCM, interdenominational
agency of the Canadian Council of Churches bn the campus,
will sponsor services at Christ
Church Cathedral.
Dean Cecil Swanson will preach
and Dr. Norman A. M. MacKenzie
will give Bible readings. President
Jim Sutherland and other council
members have been invited to attend.
Services begin at 7:30 Sunday evening.
*r V *r
LECTURE by Reverend Dr. Jocelyn
Perkins of Westminster Abbey on
"A Ramble Round the Abbey" will
take place at 3;30 today in Physics
200. Interested students are invited
to attend.
#
#
FIRST general membership meeting
of the Student Liberal Club will he
held 12:30 Monday in Aggie 100. Resolutions to be forwarded to the Young
Liberal Convention in Montreal this
fall will be discussed. Previous members and anyone interested are invited to attend. ,
from loitering in the cafeteria at noon
hour, there will be no discrimination
against any particular groups," R. M.
Bagshaw, Bursar, stated today,
PATROLLED
The cafeteria, a sore point on the
campus last year, was patrolled by
commissionaires from 10.00 a.m. until
2:00 p.m. every day. Special constables
installed by the Discipline Committee
threw out lounging society co-eds and
bridge players.
Complaints in the past came from
ncn-sorority and non-fraternity students who said they couldn't get
meals or places to sit
POWERLESS
Student Council had declared itself
"powerless" to relieve crowded conditions in the Caf, and manager Frank
Underhill had enforced the policy of
no loitering. He refused to say, however, what his actions would be in
future.
Regulations last year hampered
fraternity activities when fewer students signed up for rushing than expected.
BOTTLENECKS
Cafeteria traffic bottlenecks proved
a headache for the student discipline
,/committee.
Bursar Bagshaw said tile cafeteria
was primarily a service organization
and therefore wanted to handle as
many students as possible.
Phrateres Meet Wed.
New membert of Phrateres will
meet Wednejday, September 29, at
12:30 in Applied Science 101. Old
Phratereans are asked to assemble
Monday, September 26, at 12:30 in
Applied Science 202.
circles
SURPRISE
That is the surprise in store for the
unsuspecting  Missionaries	
Perennial star on i'he gridiron Doug
Reid is the newest and probably best
addition to the team since last week
although there have been more to
bolster up the team.
Burke has been showing and teaching the boys a new set of play that
he likes to feature.
Passing seems to be a favorite way
of coach Burke's for getting the ball
way down the field in as little time
as possible and that is the kind of
practice that he has been trying on the
team.
Fraternity Rushing Opens
Monday Announces IFC
Fall rushing for membership in the Fraternities begins
Monday Tom Gray, vice-president of the Inter-Fraternity
Council, announced yesterday.
Applicants must have been to either
UBC or Victoria College and be in
possession of twelve credits.
Registration will take place at the
AMS office between Monday, September 25, and Friday, October 1.
Students And Faculty Subject To
Penalties States Administration
Students and faculty parking in non-allocated parking
places will be subject to administration fines of up to five
dollars.
Because   of   ample   parking   space ® —
now  available  on  campus,  Adminis
tration feel that no cars, faculty or
students, shpuld be found in wrong
or prohibited areas.
Faculty cars have been supplied
with stickers indicating that they are
eligible to park in faculty space,
Parking areas have been allotted
to both faculty and students. Neither
will be allowed to over-step the^e
boundaries.
In addition to administration fines,
Provincial Police fines will be imposed on students who infract provincial road regulations in Endowment Lands.
Full statement from committee on
buildings and grounds is as follows;
During the past few years traffic
and parking conditions on the campus have caused a considerable problem. Building construction has made
the situation  even more difficult.
In order to avojd .these and further
difficulties as well as to ensure clear
areas for our fire prevention program
the Committee on Buildings and
Grounds considers the following regulations necessary and a benefit to
Faculty and student body alike:
(a) Suitable parking areas have been
designated for staff and Faculty members, and the student body. Thesr;
areas are clearly marked and must
be used as indicated.
(b) The Provincial Police will enforce all parking regulations.
(c) A system of warnings and internal fines has been instituted by
the Committee and approved by the
Faculty   Council.
(d) Parking regulations will apply
to all members of the teaching and
administrative staff as well as students.
It is hoped that these regulations
will solve many parking difficulties
which have been experienced in th3
past.
Members of the Committee welcome suggestions for the further improvement of parking conditions.
Chairman of Building and
Grounds Committee
Deadline Set
For Totem
Grad Pictures
October 28 is the deadline for
grad pictures in this year's
Totem, Bob Currie, public relations officer for the AMS,
informed The Ubyssey today.
Pictures are being taken on the
campus by Krauss Studio and appointments can be made by consulting the list on the Quad notice board.
TWO DOLLARS
For two dollars, the grads receive
four proofs from which they have
ten days to choose their picture for
finishing. Within 60 days, they will
receive one 4 by 6 portrait. Reprints
will be available from Krauss' downtown studio anytime after December 1.
Walt Ewing, AMS treasurer, made
it clear that only the number of yearbooks ordered by the end of next
week will be printed.
CONTRACTS   SIGNED
All contracts must be signed by
October 1 and in order that the publication board may know how many
Totems to order, all down payments
must be made by that date, One
dollar and eighty-five centfe-will assure you of your copy of the Totem
when it reaches the campus April.7.
The remaining two dollars, which includes the sales tax, can be paid at
that time.
NO  SPECULATION
"There will be no speculation on the
Totem this year," Currie emphasized.
"There's a good staff and they should
have the students' support. Anyone
who wants a yearbook will have: to
make up his mind by the end of next
week and make a down-payment. It's
as simple as that and it' means the difference between success or failure.
INFORMATION
On hand at the AMS office will be
a number of fraternity representatives
to enlighten querulous applicants.
Information booklets will also be
available on demand.
Fee for registration is one dollar
during specified times but two dollars for those registering three additional days of grace from October
2 to 4.
During the seventeen periods from
October 5 to 21 prospective fraternity
members will have an opportunity to
attend numerous functions given for
their benefit, at which time they must
decide which two fraternities they
would best like to join.
MAKE CHOICES
October 24 fraternities will make
their bids to applicants who must
then make their choices known to Dr.
Ranta who will bc at hand in room K
of the Chemistry building.
On the Air
Radsoc Broadcasts Grid
All home games of UBC Thunderbirds Football team will be
broadcast by GJOR and University
Radio .Society.
Ben McConnell will again do ihe
announcing, assisted  by Ray Per
rault, former URS president, and
now on tho staff of CJOR. Technical equipment and operation will
be handled jointly by the station
and the club.
Tlie broadcasts will not be spon
sored this year.
Kickoff lime for the first home
game,, is two-fifteen Saturday,
September 24. The broadcast will
begin at two o'clock on the clay
of each game.
tioiissey   t'noto  by   Mickey  Jones
.FINALISTS in the annual Lambda Chi Alpna   freshette   Queen    contest    are    these    three
beauties left to right Liz. Tupper, Mary Stewart and Joan Vickers. One of the trio will be
chosen by members of the fraternity ''as the girl we'd like to fraternize with" and be crowned
with suitable honors Saturday night during  the Frosh Reception.
Be a Privileged Person - Buy A Privileged Pass Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, September 23, 1949
The Ubyssey
M..,,.!     rVa,asl; •,!•,     IlnlvaaH,.    T>,.„r*
.. Meinljur Canadian University Pros..
Authorized as Second Class Mail. Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Suhscripyons—$2.00 per year.
Published  throughout  tho university
tie editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
Mater Society nor of the University.
- -    -    year  by  the Student  Publications  Board  ot   thc  Alma
Mater Society of  the University  of  British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed  herein  are those of thi
necessarily those of tli.- Alma Mater Sc
Offices in E'rock Hall.. Phone ALma 1G24 For display advertising phone ALma 3233
KDITOR IN-CTIllF JIM    BANHAM
MANAGING   EDITOR ,        CHUCK  IWAIiSHALL
GENLKAIj STAFF:  Copy  Kdilor, Lama Haahti;  News  Editor,  Art  Welsh;  Features Editor,
Vic May; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Asst» Les Armour
Cily  Editor  This  Issue — RON  PIN CHIN
Associate   Editor   -   MARI   PINEO
On Inherent Contradictions
What logicians term "an inherent contradiction" seems to be rapidly embedding itself in the policies of our "good neighbours"
lo the south.
On the one hand pious speeches condemning "thought control" and on the other
hand not-so-pious actions .simulating the con-
demned .actions are beginning to make those
Americans who think disgusted and beginning
to make those who do not think—and they
are always in thc majority—so confused that
they are quite unable to decide what is
worthy of praise and what of blame,
While it must be admitted that "thought
control" is impossible, control of the exchange
of thoughts is both possible and practiced.
It seems, however, that when students
get together to discuss Marx they are immediately suspected of stashing bren guns and
small bombs under their beds to await the
time of the revolution. In fact, the theory of
dialectical materialism maintains that thc
order of the universe is such that change is
brought about by a series of small actions
which lead to a sudden violent change. A
case in point is the boiling of water where
the water becomes hotter and hotter and
then, suddely becomes steam. Society, Marx
maintained, changes in exactly the same way.
It is difficult to see where guns and bombs
enter into the theory.
Sfi-V;
Marx, however, has become inseparably
associated in the minds of people today wilh
the applications of his theory by Lenin and
Stalin. It does not follow that the same pattern must occur whenever the theory is
applied.
While there is probably some justification
for (hc condemnation of conditions behind
the so-called "iron curtain," the fact that
control of thought exchange is practiced
somewhere else is surely no justification for
its practice at home.
Latest contribution to the Inherent contradiction is action of two eastern U.S. colleges in suspending "Karl Marx Societies."
In niosb universities Karl Marx, as a philosopher and an economist, ha.s a very distinct
place in the curriculum. At UBC the problems
raised in the theory of dialectical materialism
are discussed in several philosophy courses.
In fact the philosophy student who had not
given some thought to the question would be
extremely hard to find.
Even if the students in those two eastern
colleges had resolved to repeat, in their entirety, the actions of Lenin and Stalin, it i.s
difficult to reconcile their suspensions with
the commonly accepted conceptions of democracy—unless, that is, one regards democracy as essentially capitalistic in nature.
But suppose that one did conceive democracy as being linked with capitalism.
Would it be of any avail to make martyrs
oi Communists? Has history shown the making of martyrs to be profitable to the makers
—or to the martyred? Most ofteh the martyred
have profited.
If then, the suppression of Communists
i; going to benefit the Communists more
than the suppressors, some other course of
action would seem to be indicated. The only
course of action possible is to attempt to
show that capitalism is essentially better
than  Communism. ,
In This Corner       by jim banham
The age of great movie comedy is dead.
Men like Charlie Chaplin, Harry Lang-
don, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd, who
immortalized themselves on celluloid are now
to most people nothing but misty symbols of
one of the greatest eras the movie industry
has ever produced.
The point was brought  forcefully home
recently when Life magazine published a fine
article on the early clays of silent comedy av
•■-» it was practiced by Chaplin et al,
It was even more forcefully brought
home to myself when I was robbed of tit)
cents early this week to see an innocuous
little episode entitled "Ma and Pa Keltic," an
exploitation of Belly Field's "The Egg and 1".
which I sec litis been unfortunately detained
ir, Vancouver lor a third week.
There was nothing slopping tire producers
of this picture from utilizing a basically good,
il: somewhat hackneyed, plot, turning it into
a first-rate comedy,
Tlie .story concern:-; Ma and Pa KcUlo
(Marjorie Main and Pi rey Kilbride), who
manage'to win a home of the fulure in a
contest sponsored by a tobacco firm. Tlv:
only opinion I care lo pass on the mentality
of the tobacco company':; employees !.<>>'
awarding Pa the house is thai, they must have
been congenital idiots to award him tho
prize.
At one point in the picture one of Ma's
sons gets (.angled up wilh a blonde p'-css
agent who is doing a seri.\s of articles on lh"
Ketiir's. h\ a typical Ilol'ywood "I lil'.e you,
do you like me?" scene the young lady remarks, "As llv'y say in lhe younger set, Tom,
I think you're real gone." ♦
This statement just about sums up the
whole picture in a nutshell.
The comedian today has lo:d. all abilily
to drag from the silualiun all the humor lhat
is inherent in il, To pul i! in show business
venacular they don't know how lo '-milk
a gag."
During llv umr.ier lltero was one comedy
in town 'which measured up lo the old-time
standard The piHttiv starred (he Mar.:
Brothers in "A .?\i"iu ai ilie Opera.' This
diverting comedy, n one scene adiuiraiily
shows how  a   ",,1", ran   lie  milked.
The three brothers are on a ship crossing
the Atlantic. In their tiny cubbyhole ol a
cabin, first one and then another of the ship's
crew enters tlie room on one pretense or
another. All the shenanigans arc accompanied
by the hilarious remarks of Groucho who is
getting manicured while the room fills.
The scene ends when someone opens tho
door and everyone piles out into the hallway
in a heap. It is a very funny scene. It also
shows something about old-time comedy that
modern funnymen could take lo Ivnrt.
In setting the gag up, the director has
been very careful to see that the funniest
laugh is the: last one — thc "topper" as they
term it, As the room fills up the laughter
mounts until the final act—the opening of the
door -climaxes the situation.
Too often in modern comedy, the situations
become anfi-climatic. Thc comedian milks his
g.ig with one huge laugh that drowns out
the rest of the dialogue for several minutes,
The rest of the laughs are completely lost
in Iheir relation to the primary one.
Today's best comedians are at the best
only shadows of what the old-timers were
Lob Hope puts a beginning into his gags bul
never a middle or an end. Abbot and Costello
are just poor. Red Skelton ranks a shade
below Hope
'Ihe early talking pictures produced some
groat comedians. The late W. C. Fields ha.s
never been equaled  in his field.    The Matx
Brothers, I think, are unbeatable. !
I
I understand Lhat the UBC Film Society ;
is   going  to  show  a  Bert  Lahr  film  in   the '
Auditorium   this   week.   He  too  has   earned '
himself  a   place   among   the   greats   for   his I
."■'■parkling visual comedy.
Last year  the  Film  Society  brought to
the   campus   two   films   made   by   the   great l
'Stone-lace,    Buster Keaton.  If the Society j
does  as good  a job  this  year,   they  will  he '
doing (he campus a real service.
If some funnymen could give back fo
lhe people of the world the essence and
lie.vor ol (he comedy that was shown ten or
la years ago, lhe world of entertainment
\,ould noi be .mi hard to gel along with as
ii   i ■   iodav.
Lost
LOST IN THE AUDITORIUM WASH-
room—a man's billfold containing papers and sum of money. Please send
to Lost and Found.
LOST ON GRASS IN FRONT OF
library on Wednesday noon, glasses
in brown case. Call Al, Dexter 0334L.
Wanted
RIDE FOR 8:30's, Monday to Friday,
vicinity 59th and Granville. KE. 0599R.
Jack.
HIDE WANTED PLEASE. 8:30\s FROM
.'list and Macdonald. Dcrecn, KE. 5008'L,
RIDE WANTED VICINITY REN-
Irew and 22nd Avenue to 8:30 lectures.
Phone Dexter 3011M, Rcnec.
RIDE FROM WEST END FOR 8:3!)
lectures by fourth year engineer,
Fhcne Pacific 5885, Norman Wilson.
RIDE WANTED FROM 23RD AND
Macdonald or vicinity. Phone CM.
88C2.
THREE PASSENGERS WANTED-
9:30 lectures, Monday to Saturday,
West' End, vicinity Davie and Buiraid
cr Point Grey Read. Pacific 8995.
WANTED BALMORAL, OFFICER'S
size 7 1-8. Phone Kerr, 0797L.
RIDERS FROM VICINITY POINT
Grey Road and Alma or Dunbar for
8:30's Monday to Friday. Walt Nisbet, Cedar 7454.
RIDE FROM WEST VAN (MARINE
at 30th) for 8:30 classes. Call West
1543R2.
RIDE WANTED FOR 9:30's FROM
Eroadway and Waterloo. Phone CH.
8894.
RIDE WANTED FROM KINGSWAY
at Royal Oak. Dexter 2834F.
WANTED RIDE FROM VICINITY
of 25th and Gamble for 8:30 lectures
Monday to Friday. Phone Fair, 0144M.
VERY URGENT. RIDE FROM 1700
block 59th for 8:30's Monday through
Saiurclay.  Phone KE. 4620L.
Room arid Board
COMFORTABLE   BRIGHT   ROOM,
breakfast  optional, for ir.c.b  student.
AL. 1278Y.
NEAR UkC GATES VAC.aNJY FOR
mule  student.   Sharing   with  student
from Trail, AL. 0728Y. 46K West 14th
Avenue.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   0X12   MALE
student   sharing,   Phone   Fair.   3397R
For Sale
CAR FOR SALE. 1936 Tt,Ri:.\P:,ANE
just   the   I'hing   for  winter   t oi.ipor
talion. Must be sold quickly. Dcst offer takes. Terms. Phone HA. !>73.:Y,
Civil Court Hears
Charges of Racial
Civil court suit has bo •" '■■(' "d
'in Berkeley courts civ a a • ') Ir-
Carleton Hotel in Berkeley vi'''. :■; ■•-
ial discrimination.
In addition to this a picK-t 1 i I,
been set up by colored studen':: u vl t-
National Association for thc Adv r.v"'-
ment of Colored People. They arc
charging the hotel with alleged racial
discrimination.
Hotel failed to rent rooms to Negro
■'"(!(."Is   when   they   were   available.
I'l'irstliatcly after the Negro stud-
c:is were refused ledgings while
male .-.tiideiils applied at the clcial:
and   were  offered  vacancies.
Picket line consisted of five students and was operated in an orderly
fashion.
California slate codes declare racial
discrimination in a public place liable
to a fine of up to $100.
In addition to thc hotel several
women's residences have l^een discovered to be barring Negro women
from residence.
Fort, Acadia Camps
Provide Housing
Koom and beard accommodation is
still   avadable   in   dormitories.
Fort and Acadia Camps have vacancies for both veterans and non-
service students, the University Housing office said  today.
Anyone who lias nol yet found ac-
ccmmodai'ion should apply al once
to the- hou.-int; administrator, Room
205A,  Physios  Building.
Contacting the housing administrator is the only way students can get
this accommodation, a.s housing cl'l'icc
cannot phone people formerly on
wailing   lis!.
Area Resident Opens
New Gate to UBC
A second official entrance to UBC
campus is rapidly taking shape at
Chancellor  and  Marine  Drive.
Mr.  G.  C.   Andrew,  assistant  lo  the
president,   lias   announced    that    the
gates  aro a  presentation   to  the  Uni- j
versity    from   Ronald   Graham,   well-
Ion \vn   resident   of   the   L'l'C   area. I
UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER NO. 5
E 12" carriage, Excellent condition.
A. B. Nash, Dexter 3122R after 6 p.m.
ARMY OFFICER'S UNIFORM, SIZE
38, tall. Phone Jim Wood, Kerr. 0023.
R AND E MANHEIM SLIDE RULE.
Fharie Bruce, Cedar 4649.
SUNBEAM SHAVEMASTER A3 NEW
,?15. AL, 1996, Jack.
ALL FIRST YEArt ARCHITECTURE
books, slide rule, drafting set, set
squares, T-square, French curve.
Phone West 694L.
'37   MORRIS  SEDAN.   MUST   SELL.
S400. CH. 7701.
'36   CHEV,    COUPE,    MUST   SELL
$400. CH. 7701.
ROOM   AND   BOARD
Bed fitting room and board in
quid home on Dunbar carlliie lor
nude student. $50 per month.
CHeny 9876
Specializing in
PRINTING
FOR
Fraternities
and
Sororities
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING  CO.
566 Seymour St. •
YOU LL GIVE
PERFUME
BMUHLLT
Something new in a bracelet
with a perfume flask attached.
Price 2.25
Birrs
VANCOUVER
'Congratulations,   Mr.   Clout   N.  Putt!
Your admirers wonder if you were always
confident of winning?"
'Absolutely! Dry Scalp simply never had
a chance once I started grooming my hair
with 'Vaseline1 Hair Tonic."
Wsdih6HlllTOVIC
T«AClfc   MARK
'VASELINE'   IS   THE   REOISTEHED   TRADE   MARK   CIT   THE   CIIES EOROU n.'l  MFO.   CO.   CONa'O
L. Friday, September 23, 1949
THE UBYSSEy
Page 3
Spotlighting
Eileen Moyls
This should be quite a year for the
UBC coeds with five women on
Council. , 9
. As President of thc Women's Undergraduate Society let me enlighten
y,ou as to what WUS intends to accomplish. The object of the Women's
Undergraduate Society is to consider and advance the interests of
the women students through the promotion of extracurricular activiitcs.
Following the announcement of a
government grant for the erection
of Women's Residences, WUS is concentrating its efforts on this project.
Wc are working with a group of
women on Women's Residences, and
arc calling this year 'The Residence
Year'.
Following our Fall Fashion Show,
planned for October 12th, wc hope to
make our first contribution to the
Women's Residence Program Fund.
Scheduled are two showings, thc
first at 3:15 p.m, for undergraduates
and their guests, and the second nt
8:15 p.m. for the Alumnae. Fashions
will be from Woodward's fall collection.
I'll see you at the Tea Dance this
afternoon and we'll drop in at the
Fashion Show tryouts at four, shall
we?
(Signed)    Eileen    Moyls
Pres. WUS
Woman's Page
women's editor
shirley finch
Ub:
EGG SHAMPOO is the punishment for freshette Vivi Busch. It's be:
dent Eileen Moyls (right) and Shirley Finch (Ubyssey Women's E ,
urer Helen Robinson is holding the victim do wn.
nolo by Tommy Hat titer
, applied by WUS Presi-
on the left. WUS Treas-
BE A PRIVILEGED PERSON -
BUY   A   PRIVILEGE   PASS
The Pub's a tradition at UBC.
In fact, a buncha guys moved out last year and
wc aint got enough reporters to cover the campus.
We gotta have some. If wc dont, you aint gonna know
what's going on round here.
We need a whole buncha guys to take editors
positions too, on accounta bunch of them guys left loo.
By the way, as well as work, we hava buncha
parties during thc year and we have one heckuva time.
Why doncha come up to the Pub at noon today
and have talk with us. Blue-eyed blondes we like best.
blondes we like bestest.
TODAY-12:30
Pub -- North Brock
i
aftip<U*}'i.«>0»i.«HH-i<4Bn>    «£». <mt>,
Young Peoples'
1
Saturday
Sal
urckiy
This
and
Every
irnoon
Saturday   Thereafter
The New Moose Ballroom
mow,:
nk.-u:
M 7::;d
t'.WIlai
P.M.
Da! Richards and His Orchestra
Dana   Demonstrations bu  Artlni,- Murray instructors
CKWX    KKOAM'AST    r>:::i)-<;:0()
Air   l>it(o-A'r\rs   r:,th    .'!.>/>    IP'lt m
TOTAL ADMISSION S0.75
ADVA'NCi: RAT.!-: Weste:u MuX... K, 'X' ; ■<', '■'. M.llc: CloXo.
' i [n'.vi'   in a:   ( !ri.r"i
,«MP.'"M»PP4ai»i<.MM"   MP.   >«W>.,<!M   >.iSB.    WB   > •»«.     *«»■     ,P-K',     *.*#     •£'..*     W«3     'M&     *itf     «M1>  , «BS»    «U»  , RBto
Frosh on
As Eggs
The annual Big-Little Sister Supper,
staged by WUS, started off with dinner in the Caf,
The freshettes and their big sisters
were-fed hot clogs, ice cream and cokes
in true kiddie fashion, with the litt'e
sisters all dressed up s i_:i-yeai-ok'i
and  under.
The feed was followed by a snake
parade around the campus back to a
Pow Wow in the auditorium. M. C.
Bim Sehrodt led campus songs and
yells which interspersed thc hilarious
skits. One was put' on by WAD and
Denny Pierce and Ruthie Genis did
a blackface number which had the
audience rolling.
Spot
Fly
Tlie top entertainment of the evening was put on by the freshettes
themscves. It consisted of a gooey egg
shampoo, fioi'hy Hcs applied in the
face<by I'.'.'.jlul WUS members and the
proverbial   sickening   cigar.
» fashion
» briefi
By THLLMA  BAIU R
Campus   clothes   don't   men   baggy
sweaters  and   .saddle   shot's   anymore.
Campus   clothes   mean   tb.e   kind   cf
casual   clothes   that   any   ytaiiit;   lady
wears,   whether  she   is  working   in  a
department    store   or   prcwring   poV-
assium per.nanganale in tho (hem. lab. I
|
Those old faithfuls., i'he skirt a.nd
.sweater, are still tb.e major ckiring-
thc-wcek oulfit. Only this fall the
wool sweater may be replaced with a
smart wool jessey blouse in any number   of   wonderful   ftyles   and   eokars.
Voluminous skirls went out wilh tho ,
lent coal'. No more skirts that drape
gracefully on the floor when you ;
sit down, for now thc skirts are pared
down. Some are back to the tube
shape and others swirl into fullness
when you walk, by courtesy of hidden
fullness and perhaps panels.
If you want to be a walking fashion
plate, girls, jusi' follow a few of these
tips:
1, Let's see burlap. Yes, burlap. Have
it made into a skirt, a smart little
waisicoat or even a big drawstring
bag  for all   your  miscellany.
2. Instead of scarves around the
neck, wear ihe new inch-wide
ribbons. Just tie them around and
let the two ends stick up like a
bow. Nice for sweaters, blouses
or at the throat cf a jacket.
The Right Smoke
at the Right Price
for Young Men
m±m_m*M_wm   _*m     ,-....1   »£»   4560 W. lOtll
CASTLE JEWELERS  Aim.2009
Open Saturdays till 9 p.m. starling Sept. 3
fee Our WATCHES by
Elgin, Gruen, Bulova, Rolex
Rings — Gifts -~- Terms Given
EXPERT WATCH REPAIRS
Work Guaranteed Quick Service
Special  Discounts  to  Students
T"i'.".."J3CUUUUL>MI
EATON'S MEN'S WEAR
Picture  Yourself
In One Of These
Plush "Plaids"
Drop yourself into this shirt for
moment . . . feel the roomy, fu
bodied cut! Take the fabric between
your fingers and feel it! Now, look
in a mirror at the big, bold feature
of this warm shirt . . . big pockets
Big collar! Full chest! Oh, man . . .
what a shirt this is for the casual,
easy-going man. The big plaid patterns are in red, white, green and
grey. Sizes small, medium and largo,
Each 10.00
FATON'S — Men's Furnishings — Main Floor
T EATON C°
■ * annas;.!  Columbia ^"p" limit t:r.
VANCOUVER
CANADA Page A
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, September 23, 1949
Wide Open Football
Featured Saturday
Missionary, 'Bird Deceptive
Fast Plays "Spectator's Paradise"
Wide open football promises to be the style for Saturday's
match between Whitman College Missionaries and UBC
Thunderbirds, both teams placing emphasis on speed and
deception rather than smashing power.
Better game from the point of view
of the spectators than a bone-crushing
line smashing ground game, but that
is not the reason for both teams employing this kind of play.
Whifrnan has virtually the same
class of team as last season, but with
a number of their lettermen con-
spiculously absent,
Cal Boyes, one of the most proficient quarterbacks around these
parts last year is still calling the plays
but the team behind him is not any too
heavy or experienced.
PASSING TOPS
Boyes is not too tricky on his feet
but his passing is tops. Combined
with a good end and a few fleet
backs, he will be a big threat.
Whitman's ends are light but man-
ueverable, although *he rest of the
line up is not in any way outstanding.
Offensively the 'Birds have two strong
poirite. Burkes new series of lateral
play* and the smooth passing and
receiving combination of McArthur
to Chisholm or Barker,
LINE NOT TOO TOUGH
But UBC's line is not tough enough to take a stiff ground gaining
game, nor will it withstand a similar
attack from the opposition.
Whitman  is in  the same  position,
the fact which will make the game
' a spectator's delight.
Cec Taylor will be out of action
for Saturday's clash and the next
four or five weeks to follow with a
busted thumb.
But the overall picture appears i'o
be in favor of the 'Birds. It is the
stronger team, and should win this
game by at least one touchdown.
■i ■■■■ p.—-— . .	
Permission Needed
From MAD To
On Outside Teams
Play
Students attending UBC who play
on outside athletic teams without permission of MAD may find it is a cosily adventure.
Violators of the campus code are
liable to forfeit any or all athletic
awards that they may win while at
university and may also have fines
imposed on them.
Permission t'o play on outside teams
may be sought by applying to MAD,
provided that the player has written
release by the coach of that sport.
The coaching staffs of UBC have first
choice of the available talent.
SHORT -A
-SPORT
New rugby coach to assist' head
mentor Al Laithewaite for the 1949-50
season will be Harry Cannon, old
hand   at   the  game  from  way   back.
His experience will be invaluable to
the teams.
* * *
Different names for the UBC's two
Millar Cup rugby entries, Varsity
and UBC, may be adopted for the
coming season. Choice for their new
monicors are Braves and Chiefs, following in the footsteps of UBC's
Senior A Basketball teams of last
year.
*p fp jp
Sparkling new uniforms are the
fruits of four seasons of hard playing
for UBC's hockey squad. Tattered and
torn from campaigning in the last
four years. MAD has granted them
money to purchase new sets.
^n *r v
Dr. J. C. Kovach takes over the
duties of official team doctor on the
campus this year. Dr. Kovach will be
with the teams when playing off the
campus as well. Injuries are sure to
be put into shape by capable and
able hands this season.
fp 9fi 9p
UBC may not turn out the best athletic teams in their various leagues,
but they certainly have the healthiest'.
Stiff and thorough medical examinations must be passed by each team
member before he or she is allowed
to participate in any sport,
* * *
Intra-mural. Volleyball play will
begin Monday, September 26. Entries
must be in Hut G Room 11 by Sept-
30.
* * *
The  UBC  hockey  squad   will   hold
an organizational meeting on Friday,
September   23   in   Arts   106   at   12:30. |
All last season's players and all new- i
comers are urged  to attend as plans!
for   the   forthcoming   season   will   be
discussed,
* * *
There will be a meeting in the
Brock stage room (north end) of all
those interested in joining the swimming club on Tuesday, September 27
at 12:30 noon.
SPORT
Sports Editor — RAY FROST
'BIRDS Lose Chance
To Play In Rose Bowl
An offer from Bob Blackman, head football coach at
Pasadena City College, which plays all its home games in
the Bowl requested a two year home and home series with
the 'Birds.
UBC reclined the offer because of high guarantees involved but suggested that the invitation may be accepted
at some future date when circumstances were more favorable.
Rudy Vallee Appearing
At Noon Pep Meet Today
'Bird Coaches to Demonstrate
New Plays to Student Gathering
Stage, screen, radio and television star Rudy Vallee will
be the chief attraction in the entertainment department at the
combination Pep Meet and Dress Rehearsal for UBC Thunderbirds in the Stadium noon today.
Idol   of   millions   for   many   years,<S> ———
Vallee is currently appearing in an all
star revue which includes name entertainers in a local downtown cabaret.
The "Vagabond Lover" will probably break out into a tune like his
favorite "Whiffenpoof" song if enough
encouragement comes his way.
As well as seeing the famous enter-
<~m\
^^H
^^^j^^^^i
'1H
1'            1 %'■   '^_mW   <
1                       >   ~^____t
|m«*> v
________x______m« I.. *
RUDY VALLEE
,  .   .   here   at   noon
tainer in person, students will witness their Thunderbird grid team in
action as t'hey show off some of the
plays that coach Orvlle Burke has
been drilling into them for the past
three weeks.
Burke will bc directing his charges
through the various formations. Explanations of each play will reach
the audience over the PA system,
Coaches Burke, Anderson, and the
well-known Pomfret will be introduced to the public.
Al McMillan's orchestra is to favor
the crowd with a few selections and
the Pep Club takes over the remainder
of the time with their cutups and
yells.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-Squares, Protractors, Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RULES
AMES   LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER RING  BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and  Index
From $2.69
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
Stationers  and   Printers
550 Seymour St.      Vancouver, B,C,
$2200 Tied Up
_t__,
Scoreboard Held
Up At U.S. Border
UBC  stadium's  electric  scoreboard   is awaiting  possible
ease-up in import restrictions.
Graduate manager of athletics,
Ole Bakken, said Wednesday that approximately $3000, donated by class
of '49, has been collected and that
the scoreboard is now waiting on the
American side.
The board is expected to cost $2000
plus another $200 to cover the devaluation of the Canadian dollar.
Bakken hopes that the devaluation
of the dollar will cut demands for
American   goods,   allowing   the  gov
ernment to ease restrictions on imports.
He said that the only possible way
of getting the scoreboard across the
border was to have a company bring
it in on its quota. He hopes to do this
without paying an exhorbitant commission to the company.
Electric scoreboards are not made
in Canada.
Terms of the gift state that the difference between the cost of the board
and the $300 is to go into AMS coffers.
/
There's More To The Game
When You Play Refreshed
4«4X
5
4
Ask Jor it either way... hah
trade-marks mean the'same thing.
COCA-COU ire.
¥ BANK'... M tU
70 A MILLION CANADIANS
ni|iii
(famfute
would like, to meet
YOU
You can save time and money and cut down
on trips to town by doing your banking
right on the Campus. Centrally situated, in
the Auditorium Building, "My Bank" on
the Campus offers you a complete, full-time
banking service, and is as easy to reach as
the library, lab or gym.
Why not drop in and see us ?... talk over
your banking problems, real or academic,
with any member of our staff. You'll find
people at the B of M really interested and
anxious to help.
We'd like to meet you soon... a warm
welcome awaits you at all times.
Bank of Montreal
($44tiUt&4 *pCl4t *8<XH&
In the Auditorium Buildimj: MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
WORKING     WITH     CANADIANS     IN     EVERY    WALK     OF     UFE     SINCE     1117

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