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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1955

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JaOafir       oVmUM AAmmmmlM
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1953
GENERAL   MEETING
Record Attendance Forecast
Bray,  Longstaffe
Claim Time Wasted
UBC delegates to the National Federation of Canadian
University Students Conference, Ron Bray and Ron Longstaffe returned from the convention with the opinion that their
time had been wasted. ♦"
UBC NFCUS chairman Marc
Bell was more enthusiastic
about the outcome of the conference. However, he also stated that leadership was lacking
and thus the conference did
not accomplish what it should
have done.
Bell said, "If the nebulous
abstracts discussed by NFCUS
could be adhered to they might
get somewhere.
Council president Bray said,
"Under the present system
NFCUS is unable to attract an
executive of a caliber to handle
such an operation."
Vice president Longstaffe
criticized the convention saying, "It lacked direction from
last year's executive. The delegates come cold and they are
given no backbone for discussion."
UBC suggestions concerning
a national university publicity
scheme and Corpuscle Cup competition were approved by the
convention and will be handled
by the UBC committee.
Other accomplishments of the
meeting included the formation
of a comittee to investigate a
life insurance plan and a decision to issue students at NFCUS
affiliated universities with student discount cards.
These cards are similar to
UBC-AMS cards and were opposed by UBC delegates as being entirely unnecessary.
Bray was strongly critical of
the NFCUS budget operations.
He said, "They do not even
have any idea of simple accounting principles. The budget
(Continued on Page S)
See TIME WASTED
Goal Posts
Take Walk
Six UBC students were arrested and twenty others
warned by Bellingham police
during a wild after-game fracas Saturday night.
Five of the students arrested
were later released with a
warning while one, a second
year Arts student, was charged
with the possession 01 nquor
while being a minor, intoxication, obstructing a policeman
and resisting arrest.
He was finally released upon
payment of ninety dollars bail.
STUDENTS
Hundreds of shouting students from both UBC and
Western Washington thronged
Bellingham's streets after the
game with the result that four
squad cars were called out by
City Police and the Hotel Leopold was later closed to all
students.
The twb goal posts in Bat-
tersea Park, scene of the game,
mysteriously disappeared Saturday night, to turn up Monday morning, broken into numerous souvenir pieces, this side
of the border. Poles belonged
to the City of Bellingham.
WEEKEND
Asked to comment on the
weekend disturbance, Bob Osborne, UBC Athletic Director,
said Monday that he was making S report to President McKenzie on the matter, Mr. Osborne said that the whole
affair would be discussed at
the Athletic Committee meeting next Thursday.
Clear tomorrow. Early
morning fog patches. Little
change in temperature. Light
winds. Low tonight 40. high
tomorrow 58.
CUS Descends
On   Lectures
A campaign for Community
Chest donations, sponsored by
Commerce Undergraduate So*
ciety will be held Wednesday
morning between 8:30 and
10:30.
Commercemen will descend
on every classroom, with the
intention ot extracting 20 cents
from each student.
The campaign is an annual
event, but in previous years
contributions have amounted
to an average of only $600.
This year Roger Montgomery, who is in charge of the
campaign, hopes to raise a
total of $1200.
Collectors will also be stationed outside the library to
accommodate students who
don't have morning lectures.
SATIRIST   VISITS  CAMPUS
Potter   To  Plonk  At   UBC
By MIKE AMES
If you are a "plonk", fellow,
and want to know the "ploy"
that will make you "one-up",
well, the place for you to be
is in the auditorium at noon
Wednesday.
That is where you will meet
and hear Stephen Potter, famed
for his Gamesmanship, Lifemanship, and One-Upmanship
expositions.
"PLONK"
And, naturally enough, you
do not have to be a "plonk"
(see Potto*- fny g dj»ifiHJtiAra to
5njoy histalk Wednesc ay. Pot-
ffff'fS universally re ognized
as England's top sptii ist and
ieading humourist.
STEPHEN POTTER
, . . here Wednesday
Sponsored by the Fine Arts
Committee, Mr. Potter is another in a series of celebreties
slated to appear on campus
this year,
OXFORD
Potter studied at Oxford,
where he wrote on D. H. Lawrence and Coleridge, and
worked for the BBC, during
which time he wrote humour-
ous programs on such topics as
"How to go to the Theatre,"
and "How to Blow your Own"
Trumpet."
Along with the "Gamesmanship", "Lifemanship", and
"One-Upmanship' books, Potter
has just recently published
"Sense of Humor", and is now
working on "Golfmanship."
Fall   AMS   Meeting
Arouses   Interest
Sharply divided opinion on campus issues indicates a
record turnout at the AMS general meeting in the Armoury
at noon Thursday. $  , .
Hottest issue is the honor- 'fw##n clotSfl
arlum question. ■^■^*"^■■
While students generally
agree with present policy of
paying the $240 tuition of
council president, treasurer
and Ubyssey editor, they are
wary of extending the principle' to all council members
through $100 honorariums.
Rumour that the law faculty:
will turn out in force Thursday to kill the motion would
neither be confirmed -nor denied by Law Undergraduate
Society officials.
Students also differed on
council's plan to eliminate fall
general meetings with council
giving final approval to the
budget.
Campus leaders favoured
the Brock extension plan and
said the budget "couldn't be
better."
Only a minority opposed
raising the number of general
meeting petition signatures
from 100 to 500.
Opposing honorariums were
Law executive Joseph Cvetko-
vich and committee worker
Jim Craig.
Cvetkovich commented: "It
is poor if students have to be
rewarded for council work.
They should serve because of
interest in the Job."
According to Craig, councillors should "set an example"
of public service without pay.
He added that other students
work1 as hard as those on council.
Approving the $100 honorariums were Don Yera, Commerce 4; Jerry Stolar, Arts 4;
and a mysterious campus beauty who refused to give her
name.
Club presidents Phil Govan,
Conservative, and John Bossons, United Nations, agreed
that other councillors besides
president and treasurer deserved remuneration, but "not
to all" said Govan and Bossons
added: "I am wary of the tendency to make them paid positions."
Opinion on abolishing fall
general meetings varied from
Neil Merrick who called them
"useless" to the mysterious
beauty queen who called them
"vital."
Calling for an extension to
the Brock, Tony Sanbrill said:
"The Brock Hall is not up to
the standard of other North
American sti dent union buildings." Law's Joe Cvetkovich
called the plan "a great thing
for   clubs—they   will   get   the
(Continued  on   Pag*   5)
Se* AMS MEETING
Goodness of Man
Upheld at Noon'
VCF presents Rev. Standee
Wick speaking on "How Good
is Man?" today at noon, Physics $01.
*     *     ¥
LIBERAL CLUB to hold
closed meeting today at noon
in Arts 100. Mr. Grant Deach-
man, the Executive Secretary
of the B.C. Liberal Association
will speak on the topic "What's
in politics for me". Members
are urged to attend.
ep ep ep
CATHOLIC THEOLOGY
course begins Wednesday at
3:30 in Physics 302, conducted
by Rev. Father Hanrahan. The
first discussion will be on "The
Existence of God". Sponsored
by the Newman Club.
ep e^ ejl
CCF General Meeting la
Wednesday noon in Arts 108.
tt *\r T
VCF will  hold a Dagwood
Supper tonight at 5:30, HO 7.
Fun, fellowship, food.
H>     *t>     H>
ALPHA OMEOA meets Wed*
nesday, 12:30 in Arts 104. Students interested in Ukrainian
literature are invited to attend.
ep ^p op
JAZZSOC presents Gerry
Hodge, past president of Van.
New Jazz Society, speaking on
the swing era. Today at noon*
Brock Stage Room.
ep ep ep
SWIMMING and diving team
to be organized and practises
to be arranged Wednesday
noon in Gym room 211. No*
vices welcome.
ip ep ip
PRE-MED SOCIETY will
hold a meeting in Physics 202,
Wednesday noon. Dr. Nelson,
assistant to the Dean of Medicine will speak. All Pre-Med
students urged to attend.
9f* 9ft ff
MODEL ASSEMBLY delegates will meet at noon today
in Arts 104. Anyone wishing
to take part in the assembly
should attend.
**
*
ARCHERY inter-varsity
tournament will hold a meeting, 4:30 Tuesday in the field
house.
tfp ep ep
CARRIBEAN Students Association will hold a meeting
Wednesday noon in Arts 106,
West Indian students and others are invited to attend.
(Continued on Pag* 3)
Se* CLASSES
.iii THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1955
flii
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRISS
Authorized es second class mail, Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
In Vancouver throughout the University year by'the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
#Hti*h Columbia, Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
d the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and hot necessarily those of
the Aline Matfr Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
■Would not*e more than 180 words. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication ot all letters
received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF STANLEY BECK
Managing Editor. Bed Smith      City Editor Sandy Ross
Feature Editor.   Mike Antes       Sports tatter.-Mike CRaspIo
CUP Editer. Jean WWleelde
Reporters and Desk: Julie Bossons, Val Haig-Brown, Rosemary
^Kent-Barter,'Al Forrest, Caroline Forbes, Mafie Gallagher, Dave
ferry, Jon MacArthur, Joyce Brown, George Lane, Dave Wyttall,
Len D
Davis.
SENIOR EDITOR	
Offices in Brock Hall
Phone ALma 1624
DOLORES BANERD
For Display Advertising
Phone  ALma  1230
Imo Hours
Every fall at UBC two hours are set aside on a Thursday
in October for approximately 1000 students to get together in
the Armoury and Tiave a rousing, disorganized debate. Oc-
fcassionally a vote is taken but by that time most of the delators have lost interest in the proceedings and have left.
Those two hours are more formally known as the Fall
General Meeting of the Alma Mater Society. This Thursday
noon the debating society will convene for this year's entertainment.
This year's debate promises to be rowdier than ever with
m superfluity of contentious issues up for your approval.
However, the meeting need not deteriorate into a farce.
By means of these pages students have been made aware of
the issues and what they involve. They are reprinted on pages
four and five again today. They should be studied and discussed rationally at Thursday's meeting.
The most contentious issue is the constitutional revision
-that would do away With the fall general meeting and leave
the approval of the yearly budget in the hands of Student
Council.
The Ubyssey supports this idea. We believe that this
University has reached the stage, population wise, where it no
longer can conduct its business by the "town meeting" method.
The fall meeting is called for the sole purpose of approving
the budget. Months of work and debate go into the preparation
of the budget. Every organization concerned is consulted and
their requests are complied with as far as is possible. Is it right
that 1000 students, who purport to represent 6500 students,
fcan in one hour throw out a carefully considered budget? Do
those students have all the pertinent information? Can they
in one hour possibly give careful consideration to the numerous factors involved?
The constitutional revision provides ample time for disat-
isfied groups to be heard before each year's budget is approved
by Council. We remind you that you elect your Student Council
each year and that it is your interests they are working for.
We urge you to support this revision and do away with the
unfair and ridiculous spectacle that occurs each year in October.
The revision of the Student Court constitution has been
carefully, almost painstakingly, worked out and we believe it
to be the fairest and soundest solution possible and it should
meet with your approval.
The new qflorum and special meeting provisions are also
sound and reasonable in light of the increased, and ever increasing, student enrollent.
The question of honorariums will probably prove to be
the most contentious one before the meeting. It is the type of
resolution that one tends to be automatically opposed to without giving it consideration. We would remind you that an honorarium is in no sense payment for services rendered but is
rather "an honorary reward in recognition of gratitous services
on which custom or propriety forbids ANY price to be set."
LONGSTAFFE
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir,
Pleased as I was to find a
story of the recent World University Service of Canada Annual Assembly in Saskatoon
given a three column headline
in The Ubyssey, I must take
exception to the manner in
which your reporter played up
one. of the minor results of
that conference out of all reasonable proportions.
I am, o! course, referring to
the election of Ron Longstaffe
as One of the two WUSC delegates to the NFCUS Convention
in Edmonton.
In the first place, his election was in no way a surprise
(please do not act as if you
did not think UBC could
offer suitable candidates for
such a responsible Job), and
secondly, it was by no means
the "highlight" of what your reporter calls "UBC's successful
invasion of the Saskatchewan
World University Service of
Canada Convention."
Your reporter should realize
that The Ubyssey is distributed
to all Canadian Universities,
and—believe me—its is being
read in the most surprising
quarters. It does not say much
for UBC to have a story such
as this splashed all over the
CUP orbit. It is quite clearly
implied by your reporter that
the important thing that came
out of the WUSC Annual Assembly as far as UBC is concerned; was the extra vote
given UBC at the NFCUS Convention in Edmonton.
I stressed it when your reporter interviewed me, and I
stress it again now: Ron Longstaffe was elected as a representative of WUSC, not as a third
delegate from UBC. He was
given a responsibility by WUSC
and to represent that as an
extra vote for UBC is undermining the trust put In him by
the WUSC Annual Assembly.
Hans Peter Krosby,
WUSC Chairman.
BIBLE
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear   Sir,
While looking for a copy of
the New Testament last week,
I was distressed to discover
that every copy of the Holy
Bible in the university library
has the letters "BS" clearly
marked on the binding.
The choice of the catalogue
letters "BS" to describe the
Bible is, if accidental, unfortunate, and, if intentional, disturbing. Such is the dominance
of irreligious thought on* this
campus that it would not be
difficult to believe the latter,
in which case the perpetrator
should be warned that such
satanie humour must, ultimately, be answered for.
I nope that this situation—
which must cause distress to
many, other than myself—will
be corrected.
"Disturbed,"
4th Arts.
PARADE
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir,
ATT.: HOMECOMING COM-
MITTEE.
Quite obviously your plan to
continue the annual downtown
homecoming parade is unpopular with the very folks you wish
to impress.
Remember the TREK, the
old Fairview shacks are coming
down and this would be a good
year to restage it. I know
you've done it before and the
idea is old but I think still
good.
Old trekkers would be included, and the parade theme
can revolve around UBC's progress. For all concerned it
would be a true HOMECOM^
ING and as good as, if not
better than, the downtown
farce, for both public relations
and publicity.
LAWYER
EYES EXAMINED
J. J. Abramson
I. F. Hollenberg
Optometrists
Vancouver Block
MA. 0928 MA. 2948
Double Breasted Suits
Converted into New
Single Breasted Models
Satisfaction Guaranteed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville
PA. 4849
WANTED
Wanted—Textbook of Zool-
ogy, Parker T. J. & W. A. Has*
well, 1940, Vol. 1, 6th Edit.
Will pay good price. Pleas*
contact Dave Green, CH. 1306.
*r *r op
Riders Wanted—Mon. • Fri.,
8:30; leaving 41st & Victoria,
any route. FR. 7282.
¥      ¥     ¥
Typing done at home. Neat
accurate work. MA. 7004.
*r ep Op
Riders wanted, leaving from
vicinity 22ndvdt Boundary Rd.
M.-T.-W.-T.-F. for 8:30*s. Return
5:30. Phone Bob, DE. 4050-L.
V *r *r
Typing arid Mimeographing.
Accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Florence Gow, 4496 W.
10th. Phone AL. 3682.
¥     ¥     ¥
FOR *ALE *
1984 James 98 CC Motorcycle in top condition. 2300
miles at 130-160 miles/gallon.
Very easy to care far. $190. or
best offer. Phone KE. 0806-R.
1991 BSA 290 CC. Motorcycle. Excellent condition. Low
mileage, new rings, good rubber. $189.00. J. Cresswell, Hut
93B (1), Acadia. ALma 0019,
6:00-7:00 p.m.
*r *r *P
LOST
A Keuffel & Esser Slide
Rule. Reward. Call Glen at YO.
5520.
ip *P ip
NOTICE
Double your reading speed-
raise your marks, with Specialized Individual Training in
Reading Skills. Start any time.
Full course in 7 weeks. Special
student rates. Learn to grasp
ideas quickly and accurately,
improve memory and concentration. Western Reading Laboratory, 939 Hornby St. TA.
2918.
ep ep ep
Single light housekeeping
room, $28.00 per month. Phone
AL. 3589-L after 7:00 p.m.
*P TP *P
ROOM AND BOARD
For Rent—Commencing on
or before Oct. 24—2 room suite
with bath and kitchen, close
to UBQ gates. $65 per month.
Phone ALma 0235-Y or ALma
3091-Y.
ep mp op
LOST
Watch—During invasion of
Bellingham. Make, Amarillus.
Probably at goal post ceremony. Finder please call Danny at CH. 0549 after 6 p.m.
ths MILDEST BEST-TASTING «'<"«"« Pleasures  of   Europe
Revealed  To  Coeds
One hundred and fifty girls walked away from Physics
202 on Friday afternoon formulating plans for a European trip
in the not too distant future.   	
Pictures of famous places ln
Europe flashed through their
minds — Princess Street in
Edinburgh, Hampton Court
In London, Hall of Mirrors at
Versailles, Beer Gardens of
Windorf.
Who was responsible for this
mass migration of minds to
Europe?—A Mr. Max Turner
CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
LAWRENCE HAAVE will
discuss "Dare the Truth" today at 12:30 in Arts 103, sponsored by Lutheran Students
Association.
op ep op
LE CIRCLE FRANCAIS will
hold a general meeting in Arts
102 at noon today, for election
of officers. Prospective members invited to attend.
ip ep *P     '
NEWMAN CLUB will hold
a general meeting Wednesday
at 12:30 in hut L5. All welcome.
9ft 9ft 9ft
HILLELL presents Les Raphael, executive member of
Zionist Organization of B.C.,
who will speak on Zionism on
Wednesday noon.
*r 9f *V
THUNDERBIRD Ski Team
will meet in Engineering 204
at noon Wednesday. All interested please attend.
3ft 9p 9ft
VOC general meeting Wednesday noon, Engineering 200.
Will feature: "The Savage
Slides of Seymour" in color.
More information on the Short-
Long Hike. Everyone welcome.
Remember, there's still time to
join.
#f* ep ep
FILMSOC presents "The
Kidnappers" today, 3:45, 6:00,
8:15. Auditorium, 35 cents.
Students and staff only.
of Wright's Travel Bureau, and
a Mr. Allen Lewis of Trans-
Canada Airlines.
ITINERY
Mr. Turner stressed the importance of planning an itinerary before leaving. "Decide the
means of travel and the point
of departure." Reservations
should be made in advance to
avoid confusion.
Mr. Turner briefly outlined
the highlights of such a trip,
emphasizing Paris as an expensive tourist attraction.
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1955
-OMMMBBVBSVMnSBBl
*
TRIP
To get the full benefit of a
trip to* Belgium, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, France, and the
Scandinavian countries, the
traveller should count on a
minimum of six months. A six-
month tour, all expenses included, runs from twelve to
fifteen hundred dollars.
ABROAD
Mr. Lewis, just returned
from a trip abroad, gave a
highly entertaining account of
his travels to Great Britain,
Germany, and Paris.
The lecture concluded with
a film, complete with commentary, entitled "Destination
U.K."
ANTON R. LENDI
Swiss Film
At Lecture
How would you like to take
a leisurely journey through
Switzerland's "lovely valleys
from perennial snows and glaciers to sun-drenched vineyards?"
Anton R. Lendi, internation-
ally-known commentator, will
illustrate his talk at noon today in the Auditorium with a
film of such a Journey, as well
as give his "message" from
Switzerland.
DUAL
Lendi now holds a dual citizenship in both Canada and
Switzerland, and has for the
last 16 years travelled North
America telling his Switzerland stories and showing his
Colorfilms.
THE NEW NOTE
IN
The Continental flavour is highly
popular in footwear,.. and here is
one of the very latest s'tyles built
by Ritchie in dressy black calf... a
smart plain toe, 2-eyelet tie that
shows racy lines. You'll like the
extra comfort of the mid-low
ankle fitting, and BLACK
is so right for fall.
STYLE 640
—about »13.00
Other ttylM from
18.98 to »1».M
Be right in style with
Hf ITCH IE *H0Cf FOR MEN
Be Biggest Yet
"This year's Homecoming celebrations will be the biggest
and best ever," John Butterfield, Homecoming Publicity Chairman said Monday.
Programme lined up by But*
terfield and other Homecoming officials seems to bear out
this statement.
Main Homecoming event for
UBC students is the big parade
through Vancouver's main
downtown section. Every club
and organization on the campus has been invited to submit
a float for this.
There are no general themes
for these floats, Keith Liddle,
Parade Chairman said Monday,
but as the best float will be
entered in the Grey Cup Football Parade November 27 those
wishing to compete "might do
well to keep this in mind."
OUE8TS
Mayor Hume and Mr. Aubrey Roberts will be the special
guests at a luncheon for all
graduates, Saturday, Nov. 5.
Half-time parade during the
Annual Football game against
Central Washington College
will include a jet fly past by
the RCAF; parade of the best
floats and selection of the very
best for the Grey Cup Football
Parade  and  finally  a  parade
of the faculty candidates for
Homecoming Queen.
Saturday evening will see, a
basketball game between grad-
uates and Thunderbirds in the)
War Memorial Gymnasium. Also that ntght there will be a
big semi-formal dance in tha
Armoury.
Ice Arena
Offers  Plan
A special plan for ice skating
for students of UBC has been
proposed by Kerrisdale arena
manager Jack Elliott.
Slated to take shape in about
two weeks time, the scheme
includes free bus transportation from Acadia Camp to the
arena and back.
Here's how the program will
work. Each Wednesday, at a
set time, students will board
chartered buses at Acadia
Camp, unload at the arena then
pay regular admission. At the
end of skating, the buses will
take students back to the campus. Skates are available by
rental at the arena.
TO UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATES
The John RUchu Qmfiany Limuei, Qmtes, F.Q,
SIRVICI IN THS RCAF
Offers young men and women an unusual opportunity
to expand their knowledge and gain valuable experience while making an important contribution to the
t€ause of freedom.
Financial assistance to help with university expenses
can be obtained by undergraduates in either of these
Uvo plans:
AIR FORCE
U.R.T.P.
<— ' m
<Univ«riiiy R«i«rv*
Training Plan)
flight Cadets (male and
female)are enrolled in the
Reserve Force — receive
116 days pay during thc
.University Term — and
jhave a potential  of 22
'weeks   additional   paid
employment during surn-
.tner vacation months.
Openings now for
AIR CREW, TECHNICAL
LIST AND NON-TECH.
NICAL LIST OFFICERS.
TR1SERVICB
R.O.T.P.
(Regular Oflicar
Training Plan)
Flight Cadets (male) are
enrolled in the Regular
Force — during the University year are subsidized for tuition with a
grant for books and
instruments —- and receive pay and allowances throughout the
whole year.
Openings now fer
AIR CREW AND TECH.
NICAL UST OFFICERS.
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Take advantage of (hit opportunity now, while
you ar* •till attending Univertity. For foil infer-
•nation on reauiromontt, pay ana? other benefit*,
Ul YOUR RCAF RISIDINT STAFF OFFICII!,
UBC SQUADRON
THE ARMOURIES,
CAF1J.J5 THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1955
BUDGET  SUMMARY
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
NET COST OF ACTIVITIES WITH COMPARISON
OR PREVIOUS YEAR'S FIGURES
FOR ELEVEN MONTHS ENDING MAY 31, 1956
Actual      Budget
per student 1954/55      1955/56
Administration
2.60
15,508.00
16,232.00
Memorial Gymnasium Payment
5.00
28,609.00
30,850.00
Men's Athletics
3.60
18,089.00
22,320.00
Publications Board*
2.05
10,495.00
12,500.00
World University Service
1.00
5,722.00
6,170.00
University Clubs Committee
.95
6,452.00
5,901.00
Undergrade Society Committee
.62
2^41.00
3,847.00
Activities and Funds
.70
1,464.00
4,065.00
Accident Benefit
.65
3,000.00
4,100.00
National Fed. Can. Univ. Stud.
.50
1,929.00
3,150.00
Women's Athletic Directorate
.43
2,007.00
2,500.00
Margin
2,630.00
18.00
96,116.00
114,265.00
Thursday  Noon
GENERA
Printed below for your information and considered
Armoury when the fall general meeting ef the Alma
Council proposals are given in the hope that Thursday']
comment. Each proposal has been given careful considc
consideration by the students.—Ed.
THE ISSUES
SUMMARY
Men's Athletics  40c increase per student
Undergraduate Society :. 20c increase per student
NFCUS  15c increase per student
Activities and Funds  40c increase per student
Publications Board  15c increase per student
(Selling price of Totem (Yearbook) reduced 50 cents to
$3.50 due to Increased subsidization.)
Women's Athletics   5c increase per student
Clubs  15c increase per student
(50% increase)
Accident Benefit  15c increase per student
CONWAY COMMENTS
This year the Alma Mater Society has a budget of nearly
a quarter of a million dollars.
The accompanying summary shows that nearly $20,000
or 20% more will be expended on student activities this year.
These funds have been provided by an increase in enrollment,
an increase in other income, (advertising, rental, etc.) and by
the new policy of non-surplus budgeting.
That is, the budget has been drawn up on a realistic
basis to insure that all income will be expended on student
activities this year with no funds left unallocated to revert
to surplus.
The budget is also sufficient in that every organization
has had its "legitimate" requests granted. Increases of 20% to
50% have been given to the large organizations, such as, Athletics, Undergraduate Societies, Clubs and Special Events.
An accident benefit assistance fund for all Alma Mater
Society members has been drawn up to protect the individual
student against financial loss due to injuries received.
GEOF  CONWAY,
TREASURER, AMS.
BUY YOUR
TOTEM
NOW
$3.50
Save   $1.00
ON SALE IN THE
A.M.S. OFFICE
The Students' Council will present several proposals and constitutional revisions for
the approval or disapproval of the student
body at the Fall General Meeting this Thursday. Some of the proposals will be put forward
with the unamous recommendation of the
Council; the others will have a majority recommendation; all are of vital concern to the Alma
Mater Society and deserve the intelligent
thought and consideration of each student. An
outlined agenda of the General Meeting is as
follows:
1. APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES—
routine approval of the minutes of last Springs'
General Meeting.
2. CLOSING OF THE AGENDA—anyone who wishes to have a motion discussed at
the meeting must submit it to Students' Council Secretary Helen McLean before the agenda
is closed. Notification of motions may be made
at the AMS Office today or tomorrow or at
the beginning of the meetings in the Armoury
on Thursday. This is standard procedure at
General Meetings to assure that the Student
body has at least a half hour's notice of motions they will be called upon to be discussed.
3 BUDGET—the approval of the 1955-56
AMS Budget is the official reason for the convening of the Fall General Meeting. The Council is unanimous in its approval of Treasurer
Conway's financial outline and in the past two
weeks what kinks there were in it have been
ironed out. The concensus of student opinion
as reflected in last week's Ubyssey seems to
assure almost automatic approval.
4. PRESENTATION OF COMMEMOR-
ATIVE AWARDS TO THE ROWING TEAM
—in recognition of their excellent representa-
iton of UBC at the Henley Regatta last June,
MAD president Bob Hutchinson will present
the team members with pewter UBC steins.
5. INTRODUCTION OF WORLD UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS—
WUS President Peter Krosby will introduce
the six foreign students studying at UBC this
year under WUS scholarships.
6 BROCK EXTENSION—a long awaited
extension on Brock will be possible if the
student body wil agree to continue the five
dollar levy which is now assessed to retire the
debt incurred in building the War Memorial
Gymnasium. The Gym debt will be cleared
next September, and it is the hope of the Students' Council that the students will agree to
continue this voluntary levy to carry on construction of facilities directly pertinent to
student activity.
Taking into consideration the increase
is student enrollment each year, it is estimated
that a sum close to $250,000 would be available
if the levy is carried on for seven years. The
architects have estimated that at least $200,000
will be required to provide the necessary
floor area.
The Brock Extension Committee, under
co-ordinator Don McCallum, feels that the addition of a wing on each side of the present
Brock would be the most workable arrangement to provide the necesary clubrooms, offices and lounges for the many clubs and organizations on campus now without facilities.
The area immediately to the rear of Brock
Hall has been set aside as the probable location of a new cafeteria which would utilize
the existing kitchen facilities and tie in with
the two proposed wings. The Council does not
suggest the construction of the cafeteria with
student funds but feels that this cost should
be born by the Administration.
7. EXTENSION OF UBC's PARTICIPATION IN WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE—
at present, UBC leads Canadian universities in
its support of the WUS scholarship plan (six
of the 12 WUS students in Canada are studying at UBC) but takes little part in WUS's
international activity, because the student's
contribution to the Committee is limited to the
scholarship fund. The motion is proposed to
permit UBC participation in the full WUS
program.
8. CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS—
Group A—General
i. The extension of voting hours to in-
tt'
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4439 West 10th Avenue        ALma 2174 THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1955
MEETING
sues which will be before you Thursday at noon in the
ly convenes.   The reasons for each of your Students'
will not turn into the usual raucous arena of uninformed
| your Councillors. They should receive the same careful
THE ISSUES
elude the dinner period at Fort and Acadia
Camps.
ii. The designation of the Student Court as
the sole arbitrator of the Society's code and
constitution—the structure of the Court makes
it the ideal body to interpret such legal matters.
iii. Change of the fiscal year end from
June 30 to May 31—to enable the AMS treasurer to complete the duties of his office as
soon as possible after the end of the university
term.
iv. Change of the depostit to the Accident
Benefit Fund from a $3,0Qp to 50 cent per student per year—to adjust for increased enrollment and to extend to all students the coverage
now offered athletes.
Group B—Elimination of Fall General Meeting
It is proposed to change the method of
budget approval from vote of a general meeting to vote of two consecutive Students' Council meetings. Before these meetings, the budget would be printed in The Ubyssey, and the
Treasurer would discuss with a representative
of each organization concerned their particular financial provisions. The Council believes
that the Budget can be prepared much more
fairly in this manner.
Since the Fall General Meeting is convened to approve the budget, the acceptance
of this proposal would eliminate the need for
the meeting. It is important to remember,
however, that t'he students still would retain'
the right to call a special meeting at any time.
Next years' enrollment at UBC will be close to
7500 students, and the discussion of a budget
by the general meeting type of government
would be even more difficult than it now is.
Group C—Special General Meetings
It is proposed to change the number of
signatures necessary to request a Special General Meeting from 100 to 500 and to change
the quorum from 20% of the student body to
"either 1,000 students or 15% of the student
body, which ever is greater." These revisions
are recommended both to take into account
the increase in enrollment and to make certain that before the A.M.S. is put to the expense ( one hundred and fifty dollars) of a
General Meeting, a sufficient number of the
Society's members are concerned.
Group D—Clarification of the Position of the
AMS   MEETING
(Continued from Page 1)
space they  have  been crying
about for years."
UN. head Bossons noted that
UBC's students are "famous
for their support of university
development" but Commerce-
man Yera suggested that Alumnae or other sources should be
tapped for the Brock extension. Yera also demanded a
iall general meeting as he
feared "too many things are
becoming a closed shop" on
the campus.
NFCUS committeeman Craig
approved the Brock extension
plan but wanted none of the
$5 levy used "tor any further
development of the physical
education and athletic facilities on  the campus."
was not prepared in any way
prior to the conference."
The budget amounted to
$18,753.50 which Bray termed
totally inadequate and was
eventually approved in the last
moments of the conference.
As approved, the budget includes, in part, five thousand
dollars tor administration, three
thousand for executive salaries,
five thousand for conferences
and eight hundred for the international program.
Both Bray and Longstaffe
agreed that the World University Service conference was
well run and successful.
Suggestions were provided
by the executive and plans for
■the year were laid out in the
three-day conference.
Undergraduate Societies Committee with Regard to the Students' Council
At present, the AMS Constitution states
that "in the case of the constitution of the
Undergraduate Societies, the Students' Council shall not amend or disapprove proposed
amendments except by unanimous vote."
Since the USC is represented on Council by
their Chairman, this in effect, gives him a veto.
Since it is held that no subsidiary organization
should have such unlimited control over the
Students' Council, it is proposed to delete this
sentence.
Group E—Honorariums
It is suggested that the student body consider the approval of $100 honorariums next
year for all members of the Students' Council
and for the Editor of the Totem and the Managing Editor and News Editor of The Ubyssey.
At present, the AMS President and Treasurer
and the Editor-in-Chief of the Publications
Board receive honorariums to the amount of
their year's university fees. Many American
and other Canadian universities offer honorariums on a wider basis than does UBC in an
attempt to compensate for the time and energy
office-holders devote to student activity and
their inability to hold part-time jobs.
Group F—Student Court Revision
A revised constitution of the Student
Court has been carefully prepared by Law
students and Court members John Spencer
and Terry Nichols to more clearly define the
role of the Court in maintaining and enforcing student discipline. Under the proposed
constitution, the USC Investigating Committee
would lay a charge and prosecute it before
the Court in the presence of the accused. The
Court would levy no fine over $5.00 but could
charge t'he accused with any damages he had
caused. Its decision could be appealed to
Faculty Council.
The effect of the revision is to turn the
Court into a more effective and fairer interpreter of student justice.
9. Elimination of Faculty Editions of The
Ubyssey except the Engineers Edition.
It is felt by the Publications Board and by
Students' Council that the various faculties
could receive better coverage through a system of features. The present faculty editions
are uninteresting and uninformative.
TIME   WASTED
(Continued from Page 1)
Unlike NFCUS, WUS has a
purpose which is to aid underprivileged universities and provide exchange scholarships on
a world level.
WUS is composed of both
faculty and students. The program for the coming year includes aid to Pakistan, Israel,
and Indonesia for student housing and to Japan for student
health.
Bray said, "UBC is not pulling its weight ia WUS because
we do not contribute to the
international aid program."
He expressed the hope that
students would approve a motion to be presented at the general meeting allowing part of
UBC's contribution to go to
this program.
CAMPUS
POLITICS
By AL FORREST
Hot, explosive issues will
come at students Thursday
with the speed and impact of
a machine gun blast.
Decorum of student council's general meeting will be
shattered when Commie Jim
MacFarlan (snarl) raises the
budget question by shouting
that his party was shortchanged.
And then the honorarium
question.
Never before has there been
a more explosive campus political issue than the proposal
that student council members
be paid $100 for their services
during the year.
Roofing the swimming pool
—certain to be revived Thursday—is tame stuff compared
to the implications of award*
ing a $100 cheque to a candidate upon election.
HONORARIUMS
Campus leaders don't quarrel with the $240 honorariums
now paid council president,
treasurer, and Ubyssey editor,
and are generally in favor of
the principle of reimbursing
councillors for losses encountered in the line of duty, but
the amount and who is to receive the money are touchy
questions only slightly less explosive  than  an atomic blast.
Chances of the motion passing depend entirely upon who
is included and how much.
Third hot issue is the Brock
extension plan.
Current plans include: build
one wing, 20 rooms, $150,000;
or build two wings, 40 rooms,
$300,000; or build one big extension, $250,000; or build no
wings.
Apparently you pay your
money and you take your
choice.
Violent protests will greet
council's motion to raise required signatures to call a general meeting from 100 to 500.
This bids to sneak through despite determined opposition
from UCC head Al Thackray.
Proposal to lower the quorum may not be necessary if
future general meetings are as
lively as this one is shading up.
TAIL SWATS
I was wrong—everybody's
coming. Socred national
leader Solon Low speaks
here Oct. 28. which may be
the same day fate decrees^
M. J. Coldwell. CCF chief,
to arrive. Tim Buck, national leader of the LPP (boo)
speaks in the Auditorium
Nov. 1, safely before the
snow season.
Also watch for Rod Young
this Friday and Art Laing, the
following  Tuesday.
Frosh get their first look at
the wild mock parliament sessions October 27 with CCF
forming the government, Conservatives the official opposition. Socreds, Liberals and
LPP bring up the rear.
FILMSOC
For Stuocnts Aw Staff OnlvJ
WmXpPERS
Today: Noon. 3:45. 6:00. 1:15
Auditorium - 35 cents
Students and Staff only
smart ootds choott
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10th Anniversory Book Sale
2 Days Only— Friday and Saturday, October 21-22
PEOPLES CO-OP BOOK STORE
337 West Pender Street
Sale Hours 9 a.m.—9 p.m. THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1955
6
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IN 1934 the first stainless steel train
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miles of service, this silvery streamliner
still carries on, as gleaming-bright as
when new.
Today, the records established by
this and many other stainless steel
trains, have brought about a fleet of
173 new C.P.R. cars.
Because of stainless steel's high
strength and the knowledge that it
will never be weakened by corrosion, structural sections can be
made lighter, thus giving greater
safety with less weight.
Weight saving and economy 'are also
obtained by using stainless steel sheathing of a thinner gauge but designed
with greater rigidity than previously.
With this stainless, corrosion resisting chromium nickel alloy, paint is not
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" The Romance of Nickel", a 72-page
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Secondary School teachers.
t «A0«    MARK
Nickel Silver Hardware
Over 70 tons of nickel silver containing
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of 173 cars.
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THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Oetobar 18, 1955
tw
NFGUS Conference
The election of the 1955-56 executives for the National
Federation of Canadian University Friday, ended the annual
conference of the federation held at the University of Alberta. • r   ■■ ; ;	
Peter Martin of the University of Toronto was elected the
new president succeeding Doug
Burns of Alberta. Elected vice-
presidents included David Peal
of Dalhousie to the post of maritime regional vice-president,
Xen Clare of Sir George Williams to Quebec region vice-
president of John Sherman of
U. of A. to the Western Regional vice-presidency.
Wally Tarnanpolsky * from
University of Saskatchewan
succeeds' Paul' Wonnacott as
newly elected international affairs commissioner. NFCtJS, debating association chairman is
Ivan Cody °l. McMaster succeeding Peter Tanquay of Ottawa.
CONTROVERSIAL
The election ended a controversial ten hour session which
finally broke up at four a.m.
Saturday morning. Administration finance, the stumbling
block of the five day conference, was finally revised with
changes in the budget and a
revision of the administration-
al set-up at the national level.
The closeness of expected
revenue and expenditure necessitated the barest minimum
allocation to administration,
executive salaries, projects and
international affairs. The travel department under the direction of Mr. J. Y. Pilon came
under the close scrutiny of the
conference. It was finally decided that if charter flights
cannot be obtained from International Air Travel Association
that the travel department be
deferred for this year and Pilon
would be hired as full time
secretary.
The matter of finance was
brought io a head when Ron
Bray, prettdwnt of Students
Council at U. of B.C., moved
a fee hike from the present
50 cents to 75 cents and if
this was not found feasible
io disband NFCUS.
The   motion   seconded   by
Manitoba was defeated 8 to two
by the Plenary Session.
A tight budget was finally
passed with recommendation to
member university representatives to raise funds through
grants to the Federation and to
get member student councils
in a financial position to do so
to endeavor to grant a bonus
besides their per capita fee to
the federation.
McGILL
A proposal was put to the
floor by the observer from McGill who had speaking rights
only because McGill isn't in
NFCUS to revise the adminis-
trational setup. The result was
that the federation adopted the
following, "That an advisory
council be created including
one national president with a
salary of 1800 dollars per year;
that five members of public,
esteem residing near the na-'
tional office be selected for a
priod of three to five years by
the national conference; this
adivsory committee shall meet
at least three times a year and
will be in power to report and
make recommendations to the
national executive."
Throughout the conference
member delegates tried to get
something concrete and substantial to present to the stu-
" dent bodies of their respective
campus. As a result the national commission brought several
projects before the Plenary to
try and overcome student apathy towards NFCUS.
APATHY
' Included in the national com-
Mission .report and pissed by
"the plenary session were: 1.
The establishing of a publication setup which would take
• a form of magazine mandated
to Carleton College similar to
"Canadian Campus" but with
added improvements; 2. A
life insurance scheme; 3. Printing of a national membership
card; 4. A student's discount
service accepted as part of federations economic program and
put it into effect on as many
campuses as possible, McMaster
and Dalhousie already have it;
5. Approach representatives of
industries and employment to
improve student employment
services;!. NFCUS scholarships
to students of member universities;?. Brief of NFCUS schol-
- arship campaign to the Royal
Commission on Economic Affairs; 9. Try and get income
tax exemptions.
The Georgian Trophy presented for outstanding contribution to NFCUS during the
year 1954-55 was wonfby the
University of Dalhousie in Halifax. Doug Brown president of
student's council accepted the
trophy for the contribution
made to NFCUS by Dennis
Madden of Dalhousie.
St. Patrick's College and
King's College were admitted
to the Federation to bring the
membership of NFCUS to 21
universities. The conference
wound up Saturday with a trip
to Banff and meetings of the
new executive there.
fteqtostti By Office
All undergraduate societies \
which intend to enter a float I
in the Homecoming Parade ■
on November 5 are request- \
ed to fill out an application
at the AMS office or notify :
Keith Liddle at AL. 0001.
sasfa
eM
•mm
\
CM} Ne»ds
RjHe Shdts
Rifle shots — not shotgun;
blasts—is a voluntary group's
bast attack on problems of
civil liberties, Social Work
Professor William Dfxon told
a Civil Liberties Union meet-
ihg Friday. j
' He slid that groups such ad
the Vancouver Civic Unity As^
•odatton—of which he is anj
executive member — should
n*y to influenr* community
leaders rither than trying to
re-educate the general public. '
Dixon told students the
VCUA tries to influence social
agencies, newspapers, and three
levels of government.
■%
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MIKE GLASPIE—SPORTS EDITOR
Chiefs In
Good Form
Campus teams finally made
their season debuts over the
weekend, with the Chiefs unleashing a devastating display
of power in handing Meralomas a 20-0 shut-out.
Dave Morley and Peter Tynan, showing top form, scored
12 of the 29 points.
Al Laird, Clive Niel, Dick
Clement, Ted Hunt, Bill Hutchinson and Bob Morford accounted for the rest of the
scoring.
In Bell-Irving Cup play, the
Redskins were the only varsity
team who hit the win column
defeating the North Shore's
Second team 8-3.
In other second division
tests, the Braves and Tomahawks went down under 22-5
and 13-0 counts against the
Kats and Rowing Club Seconds
respectively.
SPORTS BRIEFS
The Tennis club will hold a
meeting Thursday in the Brock
club room at 12:30.
ip ip ep
The hockey meeting will
take place at 12:30 Wednesday
in the Memorial Gym in room
212.
On Saturday the qualifying
round for the UBC Golf Match
Play Championship was held.
Low score was made by John
Russell with a 74. Art Pullman
and Ernie Girard scored the
low nets with 68 and 69 respectively.
ef* ep ep
Varsity Men's Grass Hockey
team defeated the Cardinals
1-0 after a hard fought game
on Saturday. Putting on the
pressure, B. Jawanda scored in
the second half. The other
team, the UBC squad, was able
to out-score the Redbird.s 4-3
with Doug Howie, John Chant
and Norman Dial the marksmen.
YARX STICK
U.B.C.
Western
168 Total Net Yards
IIS Total Yards Rushing
3 Total Yards Passing
9 First Downs
9 Passes Attempted
1 Passes Completed
0 Passes Intercepted
3 Fumbles
1 Fumbles Recovered
189 Punting Yardage
8 Number of Punts
31.3 Average of Punts
S Punt Returns
8 Total Yards Returns
80 Yards Penalised
87
52
35
22
185
33.0
58
83
Mighty mite Don Spence is surrounded by Vikings as he plays a big part in Birds' 6-0 upset win. Ihis was Spence's first game since being injured three weeks ago.
. • e,   • —Photo by John Robertson
Soccer
Sweep Two
Led by Bruce Ashdown, Varsity soccer team swamped a
badly outclassed Dubbleware
squad 6-0 at Kensington Park
on Saturday.
'This was the second win in
three starts for the Birds. Varsity lumped into an early lead
on a quick goal- by Fred Green.
Bruce Ashdown followed with
the first of his four goals on a
pass from Jack Butterfield.
UBC led at the half 20.
On resumption of play Ashdown opened fire drilling in
three successive goals past the
Dubbleware goaltender to give
Varsity a 5-0 lead.
During the last 15 minutes
the Bird defense was shaken
by the loss of Ian Todd, due
to a knee injury, but was able
to hold off a Dubbleware rally.
However, Dubbles missed several golden opportunities.
Then Frank Sealy moved in
during the last few minutes of
play and scored the sixth and
final goal.
The Chiefs followed the
Birds' lead as they topped
%adner 6-2 at UBC. Playing
against the wind UBC took a
2-1 lead at half time.
Goals were evenly distributed with Stan Glasgow scoring
two, Bob Harris, Rodan Go-
paulsingh, Larry Husbands,
and John Pucha all scoring one
each.
Thinclads
Run   Second
A six-man UBC cross country team finished second at
Brockton oval last Saturday.
They were beaten out by the
Vancouver Olympic Club by
two points after running some
five miles through Stanley
Park.
The fastest time made was
23:25:4 by Jim Moore who
placed second. Head Coach
Pete Mullins feels the team
consisting of Alan Hale, John
Butterfield. Bern Barton, Cole
Harris, Jim Moore, and Peter
Ocks, has terrific potential and
should clean up in the coming
meet, to be held in several
weeks, that will include a Spokane entry.
JayveesWin
The Jayvee football squad
scored their second win in two
starts as they beat Seattle City
Lions 19-14 on the campus
Sunday.
Jayvees ran up an early 12-0
lead but were soon on the
short end of a 14-12 score.
Jackie Henwood and Bill Mel-,
ville sparked the UBC squad
as they finished strongly to
grab the win. Henwood, ineligible for the Birds, scored
all three touchdowns.
Birds   Score   First   Win
At   Battersea   Field
The fired-up UBC Thunderbirds racked up their first
Evergreen Conference win of the season in scoring a tight
6-0 victory over Western Washington Saturday night as 500
Bird supporters roared their approval.
It was the maiden win for
Frank Gnup as UBC coach,
and is the culmination of a
tremendous coaching job by
him, in turning green but willing boys into a gutty, fighting
football team of which UBC
should be proud.
The game itself was a tight
defensive battle. The winning
„ touchdown came in the second
quarter after the squads had
<
spent the first stanza sparring
around midfield.
Bird's halfback Bruce Eagle,
who played a whale of a game
both ways, picked off a pass in
the flat by Viking halfback
Gary Bruno as he cut in front
of the intended receive' on the
UBC 41. Eagle then raced 50
yards unmolested for the Birds'
first conference score of the
season.
SCORE AGAIN
Only minutes later the inspired Thunderbirds completed
a 72 yard touchdown pass play
from Ian Stewart to Don
Spence, only to have it nullified by a penalty.
But the win-hungry Gnup-
men did not need that score,
as they held off a desperate
Viking squad who were not
suffering from lime burns as
"advertised."
The contest developed into
an exciting defensive battle
after cthe Bird touchdown. A
superlative UBC defense only
once allowed the Vikings to
reach the Bird 20 yard line.
It was the same Thunderbird
defense that has held UBC up
all  season.
DEFENSE TOUGH
The Vikings, unable to gain
consistently along the ground
against tbe stingy Bird line,
took to the aerial route as the
game progressed. Bruce Randall, whom the Vikings claim
is the best passer in the league,
threw  the  majority,  but  the
upset • minded Thunderbirds
were not impressed.
The Bird line turned in a
great game, and it would be
impossible to single out any
one person as the standout.
They continually got into
the Western backfield to rush
the passer or to stop a ball carrier before he got started, as
the Vikings were thrown for
losses totalling 74 yards..
Don Spence and Brace Eagle
packed most of the mail for the
Thunderbirds, while Ian Stewart and Roger Kronquist divided the quarterbacking. Jerry
Nestman and Al Ezzy also helped give the Birds their best
offense of the season as UBC
picked up 184 gross yards along
the ground.
ROOTERS HAPPY
The win was the first for the
Thunderbirds in Evergreen
Conference play since 1951
when Central Washington was
upset in a "Homecoming" game.
, And the Birds supporters
acted like they wouldn't have
another win to celebrate for
another four years. As the final
gun sounded hundreds of de-
lerious students poured onto
the field to rip down the goal
posts, and congratulate their
heroes.
However, the team was already occupied in putting
Frank Gnup on their shoulders,
and they acted like they knew
the next win would not be far
off.
This weekend the Birds play
the league-leading Whitworth
Pirates in Spokane as they seek
their second win.
Dr. John B.  RoseboTOugh
DENTIST
2130 Western Parkway
Behind the Canadian Bank of
Commerce
University Boulevard
Phone ALma 3990
KEEP YOUR
MONEY SAFE...
when you're travelling!
-££S
Traveller's cheques protect you against loss of your money
while travelling. Negotiable anywhere.
You can obtain Traveller's Cheques at our nearest branch—
we have more than 700 to serve you.
NW-143
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COM MERCE
More than 30 Branches m Vancouver and District
BRANCHES IN THE UNIVERSITY DISTRICT
10th and Sasamat Univ. Blvd.
Mgr.: Mr. R. E. McKinnon Mgr.: Mr. G. C. Hull

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