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The Ubyssey Feb 12, 1937

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 Published TwiceWeekly by the    Publications Board of theUniversity of British Columbia
Vol. XIV
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  12,  1937 No. 31
Anti-Conscription Campaign
Gains Force Among Students
Wednesday Will Be
Student Night For
"Robin Hood" Show
Bus Gets Water On
The Knee and Limps
Slowly Back to City
Crime never pays, 'tis ssld, but
a number of atudants ere willing
to amsnd that admirable aaw to
"Industry nsvsr paya," after a
tortuoua and muoh prolonged
bus-rids last Wednesday night.
Industry, In this esse, It ahould
bs explained, Is s misnomer for
staying lata In ths Library, and
the punishment being an ordinary ten-mlnute rldo to Sassmst
tsklng two hours.
About 8.S0, tha flrat atudenta
began to slosh their way from tha
Library to the bua-atand through
an ankle-deep mixture of enow
and rain. They ware atlll thsrs
whsn the patrona of tha 8.60 bua
arrived, atlll there In faet when
tha ehaary Library lighta want
out at 9.40. Ten minutes latsr,
msjsstioslly and alowly, oh so
slowly, ths bus erswlad to the
stsnd, a victim of water on the
knae, or In the carburetor or
some plsoa. Soma 20 mlnutos
later It agsin ereapad to a atand-
still st the Qsblea Inn; ten min-
utaa later It had arrived at the
Unlveralty  Lodge.
But aueh a tsrrifie paoa could
not ba kept up. Tha bua alowed
down, stopped—snd didn't start
again. . . Tsn minutes, flftssn,
Two passing sutos stopped and
took on a load of miserable humanity. Several atudenta, growing Impatient for aome reaaon or
other, hlteh-hlkad. At last the
B. C. Elaetrie'a relio of a psst
sga raaohed 8ssamat, only 40
mlnutea after it had left the bua-
atand.
An am.ztd atreet-car conductor heard aaveral paaaengara utter a vehement "Phooey," but he,
innocent aoul, didn't underatand.
All he could aee waa a cute little
csrd saying, "The B. C. Electric
—your friend   In  need."
Dread Scarlet Fever
Disrupts Orderly Life
At U. of Saskatchewan
SASKAOON, Feb. 11 (WIPU)—
In an effort to stop an epidemic of
Scarlet Fever at the University of
Saskatchewan, 61 students ln Qu'-
Appelle Hall were placed under a
24-hour quarantine when two cases
broke out here on Tuesday, February 2, and 20 of these, showing susceptibility to the disease were
placed under a seven-day quarantine, as well as being innoculated
against  the  disease.
TWENTY   OUTLAWED
Immediately after discovering
two cases of Scarlet Fever in the
Residence, the doctor gave the
Dick Test to each student, which
prevented any contact with the outside world for 24 hours. At the
conclusion of a hectic day filled
with basketball, swimming, cards
and devilment, another examination was taken, and 20, including
the Warden, Dr. Spinks, were found
positive, or susceptible to the disease.
These 20, living among the others,    yet    permitted    no    outdoor
freedom    exoept   at   night,    have
nicknamed   themselves   the   Leg-
Ion of tha   Damned, for they felt
that  thay  were   unwanted,   shunned and forgotten  by the reat of
society.     Vet th«>y heve  not been
too cruelly treated.    Lunohea and
apecial   meala   are   provided   for
them.    The Preaident donated loe
cream for the aupper on  Friday.
They   have   been   allowed   to   uae
tho gym, the pool snd the ourllng
rink.     With   the   psssing   of   the
days,    the    Legion    la    becoming
more   unmanagable,   and   aaveral
practical   J o k e a    have   reaulted
from   their  enforced   aeclualon.
Unless    someone    comes    down
with  the   disease   before   the   week
is up, tho boys will be allowed their
freedom  on  Monday  night.   Beards,
cards aud  basketballs will  then be
put   away,   and   normal   life   is   expected   to   be  resumed.
Large Cast In
Production
Wednesday will be student
night for the Musical Society
production of "Robin Hood,"
which will also be shown
Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings. The Society
has announced a special
student price for Wednesday
evening.
MORE TUNEFUL
With the production in its final
rehearsal stages, it is expected that
"Robin Hood" will, with little effort,
excel many past productions of the
Musical     Society.      Certainly    the
operetta ia more tuneful than some
of the Gilbert and Sullivan works.
This year's show has the added
advantage of a substantial dramatic plot, around which the musical offerings are arranged. "Oh
Promise     Me."     "The     Tinker's
Song,"   and   several   other   well-
known of the Reginald de Koven
tunes, will  be presented.
The   student   night   performance
will be arranged to start early, and
the   caf   will   remain   open   late   in
order that students may have their
suppers on the campus.
TICKETS SELLING
Tickets for the other performances are selling rapidly, but there
are many excellent seats still available. They are on sale on the
campus and down town, with prices
ranging from 60 cents to a dollar.
A large cast of students will be
featured in the "Robin Hood" show.
Among them, Callum Thompson,
Lewis Freeman and William Cameron. Many members of the Musical Society will be in the choruses
and  orchestra.
IN OPERA
Another Debate
Tuesday Noon
The Parliamentary Forum will
continue the noon-hour meetings
which have proved so successful,
with a debate on Tuesday of next
week.
The affirmative of the resolution,
"Resolved, that trade unionism
should supersede craft organisation," will be taken by Leonard
Martin, who led the U. B. C. home
team to victory against the University of Alberta in January.
He will be opposed by an experienced and able speaker, Alf Kitchen, who returns to debating after
a lapse of some time. Alf sat In
the Boys' Parliament for several
years, and for the space of one
year held a position in the cabinet.
He will be remembered at Varsity
for his part in the Pub-S.C'.M. debate  last year.
The topic chosen Is extremely interesting and important, in view of
the labor troubles in tbe United
States, where this issue is one of
the main points of controversy in
the present labor split. The meeting will be held at 12.16 Tuesday
noon in Arts 100.
The executive has announced that
the flrst radio debate of the year
will be held on February 19, when
Lud Beamish and Les Allen, of U.
B. C. oppose a team from Manitoba
on the affirmative of the subject,
"Resolved that under present world
conditions, dictatorship is preferable to democracy."
Callum Thompson, who sings
one of the lead parts in the
Musical Society production of
"Robin Hood," to be shown here
Wednesday to Saturday of next
week.
International Debate
To Be Staged Here
On February 25, under the sponsorship of the Literary Forum, two
women from University of Washington will debate with two U.B.C.
women on this campus. The subject which was chosen to conform
with International week of the S.
CM., will be, "Resolved that the
United States Is a greater menace
to world peace than the British
Empire." The affirmative will be
upheld by Mary Rendall and Kae
Farquhar of  U.   B.   C.
TROUBLE    IN
PRODUCTION
Those who attend the performance of "Robin Hood," will notice
in particular, the beautiful solos
and rousing choruses which are
distributed so liberally throughout
the opera. They, of course, form
the major feature of the production, but at the same time lt Is not
right to forget that rather nebulous group known as the production staff, manager of which ls Kay
Washington.
Patrons   usually,   for   Inatanee,
take   the   oroheatra   fer  granted,
but  It la well to  remember that
membera have apent many houre
bringing  thslr  part  of tho  score
ss near to perfection ss possible.
This yssr a large part of the orchestra la composed of studsnts,
but profesalonala sre being uesd
to fill  In gsps.
Priacllla   Boyd   aa   concert   mistress,  plays  the  flrst  violin  with a
dexterity that is incomparable. Bill
Bitot is business manager for the
orchestra    and    has    arranged    all
practices.
FAIR CREATED
Margaret McDonald, pianist for
the society for two years, has attended the multitudinous practices
and  performed  bar duties  ln  such
(Turn to Page 2;  Sec OPERA)
De Ridder Discusses
Classical School of
Vocal Development
In the fourth lecture of the series "The Development of Vocal
Music," Allard de Ridder concluded
his discussion of Bach, Introduced
his audience to the classical school
and touched briefly on the romantic period. The composers of the
classical period, Haydn, "the father of the symphony," Mozart and
Beethoven, turned out a large
quantity of beautiful and excellent
work.
MANY  POEM8
Haydn's works, the "Seasons"
and the "Creation," are particularly
notable for their originality. Even
when 70 years of age, his work
showed no falling off. The speaker
referred to the industry and genius
of Mozart, who died at an early
age, and to Schubert, wbo set
hundreds of poems to music, including works  of Goethe.
Discussing Rossini, Mr. de Ridder
pointed out that apparently this
composer was over critical of his
own work, and produced very little
after  the  age  of  40.
Elsje de Ridder performed a
Bach number. Mrs. de Ridder,
Kitty Hamilton and William Mc-
Gavin also assisted. Mrs. Hamilton's singing of Schubert's "Erl-
Klng" was enthusiastically received.
Canada Has Few
Physical Training
Courses Available
Speaker Outlines Whet
Is Necessery for a
Physical Instructor
Stressing the fact that there was
not a suitable Physical Education
teachers' training course available
in the whole of Canada, W. O.
Brandreth, superintendent of Physical Education in the City of Vancouver, spoke on Wednesday noon
at the second Vocational Outdance
lecture.
MUCH   TO   BE   DONE
Introduced by Prof.  C.   B.  Wood,
Mr. Brandreth outlined his theories
on    the   value   of   physical    education  training as a  definite  part ot
the educational  system ot today.
Stating  thst  slthough   a   great
deal   of  work   had  bean  done   In
thla   field   the   greatsr   psrt   wss
yat to be aeoompliahad, eapeolal-
ly    in    connection    with    regular
school     ourrleulums.     "What     is
the  uae  of full  aoademlo  knowledge If we are broken In health?
Heslth   Is   tha   determination   of
peraonalitlea."
EXPANSION   COMING
"The opportunities in this field
are not very great as yet, but we
are looking for expansion. The
recreational centres are helping
the unemployed to regain their
moral courage, but these are only
the beginnings of a larger scheme
—the establishment of clubs for
which  leaders will  be  wanted."
The remuneration that may be
expected in this work will average
about $180 for men at junior high
schools and $120 for women. Promotions will depend on training
and experience.
Faculty Asks For Less
Noon-hour Pep Meets
Students will see fewer pep
mets during the rest of this term,
it ls reported, mainly because many
membera of the faculty object to
sucb noon-hour amusements. Following the recent Arts '40 draw,
which went slightly overtime into
the 1.30 class period, lt was decided
to cancel a pep meet planned to
boost the coming Co-ed dance.
The Faculty Committee on Student Affairs, whose chairman is Dr.
William Ure, Honorary President
of Arts '40, is rumored to have requested that fewer pep meetings be
held. Students' Council, lt is stated by the Pep Club, was also asked
to act.
FILM GROUP
TO  PUBLISH
MAGAZINE
Aiming to ba "an Intelligent
guide to fllm-goera," the new
Film Bulletin, organ of the Vancouver Film Society, will.be on
aale tomorrow In tha eafateria
snd at ths bus stop.
Ths editor of the new magaslne la none other than Don Munro, prominent Playsrs' Club member, and most of ths srtielss and
film rsvlawa are by U. B. C. pro-
feaaora or atudenta.
Tha February iaaue of thla
allm, flva-cant publication In-
cludaa such fssturs artlelea by
Or. D. O. Evana, President of ths
Vaneouvsr Film Society, snd Dr.
Robert   Bnglsnd.
A regulsr festura of tha mags-
sine will bs its rsey rsvlawa of
currant fllma ahowlng at ths commercial theatraa, as wsll ss ad-
vanoes on coming foreign productions.
Members of tha Vancouver
Film Society, aocordlng to a
newa Item in the Film Bulletin,
are planning an amateur production dealing with tha Vanoouver wstsrfront.
WIN OVER
PROVINCE
Playing before a howling and
cheering collection of Student supporters, Maury Van Vllet's Senior
basketballers whipped a highly-
touted Province quintet at the U.
B.   C.  gym,  by a 52-39  score.
Flashing plenty of old-time power, and using their famed speed
and fast-breaking attack to count
for most of their swishes, the Collegiate cagers played like champions ln their breath-taking victory.
Crabbing an early lead, Alma Mater's ambitious basketers continued
piling up points, and were never
headed by the disheartened Jones'
boys.
The U.B.C. win again brings
hopes for a top-place tie with
Province. Although the blue and
gold squad played their last league
game Wednesday night, they can
still gain the coveted bye slot, with
a Forst triumph over the Newsies
in the finals on Saturday. (See
Sport Page tor story.)
Todsy noon Is positively ths Isst
chance to claim your money and
books at ths Book Exohsnga. Your
money booomea the property of the
A.M.S. sftsr thst time I
"Brontes" Is Character
Study of Famous Sisters
Acting abilities of members of
the Players' Club will be put to a
searching test, when their Spring
play, Alfred Sangster's "The
Brontes," is presented in the Auditorium next month.
INTENSITY OF FEELING
The play is essentially a study
of the characters of the three
Bronte sisters, and the reactions of
their sensitive natures to an environment which tended to suppress
their artistic temperaments. It embodies the intensity of feeling
which seems to be a characteristic
of those living near the great, desolate moors of Yorkshire.
Central in the play is the figure
of   the  Rev.   Patrick   Bronte,   a
stern man who never allows hia
daughters  to  interfere with  his
strict dally routine, but who takes
a  secret  pride  in  their achievements.
Miss  Branwell, the maiden aunt
who   felt   it   her   duty   to   leave   a
fashionable existence in Brussels to
care for the little girls after their
mother's death, believes that  emotional display is unseemly and improper, and treats them in a distant
and reserved manner.   They fly to
Tabitha,  who  gathers them  round
her   kitchen    Are,   and    fills    their
heads   alternately   with   stories   of
rough country humor, or weird legends of the bleak Moors.
PASSIVE ENDURANCE
The action reveals the effect of
these conflicting conditions on the
sensitive and talented girls. The
eldest is Charlotte, the strength and
inspiration of them all. Emily, almost as gifted, is sufficient unto
herself, and resents fiercely the
exposure that publication of her
poems would mean. The mediator
between theae aggressive characters is Anne, thai generous and
sweet younger sister, who nevertheless shows remarkable qualities of
passive endurance.
The problem of the play is the
question  of  whether  or  not  the
girls will  persist in their ambition to make a name for themselves in literary circles, in face
of the opposition encountered in
the home, and in face of the current   prejudices   against   women
writers.
Alfred   Sangster   has   portrayed
the  romanticism   of  thier natures,
and  the disturbing background   of
the play with accuracy and power.
He uses to advantage every significant  trait in  their versatile characters to bring them to life on the
stage.  The result is a play of lasting  Interest to every audience.
PETITION IS
CIRCULATED
French Students Play
Large Part In
Agitation
MONTREAL, Feb. 11-.—Today the National Student Petition Committee with headquarters in Montreal, launches its campaign to enlist the
support of Canadian Students for a petition which it
plans to present to the Canadian Parliament.
Thia petition will aak the Oovernment to remove tha power to
oonaerlpt Cansdlans for foreign
wara by mars order-ln-oounoll
snd asks thst the Canadian foreign policy of tha preaent government be enunciated.
TO   ALL.   STUDENTS
The petition ls the result of preliminary conferences at Queens
University, Kingston, and the University of Toronto at which official
delegates from Queen's, the University of Toronto, the University
of Montreal and McGiil were present. The petition is being forwarded to the National Federation
of Canadian University Students
and to all the Universities in Canada. The aim of the petition committee ls to enlist the support of
every Canadian Student and it is
hoped to get the majority of the
names of Canadian college students appended to the petition before presentation.
The petition committee plana,
once the petition haa been signed
by ss many atudenta aa poaalble,
to aand a delegation to Ottawa to
preaent the petition to Parliament, poaalbly through the Prime
Minister.
Wherever the plans have been
made known the idea has been enthusiastically endorsed. Laat weekend a large meeting was held at
the University of Toronto before
which the plans were presented. It
ls understood that the campaign tor
names is already under way In tbe
Queen   City.
POSITION   AT   PRESENT
At the present time the Oovernment of the day may enforce conscription and may force Canadians
to serve In the army abroad by
mere order-ln-council. It ls hoped
to have this power curtailed, so
that before any conscription measures could be Invoked they would
have to be discussed freely and
openly in Parliament.
It is also hoped that the Canadian Oovernment will make some
announcement as to its foreign policy, particularly in regard to Canada's commitments to foreign powers or to other parts of the Empire. It was stated at the various
preliminary conferences that while
the question of how much Canada
should share ln a future European
War or in fact an Empire War
would depend largely on the circumstances at the time and that
Canada's position should be definitely stated as has been done in
South Africa.
RESULTS   FROM   "DAILY"
SURVEY
It ls understood that the Idea for
a petition was the result ot the
opinions expressed in the result of
the survey made by the "Dally"
last December, in which lt wad
found that the opinion in the various Universities was against conscription.
The second clause ln the petition
was more or less instigated by re-
mams of the Prime Minister which
were to the effect that Canada
would not enter into conflict without a full and open discussion ln
Parliament.
The organizing executive of the
petition committee consists of
Bernard Muller of McQill, Jean
Vallerand and Maurice Arcbam-
bault of the "Quartier Latin' 'of the
University  of  Montreal.
It ls understood that the petition
will be placed ln conspicuous places
about the campus and will be available for all who wish to sign it. Two
THE
U B
_-___.
Y S S E Y
Friday, February 12, 1937
THE   UBYSSEY
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Kemp Edmonds
SPORTS EDITOR
Dick Elson
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Ken Grant        Dorothy Cummings
Psggy Higgs
FRIDAY: Dorwln Baird
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITORS
Frank Perry    Frank Turner
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Student rate, $1.00 per year.
Rate for non-studants, $1.50 per year.
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone:  TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:   Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited.
PRODUCTIONS NEED SUPPORT
Back-stage scenes these days remind us that the Musical Society and the Players' Club are putting the finishing:
touches to their spring productions. "Robin Hood" and
"The Brontes" will soon be shown to audiences of students
and public alike.
There Is a taBk for every student ln the word of mouth
advertising for the above-mentioned affairs. The word
should be spread wherever students go that two of the outstanding dramatic efforts of the year will be those of the
university societies. Support, and plenty of it, Is badly
needed, for the A.M.S. has several thousands of dollars tied
up in the two productions.
• o •
MUGWUMPS AND THINGS
W. B. Yeats, In his poem, "Tho Second Crossing," has
summed up modern life rather well in the words:
"Ths best laok all oonvlotion while ths worst
Ars full of passionate intensity."
Unless the signs are wrong our campus ls due for another wave of Pacifist propaganda under the auspices of the
N.P.C.U.S. Their object is a worthy one, no doubt, the
abolition of conscription measures in the Mllltla Act. But
if their methods are those of the past hysterical emotionalism mixed with complete lack of common sense, then
there can be but one result, complete disgust and revulsion
on the part of the average student.
Why not try conducting a campaign in a sane manner,
for a change? Above all, let us try to act like normal individuals in order to avoid attracting the customary well-
founded ridicule that such matters attract from the general
public
There is a great deal to be said for being a mugwump.
OPERA
(Continued from Psgo 1)
a manner as to win the esteem ot
the society.
Tbls year  a Fair scene in  Nottingham bad  to  be created and in
the second and third acts a forest
scene and a village church scene.
The Bets  were  painted  by  the  Osborne Studios.    Sam Smith la stage
manager and ls assisted by several
members o( the Players' Club.
Charlie Brewer had s rssl preposition   on   his  hands  when   he
undertook  to  eeeure  the proper-
tlea for the opera.    Theae Included    bows   and    srrows,   tinker's
tools,  a  rssl  set  of  stooks and
even milkmaid's palls and stools.
After spending much time around
the Aggie barns, Charlie produced
not one set of milk palls but three.
all   different.     However,   he  found
difficulty ln securing the anvil and
hammer  which  Will  Scarlet  uses
ln his Armorer's Song.
IRONING   PROBLEM
Barbara Beney, last year's costume manager, is again ln charge
of thla department. One of the costuming problems is the re-ironing
of costumes after each performance. This questionable honor has
gone to Mavis Eastham, Barbara
Breeton   and   Jean   Anderson.
Much work has alao been done
by the advertising staff, composed
of manager Oeorge Robertson,
Jack Qrey, Doug Ford, Jean McLeod.
Tbe business staff under Bill
Cameron, Harry Bigsby and a committee composed ot Dlgby Lynch
and Jack Kennedy, are looking after the sale ot tickets. Bob McLellan is ticket manager.
BOY I   ARE WE MAD I
With hate in its soul, the Totem takes Its pen in hand to enjoin all
seniors ONCE AGAIN — senior write-ups are due promptly, tn the
square, wooden box at the foot of the Caf stairs, or ln the depths of
the Pub. office cabinet.
These same write-ups are due today—now, directly. The fact that
you don't read the Ubyssey and hadn't seen the notice is no excuse;
native Intuition should have told you.
Pleaae turn ln your Individual Totem write-up now, today; after
Wednesday next, we're going to make them up ourselves, and Ood help
the seniors WE} make write-ups for. '
NAME  ~	
HOME TOWN _	
ACTIVITIES -.._ - - -	
(as you wiah it to appear in Totem)
(Clubs, teams, executive offices, interests)
FACULTY-
COURSES.
"GRADUATE JEWELLERS WITH UNDERGRADUATE IDEAS"
FIRBANK & LANGE
CONVENIENT DIVIDED PAYMENTS
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY. 2088
Random Ramblings
BY
THE 8TUDENT   PRINCE
••BROWSING"
Library "browsing," I discovered
early ln my Frosh year, la an excellent sedative for an awakening
conscience. It Involves tbe danger, of course, of digesting something downright educational, but
with a bit of caution such accidents  can  usually  be  avoided.
The   accomplished   browser   can
skillfully surround himself with an
air  of  deep   study   and  meditation
that Is frankly awe-inspiring to his
teas  artful  colleagues.    An  experienced eye, however, can  generally
detect the browser from the genuine   student   by   noticing   whether
the   title   of   the   book  In  question
is proudly flaunted or casually and
adroitly  concealed   by  a   finger  or
two.    I regret to report tbat most
professor have experienced eyes.
CAPTAIN  VANCOUVER
Driven    into    the   gloomy   laby-
rlnthes   of   the   Library   the   other
day by Inclement, climatic and financial conditions, I happened ln my
browsing  to stumble across an Interesting fly-leaf note ln a volume
of    Captain    Vancouver's    Journal,
wblch    throws   some   interesting
light on that gentleman.    The volume waa  printed ln  1801, and the
note obviously written soon  after,
being very faded and Indistinct, apparently written by an elderly person   whose   Identity   must   remain
unknown.    Here ls the note, tn its
original  punctuation  and  spelling:
"I am vary eradltsbly Informed
that Cspt. Vsneouvsr wss nsvsr
sgaln smploysd, baeauss he flogged    Mr.    Pitt    afterward    Lord
Camelford  now the atory  la thla
the   Capt.   missing   some   sheets
of eoppsr ed  not lesrn who had
taksn thsm  hs  thsrsfor tlsd  up
ths   boatawsln.   during   ths   flogging   ths   boa ta wain   faellng   tha
pain   aald  oh   Mr.   Pitt  how  oan
you ass ms thua uaad.    Cspt. V.
peroelvlng that Mr. Pitt hsd tsk-
sn ths  eoppsr ordered  tha boat-
swsln to be rslssseo' A Mr.  Pitt
to   take   as   many   laahaa   aa   the
boatawsln    had    reo'd.    I    think
Capt.   Vaneouvar'a   oonduot   very
manly and thoae who dlareapeot-
ed   him   for  It  very   unmanly.     I
wish  I ed take him by the hsnd
but   alss   he   is   dead."
ROYAL   ROAD   TO   ROMANCE
The   summer   before    I   entered
Lily   Pond   and   the   fairyland   ot
Froshdom  I  decided  to  follow  the
course  of  Captain  Vancouver's  local explorations ln my home-made
sailboat,   spurred   on  by  a  broken
heart,   (my  third   that   summer,  if
I   remember)   and   an  overdose   of
reading Richard  Hallburton.
My expedition finished with a
crossing from Valdes Island to
Howe Sound, aome 80 odd miles
of open sea, that almost finished
me and my diminutive craft. When
I got back I was completely cured,
both of my heart trouble and my
admiration tor  Hallburton.
Strangely enough the detail I
remember most clearly ls that
when I got home my pajamas were
all in the wash and I had to borrow my grandfather's night shirt.
There ls no more luxurious feeling
than falling asleep ln a good, honest, middle-class Puritan, flannel
night shirt, preferably one warmed
first ln the front ot a good bourgeois  kitchen  range.
Some day I bope to master up
the moral courage to buy halt a
dozen. I'll bet Captain Vancouver
wore them!
WAR IS HELL
Pacifism is about to come into
Its own again on the campus, according to Dame Rumour. Some
enlightened young thinkers in
eastern colleges have conceived
the startling new thought that War
Is Hell, and tbe gospel is being
spread   throughout   the  land.
Just whom they hope to convert,
however, is not clear. Proeletarlat
and bourgeois, C.O.T.C. and V.C.U.,
even the Archbishop of Canterbury,
all seem to have grasped the same
original   truth   some   time   ago.
For the sake of my digestion, I
hope we are not in for another
emotional debacle like the antiwar meeting of two years ago.
(Remember the passionate virgin
who began her speech, "Fellow
cannon-fodder.")
The threatening P a c 1 fl s t campaign is being aimed at certain
clauses ln our national statutes,
providing tor conscription ln time
of national emergency. I doubt if
civil war could erase them, far leas
any resolutions passed by student
assemblies. In Britain, far from
being withdrawn, conscription
measures will probably be extended in 1937 to make military training compulsory in peace time as
(Continued in column 6)
More   Light
Than  Heat
By  O.  O.  iEDQEWICJC
One day last week our morning
contemporary printed a very interesting interview with Sir Herbert
Atkinson Barker, the famous specialist in manipulative surgery. He
spoke of the
"many battles
still to be fought
In the flght against
the awful sum of
human misery."
The chief enemies,
he implied, were
"quackery on the
left" and "Inane
and stupid prejudice on the right."
•    »
There can be
few better judges
of both those enemies of mankind
than Sir Herbert. For years he was
branded as a dangerous quack himself; and he has personally experienced every sort of foul blow in the
reportory of insane and stupid
prejudice.
His story is as old as the history
of thought, 2300 years ago, Socrates had exactly the same flght
on his hands against similar foes.
And there is the pretty and recent
story of the eminent Viennese physician who was practically hounded
out of Chicago by die-hards of his
own profession because his methods,
admittedly beneficent, were "new
and unorthodox."
The local and immediate lessons
we can learn from Sir Herbert's
case are so obvious that we need
not pause over them. But the
quacks and the die-hards will always be with us, I suppose—always
Interesting as specimens ln a museum or a soo and always a pest
when they are let loose in sooiety.
• *    •
The so-called "learned professions" are peculiarly liable to be
infested with such plagues. Education, for Instance, is their happy
hunting ground.
There are still plenty of die-hards
who regard everything1 but the
Three R's as "fads and frills" in
the school room. They still appear
to approve of the sanitary arrangements of the little red schoolhouse
and object to any examination of
school children's teeth. As for in
structlon in music, they maintain
that is a monstrous burden on the
taxpayer 1
But there is alao the opposite extreme, the educational quack. Such
a one may believe that vulgarity in
speech should not be corrected, on
the ground that dear child must be
allowed to "express himself." Not
so many years ago, a Seattle superintendent of schools took that precise view and gave orders accordingly.
Like all quacks, the educational
specimen hypnotises simple and
innocent listeners with a jargon of
hia own. This he compounds of Ions;
and soul-stirring words purporting
to come from psychology. And he
rolls them out with, all the fervor
of a darky preacher or a vendor of
patent pills.
• *    *
Pedagogical quacks and die-hards
are the sorts I know best, but all
professions have similar disease-
carriers.
There are men-of-law whom our
American friends call "hearse-
chasers." I have not observed these
at close range. To a student of
quackery, however, they must be
as interesting; as the sick man
whom a doctor onee described enthusiastically as "a beautiful ease
of small-pox."
They are nicely balanced by the
lawyers (always respectable and
successful) who regard a change in
tho divorce laws or an amendment
to the British North America Aot
as a blasphemy against the "faith
of our fathers." When that phrase
issues from a mouth, you can be
sure that the brain cells of the
speaker have hardened into stony
fixity. I once heard a really "big
lawyer" say, in all seriousness, that
a certain text-books on contract
was about as divinely inspired aa
the Bible.
• *    *
Some quacks and charlatans make
a sentimental orgy of religion. And
they, In their turn, are balanced by
the die-hards who keep on chanting
that "the old-time religion is good
enough for me"—though examination finally shows that their spiritual brand of belief much resembles that of darkest Congo.
As for the doctors, consult Sir
Herbert Barker.
DIAMOND MERCHANTS
FOR THREE GENERATIONS
Goldsmiths
Silversmiths
The mental ossification so justly denouned by Dr. Sedgewick,
is never to be feared by those
who read and Inwardly digest his
regular column in the Vancouver
Sun, of which this is a sample.
Telephone Trinity 4111 for daily
delivery!
GIRLS.. Dance Your Way To Health
Join our girls' tap and gym data.
Monday: 7.30 p.m.-8.30 p.m. $1.50 par month.
Telephone Bayviaw 5306 or 5333 R.
GRACE MacDONALD
3657 West 9th Avenue, at Alma
FUN   AND   FROLIC  WHEN
ENGINEERS  MIX  IT  UP
SASKATOON, Feb. 11 (WIPU).
—Practical jokeaters were In their
element on Friday, February 6, at
the U. of S„ where such pranks as
hijacking the sheaf, pulling down
rival signs and drenching Engineers with a fire hoae, all took place
within six hours,
LOTS OF FUN
The excitement which at times
reached fever heat was caused primarily by the eagerness of each
college to place their candidate as
Queen ot the Agro Carnival, to take
place on February 13. The Queen
is to be that candidate who receives
the greatest number of votes, and
in the last issue of the Sheaf,
twenty-five of these votes were
printed in each copy.
By hi-jacking the Sheafs before
they reached the distributing centre, the Engineers were able to cut
these ballets out. Such action
caused high feeling against the
Engineers, and it is thought to have
done a great deal of harm to their
candidate. The Sheaf office, in retaliation, ordered 1,600 more copies
to be printed, and the cost of this
second edition was to be borne by
the Engineering Society.
ENGINEERS AGAIN
Again a civil war almost broke
the Engineers' ranks. It appears
that several of the Engineering students had removed a Med. poster
and substituted another in its plaoe.
This poster was an insult to the
Med. candidate and advocated the
Engineer's hope, Jean Peterkln.
Many of the Engineers, disliking
such underhand advertising, in a
body returned the flrst sign to its
former plaoe.
When quiet was again resumed
on the campus, tho president of
tho Engineers, George Mlhm, received • telephone call from a
Med- calling them cowards and
daring them to meet outside
College building. A similar message waa then sent to the Med.
leader, Doug Cameron.
When the two Colleges had
drawn up face to face, with the
leaders in front, by conversation it
was learned that neither College
had done the phoning. Being too
jovial now to flght each other, they
suspected a bystanding lawyer of
the trick, caught him, and trounced
him in the snow. After a snake-
walk around the bowl, the Engineers returned to College building
to And several Argos and pre-Meds
pointing the fire-hose at them, but
they were unable to turn on the
water.
PRESIDENT COMES
In defiance the Beersmen gave
their yell, but just as they finished
the water suddenly spurted out,
drenching and scattering the once
boistrous Engineers. After several
attempts, the hose-men were forced
into tht building, and in the fljrht
which followed,  the  hose,  allowed
to go unguarded, filled tho building
with several Inches of water. Tho
appearance of President Murray,
and his warning not to touch lire
equipment, was a signal for peace,
and after another snake-walk and
yells, the crowd dispersed.
Arguments for and against tho
action of the Engineers are high,
but whatever the decision reached,
one thing is clear, that the Carnival
should be a howling success.
OPERA BROAOCAST
Students are reminded that selections trom the Robin Hood opera will be broadcast over CJOR,
from 10.30 to 11.00 tonight. Also
over CRCV and CKWX on the B.C.
program sponsored by Home OU
Distributors Limited at 9.00 p.m.,
Sunday. The program will feature
a duet by Callum Thompson and
Willa  Elliot.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications for National Research Council scholarships will be
received by S. P. Eagleson, secretary-treasurer of tbe council on Fellowships and Scholarships, up until March 1st.
COAT   LOST
Lost —i Blue ooat, ln the men's
basement of the Library, on Monday. Please return to P. Patience,
care of the Ubyssey offloe.
BOOKS LOST
Would tbe person who took the
two books, Hemon-Lamartlne and
Pormalrlos - Lamartlne, from the
Gamma Phi table pleaae return
them to the library as' they aro
long overdue.
Rambling 8
well as ln war. Not a pleasant
thought, but there it is.
Conscription, by its very nature,
implies c o m p u 1 sory enlistment
against the wishes ot the conscript.
Isn't lt rather futile, therefore,
merely to inform the government
that you oppose conscripUon measures, when the government already
recognizes your opposition by the
very existence of such  articles?
If our local uplifters feel the
call of the limelight in their bones
again, why not atop tilting at windmills and turn all this altruistic
energy to some more practical purpose. There are, believe lt or not,
greater menaces to campus welfare
than War and Fascism. If tbe
worst comes to tbe worst (and this
suggestion will probably cost me
my Journalistic standing for a
while)  there is ol'  Demon Rum.
How about it, brethren? For the
Bakes of women and children . . .
OPTOMETRIST
LAWRENCE SMITH
49 Wait Hastings Street
Phona Say. 6860   Res. ft. Grey 497 R
WE   ARE   YOUR   DELIVERY   SERVICE"
B. C. District Tel. and Delivery Co. Ltd.
916 W. HASTINGS STREET SEYMOUR 9188
Trucks, Motarcyclis ail Biki Miuin.ir., Availibla at All Tims Friday, February 12, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
aiiiiiniiiiiiiiiimiuiiHMiuiuinmiiu
SHOPPING
There were all kinds of optimistic men around the campus who made
dates for the Science and then found they couldn't buy tickets. We taw
a very worried Phi Delt frantically phoning his disappointed girl friend.
•a******
A lovely lady formally gowned in swirling taffeta and poised on
fragile dance slippers—but the picture isn't complete without a corsage
from BROWN BROS. To complete a perfect evening you need perfect
flowers and you can be sure of getting the best from Brown Bros. For
fraternity formals and more especially sorority formals corsages are the
rule. Find put what colored dress she is wearing and leave ths rest to
the florist.
And don't forget that Sunday is Valentine's day and flowers are the
nicesf and most thoughtful Valentine gift.
4*        4«        4*        4»
What Scienceman thinks that he sent a sympathy card instead of
a corsage for the Science last night.
•k      -k     -k      4t
Spring means suits to most women. MADAM! RUNOB, on South
Granville, is all ready to fill all our suit needs. There are the exclusive
three-piece knitted suits. And the two-piece suits with the embroidered
sleeves and necklines are very attractive.
This year very tailored suits are popular. There are the mannish
suitings in greys, browns or navy, with the fitted coats and smart skirts.
Nubbly wools are very comfortable and the bright blue suit with the Wide
lapels would be perfect for the campus.
Don't let spring beat you to it. Get your new suit now from
Madame Runge's.
4«        4t        4«        4t
Do you remember the little leaflet that was circulating around last
term about why certain fraternity men were unpopular at their formal?
It had something to do with corsages, we believe.
Well, the leaflet will be circulated again unless many of the men
around the campus remember that American girls always expect flowers.
4t        4*        4T.        4t       ,
Have you been down to ABIRS Studio to see about your fraternity
pictures yet? They can give you all sorts of new ideas to make your
chapter group more attractive than ever.
And here'* a tip, if you want pictures taken In your own home
make use of Aber's travelling photographer. If you want a portrait of
you all dressed up have it taken right at home by Aber.
Aber will take beautiful costume pictures, too.
♦       *       «       ♦
Ain't love wunnerful? this being near Valentine's day. Did you hear
of the D. U. who formerly brought his car out every morning iust Jammed
with the hoi poloi; but he now comes out with just one fair passenger
and refuses to bring any one else out to lectures. The gal Is a Signa Phi,
by the way.
4»        4t        4*        4«
Has the cold weather left Its souvenir on your hands? If they are
all rough and chapped you need a jar of RUSSIAN DUCHISS hand cream.
You may buy a .generous size jar for 50c at the Beauty Salon opposite
the Lyric Theatre, on Granville St.
This superlative cream, besides smoothing chapped hands, acts also
as a mild bleach, removing any redness or remains of sun tan. In the
summer you can rely on it to prevent sun-burn.
If you want smooth, milk-white hands, get your jar of hand cream
from the Russian Duchess.
•k        4t        -k        4t
There is a B.A.C. Scienceman who had trouble with the flu and the
Science ball. He asked no less than three dates and they all accepted,
but one after the other got flu.   Ho finally got there, though.
4t       4>       4*       -k
Spring has arrived at RAB SONS BUDGET SHOP. Just pay a visit
to 444 Granville St. and get acquainted with the new spring shoes which
are all ready to carry you smartly into summer.
Brown, grey and blue suede oxfords trimmed with lizard skin are
very fashion-wise, and just made for sensible co-eds. The blue suede
piped in grey are simply stunning. Sport shoes are tongusd this year and
have interestingly decorative eyelets.
And remember that your now Spring shoes will cost only $£.60 at
the Budget Shop.
4»        4»        4*        *k
There seems to be a great shortage of good gossip this week. One
little freshette said that people must be getting almost too good, but
personally we think it must be the* flu.
4t        4*        4*        4t
NATIONAL STUDENT PEACE PETITION
Whereas the preaent international situation confronts us with the
imminent danger of war.
Therefore, we the undersigned Canadian students resolutely affirm our
stand for Peace and hereby submit the following petition to the Canadian Parliament:
I.—Whereas the Militia Act is part of the revised statutes of
Canada c. 132, 1927; and
Whereas certain sections of this act make it possible for Canadians to
be conscripted for active service abroad by order-in-council;
Therefore, we hereby register our opposition to conscription for active
service abroad and petition Parliament to amend the aforesaid act so
aa to remove this present power.
II.—Whereas many rumors are being circulated ln Canada today
concerning the possible commitments of Canada to Great Britain in
the event of Great Britain being at war; and
Whereas the relationship of Canada to Great Britain in this event is not
clearly defined;
Therefore we petition the Canadian Parliament to introduce legislation
necessary to establish and make clear that Canada is not automatically
at war when Great Britain declares war and that only the Canadian
Oovernment has authority to declare war and peace for Canada.	
LEONARD FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Rov. Dr. Trumpour, Principal
of the Anglican Theological College, is the B. C. representative on
the committee ot the Leonard
Foundation Scholarabips in Toron
to, ln succession to the late Dr. W.
H. Vance. All enquiries about theae
scholarships and ail applications
from B. C. should-be made through
him. Tbia should be done during
March at the latest.
cssiinniipTuis
CLASSIFI
'HMiiiiummitmimwitiitummiitti
By   DOROTHY  CUMMINGS
No deprecatory remark about the
engineering faculty will be warranted heretofore after their ball
laat night. In carnival mood with
red, green, and yellow lights strung
around the danoe floor and literally
thousands ot red and white balloons suspended from the pillars,
tbe Commodore was the scene ot
Engineers' Open House, when the
Faculty of Applied Science entertained their friends at their annual
formal ball.
Bob Lyon was flanked on one
hand by a model factory, In the
centre of which stood a three-foot
blast furnace, and a "stream-lined"
train of early nineteenth century
model.
The most technical feature of
the evening was a series of booths
representing the departments of
engineering named by lighted
signs. The most original of these
was the forester's log which showed Paul Bunyan or rather Sclenoe
87-40 attacking and demolishing
such things ss Civil 6, and Forestry
8.
Miners had erected a model tunnel with an electrically controlled
ooal buggy. In next booth samples
ot pyrites and siderlte were Illuminated by a phosphorescent cabinet. By approaching the electrical
show you might Interrupt a photoelectric cell aotlon and produce a
current of 6000  volts.
Among the women guests was
noted Norma Pollock, who wore a
white taffeta printed gown with a
flared' skirt and a square neckline
and short shirred sleeves. With the
gown, the flowers of which were
pink and green, she wore green
sandals.
Coin-dotted navy taffeta fashioned the gown chosen by Kay
Armstrong, over which she wore a
flared Jacket with three-quarter
sleeves and white lapels.
Eileen McDonnell chose a black
taffeta model, cut on princess lines
and marked by small buttons down
the back. A double row of green
and red velvet at the hemline of
the very full skirt was echoed by
colored ostrlct feathers at the neck.
see
The womens fraternities on the
campus will hold a Pan-Hellenlo
luncheon In the Georgian dining-
room ot the Hudson's Bay on Saturday afternoon at 12.46.
• •        •
With a rattle ot two tickets and
several male council members worrying about whether they will receive compllmentarles, co-eds and
others are beginning to think about
the Co-ed. The date ls February
26, and it bas been said that if
the males bave done their duty by
the Science Ball they may rest in
peace knowing that all will be well.
• •        e
Announcement Is made by Kappa
Kappa Gamma women'a fraternity
that three scholarship* ot $600 are
open to fraternity and non-fraternity women graduating this year.
Further information may be obtained from the Dean of Women.
Phy
sics Club Hears
Lecture on Space
The members of the Physios
Club met Wednesday noon In So.
200 to hear a leoture by Dr. C. 8.
Beals ot the Dominion Astrophysi-
cal Observatory, on tbe subjeot ot
"The Mechanics of the Formation
of Absorption Lines in Inter-stellar
Space."
Dr. Beals explained first tbat the
unchanging nature ot Inter-stellar
lines in the spectrum proved the
existence of matter between the
stars, since the spectra ot the latter are continually cbanglng. He
then went on to show that the experimental evidence indicated that
this peculiarity of tbe inter-stellar
lines was due to the state of continual Irregular motion ot atoms
in free space.
RUBBERS MISLAID
Will the person who took the
wrong pair of black rubbers from
tbe Library basement please notify Emily Fraser, Arts Letter Rack,
for exchange.
PENCIL LOST
Lost, about February 8, a silver
Wahl eversharp. Return to R. F.
Christy, Room 201, Science Building.
OlASSI F I ED
ADVERTISING
HAVE YOUR THESES TYPED
Students requiring their theses
typed carefully, neatly and accurately at reasonable charges cannot
do better than to send them to Miss
Mary Hutton. They will be called
for and delivered. Telephone Bay-
view 4094.
UNIVERSITY
BUSINESS
DIRECTORY
Listed below are leading Vancouver Professional, Business and
Manufacturing Concerns, compiled fer easy reference. By referring
to tha Firms and Individuals represented, your every need can ba
easily and completely satisfied. You will find It Convenient and
Profitable te de so.
Retain This Directory for Immediate and Future Use.
Bakeries
CANADIAN
WINDOW BAKERIES LIMITED
For the Best in
Cakes, Pastries and Breads
4511 W. 10th Avs.     Pt. Grsy 803
Stores   All   Over   Greater   Vancouver
Cleaners & Dyers
SWAN BROS. LTD.
Expert Dyers and Cleaners
Garment Dyeing Specialists
Main Office and Works:
12th Avs snd Kingsway Fslr 6200
City Office:
537 Richards St Ssy 6200
Furrier
Furs of Distinction
Convenient Terms
G. L. POP
Furrier
MAIN, AT SIXTH
Pair. 3593
Men's Wear
FSFiToN-eBftEI
RICHARDSON-JARMAN   LTD
Clothiers and Haberdashers
British Importers
523 Granville Ssy. 8179
Milk
PACIFIC MILK
100% B.C. Products
Efuild B. C. Payrolls
Moving
CRONE-
STORAGE CO. LIMITED
760 Bsstfy St. Seymour 8084
Moving, Packing, Shipping,
Storing
Paper
COLUMBIA PAPER COMPANY
LTD.
Wholesale   Paper   Merchants
and Manufacturing Stationers
986 Homer Street Vancouver
Photographers
PHOTO ARTS LIMITED
S. C. Thompson, Mgr.
Specialist in
Photographic Enlargements and
Reproductions
Kodak Developing and Printing
573 Hornby Street Sey. 9077
GEO. T. WADDS
Portraits
Ground Floor Studio
1318 Granville St. Sey. 1002
Pump Manufacturers
Dealers in Diesel and Gasoline
Engines,   Electric   Motors,   Etc.
40 East Cordova St.
Vancouver
Refrigerators
LINDE CANADIAN
REFRIGERATION CO. LTD.
Makers of Refrigerating Machinery
for every purpose,  including
Ammonia, Methyl Chloride
and Freon Systems, etc.
500 Campbell Avs.        High. 822
Sanitation
SERVICE FUMIGATING CO.
(Established 12 Years)
Vermin  Exterminating—All Work
Done at Your Convenience
and Fully Guaranteed
P. W. McLeod, Operator
844 Kingsway        Phons Fair. 110
CLEANS  AS   NOTHING
ELSE DOES i|
OHAD
emulsifies  the
Greases
For the Kitchen, Clothes,
Silverware,
Bath, Washing
Paint. At
your Grocer.
DUSTBANE   PRODUCTS   LTD.
1285 Pender St. W.       Sey  4641
Schools
STENOTYPY
The Modern Machine Way of
Shorthand
Get  complete   information  as to
what this means to you
STENOTYPE SCHOOL
Ssy. 5406 522 Wsa* Psndsr
H.   FAULKNER  SMITH
SCHOOL OF APPLIED
AND FINE ART
Recognized  by  B.C.   Dept.  of  Education
Day and Evening Classes in
COMMERCIAL, APPLIED AND
AND PINB ART
Prospectus on Application
MARINE   BUILDING SEYMOUR «31
Stationers
C. P. FOSTER & CO. LTD.
Commercial and Educational
Stationers
Engineering, Optical and
Mathematical Instruments
592 Seymour St. Ssy. 5070
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT
LIMITED
Wholesale Stationers and
Paper Dealers
Homer and Davis Sts., Vancouver
The CLARKE fir STUART Co. Ltd.
Stationers, Printers, Bookbinders
Social Printing and Engraving
Educational Supplies
Architects' and Surveyors'
Instruments
550 Seymour St. Trin. 1341
Vancouver, B.C.
Sporting Goods
McLENNAN. McFEELY & PRIOR
LIMITED
Retail Store:
556-558 Seymour St. Doug. 21-22
Golf, Tennis,  Badminton and
Fishing Requisites,  Frigidaire and
Westinghouse  Electrical
Appliances
MARSHALL-WELLS B.C. LTD.
Sole Distributors for
A. C. Spalding & Bros., Sporting
Goods and Athletic Equipment
'The Choice of Champions"
Storage
JOHNSTON NATIONAL
STORAGE LTD.
1150 Msin Street
Trinity 1301 Seymour 1703
Tailors
We cater to the man who wants
something better
J. McGOWAN Sr CO.
High-class Tailors to Ladies and
Gentlemen.
Only British Woolens Used.
431 Homer St. Ssy. 1947
A. STUART
Civil and Military Tailor
Breeches Maker
Ladies' Riding Habits and
Breeches a Specialty
413 Granville St. Ssy. 6838
For quickest and best Dry Cleaning
Service in Point Grey
PHONE ELLIOTT 1540
F. L. ANSCOMBE, Custom Tailor
4433 West Tenth Avs.
Dry Cleaning, Pressing,
Remodelling, Repairs
Suits Pressed While You Walt
ALBERT J. KYME
Exclusive Ladies' Tailor
Suits or Coats $35.00 and up
2320 Alma Road Bay. 54
Transfer
ROYAL TRANSFER LTD.
E. C. Davi son, Manager
Baggage to and from All Trains
and Boats
Office at 314 Granvilla St.
Near C. P. R. Depot
Phons Ssy. 6
Tobacco
BERT HENRY STORES
Retail Tobacconists
Stores located at:
601 Granville St. Ssy.   434
898 Granville St. Ssy. 7358
510 West Hastings Sey. 6627
74 West Hastings 160 E. Hastings
Office: 1037 West 15th Ave.
Phone Bay. 8496
Featuring "COMOY"
Featherweight Pipes
Teas
Compliments of
BLUE RIBBON LIMITED
E. Yuill, Manager
Pacific Coast Division
Vancouver Four
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 12, 1937
HOOPSTERS
PLAY P.L.C.
TEAM TODAY
Varsity Should Chalk
Up Fourth Win
in a Week
Today noon ln the campus gym,
another of the visiting Southern
teams will face a smart, scrappy
bunch of Thunderbirds, who'lj be
out to wipe the floor with the opposition.
After winning two exhibition
tllta against Cheney and Balling-
ham Normale, and a final league
fixture againat Provlnoa In tha
past weak, Maury Van Vliat'a
quintet are all aat to make It four
In a week to top off their mueh-
publlelsed "tough grind" aarlaa.
P.L.C. OUT  POR   RBVCNQK
Pacific Lutheran College slushed
their way from Tacoma last night
to take on the B. C. melon tossers
today. The Lutherans are out for
revenge, having lost to Varsity by
a 27-22 score on their home floor
a little over a  month  ago.
However, Alma Mater's basketers are prospecting a win today,
and on the basis of their play in
the last couple of games, should
be a cinch. All the old-time zip and
pepper is back with the Collegiate
cagers, and with their famed lightning-like attack clicking once more
it's a safe prediction that P. L. C.
will be the third Southern Invader
to go down to defeat.
NO   WALKOVER
But don't get the idea that It will
be a walkover—it probably won't.
The cagers still have very vivid
memories of the last "walkover"
against Forsts a week ago, and the
Tacomans' fl g h t i n g spirit may
prove quite annoying to the local
U.'s idea of "cinch" victories.
■VKRVBODY   OUT!
Once more, the admission has
been set at a thin dime—a tenth
uva part uva dollah. Thla time,
however, the small metal discs
should abound to a greater degree
of plentifulness ln the U. B. C.
treasury—ln other words, a packed
bouse is expected. If you'r ancestors are Scotch, and you're Scotch,
don't let it bother you, it's a sound
Investment.
Por the email admission fee,
you'll aee one of the beat basket
squads In B. C. perform—and In
our own gym, today noon, 12.16
on the dot.
CO-ED
SPORTS
A huge crowd (both unlveralty
students) saw the Varsity senior
A girls defeat Spencers, 13-12 in a
closely fought exhibition basketball
game at the Y. W. C. A. gym Tuesday night.
Neither team showed much pep
or an extreme desire to win.   How-
<S"
girls were
co-eds
and
the
luck at
qusrter
the Diamond
a   little  the   lasier,   so   the
came out on top.
Extreme energy
shooting brought
time score of 1-0 up to 3-2, Vars
ity'a favour, at half-time. But in
the rest of the game both teams
wont on a scoring spree to end
the game 18-12.
ISABEL CAMPBELL TOPS
Speedy  Isabelle Campbell, co-ed
top-scorer for the  season,  showed
her ability at shooting by gaining
six whole points for good old Alma
Mammy.
Weather permitting tonight,
thia team will travel to Chilli-
wacks to confound the local pride
and joys.
MURALS RECOMMENCE
Intramurals will get under way
again this term when the Seniors',
Sophs, Juniors and Freshettes meet
Monday noon at volleyball. All
players take notice and turn out on
time.
PIN   MISSING
Lost on Campus—A. D. Phi fraternity pin.   Name on back.    Finder
please return to Pub Office.
ey.   9151
STAR CABS *
Manager: Bob Strain, '33
SASAMAT  BARBER
SHOP
Ladies'  and Gentlemen's
Halrcutting
4473—10th AVE. WEST
Van Vliet's Quintet Will Show Today Noon
Cagemen In Action
That fellow hooping it up in the candid camera shot above is
the top-scorer of the Wednesday night game in action. Bill
Swan is the sniper's moniker, and the last part of it more or less
describes the smooth manner in which he piled up 6 points
against the redoubtable Province quintet. The cameraman snuck
up on the boys in this battle royal, his result being vividly illustrated in the close-up, and the game result being historically
registered as a smashing win for the College cagers.
SWAN  IS TOPS AS  U.  FIVE
DELUGE PROVINCE 52-39
BY JACK  MAIR
In one of the smartest displays of basketball seen this
season, an enthusiastic Varsity Hoop squad smashed their
way to a brilliant win over Province, submerging the league-
leaders 52-39 before a howling mob of students at the U.B.C.
gym Wednesday night.
Running tha muoh touted "Glanta" off their feet from tha outaet
of the game, ths Thunderbirds grabbed an early Issd snd Inoraassd
It throughout ths tilt to load by 20 polnta fivs minutes bsfore full
time. Although Provinee ware without tha asrvless of Bob Osborne, his prsssnos would hsve msde little difference to tho rssult.
SHARK TOP SPOT
Tho win puts the students on even terms with the Newsies on top
of the Intercity loop.
If they lose to Forsts next Saturday, the two squads will have to
light it out for the much coveted bye.
Whipping the ball around a surprised Province quintet, tbe Thunderbirds opened up an 8-0 lead in the first three minutes of tbe tilt and
froral then on Increased lt steadily, piling up points from close ln, to
lead 26-14 at halt time.
After the breather, the Jones' Boys, led by Purves and Kenning-
ton, rallied momentarily to cut the students' lead to seven points. But
at this point. Swan staged a one-man spree, gathering ln ten points
for the Thunderbirds. From then on the collegians took lt easy, and
with the count standing 52-34, the second string was sent ln to fill ln
the  remaining  five  minutes.
SWAN   BRILLIANT
Bill Swan flashed brilliant form to lead the scoring with 16 markers, followed by Wllloughby with 13. Bardsley, who was recovering
from the 'flu and only played the flrst half, accounted for eight. Purves
with eight,  and  Kennlngton  with  seven, led  the  Province  quintet.
In the prelim, Varsity Intermediates lost to Magee, 31-20. The
half-time score was 18-3.
SCORES:
Varsity: Bardsley 8, Wllloughby 13, Matthison 6, Henderson 6,
Swan 16, Pringle 2, Hudson 1, Armstrong, Davis, Mitchell, Turner.
Total, 62.
Province: Purves 8, Bumstead 6, Kennlngton 7, McLellan 4, Rollo
3,  Pay, Anderson  4,  Wills,  4,  Harvey 4.    Total,  39.
SOCCER SENIORS
IN CELLAR
With the anow still holding out,
the Varaity soccer enthulsasts have
little chance of completing their
series. The scheduled time for
second-half season play ls now half
over, and not a game has been
played.
For obvious reasons, no matches
can be played after the flrst of
April. This makes the Juniors'
lead look rather hopeless, if they
cannot play all their games, and the
Seniors, ln the basement now, have
almost no chance of coming to the
top.
All ln all, the soccer outlook is
very glum, and not inspiring of
any sensational play for the rest of
the year.
^''NowLefst
Inter-Collegiate
Hockey Bug
Bites Manitoba
UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA,
Winnipeg, Feb. 2. (WIPU) — An
Intercollegiate hockey league involving Manitoba, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and probably
Northwestern, may result from the
series Manitoba's Varsity team
Just completed with  Minnesota.
U. S. TEAMS  IN  LEAGUE
This proposed league would
aupply Manltoba'a need for competition with other eollegea and
aince the long and expenalva
trlpa Involved In competing with
other Canadian universltlea aueh
aa Saakatehawan or Alberta,
make theae out of the queation,
the new league would, aeoordlng
to Heotor Craig, who la in
charge of Manltoba'a hoekey activities, fill the plaoe left open by
the discontinuance of Inter-oolle-
giate   aotlvltlea.
■Ski'*
♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦
"Oh! for the life of the great
outdoors" is an old adage, and ls
usually regarded only as such, but
with the Varsity Ski Club members
It's an obsession, and a very regular, and a much-looked-forward one
at that.
SWEAT,  SNOW  AND  SKIERS
At present, beams of pleasant apprehension are mingled with crusty
snow on the skier's sweaty facial
fixtures. The rays of sunshine
originate from the south, and the
definite meets the boys from down-
under have lined up with the local  College greased-plank addicts.
The local U. skiers will mush up
Grouse Mountain for their first
battle with Washington's brawny
Huskies on February 21st. Rain-
ler's snow-capped peaks will be the
scene of the second, March 4, 5,
and the final club mix, with the
opposition furnished by the College of Puget Sound  skldders.
Optimism is the prevailing aria
arising from this year's club's collective throat, and one glance at
the formidable list of names on the
roster would convince even pessimists of their potential point-winning power. Such aces as Burden,
Killam, Progue and the Barchard
brothers (Olie and Nels) will see
plenty ot sliding action ln the next
month or so.
WOULD  TRAVEL   BV  AIR
The proposals (tentative) at the
informal discussions held in Minneapolis, would mean that the Varsity team would travel by air and
by being away a week, would fulfill their engagements with two or
three of the  teams  on the  circuit.
More flavour
—yet
Buckingham
CIOAR STT ■ t
BT4-36
Blacks - Thunderbirds To Battle
In Miller Cup Final Game Mar. 6
On February 20th, one week from
tomorrow, the long-awaited Tisdall
Cup knockout aeries starts in all its
glory. Varsity will enter a flrst and
a second team in the twelve-team
iine-up, whose schedule is still
shrouded in darkness. In preparation for this, Skipper Carey has
called practices for Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at noon, starting this Tuesday on the playing-
field.
MARCH 6 IS DATE
The   Miller   Cup   game   is   set
definitely for two weeks after the
Tisdall Cup game, on March 6th.
In this final game,'Thunderbirds
will meet North Shore All-Blacks
for the most thrilling feature of
the season.
Teams  will   be  picked  from   the
following:    1st—Bird, Wilson, Mc-
Phee,  Lumsden,  Legatt, Wllloughby, Carey, Andrews, Harmer, Mc-
Cammon,  Pyle,  McGuire,  Upward,
Swan, Colthurst and Watson. 2nd-
Whitelow,  College,  Spohn, Runkle,
Trussell,  Mackle,  Whittle,  Robertson, Gross, Pyle, Madely, Billings,
Tupper, Day-Smith, Housser, Harrison, Robertson, Gick, West.
BILL WATSON IN 2nd ALSO
Watson is eligible to play the
Miller Cup game with the flrst
team, but will have to play the Tis
dall Cup match with the second
team, due to some technicality that
declared him ineligible to play first
team rugby after Christmas.
CAN. RUGBY NOTICE
Everybody intereated In Canadian Rugby are asksd to report
in tho gym at 12.30 on Saturday.
There will be a short workout and
a dlsousslon of the eystem to be
ussd   nsxt  yesr.
INTRAMURALS
Arts '39 took undisputed possession of first place ln Intramural
volleyball Wednesday as they defeated Science '38 ln three hard-
fought games. The Artsmen took
the flrst game by a close margin
but the Redshlrts tied lt up in the
second. In the final game the Sophomores emerged victors, but
only after the Sciencemen had
given them a tough battle. Score
was   16-14.
In the second game, Arts '38
beat Education, as Bardsley of the
Teachers and Matthison of the Juniors,  staged a terrific  duel.
Saturday, Science '40 and Science '39 will play a grudge battle
at 12 o'clock sharp. It ls unconditionally demanded that all Sclencemen turn out to cheer (or Jeer)
their classmates.
The schedule for next week's
games is posted on the bulletin
board ln the gym.
"CRITICAL MOMENTS
WfiCN ITS*
JUST   T«N
MINUTCS
TO L€CTUR€ .
TIMfi-   fl
— AND YOUV€ -FORGOTTEN TO
COMPL€T€ YOUR CLASS LECTUR-E
TH£M€ B€CAUS€ YOU THOUGHT
YOU WOULD'NT N€€D IT UNTIL
TO-MORROW — YOU'LL TH I N K
UP-A LIK€LY YARN TO SPRING
ON TH-E   PRO*=.   1-F  YOU	
CH***
UP   *2I^
1M«
w_Tmw*:«0
St*"***
Wa Cater fer Social Functions
THE GABLES INN
HOME-COOKED MEALS        TEAS
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
Bolide P.O.
Dr. Wilbur S. Watson
DENTIST
KESIDEN.IB  OFFICE i
4494 Watt 9th Avenue
3.00 te 8.00 p.m.
Telephone:   Point Grey #52
! H.Jessie How. B.A.   *
%. PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER          $
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* Popular Library                    %
X 4489 W. 10th AVINUE     P. G. «7   X
Corsages   -    -
We ars juat ss near ss your
-    75C and $1-00
Free delivery within City
limits.
Ritchie Bros, wo Gnnvme sweat Sey. 2405
I OET MY CLOTHES snd
FURNISHINGS
CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
Almadene Cleaners
We Call and Deliver
PHONE BAY. 2689
3667 Broadway West
Your Photographer
"The Latest in Portraiture"
3708 West Tenth Avenue Phone: Bsyyiew 1398
ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
$45 — $65
Typewriters  of  all
makes  for sale or
rent.
BYRNES HUME TYPEWRITERS
De Luxe New Quiet
Modal — $75
WILSON McDUF'EE, Bay. 8023
Campus Representative:
592 SEYMOUR STREET
SEYMOUR 6639

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