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The Ubyssey Oct 16, 1936

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By J. D. MACFARLANE
TORONTO 8ACA
The death pangs of student commencement activities
continue to roll and echo
across Canada as the University of Toronto, whose hometown is so nicely labelled "the
city of churches and—" by
"Hush," lives up to tradition
by presenting the annual University College residence
"bed-race" replete with broken windows, tomatoes, assorted e g g p 1 a nt s, parsnips,
stench bombs and cabbages,
plus other rare vegetation.
Exactly what this bed-race is
nobody out hero in the great wild
west seems vo know, exoept that
Trinity and South Houses, U.C.
residences, Indulge in tho gentle
pastime annually ending with a
forced peace declared by one or
other of the Dtans of residence
when the carnage becomes too terrific, a state of affairs evidently
determined by the reeeptlon of a
variegated aesortment of vegetables and whatnots by the Deans
without carrying charges In their
respective private sanctums.
Incidentally, South House won
over the famed Trinity when the
three-star joint had its halls, stair-
caeses and rooms, to say nothing of
the Dean's private abode, turned
into a littered, stinking vegetable
dump by a revengeful opposition
who broke more than 25 windows
in the interim. In the past, Trinity
has had to foot the bill to the tune
of over |200. As Larry Gough, Varsity scribe, puts It, Hell In the Holy
Land, Trinity loses, and plate glass
companies declare a dividend.
SCIENCE STUDENTS NATE
STIGMA Of ARTS DEGREE
FORMATION OF SEPARATE
SCIENCE FACULTY WANTED
■y PEGGY HIGGS
"We are the Legion of the Lost," declared Joe Andrews,
rebellious member of the faculty of Arts and Science, in a
cafereia interview on Wednesday. He was speaking on
behalf of those unfortunates who, like himself, spend
approximately three years at the university devoting themselves exclusively to the latest theories and achievements
of science, presumably fitting themselves for a job in some
specalized field of chemistry, physics, or bacteriology, and
are then turned out as Bachelors of Arts.
WOMEN
In my youthful freshman days
the reverberating thunder of the
charge of the female sex on male
rights and privileges resounded
mightily In my ears. It seemed to
be an undisputed fact that the aggressive male had answered that
old questioning ditty "how to tame
wild women" by going into reverse,
giving the stampeding herd the
vote, receiving them into the inner
sanctums of business and professions so that they presently became
as institutional as the ancient gcfll-
esses of Greece—without the front-
work. It seems that the sage and
hoary halls of wisdom are Just being permeated by this great upheaval.
McGill lawyers, In the form of an
an excited Frenchman, seem flabbergasted at the appearance of two
femmes who declare themselves
definitely headed for the Bar. Despite the presence of the lawyer-
ettes the professors' salutation is
still "gentlemen."
Manitoba quotes Dr. Sam Johnson in regarding the new species
in religion, theologlennes. "A woman in the pulpit is like a dog
standing on its hind legs — you
marvel at the uncommonness of It."
But uncommon or not, they are
there, at Manitoba College. Queer
questions seem to pop up though.
For instance, how do they expect
to wear a "horse-collar"? — travel
up in the wild and woolly north without a chaperon?—and what will we
do with the minister's husband?
Maybe he will drive the car, keep
on the tires in the church, teach
games to the boys' groups and cook
the Sunday dinner.
Even in initiation they are becoming too, too rough. At Toronto, freshmen have the queer habit of wearing green ties which
sophs try to cut off. Gentlemen
here aren't safe even In department stores. One euch man waa
attacked by a large and muscular blond co-ed with a pair of
scissors whloh she borrowed from
a nearby salesman. Se didn't get
the   trophy,   but  came   perllouely
Martin/ Rome
To Debate
Tuesday
Winter Activities
Planned by New
Executive
Tuesday night the Parliamentary
Forum will swing into its usual
winter activities, as Leonard Martin and Harold Rome engage In the
second debate of the season.
The topic finally chosen by the
executive is, "Resolved that in the
interests of the United States, the
Roosevelt    administration    should
be re-elected." Len Martin, who was
prominent   in   Forum   work   last
year, and who took part in an inter-collegiate    radio    debate,    will
lead for the affirmative. Rome, who
has a record as a capable speaker,
will oppose him. A keen discussion |
Is expected to follow after the two j
main speeches of the evening.
ENGLISH TEAM COMING I
Plans are being laid by the newly elected executive for a very active season. Some of the projects
at present under consideration are;
closed membership in the Forum, a
change from Tuesday night to Wednesday afternoon for the regular
meetings, and the sponsoring of a
series of noon hour debates such as
was Initiated last year. Arrangements are also being made for the
visit of the Oxford-Cambridge debating team, who will come here
some time before Christmas.
The executive extends a cordial
Invitation to all to come out Tuesday night. Discussion is lively, and
all impromptu speaking is of course
voluntary. The meeting will be
held at 7.30 in Arts 100.
8EPARATE FACULTY
"There should be a separate faculty for science students," said Andrews. "The senior class Is apparently looking for a lofty aim: let
them take that as their objective.
Achieved, it would help them to
perpetuate their number. 1 am not
speaking in terms of chromosomes,"
he added hastily.
"We should graduate with a
B.Sc. degree," continued Andrews. "We have no sympathies
in common with the artsmen.
After all, we don't take einch
courses like history and economics."
"People who chase bugs shouldn't
| have an Arts degree," interjected
Fred Hobson, English and Classics
undergraduate.
WOULD BE  EXPENSIVE
Gordon Fields Is definitely ln favor of a separate degree for science,
though he believes that a separate
faculty   would   be   too   expensive.
"Commerce Is under the faculty of
arts," he stated.    "Yet  those  tak
Ing the course graduate as bache
j lors of commerce.
j      "A   pereon   who   has   devoted
four years to the study of chem-
ietry or zoology generally has a
technical knowledge of his major
subjects equal to that of the average engineer.   But this Is not
apparent to tho public.
"We work hard  to get our degrees, and  I feel that we should
not have to be content with the
mere arts degree, which Is handed
out after very little work on his
part to the burrower in classical
courses."
WAIVER CAMPAIGN
New Totem
Plans Are
Outlined
First President To
Be Honored Tuesday
Wesbrook Memorial Day, which honors the first president
of the university, will be held next Tuesday, October 20, by the
senior class.
As In previous years, It will be observed by the placing of
a wreath on the grave of Doctor Wesbrook at Mountain View
Cemetery. Professor F. G, C. Wood, honorary president of the
senior class, will give a talk appropriate to the occasion.
Cars provided by the senior class will be leaving the campus
at 1 o'clock sharp and will be lined up along the centre Mall
from the bus stop south for loading purposes. Any member of
the class who can assist in transportation by supplying a car
is asked to get in touch with the class secretary, Pauline Patterson, via the Arts Letter Rack, as soon as possible.
Fall Cong. Cancels
Wednesday Classes
The 10th Autumn Congregation
for the distribution of graduate degrees will be held in the Auditorium at 2.45 on Wednesday, the 28th,
it is announced by Dr. Todd. The
committee of ceremonies Intends to
make it an undergraduate function
as the Spring Congregation is more
or less limited to graduates. Invitations for all the undergraduate
body may be obtained at the Bursar's office, on Monday. Lectures
after the 1.30 period will be cancelled on Wednesday. The speaker
will be Dr. Sedgewick.
FACULTY OF ENGINEERING
An ex-chemic who withholds his
name believes that the faculty of
applied science should be called the
faculty of engineering, and that
there should be a science faculty
as well.
Summing the matter up, he
states: "If you are a bachelor of
arts, it means that you have taken
a certain number of unspecified cultural courses with no definite and
concrete object in view. If you
are a bachelor of science, you have
specialized Intensely In some subject or subjects and are qualified
to do competent work In that field."
Success of Picture
Program May Mean
Talkie Equipment
A program of three pictures,
one In French, one in German,
and one In English will be shown
in the auditorium, Thursday, Oct.
22, at noon, by the University
Film Society. The pictures, which
will be ehown privately in town
on Tuesday of that week, are
supplied by the campus society'e
affiliate, the Vancouver branch of
the National Film Society.
At present it Is neceseary to
rent sound equipment to show
picturee on the campus, but it le
underetood from authoritative
eourees if this show goee over the
auditorium will receive permanent equipment.
No tickets will be available at
the door. Inetead, membership
tlckete will be on sale Tuesday
and Wednesday at the ticket office and will be available to fully
regietered undergraduates for
the prloe of 15 cents.
These tickets will give the holder membership to the Film 80-
olety and also admission. The
namee of the films will be printed In Tuesday's Issue of the Ubyssey.
Engineers Have
A Real Social
Responsibility
New Dean Speaks to
Applied Science
Undergraduates
The Signing of 800
Waivers Assures
Improvements
to the freehie'e jugular vein  In
her wild aweepe.
Flitting hither and yon we find
University papers, whose gender is
obviously masculine by reason of
their very skittlshness at the mere
view of anything "skirtish," we find
the same raising of eyebrows and
general surprise at female assertion
. . . except where a co-ed writes,
as in McGill Daily about the women's contemplation of men who
SIT In busses. She decries them
as rats, and flings about violently
for Emily Post. Which fence are
we sitting on, anyway?
Due credit mus't be given, however, to the co-eds at Washington,
who are getting behind their AW.
S. so splendidly as is described in
the Fritz Kreisler story, also in this
issue of the Ubyssey!
MEDICAL EXAMINATION
APPOINTMENTS
Medical examinations will be
conducted at the old Endowment
Land Office on the corner of McGill and University Boulevard.
Students are advised to watch for
their appointments on the University Health Service notice board in
the Quad.
The examinations begin on Mon
day, October 19th. The hours range
from 9 a.m. to 12 a.m. and from 1
p.m. to 2.30 p.m. dally except Saturdays. This plan is subject to
change.
It is important that students present themselves on the date and
at the time aslgned by the University Health Service. These assignments have been made in order of
registration by the students. There
are still over one hundred students
who have not registered and we
suggest that they do so at once.
Certain students have failed to return their Medical histories to the
Health Service, and are reminded
that an appointment cannot be
made until such histories are forthcoming.
Van. Institute
Announces
Lectures
U. B. C. Professor
Will Give Most
of Lectures
The Vancouver Institute has announced Its program for the Autumn Session, lasting from Oct. 17
to Dec. 12 inclusive. The institute
holds its meetings every Saturday
evening at 7.30, usually in Arts 100
or the auditorium. Although meetings are free and open to the general public, university students are
particularly welcome, and the lectures, as may be seen from the program, are of special Interest to
those engaged in study of particular aspects of the subjects treated.
The program Is as folows:
Oct. 17: Dean Finlayson, M.Sc,
F.R.S.C.: "Future Trends in Industry."
Oct. 24: Rabbi Samuel Cass, B.
A.: "What I Saw ln Palestine." (Illustrated.)
Oct. 31: Prof. Ira Dilworth: "This
Modern Stuff," a study of contemporary music,    (llustrated.)
Nov. 7: Prof. F. H. Soward: "The
Present  International  Outlook."
Nov. 14: Dr. Gordon M. Shrum:
"Recent Experiments on the Transmutation of Matter." (With demonstrations.)
Nov. 21: Dr. Isabel Maclnnes:
"The Spirit and Tradition of Ger
man Literature."
Nov. 28: Dr. J. H. MacLeod: "Social Aspects of Science."
Dec. 5: R. R. Payne, Esq.: "The
Fish Industry of B. C."
Dec. 12: Dr. G. G. Sedgewick:!
"Shakespearian   Imagery." '
"Engineering may be defined as
the art of directing the powers of
Nature for the use and convenience
of man," said Prof. J. N. Finlayson, new Dean of Applied Science,
as he addressed a meeting of the
U. E. S. Thursday noon.
Dean Finlayson, speaking to the
students for the first time, reviewed
the opportunities awaiting engineers today.
"There is an increasing demand
at the present time for technically
trained men. Natural resources are
dependent on engineers for development, and even invention has
become a technical service," he
stated.
Dean Finlayson stressed the
need for an extensive and scientific
training. "The engineer should
learn methods, not merely facts.
Supervision of work requires a
high degree of administrative ability." To know and handle men, the
engineer should study psychology
as much as possible, while economics and an ability to express oneself in good English are also essential.
The speaker praised Sir Thomas
Telford, "the father of Civil Engineering," who in 1820 was made
president of the Institution of Civil
Engineers, and in 1828 secured a
Royal Charter for that body. He
was the first to win status and
prestige for civil engineers.
Dean Finlayson declared that engineers must play their part in
social reforms. "Although we are
in the twentieth century technically, we are still in the dark ages
socially. In the future, the engineer
will be called upon more and more
to co-ordinate the technical and
social aspects of his work."
Musical Society To
Meet Today
The Musical Society is holding
its major general meeting for the
year in Applied Science 100 today.
All new members are assigned
seats.
The Society has been divided into six groups, the operatic group;
studio, for those who haven't time
for opera but are interested in classical music; stage, for the study of
technical work; make-up; costumes
and dramatics.
Many new applicants have been
accepted, 26 sopranos, eight altos,
11 tenors, 16 basses and baritones,
seven    instrumentalists   and   four
The Totem staff has started a gigantic drive to persuade students to waive $1.50
of their caution money.   Today there will be fifteen or
twenty co- eds scattered
around the campus or stationed   at   strategic   points,
canvassing for signatures. According to the Totem staff, If
800 of these waivers are signed, the Totem will be of an
entirely different type than it
has been in the past.   They
have announced that the only
cash payment for those who
sign waivers will be a $1 cash
payment in the spring.
NO BALLYHOO
"At first w; thought of having an
ajroplane diop waivers on students," explained Les Allen, Totem
business manager.
"We    thought    of
shipping  them
around in little cars,
or    borrowing    elephants for the purpose.    But then we
realized that the
students of this university    would    not
fall   for   ballyhoo.
When they realized hW important
it was they wouldn't have to be sold
on the idea.
"Our greateat difficulty will be
deciding how few Totems we
ean have printed.
PADDED LEATHER COVER
"As for advertising, the Players'
Club were going to sell 1200 of
Christmas play advertisements, but
they have decided they can sell
only $150 worth of ads because the
advertisers are all waiting to get
into the new, bigger and better Totem."
Jim Beverldge, editor of the Totem, described the book he hopes
to bring out in the spring.
" There will be 200 pages, nine
Inchee by twelve inches," he
eald. "The padded leather cover
will be gold and blue, with a
gold totem rather than the old
vari-colored one.
"There will be all kinds of new
material. Fraternities, sororities,
and clubs will have write-ups.
PICTORIAL  SUPPLEMENT
"The big innovation will be the
pictorial supplement. Every undergraduate as well as every graduate
working on the campus will have
an Individual picture. There will
be shots taken at dances and football games, snaps of professors
taken In characteristic poses In
classrooms, and several pages of
scenic views taken on the campus."
The Totem staff consists of Jim
Beveridge, editor; Les Allen, business manager; Madge Neill, associate, and several assistants.
technicians. All these members are
not admitted to full membership
until Christmas. Attendance at rehearsals and a genuine interest in
the Society are prerequsites for full
membership. A full list of the accepted applicants Is posted in the
Musical Society room, Two
THE     UBYSSEY
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY: Dorwin Baird
SPORTS EDITOR
Dick Elson
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Ken Grant Dorothy Cummings
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Dave Smith Bill Sibley
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Stewart Calvert
Frank Turner
Peggy_ Higgs
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Student rate, $1.00 per year. Rate for non-students, $1.50 per year
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:  Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited.
WESBROOK MEMORIAL SERVICE
The strength of a University lies almost as much ln its
traditions as in its members and scholarship.
Our University, being young, has unfortunately few
traditions. We have, however, the Wesbrook Memorial service. This ceremony besides having historical significance,
is a fitting tribute to the memory of an exceptionally fine
man. As our first president, it was largely he who was
responsible for the final opening of the University of British
Columbia.
Next Tuesday, members of the Senior Class are asked
to pay tribute to the memory of Dr. F. P. Wesbrook. Since
this is our twenty-first year this should be made the most
moving and well attended service ever held.
A MODERN YEARBOOK
Very rarely a purely student activity blows up and stages
a drive, campaigning bravely for some innovation or movement which they think will do credit to the campus. Sometimes there is enough energy and punch displayed to accomplish the end in view. Usually the campaign must reckon
with the peculiar, inexplicable lethargy that enwraps itself
gummily about U.B.C. student affairs.
We notice with approval that the Totem staff is bucketing busily about these days, really fired with the idea of
expanding and beautifying the old U.B.C. Totem. There are
several restrictions tying them down, one the uncertainty
of sales which always dogs Totem publication and retards
expansion.
Perhaps it would be creditable of the campus in general
to support the glowing Totem Scheme. Certainly by it students will achieve a good-looking annual which will illuminate
a little more kindly the extent and scope of undergrad activity on the campus. It would likewise be gratifying to see
U.B.C. taking its place among other colleges in modernizing
its yearbook, and publishing a volume that isn't strangled
by accumulated yearbook tradition.
We suggest, wholeheartedly, that it would be both wise
and creditable of the student body to support the Totem in
its waiver drive today and during the coming week. Give
the boys a break, and do a little University boosting in the
process.       #
THE OLD QUESTION
Gowns again! We hope they are really going to do
something this time.
Year after year the old question crops up. Shall senior
students wear gowns or not? Year after year it is passed
by a large majority. Professors and well-known students
acclaim the action.   Then nothing happens.
If you really want gowns, then by all means wear them.
Don't, however, pass motions making gowns compulsory
unless you really intend to wear them.
We are not against the wearing of gowns by seniors,
but we are against the passing of meaningless motions.
Such motions make student meetings more of a farce
than they already are.
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by darby
MllllllllllllllllJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItmml
They
Recognized Him
Instantly!
Only because of his well-dressed
appearance   Men   who  expect
the   finest   of   materials   have
found
J. H. SWEDER
TAILOR
A Tailor of Distinctive
Clothes
548 HOWE STREET
Seymour 8628
Outstanding Actor
To Speak Here
Otis Skinner, outstanding actor,
whose performances have thrilled
a continent for several decades, will
speak in the Hotel Vancouver next
Monday evening,
The address will be sponsored by
the B. C. Institute of Journalists
and will be on the topic, "Footlights
and Spotlights." Admission tickets
may be secured at the door or at
the Kelly Piano House. Tickets are
priced at 75c, with the affair starting at 8.15 p.m.
RELIABLE WATCHES FROM $9.50
FIRBANK & LANGE
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY. 2088
CONVENIENT DIVIDED PAYMENTS
THERE is an earnest group of
young men on this campus who
are really worried about general
conditions. They feel that if something drastic isn't done soon the
university will face a grave danger.
It is the attitude of the students
towards student activities that
seems to bother this group most.
They are worried about some of
the manifestations of pep meeting
manners in other places than pep
meetings. Quad fights, snake parades, and rowdy Alma Mater meetings indicate, they say, a downward
trend in student spirit.
So they have set upon themselves
the task of improving the situation.
What steps they will take, nobody
knows. Enough that they are interested. But it. strikes this humble onlooker, who was invited to
become one of their number, that
a task is being attempted that has
been for a long time almost universally accepted as impossible.
Student spirit has its ups and
downs, and like depressions, can
not be controlled. This year seems
to be a bad one for the university
Next year may see a revived interest in truly sensible things, and a
general disgust for rowdyism. Such
things just happen, we can do nothing to bring them about.
. *     *     *
RECIPE   tor  a   happy   Sunday
evening.
Almost every Sunday for a great
many years, I have made it a point
to And a comfortable chair, at home
or abroad, and settle down to a
few 'hours of sheer laziness. I hold
the belief, now rather outdated,
that Sundays were made for rest,
and that even university students
should at least spend the evening
of the Sabbath doing nothing.
Listening to the radio, usually a
slipshod thing with most people,
can become an enjoyable pastime
on Sundays. On no other day does
such a wealth of entertainment of
all types come before the microphone to cheer the millions of armchair edicts.
Let us start this lazy Sunday
evening about 4.30, with a half-
hour of fantastic truths as presented by "Believe It or Not" Bob Ripley. They all go for this one, and
now and tKen the master of the
unusual relates a tale worth being
filed among the classics.
Again on the Red net of the N.
B. C. at 5, we tune into the Goodwill Court, with its dramas of human experiences. The outstanding
thing about this feature is that it
is really genuine. Every trouble
aired is true, and often you will
find someone else's difficulty start-
lingly like your own.
To proceed, at 6 we return to
C.B.S., the Columbia chain, and
hear the Ford Sunday Evening
Hour. Symphonic music may not
be to your liking, but if you can't
thrill to this program as you listen
in the darkness of your parlor, then
something is wrong. A similar show
follows at 7, on the N.B.C. Red
chain, the General Motors Hour.
But the hour of 7 is often troublesome. On the C.B.S. stations,
that new craze, community singing,
is featured on the razor blade hour.
And at the same time, the N.B.C.
Blue net has Edwin C. Hill telling
behind-the-news tales as only he
can. The best thing, I find, is to
try them all and pick your choice.
Mine, if it matters, is the Community Sing.
No trouble about 8 to 9, with
Cantor on Columbia for the first
half hour and Benny on N.B.C. for
the second. Eddie is losing his grip,
but his child stars are worth the
money you* still have to pay on
that radio. As for Jack and the
boys, we'll always have a soft spot
in the heart for them.
And so it goes on, a steady
stream of music, drama and comedy that can make your Sunday
night the restful event that it
should be. Let's all get together this
week and spend Sunday evening
beside the radio, forgetting lectures and lab. books . . . just being
lazy.
*     *     *
THE Student Prince and I were
sipping tea in one of the cozy
nooks at Jubilee Park the other
day, watching the Victoria boat
wend its way across the Gulf. The
gold and brown leaves, falling
round about us, the quiet atmosphere of the, place, and the inspiration of the superb view made me
reflect that it was a good thing that
few students had discovered this
paradise that lies but a few yards
from the campus.
Around the campus . . . Harry
Bigsby remarked the other day that
a lady was any girl that didn't go
to varsity ... but don't hold it
against him, girls, 'cause he didn't
mean it. . . . Norm Depoe has started decorating the Pub walls again.
. , . ask Norm some time why he
didn't join the army . . . The mooted visit of the U. of Washington
Glee Club to this campus is a swell
Friday, October 16, 1936
Life and Laughter
Unending
By KASTOR (Arts '37)
What's on at the show?—I don't
know, but let's go anyway—O.K.,
see   you   at   eight,   bring   Annie
along too, I'll pick up Betty—.
I catch my car home and think
what a damn fool I am to take ln
another show. No seats, and I have
to stand at the back. I glance at
a passenger's paper to see the
shows but he Is busy reading the
funnies and won't turn over—now
he finishes and carefully folds up
the paper and sticks It slowly ln
his jacket pocket; this makes me
mad and I have au unearthly desire to bash him one.
I listen to the motors humming
away and th esteel singing against
the steel. I read the ads, but the
letters and shapes run, jump and
screw about unmeaning anything.
Yawn. Watch the conductor work.
Yawn. Study the dirty fingers from
handles brass and greasy cord.
Yawn. Listen to his unmeaning
voice calling out stimuli which Jerk
the herd from the.r dream and
dazes. Yawn. Watch fingers working on tickets, punching fresh transfers, folding, bending, unfolding,
unbending, yawning and the eye
like a long dead thing following
the tickets down. Click. Oone.
Yawn.
Strangle and smile at a friend.
Yes. No. Nice day. Yawn. Breath
hot, foul air and curse at the mob.
Move up to the front and see the
motorman working; twisting levers,
winding handles, smiling wearily
at regulars, opening, shutting,
starting, stopping, stopping, start-
Ing.and always lusting, staring,
yawning.
Next is mine and press the button and get out. Stand and stare
and watch it start—steel grinding
with wheels turning—. Now walking quickly to the eating place and
wash and phone Betty.
Watch the waitress working —
rushing, — scribbling — smiling —
joking — wearied at the hungry
bohunks eating, gabbing when
they are eating — smelling foods
and bodies. The girl breathes just
like me, (funny that) I see her
breast rising, falling, curving. She
dreams too of men and lovely food
she doesn't need to serve—but now
she is trapped worse than little
Chirpy in his cage, she Is serving
time, waiting vacantly at night,
hoping, thinking, praying for the
breaks yet unvalllng. Now backwash of space, time circumstances
and ten million other things that
shouldn't have happened but did,
lick at her feet. Some days It rises
higher than others, then ebbs away
but soon comes back with a rush—
She fights on and Is there every
morning at seven and smiles at the
boss and laughs at herself and
those who work dally death with
her.
—Hell, It Is time to go — call
Betty — two bits? — thanks —
grab at a toothpick, chew and spit
and let It hang.
Betty beside me now and her thin
little hand ln mine — looking for
Mike and Annie — here they are
now.— Say what about, "You Can't
Do It Here" — O.K. and we each
pay our dime. It's better that way.
We tread into the endless theatrical night and move to our places
blindly. We settle deep ln our seats
and Betty searches for my hand
and feels It.
Mad sounds — yelling, cheering,
waving and Mussolini shouting —
drought, death, sand storms —
strikes, bullets, speeches — Industry, music and wheels grinding.
America, America, My America —
Clarke Oable and Robert Montgomery; Mae West and Qreta Oarbo.
Sex, America, Sex — limbs moving
slowly, maddeningly — male and
female, each sex faced from the
other — affairs, affairs in monotonous precision but now the wheel
Is empty, the reel unwound and
the whole moves to another beginning.
We get up and struggle out. I
feel like I always do, rotten and
mad at the system and everything.
Mike, who reads some, says its
culture. Annie and Betty whisper
about the kisses and the handsome
men. We go over to the drugstore
and order sundaes. I don't want
any.    Then Annie starts to laugh,
idea . . . might lead to a similar
club here. . . . Dick Elson, sporting
scribe, handled the Ubyssey the
other day when Editor Edmonds
made a sudden trip to Seattle. . . .
Ex-Ubyssey Editor John Cornish
is off to New York soon. . . . Next
week in this column—the inside
dop eabout the co-op. house at Salisbury Lodge . . . this scribe accepting the invitation of House
Prexy Fawley to visit the place and
see for myself.
CORRECT JEWELLERY
AND STATIONERY FOR
EVERY FRATERNITY
ON THE CAMPUS.
I
TheTof&itfo {Weri^ortjof Mu&J
Presentation of
Diplomas and Certificates
Saturday Afternoon and Evening
October 17 th, 1936
at 3.00 and 8.15 o'clock
Aztec Ballroom    -    Hotel Georgia
Afternoon Programme
•O CANADA"
Introductory Address  by the Chairman,
REV. WILLARD BREWING, B.D., D.D.
Presentation of Certificates, by MRS. JAMES A. McGEER
Piano—J. S   Bach Chorale
H. Farjeon Prelude
BILLY DEAN (Pearl M. Kerr)
Violin—Accolay Concerto A Minor
HECTOR URQUHART
(Margaret McCraney Fergusson)
At the Piano, Margaret McCraney Fergusson
Piano—Boccherini-MacMillan  Minuet
MARGARET WEST (Beth Emery)
Piano—Chopin  Nocturne, Op. 9, No. 2
MARY MacMILLAN (Lucille MacMillan)
Voice—Schubert Horch, Horch! die Larch
Brahms An die Nachtigall
ELSIE MOXHAM (Nancy Paisley Benu)
At the Piano, Nancy Paisley Benu
Piano—Beethoven  Sonata in F Sharp Major
Adagio Cantabile, Allegro ma non troppo
Allegro Vivace
JEAN RUTH SIMS (Isabel Campbell)
"GOD SAVE THE KING"
Evening Programme
"O CANADA"
Introductory  Address by  the Chairman,
DR. G. G. SEDGEWICK
Presentation of Diplomas and Certificates
by MRS. J. F. BELYEA
Piano—Mozart Sonata in A Major
Theme and Variations
JANET KNOWLES (/. D. A. Tripp)
Elocution—Robert Browning...- My Last Duchess
KAYE THOMSON
Voice—Handel    • "Susanne"
Ask If Yon Damask Rose Be Sweet
Michael Costa Oratorio "Eli"
Recit: Open Unto Me
Aria: I Will Extol Thee, O Lord
HELENA VEALS (Nancy Paisley Benu)
At the Piano, Nancy Paisley Benu
Violin—Handel Sonata No. 6, E Major
JOHN STOBBS (A. f. Talbott)
At the Piano, W. Maurice Miles
Piano—Scriabine-Siloti  Poeme
Debussy * Danse
ELSJE de RIDDER (Mrs. Douglas Johnston)
"GOD SAVE THE KING"
DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES
will be awarded to candidates who have passed
examinations in
PIANO
Solo Performers and Teachers
Solo Performers — Teachers
SINGING
ELOCUTION
Solo Performers
VIOLIN
COMPOSITION and THEORY
Betty starts to laugh, Mike starts
and damned if I don't start. Ha Ha
Ha Ha Ha, make It four sister, —
****** CORSAGES !******
!#> FRASER'S#f
$        CORSAGES AND SPRAYS        »
t MADE TO ORDER £
* 4471  10th Ave. W.        P. G. 125 •
************************
Nan Ashuiorth
GOWN and SPORTS SALON
Half Sizes a Specialty
3763—10th Ave. West Bay. 520
Ha Ha Ha — our lovely lives —
Ha Ha Ha. Here's to life and
laughter unending.   Ha Ha Ha Ha.
THE VANCOUVER
SCHOOL OF ART
Corner Cambie and Dunsmuir
DAY and EVENING COURSES
Telephone Trinity 2651
For Prospectus or Information
AttmiiuiiiiuuiiuiniwiiiHiiiiiiHHiiiiiiiiiiiiittnHtntwitMniiimitutnHMitifflHtiHiiiiinril Friday, October 16, 1936
THE     UBYSSEY
Three
'CRITICAL MOMEMTS
♦
WHEN YOU
ARC THC
CLOSING
SPEAKER
ON YOUR
DEBATING
TEAM..
-AND THERE'S A FROG IN YOUR
THROAT-YOUR SHOZ HURTS-AND
YOU CAN'T MAK€ HEAD OR TAIL
OF YOUR NOTES - DON"? WORRY-
**
CUE
cvioc
Su^t
**o*
62
Totem Waivers Explained
8UGGE8TI0N
Today, take up a Totem waiver, sign your name, and submit the waiver to one of the charming co-eds you'll find dotted
about the campus. In return, she will fasten, winsomely, a tag
to your lapel or collar, reading "Boost a Bigger Totem."
EXPLANATION
By waiving $1.50 of your caution money, now, you will help
make possible the compilation of a bigger, finer Totem. Then in
March, when your Totem appears, you need only pay $1 in
cash to obtain it.
ATTENTION!
This waiver is positively NOT the unlovely formula of
previous years, which was cancelled in the Spring and thus
necessitated your paying the full $2 In caah.
The 1937 Totem waiver is the equivalent of a $1.50 cash
payment now. The $1 cash outlay in March It, definitely,
the only one you'll be asked to make for the book.
REFLECTION
You notice that the total price represented by waiver and
cash payment is $2.50. A richer, bigger Totem in size and scope,
bulging with large-sized portrait and topical photographs, is tbe
objective. We are unable to budget for such a Totem at a $2
sale price; yet, through the $1.50 caution money waiver, we can
offer It for the smallest cash payment that has yet been asked.
EXHORTATION
Sign a waiver!
With 800 obtained, we can make up for you a genuinely
attractive Totem. Eight hundred people are interested, certainly,
in having at a reduced cash price a more valuable and sizeable
yearbook to do credit to the University of B. C.
WAIVE $1.50 NOW.
PAY $1 CASH IN MARCH.
BOOST A BIGGER TOTEM.
HANDY TO YOU —
CHEAPER FOR YOU!
PHONE
ELLIOTT
1005
UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
4264 WEST 13th AVE.
We would like to introduce you to Crawford, who has iust arrived
at RAE-SONS BUDGET SHOP and is ready to look after you all morning
and on afternoons spent on the campus. An all-suede, no tongue oxford
m black or brown, with cording across the tip and breeding in every line.
For downtown afternoons, tea dates and informal evenings you can
depend on Tiffany, a suede pump distinguished with a patent bow, a
continental heel and braiding across the tip.
At iust $6.GO a pair it is a wise co-ed that depends all day on shoes
from Rae-sons Budget Shop.
* *      *
Did you hear about the zete who when accused by a cop of having
had a little something before going out, claimed that it was only Lister-
me He felt that it was necessary, as he was going to see the girl
friend    At least it proves that Varsity student do read ads.
* +       *
A soft glow of candles on lovely flowers. The hostess knows that
her tea has been a success.
Teas for new sorority pledges, for the mother's club, for visiting
sorority delegates or teas for friends in your own home. You want them
all to have that air of gracious hospitality that indicates thought and
spells success.
The first rule is an attractive tea table. A superb centrepiece
formed of perfect blooms, combined with pastel candles of harmonizing
shades lighting the shining silver.
You will order your flowers from BROWN BROS, of course, because
you know they have the best. But here is something interesting. Brown's
can supply you with candles, too. Then you will be sure that the colours
of your tea table will blend perfectly.
* *      *
Rushing over' Then there is time to consider a new winter coat.
No need to look far, as MADAME RUNGE has just what you want.
There is the navy blue rough worsted with the standing Krimer
collar that gives the different, Russian looking effect. It has a leather
belt and the smart square sleeves. Or there is the soft vebur m wine
with the wolf mushroom collar and the attached stole.
Just m and new as yesterday's pledge pins are the frock and coat
ensembles Charming is the'one which features a taupe fur fabric coat
with sporty lines, a leather belt and the leg-o-mutton sleeves. The
dress is of harmonizing shade, very tailored with a zipper front. Perfect
for football games or for classes.
* *      *
Going golfing, coed?   You'd better go to the TAILORED WOMAN
at 22Q7 West 41st Ave and order one of their flannel skirts tailored to
order and a smart buttoned vestee to match.
Even the critical Paul Gallico would approve of women in sports,
providing they all wore the costume advocated by the Tailored Woman:
a tweed skirt fitting perfectly, a tailored vestee and one of the soft
leather jerkins sponsored by Mayfair Magazine and made to'fit you
at the Tailored, Woman.
A twin sweater set to go with your skirt is a bright idea and would
look smart on the campus. The inside sweater could be made of New-
lands Peter Rabbit angora and the outside of bumpy angora boucle.
This Newland wool sold at the Tailored Woman is efctra specially
economical, as it takes only nine balls for a twin sweater set or a two-
piece suit.    Comes  m all colors,  too.'
* *       +
Did sou know about the sorority that has passed some new sobriety
laws We wonder if they are caused by honest admiration of our city
counc i cr .s 't a sit>art rushing ga,g
+        *       *
Ue.'l.   f is'e p!edge, sMI surprised because you were actually  bid'
We II tet tr,<=.t we know the reason     Neat dressing attracts any sorority.
So don i d'sappo nt your new sorority sisters now
It your sut needs perkmg, up iust try some of
the new neckwear sold at the LINGERIE SHOP.
Black are satin vestees with cowl necks for
the very sophisticated. Or perhaps you prefer
the pleated pigue with the tailored look. Then
there are frilly georgette fronts in both cream
and white which give a feminine air to the
severest suit And Mrs. Paton can show you
some fascinating lace collars to brighten up last
year's dresses and stun your new s'Sters
* «     *
Damp weather certainly
spoils those neat curls,
doesn't it3 What you
need is a new permanent
and then not even ram
can scare you. The place
to go for a permanent
s the RUSSIAN DUCHESS beauty salon on 768
Granville Street.
Their new Wireless
Machine allows no electricity near the head and
makes burns impossible.
The curlers are all heated before touching the
hair, making a comfortable perm' possible and
at the same time insuring the health of the
hair.
One look at the wide
• waves and natural end
curls will convince you
that Russian Duchess
permanents are tops.
They are exceptionally
easy to set and besides
that are very reasonably
priced Phone Trin. 4727
now and inquire.
* *     *
Heard the good news?
ABER is going to take
the Totem pictures.
Class 37 sure gets the
breaks. There is a rumor though, that, everybody's picture is going
into the year book, so
maybe we will have photos that we will be proud
to show the relatives.
One can always be proud
of a portrait pictured by
Aber,
^<>M   °"d   Firmly  Mad<-
SWEET
CAPORALS
Cxiptwtite
"The purctt form in which tobacco can be imol<ed.-«(W«
J** J-o
t
cum
Presenting — a new policy for
Totem photos.
Mr. S. J. Aber, Totem photographer, has made the sweepingly
generous offer to arrange picture
appointments on the campus by telephone through his own downtown
office. This obviates the Totem's
anuual agony of garnering timetables and making up appointment
schedules. In appreciation of Aber's
services, the Totem earnestly
urges students to keep their appointments, once made. Book Exchange Is the campus studio.
Today's lists:
Friday.
9:00 P. M. Cazalet
Allan Walsh
Yvonne Ladner
Robert McClelland
E. de Lancey Rogers
10:00 Rose Brookes
Elsie Porteous
Violet Clark
Pat Cummings
Audrey Hamilton v
Noon: Maisie Clugston
John M. Shaw
1:30 Juanita Falconer
Muriel Chave
O. Sutherland
Dorothy Newcomb
Orne Matthisen
Harry Berry
2:30 Thomas Bailey
Catherine Mcintosh
Archie Gardiner
Joan Martin
Leslie Pearson
Bob Bianco
Jack Potklns
3:30 Rod  Longmore
Margaret Strachan
Monday.
9:45 Alice Hagen
Jessie MacRae
11:00 Margaret Atkinson
Alice Gerow
Nina Cheng
Fred Hobson
T. Kondo
George Turner
R. C. Menshell
12:00 Mary Katherine Black
1:30 Joan Pinkhorn
2:30 Kenneth Watson
Tuesday
10:00 Ralph Killam
John Scholefleld
George Nicholson
11:00 Arthur Irvin
C. W. McNeish, Sc. '37
Phyllis Black
Harold Gisslng
Hugh D. Kell
Thomas Jackson
1:30 Lin Lee
A. P. Frawley
W. Dayton, Sc. *37
G. B. Morris, Sc. '37
Sam Roddan
If anyone happens to see by the
above lists that he has missed his
appointment, please see Mr. Aber
at the Book Exchange during the
afternoon to arrange another.
OPTOMETRIST
LAWRENCE SMITH
49 West Hastings Street
Phone Sey. 6860   Res. Pt. Grey 497 R
L
ft T0TEIIIIV0RTHV Of OIR HUM OUTER
A new "TOTEM"—year book of our activities—is proposed by your Publications Board. Larger, thicker, more
beautifully bound, full of pictures of our University life,
thc new "TOTEM" is truly worthy of our Alma Mater.
All we need is YOUR support —1,000 caution money
Waivers for $1.50. Make this new book possible—come
and sign your Waiver now.
Publications Office    •    • Auditorium Building Four
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1936
There isn't a Doubt
that Gresham Crepes are
giving real hosiery satisfaction to an increasingly large
clientele. . . This is no idle
observation, but a plain
statement of fact, based
on greatly increased sales
of these fine Stockings. . .
The price is $1.00 to you.
.  . Thank You1
~V     ■■-- r:    <. i
Engagement of Recent
Science Gradt
The engagement Is announced ln
Victoria of Margaret Moffat, Nursing '34, and Dick King, Sc. '35. The
wedding will take place ln Victoria
at the home of the bride's parents
on October 28.
Margaret has been on the staff of
the Vancouver General Hospital.
Dick, who is affiliated with Sigma
Phi Delta fraternity, is a geological
engineer on the staff of the Big
Missouri Mine.
&*J>   ijjAM   q*M   ^p
Music
DRAMA AND THE DANCE
ftAft   &4ft>   f]£fi   &y>
ETHEL FERGUSSON
F.T.C.L., M.R.5.T.
OOLD MEDALLIST
VANCOUVER 8H0OL OF EXPRESSION
Public Sptaking Class—Dramatic Art
Coaching Play Tru Outs
60? HASTINGS STRKT WIST
Siymour 8627 Stymour 438
GEORGE COUTTS
Manlat MiA Teacher
All   Theoretical   Subjects
■tndlo:
1158 WEST 13th AVENUE
Telephone Bay. 7838 Xi
..(Society
• •
&
c&
Oriental Motif
At Festival
Alpha Gamma Delta
At the Commodore
In the mysterious atmosphere of
Oriental tradition the alumnae of
Alpha Gamma Delta and their
friends danced at the Matsurl festival in aid of the fraternity's work
among under-privileged children.
The walls of the Commodore, the
scene of this cabaret, were hung
with Japanese lanterns which shed
a soft glow over the 6herry blossom decorated floor.
On the individual tables which
were laden with chrysanthemums,
the flower of the east, were found
favors bearing the heads of Japanese dolls.
coming
functibns
Edythe Lever Hawes
Dramatic Soprano
3015 WEST SECOND AVE.
BAY. 3954
Member of B. C. Music Federation
i
Donald Macrae
A.T.C.M.
Teacher of Pianoforte Playing and
Voice Production
Member of B.C.M.T. Federation
2776 W. 39th Ave. Kerr. 3159
"Your Favorite Instrument"
at
Barney's Music Studio
679 Granville St.     Say. 5338
i—WILLIS PIANOS—i
Canada's Best
THE
BOWES MUSIC HOUSE LTD.
951 Granville Street        Douglas 999
l> VOICI PRODUCTION
A Special ratw for tMttnnws.
_ Free auditions by eppotntaent.
R 3890 HUDSON AVE. Bay. 6500
£HORTHY
Elgar School of Music
Piano, Voici-Product ion, Singing, Theory
Pupils iirriMirnd for all Local Examinations,
I'racttcul and Theoretical.
Sight -reading   nnd   Utr-tralnlng   classes   tor
ffcnmlnntlnn pupils: Musk  Appreciation
Clwww for Theory Students.
C. E. FINDLATER,
L.T.C.L, A.T.C.M., A.T.S.C.
68 Fairfield Building
Seymour 6937 Trinity 1956
Crustacean Caudal
For Sciencemen
Tonight at seven in the Hotel
Georgia the Science Men's Undergraduate Society will hold their
eleventh Annual Banquet.
Instead of the snake parade aud
party crashing which Is the traditional finish to this banquet the
executive has planned an extensive program of entertainment.
Hanko and Clar, dancers deluxe,
will present the "Apache," "Contortion" and "Fancy Waltz" dances.
Other features will be a magician
and a musician.
The most outstanding feature of
the evening will be the usual original menu, or iu this qase the
"Indicator Diagram." Commencing
with "S.M.U.S. Internal Combustion
Engine" and "Crustacean Caudal
Appendages with Condiments" and
going down the line of "Carbonized
Fuel—Solid injected with 600 W.."
"Diatomaceous Distillate with Synchronized Sound Effects," the engineers will finish up with "Dether-
mallzed Glacial Milk" aud "High
Speed A.C. Turbo-Generator with
Direct Connected Exciter."
Sorority Bidding
Results
Bidding' yesterday morning closed
the fall rushing season for women's
fraternities. Last night Alpha Gamma Delta pledged nine women;
Kappa Kappa Gamma, eleven; Alpha Phi, nine; Delta Gamma, eight;
Kappa Alpha Theta, seven; Gamma
Phi Beta, Ave; Alpha Omicron Pi,
four; and Alpha Delta Pi, four.
Varsity Goes American
On Thanksgiving Day
The combination of a rain-lashed
Vancouver and a long week-end,
drew many Vancouverltes to Bellingham on Monday, among them
several university students.
These included Lyle Vtnes, Bro-
dle Gillies, Jean Stordle, Hugh Godard, Helen Westby and Doris Read,
who were observed vacillating between Kress' and the lobby of the
Leopold. There were others who
were not observed.
It was also raining in Bellingham.
V. C. U.
Rev. Hind of the West Point Grey
Baptist Church, will be the speaker
ln Arts 206, Friday at 12.15.
MEDICAL APPOINTMENT8
The notice of appointments for
those who have not as yet had their
medical examinations will be posted on the Quad notice board. Please
watch for your appointment.
The social event of the term,
namely the Arts-Aggie Ball, is
scheduled for November 9 at the
Commodore. According to the re
ports of the committee In charge
this function will outshine even
the wildest dreams of former faculty balls.
As council has this year alloted
the committee the largest sum ever
spent on any one dance ln campus
history, arrangements are being
made for an excellent floor show
and a function pleasing in every
detail.
The Arts club is in charge of designing decorations.
The ticket supply will be limited
to 200 and may be obtained at noon
hours from the Auditorium box office between the dates of November 5 and 12 only, or as long as
they last. The price Is 12.75 a
couple.
* »      »
Sophomores! pay your class fees
immediately and get your tickets
for the Arts '39 class party ou Oct.
28 (only eleven days away).
In the spirit of bigger aud better
parties the executive of Arts '39
has made arrangements to hold
their class party iu the Commodore
Cabaret on October 28th. It Is expected that this party will be one
of the more enjoyable functions of
the year and all the sophomores
you know or want to know will be
there.
* *      *
Final arrangements have been
made for the Players' Club Reception. The party is to be held on
October 23rd at the home of Mrs.
Victor Spencer.
* «      »
Thursday, November 8, Is the
date, and the Commodore the place,
reserved for the senior class party
this year. Fees may be paid beginning next  week.
NOTICE
Women Aggies and Nuraea are
aaked to turn out on Monday for
volleyball.
Feminist Row In
Tennis Club
Woman Walk Out In
Heated Discussion
At a meeting of the Tennis Club
held last Tuesday It was unanimously decided to hold a fall tournament. The meeting was characterized by a heated discussion on
the advisability of Including women in the club, during which the
women guests walked out due to
a misunderstood comment ot one
of the "Tin Gods." However, the
club will be mixed.
The position of vice-president
was therefore left open, as a woman will be elected to fill the vacancy at the next meeting. Allan
P. Fawley was elected president,
and George A. Micolsky was chosen
as secretary-treasurer.
A notice will be placed at the
toot of the cafeteria stairs for those
wishing to enter the U.B.C. tennis
championships, and those who sign
are asked to give their phone numbers as well as names so that matches can be easily arranged. An
entry fee of 25 cents will be charged, and will be used for prizes.
If a high calibre of play is shown
this year some inter-varsity match
es will be arranged with American
universities.
If the members remain as enthusiastic as at present, social activities
within the club will be seriously
considered.
DANCING LESSONS —
You want more friends, more fun.    You want
to be able to go  to  the next party with  the
poise   that  comes  of  being   a   good   dancer.
Telephone Bayview 5306 or 5333 R,
GRACE MacDONALD
3657 West 9th Avenue, at Alma
Gay Nineties
Cabaret
Alpha Phis Entertain
At Spanish Grill
Stepping out of fashion
magazines of 1900, several demure maidens and matrons
dropped in to the Spanish
Grill last week to show the
modern maids and men just
how sweet their grandmothers looked on a shopping trip
or at the ball.
Merriment reached its height
at the Alpha Phis Gay Nineties Cabaret in aid of their
philanthropic work, when several members modelled the
gowns of the hoop skirts and
bustles.
3PORT8 COSTUMES
An ankle-length akirt of finely
pleated aerge with an enaamble
jaoket and hard atraw hat waa
tha oorreot wear for the tonnla
court at the end of the laat oen-
tury. Thla eumbaraome aporta
eoatuma waa modelled by Dorla
Salter.
Over the traditional seven petticoats and hoops billowed the prim
full skirt of a ruffled lavender taffeta gown modelled by Mildred Pollock. Complete with a petite flower-covered bonnet and frilly parasol,
this dress was exactly like great-
grandmother might have worn.
BATHING SUITS
Following Irene Cole, modelling
the lingerie of the nineties came
the hit of the evening, a very early
bathing suit worn by Helen Lunday.
In Impersonal black bordered by a
black and white stripe were the
extensive dress and balloon trousers which with heavy black sox
and head wrappings completed the
costume.
With the orchestra playing a
wedding march, Mrs. Arthur Mercer, a recent bride, entered ln a
white embroidered taffeta wedding
gown of 1895 model.
Aggie Banquet
At Georgia
Field Day
Prize Awards
Crowing cocks and bawling calves
received no attention at the university farm last night as it was the
occasion of the Agriculture students' annual banquet. Deserting
barn and stable at an early hour,
60 would-be agriculturists dined
formally in the York Room of the
Hotel Georgia.
The principle speakers of the
evening were Dean F. M. Clement
and Dr. A. F. Barss.
Dean Clement told of his impressions of the Empire University
Conference which he attended in
Edinburgh this year.
Prizes won at the field day on
October 9 were awarded to William
Pendray, Stanley Chin, Lester
Steele, Wlnnifred McBrlde, Gavin
Mout, Charles Hardwick, Paul Trus-
well and Leonard Zlnck.
The committee in charge was
composed of Joan McTaggart-Cow-
an, Ralph Cudmore, Farley Dickinson and Ralph Gram.
Formal Rushing
Teas Sunday
Culminating the fall rushing season each sorority entertained formally at tea Sunday afternoon for
Its prospective members.,
Presidents of the active chapters
received their guests at the last
function before the silence period
which terminated with formal
pledging last night.
Kreisler To Play
At Washington
University of Washington students will have the privilege of
hearing Fritz Kreisler on November
12 when the world-famous violinist
appears in concert at Meany Hall
on the University campus.
Kreisler will appear in the first ot
a series of concerts arranged by
the executive of the Associated
Washington students. The committee in charge, headed by Miss
Betty Davidson, is composed of
more than 38 Washington co-eds
who are handling arrangements
and publicity in churches, mothers'
clubs, high schools, private and
grade schools, amongst music teachers and women's clubs, etc. By
poster, blackboard and telephone
the students plan an intensive campaign.
This series, sponsored by the A.
W.S. which corresponds to our A.
M.S., indicates, roughly, what
might be done under a Student
Pass System at U.B.C.
What People
Are Wearing
RAIN TOQS
The wet weather is annoying but
it has brought out a lot of tricky
rain outfits on the campus.
A brunette is wearing the cleverest ensemble. Her raincoat is
made of transparent oil silk cut
on a swagger style. It has a slightly creamlsh tinge, but otherwise Is
as clear as cellophane. To complete the ensemble she has a transparent umberella exactly matched.
As If it wasn't to look not-the-
least-bit-drippy among a campusful
of clammy co-eds, she wears a deep
rose knitted suit under It, giving
the impression that "it Is spring
where ere she trods."
Other co-eds have followed suit,
but less spectacularly in greens
and blues and reds.
These outfits are heralding a new
era in Varsity winter fashions. Xo
longer will co-eds have to subdue
their personalities under grubby
tweeds and slimy rubber on rainy
days. Their smart suits will appear to advantage on any winter
day, enhanced If anything by bright
cellophane coverings.
AFTERNOON GOWNS
The rushing teas on Sunday afternoon brought out a variety of
formal afternon dresses.
Velvet in shades of wine, and
black, of ankle length, was most
universally  chosen.
Dull satin In sombre royal blue,
cut on princess lines, formed the
base over which a fingertip length
tunic jacket of lace in the same
shade was worn by Pauline Patterson.
SPORT SUITS
Attractive In the line of sportswear is a novelty suit noticed In
the caf the other day. The skirt
was of black tweed with a decided
red fleck, and cut on a very tailored
style. With it was worn a red
blazer bound with black cord.
With black suede brogues and
gloves and a black felt tyrolean as
accessories the effect was complete.
mMMimW^m-
VI
faery
0<fff
Angela Patri]
Famous writer
on problems of
youth. His
highly sought-
after articles
are a boon to
thous andi of
parents.
DR. FRANK
MoCOY
' World-
renowned  phy-
^j slctan.    gtves
W- valuable health
advice    The
prevention    o f
disease  and
simple mechanic/    les   of   good
health   told   tn
simple   1 a n * -
uage.
i
ii
Bob
a
Bouchette
Hit outstanding
column.   ''Lend
Me Your Cars,"
draws plenty flre
but nevertheless is
eagerly   awaited
>nd fully enjoyed
, by thousands!
Sidney
Canada
Norman
Canada'! foremost
mining edlter
keeps tha world
Informed ot develop m e n t s in
B.C.'i great Industry, mining. Hia
"Run o' tho Mine"
column ia an
authentic guide.
Myrtle Miylr
ELDRBD
She's baby's best
friend. Expert In
the care of children, she writes in
a vein that every
mother can understand. She's a true
and helpful friend
Business — Finance
Theatrea — Radio
SOCIAL NEWS
Every Day in
THE
VANCOUVER
BASKETBALL NOTICE
All players wishing to turn out
for the Intermediate A and Senior
B teams are asked to come to the
practices on  Saturday  noon.
BOOK LOST
Large sized black looseleaf book.
Finder please communicate with J.
Oray, via Arts Letter Rack.
PENCIL CA3E  LOST
A small leather pencil case with
zipper opening. The initials O. J.
M. are on the case.
T.B.  LECTURE
The Monro Pre-Med Club announces that Dr. W. H. Hatfield
will speak Wednesday noon, Oct.
21st, in Arts 100. "Tuberculosis
control in British Columbia" will
be his subject. The lecture will be
Uustrated.
CHEM. SOCIETY MEETS
The Chemistry Society held Its
first meeting at the home ot Norman Bell on Wednesday, October
14. Two papers were presented:
"Soya Bean Extractions" by R. D.
Walker, and "Enzymes" by Arthur
East ham. The officers for the ensuing year were elected, John
Light as vice-president and Agnes
Schroeder as secretary. There were
23 members present, and the meeting was followd by refreshments
and bridge.
L-,
ALMA HAT SHOP
(J. Patrick)
Corner Broadway and Alma
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tbe utmost tn service."
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We can remodel your old fur
garment into 1936-37 style, or
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UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE
HOURS, 9 am. to 5 p m.   Saturdays, 9 am   to 12 am
LOOSE-LEAF    NOTE    BOOKS,    EXERCISE    BOOKS    AND    SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES all your
Graphic  Engineering  Paper,   Biology  Paper,   Loose-leaf        BOOK   SUPPLIES
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink, and Drawing Instruments.        SOLD HERE Friday, October 16, 1936
THE     UBYSSEY
Five
MINING-™
Number One in a Series of Industrial Articles.
This serias of articles outlining five
of British Columbia's most important industries appears through the
co-operation of a select group of
Vancouver firms, whose cards appear below. They are pleased to
bring to the attention of the
students attending the University
of British Columbia, pertinent
facts about the industries of this
Province.
'.'s Most Important Industry
By L. A. BONNER, P.G.S.
MINING in general is the physical and cultural basis of our Occidental civilization and upon it depends largely
all the arts and sciences as we know them today.   Its genesis was the meeting point of geology and history
and consequently thereby formed a line of demarkation between the anthropoids and homo sapiens. But
(je,^    the making of any dogmatic distinction in this latter case should be avoided.   It was owing to its
geological structure that a small riband of country in Great Britain formed thenucleus of the British
Empire.  This country lay roughly between the parallel
lines of Berwick-on-Twee<! to Llandudno and from
Kingston-under-Hull to Falmouth.  The mining of coal,
Mining Industry
Fine Career
Modern civilization is based on metals and
minerals, and the production of these is a
great basic and permanent industry, in which
the mining engineer plays an essential and
permanent part. To the stock speculator only
is mining a gamble. It has its element of
chance in any operation, like all human enterprise, but as a whole it is solid and permanent. That young man who properly
qualifies himself and enters the real profession of mining engineering, with its fine
ethics and ideals, is not gambling with life,
but is taking part in a great, permanent and
legitimate industry. He is entering a field
of wide and interesting activity and becomes
a real producer, with a fine opportunity to
develop high character and worth as lie
within himself. It is in recognition of these
facts, and in earnest appreciation of the fact
that so highly specialized and advanced an
industry as mining is now largely managed
by University graduates, that the firms represented in this section haVe taken space.
They are pledged to an appreciation that»the
properly trained University student who
shows creative and productive intelligence <
will in this great industry be among that
company of men who drive civilization ahead.
iron, copper, lead and tin in this area turned a countryside of once "surprising beauty and luxuriance" into a
sectionally hideous rookery of mine fosses and manufacturing centres, with their magnificent civic buildings and other varieties of "soul destroying architecture."
The search for and winning of gold has always been
the lure that has had so much to do with national expansion and has extended the frontiers of nations beyond
the occupancy of their human drift.
Specializing on England of old, its mining and consequent manufacturing development got ahead of its
medium of exchange, i.e., gold. To equalize trade balances, hijacking on the Spanish Main came into vogue.
The earliest overseas prospectors attended to this and
were rendered immune by suspended sentences (by
their own nationals anyhow) under letters of marque,
the gangster privilege being accorded them officially
by uniformed Royalty on a 60-60 cut and not as now on a declared 2 er cepnt basis. Gold, however, served its purpose and
paved the way to the vastly more nationally important mining
of the base metals and minerals, and still does.
Coming to B. C. the discovery of gold on the Fraser resulted
in a northward rush from California and waypoints and about
depopulated it. This alien element suggested to itself the annexation of the then New Caledonia and it took nearly a half
platoon of regulars from Esquimalt to intimidate the filibustering malcontents and to insure against incidents. Then, the
rumors of a golden Cariboo, which climaxed in the finding of
Williams Creek, put New Caledonia on the map and to Williams
is due the fact of B. C.'s not being under different mandate as
in the case of the Panhandle and certain terrain south of '49.
The news of Williams was broadcasted throughout the
World, and the news flashes (via windjammers) brought a year
or so later (so great was the urge), miners, mechanics, et al,
from every quarter of the globe. These brought with them the
working tools of their professions although they had to go to
the timber for their materials for the fashioning of their plants
and equipment.
These excellently designed and economically run plants
made of the Cariboo, one of the world's epics in mining, and an
inspiration in the realm of resourcefulness.
Then followed the mining of coal and hard rock metals,
making possible the settlement of the lands and urban development, forestry, fisheries, etc.
It is possible that even Vancouver some day may become a
manufacturing centre, but the public will have to learn that
chiselled two by four stock gambling is not conducive to mining
prosperity and what results therefrom, although as a pastime
it has its points.
Mining in B. C, Canada's mineral province, owing to its,
in general, non-seasonal nature, may yet be intelligently correlated with the seasonal industries to make labour conditions
more tolerable. Mining development work carried on when seasonal occupation is required elsewhere could be resorted to and
then later on, production from developed reserves speeded up
when transient labour was at a loose end, so to.speak. There
is no altruism in this idea; it la sound business and it is up to
the mining industry to take cognizance of the fact, that as part
of the body politic, it has a vital interest in the general well-
being of labour and not merely a localized special.
The rising generation, armed with the technical training
that has been made possible for them by their predecessors, will
have social questions intimately associated with their business
and professional careers. The sooner mining and other industries having to do with the development, in contradistinction to
exploitation of the country's natural resources, appreciate their
obligations to society in general and labour in special, the better,
as indifference and or side-tracking of this most burning of all
social questions, unemployment, can have but one result —
inevitable anarchy.
C. M. OLIVER (j COMPANY LTD.
GiUblUhed HOT
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U.B.C. Debaters Are
Recognized By Book
In the "College Debaters' Annual," a publication which reports
outstanding university debates, the
contest last year between the University of Manitoba and U.B.C. Is
recorded.
The debate was one of the radio
series, and was on the question of
the legalization of sweepstakes.
Len Martin and Tom Marshall
spoke for the U.B.C. Parliamentary
Forum.
The entire debate is reported in
the book mentioned above, along
with debates ln which leading American and British colleges took
part.
FROSH WHA HAE!
DON'T MISS Shopping with
Mary Ann on tbe Editorial Page.
QUR prices art within
the student income.
fturptn Bras.
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Fine Clothes
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i 665 GRANVILLE STREET
Being a Poem, Inspired by the
Battle of the Quad.
By BILL SIBLEY
Frosh, wha hae wl' reason bled,
Frosh, wham pride has often led,
Welcome to your egg-stained head,
Or to vlctorie!
Now's the time, and here's an egg;
See that dirty Soph blackleg?
See approach  that filthy yegg?
Stool and bootblackerie!
Wha will be 'a bootleg noo?
Wha will shine a Sophomore shoe?
Wha sae base as boots renew?—
Let him turn and flee!
Wha, for Frosh, both ane and a'
Seasoned egg will gladly thraw?
Freshman stand, or freshman fa',
Let htm thraw wl' me !
By Initiation's war,
By our friends at servile chore,
We will hurl our dear-bought store—
Yolks will set us free!
Lay the filthy shoe-stand low!
Shoe shines go at every blow!
In revenge our eggs we'll throw!
Yield, base Sophomorle!
With Apologies to Soottmen,
their Language, and Poet.
THE DAILY PR6BLEM of
what and where to buy things
may be solved by consulting the
advertising columns of THE
UBYSSEY.
Between lectures
have tea at
The GABLES Inn
Beside University Hill Post Office
ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
<*> $45 — $65
a—
Typewriters of all makes
for sale or rent.
Byrnes Hume Typewriters
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592 SEYMOUR STREET SEYMOUR 6639
The Beginning
"In the beginning God created
heaven and earth" and In time man
came to the earth. Having a penchant for creating, he In turn created universities.
It has been suggested by some
that universities are a creation of
the devil. These fanatics are not
to be taken too seriously.
The universities having been created must be put to a use, and so
little children were brought into
the world. These, under the careful guidance of the medical profession, grew up and became freshmen and freshettes, a few ln time
even reached th estage ot sophomores and a very few after much
mental and physical effort became
seniors and Anally graduated.
These graduates in turn encouraged their children to come to University and begin the new life.
Life Is one beginning after another. First comes the real physiological beginning, and this goes on
to other beginnings leading ln turn
through the seven ages ao ably described by Shakespeare.
The beginning is always painful,
but also exciting, and the excitement tends to dull the pain and sorrow accompanying the finish, which
always precedes the beginning.
The psychology of the average
first year student is a little difficult
to evaluate. Their usual state of
mind mlgh tbe likened to the hypo-
mania variety of the mania phase,
where elation, overactivity, and
flight of Ideas are present. However the freshman usually has a
keen realization of his position and
environment and does not exhibit
such extreme disorder as to bring
him into conflict with his fellow
men. There Is of course always
the "Joe  College" exception.
In a few cases, periods of the
above are Interspersed with periods
of self consciousness and timidity,
due to the action of a newly
aroused Inferiority complex. The
sudden change from being a big
frog In a little puddle, to being a
very little frog in a big puddle is
always devastating.
—By Godwin Smith, Queens
Journal.
Dr. Wilbur S. Watson
DENTIST
RESIDENCE   OFFICE:
4494 West 9th Avenue
3.00 to 8.00 p.m.
Telephone:   Point Grey 652
Sylvia Thrupp
To Address
Literary Forum
At the Literary Forum tea on
Tuesday, October 20, in the Lower Common Room the guest
speaker will be Or. Sylvia Thrupp,
brilliant U. B. C. graduate, at
present instructor in the Department of History. She hat chosen
as her subject, "The Impressions
of a U. B. C. 8tudent at London."
Climaxing an outstanding scholastic career, Miss Thrupp went to
the latter University ln 1929 on an
I.ODE. scholarship. After obtaining her Doctor's Degree In History,
she spent two years in research
work at the London School of economics, later working in American
Universities on a fellowship assigned by 'the Social Science Research Council.
PRE8HITTIS WELCOMED
The address promises to be most
interesting and a cordial invitation
to all women students, particularly
to prospective Freshette members,
is extended by Kay Farquhar, Forum president. Kay anounces that
the club's program this year is being extended to include formal debating. In fact, rumor has it that
at some future date the girls, under
Dean Bollert's able coaching, might
even tackle the seasoned stalwarts
of the  Parliamentary  Forum.
Well Known Store
Celebrates Anniversary
Well known in their district, The
Marguerite Shoppe, located at 3764
West 10th Avenue, are celebrating
their First Anniversary with a
great Sale, offering outstanding
values. The sale commenced yesterday and will continue until Saturday, October 24th. The management suggest that the University
co-eds pay a visit to their shop
this week to share in the particularly  attractive  savings  that  are
Plays and Ball
Not To Clash
Aber Studios were officially awarded the contract for taking the Seniors' pictures for the Totem at the
weekly council meeting on Tuesday night.
Lyall Vine, hard hearted, close
fisted treasurer, deoreed that no
class may decide definitely where
they intend to have their party
or award any oontraets until they
have    collected    the    neoessary
cash.   If however, Arts '39 collect
sufficient fees they will bs allowed  to  have  their  party  at the
Commodore on Ootober 28.
In order to prevent a clash with
the Arts Ball It was decreed that
the dates for the Christmas plays
will remain November 26, 27, 28.
The budget for the Arts-Aggie Ball
based on a ticket sale of 200 was
passed at 1550.00.
Finding the meeting rather boring since there was little business
ot any importance the president of
Women's Athletlbs enlivened the
proceedings by starting a conflagration of room and date slips on
the table. The rule preventing the
frosh bonfire evidently does not
apply to council.
SIGN YOUR
TOTEM
WAIVER
TODAY
offered. They want you to look
over the latest creations in afternoon dresses. A complete stock of
ladies' wear awaits you—do not fail
to call at the Marguerite Shoppe
and take advantage of their First
Anniversary Sale. Remember the
address is 3764 West 10th Avenue
and the phone number: Bay. 7972.
BUTTER-FLIES
' You remember the story of the fly that fell into a jug
of cream and paddled around till he made for himself a
raft of butter, and so saved himself? But suppose another
fly had fallen in and had floated helpless on the surface.
Should the first fly have made butter to support him too?
There are some flies around the University who are expecting to have their butter made for them. The same few
faces are always seen at the meetings of clubs and societies,
or at the Varsity games. They're making the Varsity spirit
necessary for the college life of the other fellows.—"The
Gateway."
Folk Craft Festival
Opens Thursday
Halevey Singers
Give Excellent
Performance
The Fourth Annual Folk Song
aud Dance Festival, which opened
in Hotel Vancouver last Wednesday evening, will close tomorrow
night after the most successful season since its inauguration. Thousands of Vancouver citizens as well
as many from neighboring cities
have attended the nightly programs
of music and dancing, and inspected the large collection of international folk-craft exhibits.
The outstanding performance on
the opening night program was by
the Halevey Singers of Seattle, who
presented Hebrew hymns and folk
songs that compared favorably with
the best offerings of the Don Cossacks two years ago. Other feat-
tures on the varied program included Basque dances, Highland
dances and songs, and Canadian
country dances. The chairman
Wednesday evening was Brigadier-
General Victor Odium. The guest
speakers were Dean Willis L. Ubl
of the University of Washington,
and Dr. Robert England of U.B.C,
while Mrs. Paul Smith, M.L.A.,
brought the best wishes of Premier
Pattullo and his government.
Prof. Thorlief Larsen of the University of British Columbia, was the
chairman of last night's performance, which featured songs and
dances from Sweden, Ireland, Quebec, Holland, Oreece and Spain.
—K. O.
DIESEL OPPORTUNITIES
Never before has any fluid offered such
opportunities ta the mechanically Inclined
young man at doea the Diesel. Dleael tales
have Increased seferal hundred per cent durum the past three years and Olewl Is now
fully established aa tho most economical
prlmo mover In existence    Railroads, Muses,
Truck*, Tractors, Utility and Industrial
I'lanta, Marine, Aviation, etc., aro all turning   ...   ri|aaA.   ...	
in*  to' Diesel   power.
Naturally, this mammoth Industry requires
competent mechanics and operators. We have
been successfully training men In Diesel
for five years and Ihe number of our gradu-
atea now established In Diesel work I*
ample proof of our training methods. Thla
school i» equipped with the largest assembly
nf Diesel Engines In (Canada for training
purposes and our training Is Indorsed by
tho Diesel Industry. Write for free and
Interesting publication, "Diesel News," and
particulars of our Day, Night and Home
Study   Courses
HEMPHILL  DIESEL  ENGINEERING
SCHOOLS LIMITED
I lfi5    Granville   Street.    Vancouver.    B.    C. North Shore to be Scene of Varsity-All Black Game
Six
TH*     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1936
GRIDDERS IN GOOD SHAPE TO MEET V.A.C.
More flavour
—yet milder
Buckingham
CIOARITTIS
CO-ED
SPORTS
In a week the grass hockey girls
start their season battle for an un-
appreciative alma mater. Last year
actually three people—not players
—ever showed interest enough to
watch a game.    But then that is
quite In keeping with the present
U.B.C. policy in regard to sports.
However,   if   anyone   has   no
studying to do, no shows to see,
no teas to attend—what a hope
—just put In an appsaranes at
Connaught Park some Saturday
afternoon   about   thros   o'elook.
Ths games are scheduled for 2.16
but don't 1st that fool you, for
this It a women's Isagus, so naturally they don't stsrt till much
later.
NEVER LOST
Last year the U. B. C. team
never lost • game snd the girls
are determined to keep clear of
defest. That's quite a Job and
they need all the support you can
give them. There is much more
incentive to plsy well if they
know you are watching them and
want them to win.
It is fun playing against outside
teams; the other sides spend
much of their time stsring st
those strsnge people who go to
University. They hsve the wlerd
idea that we are studious bluestockings or gay, social butterflies.
HALL OF FAME
At this dignified centre of learning there is an astonishing number
of co-eds who haven't the slightest idea of just who are prominent
in girls' sports. For their benefit
particularly 1 am going to start a
Hall of Fame for sporting co-eds.
The leader of this list is,-of course,
Beth Evans, president of the W.A.A.
Beth Evans: Starred ln basketball to win a white sweater—the
highest sporting award. She is a
senior .
Margaret Ralph: A sophomore
who is makfng rapid strides in basketball. On senior team last year
and won her Big Block.
Ellen Boving: A Junior Thespian,
who learned to play first-class hockey at an English boarding-school.
Isabel Campbell: Dashing centre
from the Province basketball squad.
Now in second year Nursing.
Margaret Evans: Sophomore
President of the Grass Hockey
Club. Won her Big Block last
year.
Bea Hastings: Member of the
1936 Vancouver Grass Hockey Rep.
Team. Twice winner of the Big
Block. Now taking Teachers'
Traing course.
Laura Nixon: Member ot the Senior basketball team, and ex-secretary of the W.A.A.
Sheila Wilson: Plays on the Se-
TWO TOP TEAMS TO TANGLE
IN TOMORROW'S TILT
McCammon Will Play in Scrum Position
For Blacks-Varsity Go
SportraitS I
By ALAN MORLEY
Apparently satisfied with the
sparkling showing of the first team
in their game against the Rowing
Club last Saturday, Coach Dobbie
has made only one slight change
in their line-up for tomorrow's
crucial struggle against the ferocious, All-Blacks on their native
heath of Confederations Park,
that morass of untamed posts and
wire entanglements.
The one shift is the substitution
of McCammon for Madely in the
scrum.
In spite of the fact that a couple
of dangerous fumbles in the first
stanza of the Rowing Club game
caused the exchange of Bird and
Ellis for the second half, Bird returning to his old post of full-back
from the three-quarter line, Ellis
goes in at the safety position once
more.
The line-up, then, will be: Fullback, Ellis; three-quarters, Leggatt,
Lumsden, Bird and Wilson; five-
eighths, Willoughby; scrum-half,
Carey (captain); forwards, J. Andrews, Pyle, Hobson, McCammon,
Harmer, Maguire, Swan and Watson.
The third team having drawn a
bye for Saturday, the second team
is the only other Varsity rugby aggregation going into battle, as it
tackles the Harlequins at Brockton
Point (Lower) that afternoon,
The players: Full-back, White-
law; three-quarters, Day Smith,
Ron Andrews, Ross, College; five-
eighths, Mackie; scrum-half, Whittle; forwards, Robertson, Housser,
Stewart, Billings, Madeley, Gross,
Pyle and Tupper.
Anyone desirihg an advance clocking on these entries may get it by
trotting over to the stadium immediately they have read this, as
Captain Dobbie is holding an extra
practise of toth third and second
teams there this noon-hour.
nlor Hockey team and  is a very
fast runner.
Mike McCulloch: A Senior has-
ketballer who hails from Revel-
stok^.
Ena Clarke: Won her Big Block
for being a star guard in basketball.
Elisabeth Houston: Vice-president of the Grass Hockey and won
her Big Block.
Elissbeth Norle: Senior hockey
player from Duncan. Sophomore
Thespian.
Peggy MacLeod: Singles and
doubles champion in badminton.
Sophomore and member of the Big
Block Club.
Pat Hemberow: Grass hockeylst
from Victoria.   Now a senior.
—MYRNE NEVISON.
i      -      !
$       Frank "Vic" Perry       $
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Barney Boe
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523 GRANVILLE
The very amiable and Gibraltarlike person of Barney Boe offers
further evidence ol the fact that
ability in the realm of sport and
lack of intelligence do not necessarily go hand in hand. For Barney Is a fifth year Scienoeman and
only twenty years old — a mere
fledgling.
If anyone tells you that Barney
is not a first-rate football performer, you are perfectly justified
in calling he, It, or even she, a
dirty nsme. For Bsrney Is not
only a top-notch plsyer, but is
also eaptsln of this year's grid
squsd. Deservedly enough, too,
for hs has had many years' experience In the egg-ball game. At
North Van. High he played the
English brand of rugby and has
had three years' training on the
playing fields of Vsrsity—alternating between the American and
Canadian styles of the grid sport.
Barney weighs 180vpounds — a
very effective 180 pounds for "holding that line." And anyone who has
been dragged into the turf by Barney or who has opposed him in his
guard position in the line will forcibly agree that football is no sis-
sie'B game.
In the slanguage of sport, a
gridiron Isn't something you toast
bresd on, but is a 100-yard extension of turf over which Barney
Boe charges for the express purpose of making touchdowns He
was shunted Into s backfield position at odd times laat year and
was one of the very few to score ■
for Vsrsity when they experimented in the American game.
Barney worked at Pioneer during
the summer, as practical training
for his post-University career in
Mining engineering. A little later
on he'll be doing all his tackling in
a mine shaft, so that if we grid
fans feel like appreciating Barney's
Herculean efforts, we'd better pull
PEARSON TO
IN SATURDAY
Vies, Vanity Clash
In Grid Battle •
With one very credible performance under their belts, and another
week's brisk and tough workouts
to bring them up to that fighting
pitch, the Thunderbird gridders are
all set to destructively claw at the
V. A. C. Wolves in their second
Bi£ Four tilt this Saturday.
Going down to dsfeat at ths
hands of ths North Shore Lions
In their premlsr performance s
wssk ago, Doe Burke's Board of
strategy has figured out the answers to the winning problem. A
eouple of weak links In the line,
and no long-distance puntsrs were
troubling "Doc," but now his worries are over.
His first worry, in the line, has
been eliminated by some murderous scrimmages, and all-round
check-up on the blocking boys.
The second big difficulty, that of
discovering a kicker in the squad,
which was making those thoughtful
furrows on the coach's feverish
brow, has also disappeared, and
once imore that sunny smile Is
playing over his facial fixtures,
PEARSON PRETTY PUNTER
The cause of the about-face is
another one of those former green-
men, John Pearson. John has taken
Henry Stradiotti's place as the No
1 answer to a coach's prayers. Taking his first fling at the Canadian
game, he's walked into a kicker's
job, which seems to be right up his
alley. The long spirals which have
been taking off from his educated
toe will be a soaring asset to the
former kicker-less Gridders.
Angus, ap Roberts, and Williams, A-1 bslltoters in the debut,
will sgain do most of the yard-
gaining for the Blue and Gold.
Wide end runs, with some smart
interference, and tough blocking
by the boys up front, will be an
outstanding feature of the Students' attack.
HARDY SERIES UNDECIDED
According to announcements made
at the take-off on the annual Student grind, the first game was to
decide whether or not the U. B. C.
team would be in the fight for the
Inter-Collegiate "Hardy" mug, but
'twas not so. Although some consideration was given to the showing in Saturday's battle, It's still
doubtful if any Prairie gophers will
invade the Coast this year.
Nevertheless, n o t w lthstanding,
etc., Hardy cup or no Hardy cup,
the Varsity grid men are out to
win the Big Four title, and plan
to start their championship drive
on Saturday by taking Vacs.
—TURNER.
DEBUT
TILT
NOTICE
Intra-mural practices In wo-
en's volleyball and badminton
will be held Monday and Tuesday at noon.
Monday
12:00-12:45 Nurses vs. Freshettes
12:45- 1:30   Sophs vs. Juniors
Seniors vs.  Education
Tuesday
12:00-12:45 8enlors, Education,
Aggies, Nurses,
Freshettes.
12:45- 1:30   Freshettes.
NOTICE
Student tickets for this Saturday's Big Four game urt on sale
todsy st noon In the Quad box
office.    Price, 26 oents.
Varsity vs. V. A. C.
Baiketmen Work
For Title Bid
"I'll Make 'Em Turn/'
Says "Doc" Montgomery
The Varsity Basketeers are getting the "works" from Doc. Montgomery in the wee sma' hours of
our cold, bleak mornings, in a determined bid for the Intercity Senior A title this season. The boys
figure they're working hard right
now, but "Doc" says Just to wait,
"this isn't anything . . . I'll make
'em train." And there is a sparkle
ln the old eye that will probably
change to a murderous gleam before the season's over.
GYM WORKOUTS
Twenty times around the Oym is
one swell way, to get a fellow to
stick for a whole game, and that
Is exactly the "Doc's" Idea. . . .
Stamina, plus.
Four freshmen have placed for
the Senior A's this season: Hudson,
of champion Victoria Blue Ribbons
fame; Gross, forward; Hayman,
centre; and McKenzie, guard. Mitchell and Detwiller, guards; Berry
and Turner, forward-miners, are
back tossing the melon with more
skill this year, while veterans
"Bugs" Bardsley and "Jo-Jo" Pringle form the real backbone of the
team. Bardsley is known as one
of the best forwards in Canada, and
it was he who captained the Varsity boys to the Lower Mainland
title a couple of years ago, Pringle,
guard de-luxe Justly deserves his
fine reputation. With such a pair as
this to back them up, and with such
training as they are getting, this
year's hoopers should go far.
—VAN PERRY.
I GET MY CLOTHES and
FURNISHINGS
from
CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
Vanity To Play
St. Andrew's
Saturday
Better Condition   for
Stiff Fight
Varsity Senior soccermen meet
St. Andrews this Saturday at Mc-
Bride Park, Fourth Avenue, east of
Blenheim, for the third 3 o'cloA:
tussle of the series.
St. Andrews are a real aggregation, for they have scored 14 goals
in their last two games, which is
some record. On the other hand,
Varsity has scored three netbend-
ers in two games, which does not
appear so torrid. But the U. B. C.
boys have been doing some hard
work in the last two weeks, and
in spite of their defeat by Rangers,
their ball-handling is very much
improved, so that, with a bit of
stamina, a bit of nerve, and a good
break, they may. hand out a surprise to the Saints this week.
In fact, there probably will be,
because Manager Dave Kato issued
some very serious remarks concern-
ing condition at the defeat last
week. As a result, the boys have
had to work hard the last few days,
when the rain would let them, and
if they haven't more staying-power
than before, it's not from lack of
training.
OLD RELIABLES PLAY
Gerry Sutherland, Art Croll, Mahood, Foster, Rush, and other shining lights of this organization are
expected to be out ln full warpaint
again, with even better results
than ever.
Manager Kato has not commit-
ted himself as to the lineup, but
more than likely there will be a
slight shakeup. Chapman is uncomfortable as inside right, and may
possibly get an outaide berth;
Mootlie Is weak as right back, and
may also get a shift, but all this is
mere conjecture; Dave Kato and
Coach Hitchins can be relied on to
field a darn good team, and that
team can be relied on to put up a
darn' good flght.
Sey. 9151
STAR CAB
c *
Manager: Bob Strain, '33
A    WONDERFUL    DANCE    FLOOR
Bring your party ,and enjoy this
most beautiful spot ... the
grape vinery, which it decorated
with Japanese lanterns, is something unusual in beauty.
A wonderful open fire ovary
evening . . . available for private parties, social msetings,
and dances . . . phone Point
Grey 39.
JUBILEE PARK
SOUTH   MARINE   DRIVE
Directly BlUud
Tht   VnivtnHy
y
y
VANCOUVER'S FINEST BRIDLE i
PATHS AND TRAILS—AWAIT ||
YOUR LEISURE HOURS I
Starting at 33rd—down to Marine—Through the trail to Im- 1
^^   penal treet—then about 300 yards before going into the long   ^^ f\
^■^   trail through the University Area—Up the farm lands—through    p\ U
to 60th Avenue—Down to 10th Avenue. jt
I
May We Have You as Our Guests? U
POINT GREY RIDING ACADEMY |
4100 West 33rd Avenue                        '    Kerr. 2074 |
for him and his team during his
final year.
Up until a day or two ago, you
wouldn't have been able to miss
Barney, for he has been accompanied by a lovely, large, beaming,
purple halo hanging around his left
orb. It was the result of a scrimmage during a recent practice. A
fine way to treat the dictapator of
the team!
WE CANNOT SELL ALL THE GAS-
SO WE ONLY SELL THE BEST!
Trimble Service Garage
10th Avenue and Sasamat ELL. 1551
"WASTE TIME IS LOST TIME"
We pick up and deliver your car
while   you   are   at   your   classes. Friday, October 16, 1936
THE     UBYSSEY
Seven
George Sparling
SPORTING     GOODS
929 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone Trinity 6584
Barging Bardsley
Here's Jimmy Bardsley, "Bugs"
to you. No one seems to know
where Jimmy Bardsley got his
moniker, "Bugs." A good guess
would be that he collected this
tag because of his crazy habit
ot sinking impossible shots on
the basketball floor. After a
year of miracle-playing up in
B, C.'s hinterland, "Bugs" will
again be piling up points for the
Thunderbird melon tossers.
A New European
Dictionary
History One Simplified
For Freshmen
Fascist—having the most speed,
going faster than anything else.
Mosley—An annual shooting meet
held ln England.
Ethiopia—Legendary country in
Africa.
Russia—What a fraternity does.
Mussolini—A kind of sausage.
Not much in demand outside of
Italy.
Enemy—See  Foreigner.
Democracy—A word used quite
often by Mr. Anthony Eden, but
the exact meaning of which has
been lost.
Soviet—As ln "We had no butter, soviet without it."
Eternal Covenant — Temporary
compromise.
8PORT CARD
Football
Varsity vs. Wolves
Athletic Park, 2.15
8oooer
Varsity vs. St. Andrew's
McBride Park, 3 p.m.
Rugby
Varsity vs. All-Blacks
Confederation Park, 2.30
ARTS '39
Bob Smith, as class president,
pep-talked the English 2 members
of Arts '39 yesterday, urging them
to get their tickets as soon as possible for the annual class fiesta.
The party will be held in the Commodore on the 28th of October,
and tickets at one dollar can be
obtained from any member of the
class executive. The ticket sale
will start at noon today when class
members will be harangued from
the foot of the Caf stairs. N
BRIDGMAN'S STUDIO
PHOTOGRAPHY
CHRISTMAS SPECIALS
413 Granville Street       Seymour 1949
VANCOUVER   SUPPLY
COMPANY LIMITED
I I
WHOLESALE GROCERS
i
J
Badminton Tourney
Next Monday
With all the shuttle "birdies"
soaring through the air with that
old accustomed "zip," the U.B.C.
Badmintoners are another of the
campus sports clubs to predict
great doings for the coming year.
The old reliables of last year are
back ln the "racqueteers" folds,
and an encouraging number of newcomers are turning out, so the
Blue and Oold shuttle-smashers
have accordingly planned a big season.
Another reason for the high hopes
for the Badminton lovers, is the
standard of play which has been
shown so tar in the pre-season practices. Oldsters, and recruits alike
are pounding the pill with plenty of
that old fashioned skill, with a
marked improvement in their technique.
The American tournament, which
was scheduled for a week ago, will
come oft this Monday ln the Stud*
ent indoor playground.
President Margot Martin wishes
to remind all those interested to
turn out for practices, as there are
plenty of places to be filled. Also,
the dealres a maximum ot club
members for the first tournament,
Monday.
Golf Tourney
Begins Today
First Round Must
Finish Thursday
Preparations for the Varsity
match play tourney which gets
under way today at the University
links were completed last night
when club prexy Gordie Livingstone picked the partners for the
Friday swing session.
Sixteen competitors will tee off,
among whom are Ward Allen, the
club's top-flight man this year.
Ward has a low net of 77 for the
qualifying round.
Our imported star, Digby Linch,
from Nova Scotia, finds that the Pacific air doesn't interfere with his
usual golf style, for Digby turned
in a very encouraging 79.
Gordie Livingstone points with
pride to his 80, while the Dougs
Maxwell and Gross carded in with
an 82 and 85 respectively.
Intramurali Begin
The dates of three Intra-muVal
games have been announced by Mr.
Van Vliet. On Monday, 19th, an
English rugby team, representing
Arts '38, will meet a team from
Arts '39 on the practice field. The
'game will commence at 2.20 sharp
and all players are requested to
arrive on time.
Two days later, Wednesday, 21st,
fifteens from the ranks of Arts '40
and Science '40 will compete, and
on the following Monday these two
squads will again tangle for the
honour of their dear old olass.
CORRESPONDENCE
Editor, Ubyssey Sports.
Dear Sir:
Having given to the Canadian
Rugby Club my inestimable support
last Saturday I came away with a
strange feeling of oppression , . .
there was no yell section. What
the hell is this place, anyway, a
conglomeration of vacua?
Yours,
DISGUSTS© FRESHETTE.
RADIO SERVICE
CROSBY ELECTRIC
ELECTRICAL C0NTRAT0R3
Establish* 1923
4454 West 10th Elliott 1554
ESTIMATES FREE  TUBE  TE8T
RUOfV PRACTICt 8CHIOULI
Tuesday, 12:16—First team and
any second that want to work
out.
Wednesday, 3:30—All out.
Thursday,   12:16—Workout   for
all undsr Mr. Van Vllst.
Friday, 12:16—Sooond and Third
teams only.
Young Men's
Clothing
Specialists
SUITS and OVERCOATS
Stock or Made-to-Measure
$22t50and up
Set mi for your Tuxido
DEEM »< LONG
498 SEYMOUR, at PENDER
Trinity 2212
WE ARE YOUR  DELIVERY  SERVICE"
B. C. District Tel. and Delivery Co. Ltd.
916 W. HASTINGS STREET       SIYMOUR 9186
Truck, Mitoftftlii Ml Mil MuiMfirs, AvtMli at Ml Tim
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IN8TMT ABO $ FOR 8UGCE88
Price, $1.00 Postpaid
STUDENTS' The books which help you most are those which make you think'
You'll find this your best campus friend!   ON SALE AT ALL BOOK STORES.
KENNETH ROSS
<46 Seymour Street Seymour 4214
WMWWWWWWWWWrVWW^
Corsages  -   «   *  75c<md$l-oo
! We are just as near as your Free delivery within City
I phone.
limits.
j Ritchie Bros, m Grange street Sey. 2045
Make
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd.
Retail Store—556 Seymour St.
Your Headquarters For
ALL SPORTS
Requisites
Phone: DOUGLAS 21
THE GREATEST SALE OF FINE SHOES EVER
ATTEMPTED ANYWHERE
We Offer New Fall Showing Special for Friday and Saturday
"SBIYOST" (English make), In black and brown, Boots and
Oxfords  ff.80 sad 18,50
"flO BKXTZSnm"  (English make), Shoes and Dress Oxford*, ln
calf leathers, at  88.58
"AXD-A-WAUHMV, In kid and black calf Oxfords 8T.50
"▼XMY A.VD OADXUAO," black and brown calf
Oxfords  14.85, $640, $8.50
A Btal mspsat Valus Bsller la Blaok Oxfords j all sizes, 88.85 & 13.85
8K0i marAxm siriinnrv-urn?* k*u loiss, spseui   sao
This is an outstanding value, using only quality leathers that last.
UlinlvllLU GRANVILLE
CLEANING - PRESSING -
ALTERATIONS snd REPAIRS
F. L. ANSCOMBE
Note New Addrsuf
4433—10th AVE. WEST
ELL. 1540
I Public Stenographer |
t Nsat, Accurate Work •
I  At Popular Lending Library   |
24489 W. 10th AVENUE       P. G. 67|
»*4*M*****»****»*»*»*4#
SASAMAT BARBER
SHOP
Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Haircutting
4473—10th AVE. WEST
The Hotel Niagara's
SEASON
SCHEDULE
POPULAR SPORTS
AND HOTELMAN
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
October 17th—VARSITY vs. V. A. C. at Athletic Park
October 21st-NORTH VANCOUVER vs. MERALOMA
at Athletic Park
October 24th—VARSITY vs. MERALOMA at Athletic
Park
October 28th-V. A. C. vs. NORTH VANCOUVER at
Athletic Park
October 31st—MERALOMA vs. V. A. C. at Athletic
Park
ENGLISH FOOTBALL
Saturday, October 17th—VARSITY vs. NORTH SHORE
ALL BLACKS at North Shore
Saturday, October 24th-VARSITY vs. ROWING CLUB
at Varsity Stadium
• PHIL FORAN •
After an absence of several months in the South it affords
me great pleasure to announce that from this date I
will be permanently located in Vancouver, and look forward to renewing old friendships again.
Saturday, October 31—VARSITY vs. OCCASIONALS at Brockton Point Oval
Saturday, November 7th—VARSITY vs. OCCASIONALS at Varsity Stadium
Wednesday, November 11th—VARSITY vs. VANCOUVER  REP.   (McKechnie  Cup)
Brockton Point Oval
at
Drop around to the HOTEL NIAGARA and say HELLO!
The address is —
HOTEL NIAGARA m MB" "
Saturday, November Nth—VARSITY vs. ROWING CLUB at Brockton Point Oval
Saturday, November 21st—VARSITY vs. NORTH SHORE ALL BUCKS at Brockton Point
Oval
Saturday, November 28th—VARSITY vs. NORTH SHORE ALL BLACKS at Brocktoin Point
Oval
Saturday, December 5th—VARSITY vs. VICTORIA REP. (McKechnie Cup) at Victoria
NOTICE! Through the kindness and co-operation of the management of the
Hotel Niagara this schedule is presented. As the schedule will not be published
again We suggest your clipping out, and retaining the complete listings. n&
TH5    U | YSSIY
Friday, October 16, 1935
GENUINE VALUES!
'26 Pontiac Coupe, good condition $85
'29 Ford Coach—Overhauled $195
'30 Ford Coach—Perfect $295
'29 Essex Sedan—Good  $195
'31 Ford Town Sedan—Vox«y nice $395
'31 Hup. Coupe—Rumble Seat
Special  $475
'33 Terraplane Sedan, very good $575
'36 Dodge Touring Sedan, as new $995
CURTIS MOTORS  LIMITED
(Dodge Dealers)
1396 Granville St. Trinity 1071
Cor. Pacific and Granville
Open Evenings
Phonss Trinity 4402, Fairmont 3034
UPTOWN   MARKET:   IURRARD   AT   GEORGIA
MEREDITH   MOTORS
CHEAPER THAN  CARFARE
CHEVROLET TOURING $35.00
ESSEX COACH  ITO.00
»20 PLYMOUTH CABRIOLET 1^95.00
(Rumble Seat)
WHIPPET COUPE (»29), R.S $195.00
ESSEX COACH  $225.00
TORD COACH  ('30) $265.00
flHEVROLET COACH      120.1.00
Distributors WILLYS 77 (Daddy.of '
Em All!
•
'30 FORD ROADSTER
'26 DODGE SEDAN
'29 OLDS. SEDAN
'31 FORD SPECIAL TUDOR
'30 CHRYSLER 6 SEDAN
'31 CHRYSLER 6 SEDAN
'34 DODGE SEDAN
Terms - Cars Wanted for Cash • Trades
F. H. YEOMANS
1057 West Georgia Street       Trinity 121
You'll Be Rite at Roy's!
'81 Ford Coach $285
'30 Ford Coupe   $215
'29 Ford Roadster  $125
'27 Chevrolet Coupe  $95
'29 Pontiac Coach   $215
'28  Oakland  Sedan       ]' $165
'27 Star Roadster   $$5
'32 Ford V8 Tudor .'....$895
'33 Chevrolet Master Sedan  $595
'33 Ford De Luxe Roadster $475
ROY'S USED CAR SALES LTD.
TRADES HIGH. 2216   TERMS
Cor. 4th Ave. & Commercial Open evenings
ARMOUR-SANDS MOTOR Co.
1352 GRANVILLE STREET
'31 NASH SEDAN $475
'30 ESSEX SEDAN  $325
'29 ESSEX SEDAN $250
'28 CHEVROLET COACH  ..$185
'27 BUICK SEDAN  $150
DURANT 4  Pas.  COUPE '$65
BUICK  TOURING   $50
FORD T'S $25 Jp
CASH      TERMS      TRADES
Trinity 747
JOHNSTON'S
Economical Transportation for
the University Student
1924 Hupmobile Roadster $60
1929 Whippet 4 Coupe $245
1929 Whippet 4 Sedan $275
1927 Essex Sedan $125
1926 Star Sedan  $75
1927 Ford T Coach $25
1927 Chevrolet Coach $95
1929 Ford A Coach $185
1928 Ford A Coach $145
TERMS TO SUIT
JOHNSTON MOTOR
COMPANY LIMITED
Main at 7th Ave.      Granville at 9th Ave.
Fairmont 424 Bayview 9107
U CANNOT DO BETTER THAN TO
B UY ONE OF THESE USED CARS
C US FIRST FOR VALUES—AND TERMS
1925 Packard Sedan ..$125.00
1931 Essex Coach $350.00
1929 Chevrolet Sedan $195.00
1928 Essex Coupe $135.00
20 OTHERS TO CHOOSE FROM
1929 Chrysler Coupe $345.00
1928 Graham Coupe.$295.00
1929 Essex Coupe $295.00
1925 Chevrolet Coach... $75.00
Varsity Students are cordially invited to view the
New 1937 Chevrolets, to be on display at our
Show Room on or about November 7th, 1936.
MCDERMOTT MOTORS LTD.
ff
The Home of Chevrolet"
1200 WEST GEORGIA, AT BUTE
OPEN EVENINGS
SEYMOUR 2348
100 CARS TO
CHOOSE FROM
'36 Plymouth De Luxe Sedan. Special $1075
35 Ford De Luxe Sedan $695
'36 Plymouth De Luxe Coupe $945
'34  Chevrolet De Luxe Coach $590
'33  Ford  Sedan Special $495
'32  Chevrolet  Coach  $475
'31 Chrysler 6 Sedan $495
'30 Chrysler 77 Sedan $450
'31 Chevrolet Coupe $425
'31 Chevrolet R. S. Roadster $395
'30  Pontiac  Sedan » ...$325
'29 Plymouth Coupe $285
'29  Graham  Coupe   $275
'31   Ford   Coach  $275
'29  Chevrolet  Sedan $275
'28 Ford Touring         $125
'28   Essex   Sedan $135
EASY TERMS
CAMPBELL MOTORS Limited
Plymouth and Chrysler Dealers
Intersection: MAIN and KINGSWAY
Open Evenings Till 9
FAIRMONT 6604
Take advantage of the
Used Car Values
advertised in this section
FROWNS   TURN   TO   SMILES   as you drive m one of our Guaranteed Used Cars
ALWAYS BETTER VALUES
because two of Vancouver's leading automobile dealers have joined forces to give the best in
used car merchandise and service to be had in this city. Buy with confidence from
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Owned and Operated by
CONSOLIDATED Motor Co. Ltd.      and     DAN McLEAN Motor Co. Ltd.
Dependable Used Cars
at low prices are offered
by these advertisers
England Ahoy! College Boys
Hob Nob With Pesky Steers
By DAVE KINLOCH
1 am aware that my bunk is being shaken vigorously; a voice with
the coarsest ot Glasgow accents,
booms out, "Alright boys, it's four
thirty." I open my eyes to find
myself in an upper bunk In a small
cabin, about ten feet by twelve,
and I see that it contains eight
other sleepy figures in various
stages of getting up. I climb down
from my perch, throw on an extra
sweater, down a cup of steaming
hot liquid which has a faint smell
of coffee and tastes like Waterman's best blue-back, and wander
out on deck,
And then the inexorable voice
again. "Come on, come on, get
below and water those cattle,"
and, aa I go down the hatch,
"Goddam college education, the
only thing they can do Is stand
around like a bunch of gowks and
watch the sunrise."
We go below where the cattle,
four hundred of them, are penned
in rows; it is hot and stuffy there
and it smells. We start work from
the stern of the boat which seems
to be going around in a Jarge circle.
Some of us feel sick, some of us
are. Then we begin watering, carrying two buckets each along a
deck that feels like the back of an
elephant at full gallop. We slop
half the water into our boots and
the steers put their feet in the
rest, or upset It with their noses.
There is wild cursing, and inquisitive bovine noses receive vicious
kicks; wide and vaguely reproachful eyes stare at us as we try to
teach each animal which bucket is
whose.
SOUR PORRIDGE
The watering, our most unpleas
ant task, finished, we shake out a
feed of hay. This is a short job
and soon we return to our cabin,
soaking wet from the knees down
and covered in hay dust from head
to foot,  to snatch half an hour's
SAVE AT WALSH'S  $  SAVE AT WALSH'S  $  SAVE
<
3
U.B.C. CAR OWNERS
You can sure save money on all your
AUTO PARTS at
WALSH'S  AUTO  WRECKING  CO.
1127 GRANVILLE STREET SEYMOUR 7297
COME  IN AND LOCK AROUND
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sleep before breakfast. We are
awakened by the clinking of tin
plates and find the inevitable chiz-
zler helping himself to the best and
largest share. We persuade our irritated stomachs to accept sour porridge and tough beefsteak (not my
favorite breakfast food) and sleep
again until nine.
Our next job begins easily. We
sweep the decks and spread oats;
this takes us about half an hour,
but after it is done we find we are
expected to pull hay and grain out
of the hatches to supply us for
the next day. This is strenuous
work, but it is also a preventative
and cure for seasickness. My gang
finish this in good time and expect
to be dismissed, but Alec, our foreman, has labor-saving ideas; he
thinks that if we distribute sacks
and bales at strategic points along
the deck it will save us both time
and labor tomorrow. The fact that
he is going to make us do the same
thing tomorrow and every day after
doesn't seem to occur to him.
UNUSUAL  FOOD
We go back to the cabin for dinner at eleven-twenty and eat more
beef in various forms, or interesting dishes of unknown composition
or decomposition. We lounge
around until two, when we start
watering again. Another meal arrives at half-past four; we sweep
up at six and are free for the rest
of the evening. Two things can
happen in the evening; either we
go to bed early, or we play poker.
If we play poker, as we often do,
some of us come to blows about
who owes somebody sixpence.
In this manner we live for at
least nine days. We are seasick,
uncomfortably   dirty   (some   of   us
seem to enjoy this), and badly fed.
We are pushed around and sworn
at by irate cattle foremen and the
sweepings of the Manchester waterfront. We are considered to be
inferior to the nigger stokers. Why
do we do it? Because it is a cheap
method of getting to England and
back, and because it is one job you
can't walk out on. It has one advantage too — it is the only job
where you can call your foreman a
S-O-B without getting fired.
—Queens Journal.
•"BEAR IN MIND-
—tbe car in rugged condition it tbe car that it
cheap to run,"
-WALLY ARTHUR
WEST POINT
GREY GARAGE
4378 West 10th Avenue
Phone: Pt. Grey 560
What Can
A Professor
Profess ?
There are three possible answers,
He may refrain from saying that
he believes, in which case he is
worthless. He may honestly and
frankly state his conclusions on the
problems he has studied, and win
the disapproval of the pseudo patriots. Thirdly, he may state only
part ot his conclusions (those which
will offend none of the controlling
interests in society), which is misrepresentation and  dishonesty.
This places the poor professor in
a terrible predicament. The first
alternative is not only unworthy
but impossible; even when an instructor selects a textbook he is
stating his belief that the book is
worth reading and he must give
his opinion of it. The second position is the most desirable but apparently the least practical. The
only thing left for him is to present tactfully only part of his
views.
Students should be aware of this
and co-operate with their instructors. . . . When a professor does
have courage, we should be careful
not to misrepresent or misquote
him. We need also to determine
which of the three possible positions the instructor is taking and
evaluate his teachings accordingly.
—Washington  State Evergreen.
SIGN YOUR
TOTEM
WAIVER
TODAY
The Accounts
of tha
Faculty and
Students
of the University of
British Columbia
are welcomed.
MNKOF
MONTREAL
Established 1817
WEST POINT GREY BRANCH
4458 10th Avenue W«st
A. 6. MOORE, Manager
Total Assets m Excess of $800,000,000

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