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The Ubyssey Nov 20, 1924

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 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 20th, 1924
No. 8
XMAS CONCERT
PROVES VERY
SUCCESSFUL
Musical Society Maintains C
High Standard K/OS^
The ninth annual Christmas concert
of the University Musical Society, given last Saturday evening in the King
Edward High School auditorium,
proved a decided success and delighted the large audience of students and
members of the general public who
were fortunate enough to be present.
The most impressive numbers, those
of the Glee Club, were especially enjoyed, from the opening number,
Lohr's "Slumber Song," to the capable, refined and yet spirited rendering of Alfred Gaul's "Daybreak." A
sympathetic and careful treatment of
Gaynor's delicate "Slumber Boat" won
great favor with the audience and was
repeated. Modulation, control and an
excellent tempering of tone, in which
the men's alto section were especially
commendable, made for artistic and
distinctive effects in these offerings.
The men's section, as in previous
years, had to make up in quality for
a noticeable lack of volume.
The Orchestra, though handicapped
by a scarcity of wind and a contrasting abundance of violins, yet achieved
pleasing effects, as that of flow and
precision by careful attention to the
peculiar rhythm of Luigini's "Egyptian Ballets," and brightness and fire
in two numbers from "L'Arlesienne"
of Dizet. Mr. Wilbur Grant, the Society's excellent conductor, obtained
prompt response to his skilful guidance.
The work of assisting student musicians was of particularly high standard this year. Miss Rose Marin captivated her audience with a brilliant
interpretation of Max Vogrich's "Staccato Caprice" and an almost fllawless
rendering of the well-known "Lieb-
straum." Almost equally popular was
the spirited playing of Robyn's "Pan-
quita," a violin-clarinet-flute trio, given by Messrs. Kania, Lucas and Todd.
A novel and very pleasing duet arrangement of Lieurance's popular nature study, "By the Waters of Minnet-
onka," was sung by Miss Kathleen
Baird and Mr. Carl Barton, the combined violin and piano accompaniment
adding greatly to the charm of the
arrangement. A violin duet, Labitz-
ki's "The Herd Girl's Dream," by
Miss Alice Metz and Mr. J. Kania,
proved a very intelligent and graceful
rendering of an ever-popular number.
Solo numbers were also given with
such success as to require encores.
Miss Gertrude Dowsley, pianist, contributed the Schubert-Liszt transcription of "Hark, Hark, the Lark," and
Miss Lillian Reid, soprano, Alex. Mac-
Fadyen's "Love is the Wind," while
Miss Alice Metz also rendered a "Pierrot Serenade" of Randegger. The
work of Miss Dowsley as accompanist
to the Orchestra, and Miss Ida Kerr,
for the Glee Club, was also especially
commendable.
In spite of the scarcity of student
tenors and wind-instrument players,
the'Society have been able to present
an excellent concert.
Rating for varsity on Monday
james Craig
Next Monday evening the most important event in this University debating history will take place, when
three of the best U. B. C. student-
speakers will join with veteran debaters from the University of Oxford in
a battle of words and wits on the
most comprehensive and important
economic question of the day, "Capitalism vs. Socialism."
Every live student in this University
will be there.
Apart from the pleasure and the
profit of attendance, it is only fair to
our speakers, that we turn out en
masse. They have been preparing
steadily for weeks past in an endeavor
to   bring   their   arguments   up   to   a
MURRAY HUNTER
standard worthy of comparison with
the high level of Oxford oratory. They
have sacrificed both study and recreation. They have tackled the labor
of preparatory debates with local and
Victoria teams during the last month
in order to receive all the practice
possible before the big night arrived.
Surely we can spare a couple of
hours to go and add moral support
and confidence by our numbers.
A debate of this kind is one of the
outstanding events in the scholastic
activities of any University. It is
even more than usually unique in its
importance at U. B. C, since we are,
this year, almost isolated from intercollegiate debates.
SUSUMJp KOBE
If you go to any happening in your
University, don't miss this.
It will be no one-sided affair. Our
speakers are not inexperienced and
have built up excellent reputations for
themselves during past years as well
as in the last month. The Oxford system mixes the speakers of both colleges, anyway. A hot and even battle
is inevitable.   Don't miss it.
Even if you don't give a hoot about
economic problems—or about college
spirit—for that matter, don't miss this
opportunity of listening to distinguished Englishmen with brilliant records
for power, fire and finish in their
oratory.
Get your tickets before it's too late!
VAkSITY ORATORS
i/DEFEAT VICTORIA
Preliminary Try-Out Successful
On Friday evening last, by a very
close margin, the Varsity debaters defeated Victoria College. The subject
was the same as for the Oxford debate, "Resolved that this meeting go
on record as being in favor of the introduction of a practical form of socialism."
V.^B. C/was represented^ by Messrs.
;sl#raig, Susumu tKftbe and Eric
D/EnT-wfeHe   fh"e   Victoria leam   con
sisted of Messrs. Harry Dee, Harold
Blackett, and Raymond Bowers. For
U. B. C, Craig was especially good,
both in delivery, and in method of
handling his arguments. Bowers was
the pick of Victoria College. His delivery was excellent, making him outstanding in a team of capable debaters.
The debate was arranged with a
view to giving Messrs. Craig and Kobe
an opportunity to discover the probable line of argument which would be
advanced against them by Oxford, and
(Continued on Page 2)
VARSITY RUGBY
J^ltN VICTORIOUS
Both Teams Boost Average
TJ. B. C. scored seven points with
no" respon?e"Trom the pfcJ^g n-oorgg
fifteen^-<nd the Varsity squad and the
Xoirng Liberals, battled to a three^TT
tie in a rugby double-header staged
at the Brockton oval last Saturday.
Ramsell turned in a stellar performance for the winners and scored the
first touch for the Blue and Gold.
.Hal Gwyther then put the U. B. C.
fifteen up another four points when
he put over a pretty field goal from
twenty yards out. It was a splendid
effort as Gwyther had several men on
top of him at the time. Both the
U. B. C. and the ex-King George outfits were minus the services of many
of their regulars and this resulted in
rather a mediocre exhibition of the
winter pastime.
Varsity did well to hold the Politicians to a tie in the second encounter
for the  Young Liberals  stand pretty
(Continued on Page 2)     i
S. C. M. HEARS
^EAN COLEMAN
Miss Rutherford Also Speaks
The S. C. M. held two meetings during the past week, one on Sunday and
the other last Monday. At the former
meeting, Dean Coleman gave a short,
intimate talk on the problems of
higher education and religion, emphasizing his points by examples
drawn from his own life. He showed
that the problems the student is required to face to-day are not in any
fundamental way different from those
of his own student days. He claimed
that the most important tool necessary
in studying any such problem, whether
that of religion or economics, of capital
and labor or world peace, was sincerity.
After Dean Coleman's address, Miss
Rutherford, Canadian Secretary of
the S. C. M., lead a discussion on the
subject, "What is Religion?"
Miss Rutherford proved both a capable discussion leader and a finished
(Continued on Page 2) THE   UBYSSEY
November 20th, 1924
Skating Shoes and
Hockey Goods
We have just received a new shipment of
select Skating: Shoes and Skates.   A large
variety to choose from.
MEN'S PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY
SHOES-With sewn-in webb ankle
supports.   Regular d* A   AC
$8.50.   Special    $4,270
BOYS' BLACK BOX KIP HOCKEY
SHOES-Special, d»6 QC
per pair    ^pO.«79
GIRLS' BLACK BOX KIP HOCKEY
SHOES—Special. d»0  QC
per pair    «pO.»7«J
LADIES' BLACK BOX KIP HOCKEY
SHOES-Special. ft>A   C(\
per pair    •ipT'.iJv
LADIES' TAN BOX KIP HOCKEY
SHOES-Special. d»C  ftft
per pair    «p«J.vrv»
MEN'S BLACK BOX KIP HOCKEY
SHOES-Special, d»E  C(\
per pair    «ptJ.»J\/
LADIES' AUTO SKATES —A very
popular skate. ^£^  (^fl
Per pair     ip*J.iJ\J
LADIES' or MEN'S TUBE SKATES—
Special. &A   OC
per pair    ip^.%J%J
PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY STICKS-
earehe.3' $1.00 AND $1.25
BOYS'   HOCKEY   STICKS — Prices :
15c, 25c, 50c, 75c
David Spencer
Limited
LUNCH      TEA      SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nova Scotia
Oxford Debaters
J     Stumped by Menu
Freshies—don't neglect your French,
you may need it some day. This is
no platitude, but an actual fact—the
bitter experience of the team that
went over to Victoria last week.
Of the trio that went to Victoria,
Kobe was the only one to wake up
early enough to get his breakfast in
Vancouver. Imagine, therefore, the
feelings of both Craig and Dunn when
they discovered that the C. P. R. lunch
menu was printed in French. Now
Kobe's French was "non est," Craig's
a thing of the past, and Dunn's wholly
inadequate.
The result therefore was a wordy
debate (not on the original program)
as to the comparative merits of Beef
au Gumbo, and Epigramme de Lamb.
All speakers were slightly, though not
appreciably handicapped by the fact
that they had not the slightest idea
what they were talking about.
Eventually, in order to prevent that
sinking feeling, the epigramme won
out.
In French, we afterwards found out,
Epigram means "finish." It shows
that the French are not such awful
fools after all.
That epigram was almost the finish
of its victims. In fact we have it on
unreliable authority that the C. P. R.
was bribed by Victoria College.
Therefore, little freshies, learn
French, lest you, when you debate
against Victoria College next spring
(if you do), should fall premature and
innocent victims of the Epigramme,
or even Beef au Gumbo, whatever
that is.
(This advertisement not published
or displayed by the French department of the University of B. C)
^      Varsity Rugby
(Continued from Page 1)
high in the league table. The latter
game was a big improvement on the
former, there being considerably more
team-work on the part of both teams.
The Liberals had the edge throughout
the fracas and were somewhat unlucky not to get better than a tie with
the collegians. Purdy scored the Varsity's points on a free kick from the
two-bit line. Farmer scored the Liberal try and was given a big hand-out
by the crowd for his effort.
SWEATERS
Every  Thursday, Noon
Lit.  and   Scientific
ENGLISH
GABARDINES
Combine Style and Utility
to a Rare Degree
They are windproof and showerproof; light in weight,
but warm. These coats are tailored with convertible
collars, raglan sleeves, slash pockets and full belts.
They are offered with full wool check linings or
quarter silk lined, and come in Olive, Fawn, Drab or
Blue. All sizes, extra special flj "| ^ ^ JJ*
value at only    -----    %fj J_  / % / -]\J
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
45-47-49 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
Successful Smoker
y   Staged by Science
The Science Men held their annual
Smoker last Friday night, at Dominion Hall. The smoker was opened by
The Dean, and after a few short stories
by the profs, the Science Quartette
rendered a selection or two. Two boxing bouts were the next event on the
program and were very much appreciated.
Refreshments came next and cheese
and crackers, with beer or cider or
both were indulged in.
Mr. Ray McLaren, ex-Science '25,
gave several caricatures of various
profs, and was very much enjoyed.
To wind up the program all the men
gathered round the piano and sang all
the good old college songs.
\^ Victoria Debate
^     (Continued from Page 1)
to discover what were the defects in
their  own case, if  any.
After the debate, the teams were
the guests at a supper party given by
Miss Cann, head of the department
of English at Victoria College.
Victoria sends its best wishes with
Messrs. Kobe and Craig in the Oxford debate next Monday. In view of
the importance of the debate, Victoria College will be sending over representatives  to  root for U.  B. C.
There are still a few tickets left
for the big debate. These may be
obtained, reserved, $1.00, unreserved,
50c, from Hilton Moore, Arts "26
^
S. C. M. Meetings
(Continued from Page 1)
and interesting speaker.
On Monday, Miss Rutherford spoke
again, describing her experiences in
Europe during the past summer while
attending various Student Christian
Movement and European Student Relief Conferences. The lecture was
greatly enjoyed by all who attended.
,  JROWING CLUB
Thel/Varsity Rowing Club, as was
mentioned last week, is in action
again. At the beginning of the term
there was some talk of Rowing being
dropped for this year on account of
a demand for the full yearly fee from
Varsity participants. The difficulty
was arranged to the full satisfaction
of everyone by Professor Harry Let-
son, who is a senior member of the
Vancouver Rowing Club. On account
of his successful efforts Varsity rowers are now accorded full club privileges at the old fee of $10.00, and the
Club is looking forward to a very successful year.
X
SMOKER
Tickets for the smoker to be given
in honor of the Oxford debators, will
be distributed at the Literary and
Scientific Office, Monday noon. As
there are only one hundred tickets it
will be best to  come early.
The smoker will take place Wednesday, October 26th.
>
Under the auspices of the Faculty
Women's Club an illustrated lecture on
Flemish Art will be given by Dr.
Mack Eastman in the Physics Lecture
Room, on Monday, December 1st, at
8.15 p.m. All students are invited to
attend and to bring their friends. A
silver collection will be taken at the
door.
Have you made sure that you will
be able to attend THE BIG EVENT of
the College Year? If not, get your
tickets before it is too late, and follow
the crowd to the OXFORD DEBATE,
next Monday night.
A Saving
Suggestion!
Buy 6 or more
GEHRKE
CHRISTMAS  CARDS
before December 1st and
Save 25%
This offer refers to assorted
Autograph Cards only.
The discount cannot be allowed
after November 30th.
Shop More the Month
Before at
GEHRKE'S ^
651 SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GRANTHAMS
IRealFruitJuiceI
party punch
PURE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C. GRANTHAM A CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue Weet
VANCOUVER. B.C.
B.C. Public Stenographers
  FOR 	
ACCURACY AND INTELLIGENT WORK
115 Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Phone, Sey. 2696 602 Hastings St., W.
ORPHEUM   THEATRE   HAS GOOD
BILL
>ening with a matinee Thursday
at 2.20, this weeks bill of Vaudeville
at the Orpheum looks like a record
breaker. The headliner, Paul White-
mans S. S. Leviathan Orchestra, created a furore last season all over the
circuit, and should prove the hit of the
present season. Mr. Emmett O'Mara,
the silver toned tenor of the Metropolitan and Boston Opera Companies,
respectively, is featured soloist with
the organization this season.
Ope
Tie
BASKETBALL
ie first of a series of basketball
dances is staged for Saturday, November 22nd at Normal Gym. Two exhibition games are carded to precede
the dance: the first at 7 p.m., features
the Senior "A" Women, and in the
second. Senior "A" men meet the
strong Mission team. Dancing, 9:30
to 12:00; a three-piece orchestra supplying the music. Hot-dogs and
candy will be sold by the co-eds. Other
such dances will probably be put on
Alterta, Portland and Bellingham,
after Christmas as the University of
have asked for games. Everyone out
to the first game.   What!
Prof, (to Honor Student): Are you
doing any outside reading?
Honor Student: Oh, yes. I buy the
Star every evening while waiting for
the street car. November 20th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
Overcoat Time !
WE NEVER HAD A BETTER ASSORTMENT OF MEN'S OVERCOATS THAN
WE ARE SHOWING THIS SEASON,OR
AT SUCH REASONABLE PRICES.
TURPIN BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST.
u. b. a
Class Dance !
So many students from the
U. B. C. learn here that last
week a student thought we
had a special class from the
Varsity. We have taught hundreds of students this yearfrom
the TJ. B. C, and, believe me,
they are some dancers.
Ask Bruce about our short
course for beginners, or our
new steps for advanced dancers
Terms: Pay a little at a
time, if you wish.
VAUGHN MOORE
Private Dancing School
518 HASTINGS ST., W.        Seymour 707
DRINK—
"SQUEEZE"
Grape, Lemon,
Lime and Orange
a;
Bottled by
THORPES'
^.(■Inl.M-t"*^-!-*"!"!**1'*"*"*"!"***.!1
.H*
DanGingClasses
Adult Beginner Class, Monday
SATURDAY   EVENING  SOCIAL
DANCE (by Invitation)
Private Lessons by Appointment
i
Seymour 1689 '
The  LESTER   Academy j
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
  WE STOCK	
Varsity and Science
Pennants
SWEATERS made to order in
any color or design, at specially
low prices to students.
SKATES        SKATING BOOTS
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653     718 ROBSON ST.
SPORT NEWS
SENIOR SOCCER
MEN WIN AGAIN
Varsity fought their way up another notch in the .First ^Pivision^
League table when they tooktnTT"
North Shore United into camp by a
3-2 seunj at the Athletic Park enclosure last Saturday. The game was
hard fought as the score indicated,
and in the first stanza it looked as
though the North Van eleven were
going to grab two points at the Varsity's expense. But Chubb Arnott's
huskies staged a great comeback in
the last period, and due to two brilliant goals scored by Rex Cameron
and Tanny Butler, and to stellar defence tactics, the students emerged
on the long end of the score.
Shooting down hill in the first canto
the suburbanites had it all over Varsity, and their sharpshooters bombarded King from all angles whilst
Lavery, the North Van. custodian, was
stamping his feet to keep warm. The
efforts of the losers vanguard were
at length rewarded when Thompson
scored on a pot shot, that appeared to
catch King unawares. With only a
few minutes left Auchinvole received
the ball and sent in a shot that was
going wide, but the North Shore back
came to his assistance and deflected
the ball from his head into the net,
completely fooling Lavery who expected the pigskin at the other end
of the goal.
After the interval Varsity came to
life, and in only a few minutes Rex
Cameron eluded Lawn and Mclnnis,
and scored with a shot that had Lavery
beaten to a standstill.
After this reverse the North siders
redoubled their efforts and end to end
play was the order of the day for the
rest of the fracas. Russell brought
the stands to their feet when he beat
King with a fast low shot and tied
the count. But in only a short time
Tanny Butler scored the winning goal
for Varsity when he connected with a
beautiful cross sent over by Emery.
Varsity's defence worked overtime
to keep the losers forwards out and
did so in a most effective manner.
Crute and Phillips were outstanding.
Baker and Ledingham bottled up the
right wing forwards very nicely whilst
Butler, Buckley and Cameron proved
to be good mud larks. Emery and
Wilkinson formed an effective left
wing in the last half. Auchinvole has
a wicked shot when he gets the chance
but he needs feeding.
Clope Game Saturday
Lalst Saturday at the Y. M. C. A.
Varsity Senior A beat the Westminster
YTh the most thrilling game of the
season. With only one minute to go
the Royals were one point up when
"Dad" Hartley, Varsity's centre scored
the winning basket from centre floor.
The game ended with the score 22-21.
Varsity had the game mostly in their
own hands in the first period. Hartley
was in fine form and was largely responsible for the success of the U. B.
C. team. The second half saw Westminster staging a rally; they almost
pulled the game from the fire. The
closing moments of the game found
both teams fighting strenuously for
the lead.
In winning last Saturday's game,
Varsity showed a reversal of their
poor form displayed the previous week.
If they continue their splendid team
work they should give the other teams
a run for the championship.
SPORT READING
MADE EASIER
Varsity football teams had a good
week-end. The U. B. C. Miller Cup
squad improves greatly "on their
league standing, and the weakened
Varsity fifteen did well to tie the
Politicians in the absence of Lange
and Brock. Varsity's first soccer
eleven exceeded expectations when
they beat the North Shore Elks, as the
suburtanites have a very strong team.
Brit Brock might well be called
"Grit_^_J3rock as he went on playing
with a broken rib in the Thanksgiving
McKechnie Cup encounter. Lange was
taking chances also as he developed
blood poisoning symptons before the
game which later necessitated his removal to the hospital. Both Brock and
Lange will be out of the game for
about a month or so, but should be
available for the next McKechnie
game.
Team work is most desirable in any
sport, but you've got to hand it to the
individual player when he wins a game
for his team. "Dad" Hartley turned
in a stellar performance in a Senior
"A" basketball game last Saturday,
and won the game by a single point
when he scored with only a few seconds to go.
Canadian rugby enthusiasts met last
week and judging by the interest
shown, the game should get a hold
here this year. There is no reason
why the followers of the English code
should be antagonistic to the game
that is played by all the big Universities in Canada. Both games should
be able to get along allright together
at U. B. C. and if the majority still
want to play English rugby, the Canadian game will continue to be a
minor sport. But the club should be
recognized by the Men's Athletics. If
it is not recognized the new game is
not getting a fair show.
Defeat For Seconds
The Varsity second soccer eleven
was handed an artistic 3-1 trimming
by the S. C. Electric team at Trimble
Park on"""Saturday. U. B. C. has no
alibis to offer.
Despite the fact that for three
quarters of the first half the B. C.
Electric squad never got beyond
centre, the Varsity forward line failed
to score, passing up opportunities
galore. This more than anything contributed to the latter's defeat.
Whenever the car men came near
the U. B. C. goal they were dangerous,
their centre half and centre forward
starred. Nowcombe worked hard on
the forward line as did Alsbury. Half
time found the score sheet blank.
At the beginning of second half
Varsity started off in a reformed manner and McLuckie soon scored prettily
for the first count of the game. This
lead, however, was short lived for
Sweeten, the opposing centre, soon put
the teams on even terms with a long
shot that Sutherland did not even attempt to handle. Warden and Robertson made it 3-1, when they miskicked
on   two   occasions   in   front   of  goal.
First Freshette—"Has Bill ever kissed you?"
Second Ditto—"N-n-n-no."
First Ditto—"He kissed me too."—
Grinnell Malteases.
New
Brushed
Wool
Sweaters
X
Suitable
for
Skating
Wear
X
As Pictured
$5.95
—In the Sports Shop
Third Floor
•~i&*
LIMITED
575 Granville St.
y'y+j* y *y V yyy^y^
pOLLIN'PiN
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
■*$> *** »|< »$H%HJ
A Special
Basket Ball !
1020 has a speciality in the
Basket Ball made specially
for us in Scotland. It is of
tough Highland pelt, built on
an American model and costs
much less than the ordinary
kind.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1 AOA  GRANVILLE
1UZU STREET
Mb. THE   UBYSSEY
November 20th, 1924
©tie llbgfifipg
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued every  Thursday  by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural Subscription,  $2.00 per
Session.
For Advertising Rates, apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITORIAL STAPF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange Editor John  Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy   Editor   •_ Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, Robert
Wright, G. W. Ashworth, James Dunn,
Dave Taylor, T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmick, Peter  Palmer.
BUSINESS STAFX*
Business Manager H. A. Thompson
Circulation  Manager E.   J.  Eades
Business Asststants....H.  G. McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F. McCulloch
EDITOR   FOB   THE   WEEK
Earle  Birney
A   RES ACADEMICAE
Closer attention to studies seems to
have been the keynote of this term.
Students of the University are gradually beginning to realize just what a
University is for, thanks to the many
warnings of the faculty and the Students' Council.
Sports and other activities should,
and do, play a great part in our lives
at college—but they should never be
placed before studies. Unfortunately
during the_ past few years, such has
been the case, and the result has invariably been a large Christmas withdrawal of incompetent students.
According to all signs, the exodus
should be considerably smaller this
year than in any other. The library
is packed day and evening, many being unable to procure seats, and the
general interest displayed in lectures
has been greater than usual. The
Freshman class appears to be working hard, the wearers of the green oc-
.cupying a good half of the available
library accommodation.
It is only fair to our hard working
professors that this blessed state
should continue—and it is up to ourselves to see that it does.
 •♦.	
JPHE COMING ORDEAL
The posting of examination timetables has awakened even the sleepiest student to the fact that Christmas
exams are less than three weeks distant. There is a general atmosphere
of work and worry on the campus,
and penitent students are punishing
themselves with large overdoses of
study.
However laudable may be the spirit
that prompts such application to duty,
there is no necessity for the large
number of worried faces and impending nervous breakdowns that make
semi-aunual appearances. As exams
approach, evidences of sleepless ights
and worn nerves are too apparent and
during the actual period of writing,
the usual prevalent cold in which conscientious students feel called upon
to indulge, adds to the general attractiveness of the student body.
While we are not as dismayed as
we may appear at the actually noticeable loss of beauty, we feel that we
may take upon ourselves the responsibility of giving fatherly advice about
the needless strain that students impose on themselves. The one time
of the year when the best possible
care of the health should be taken
is the month of the exams. No student can do his best on a paper
unless he is physically fit—in most
exams good health is as great an
asset as a knowledge of the subject,
and having the ability to think abso
lutely clearly while writing a paper
is a good start towards obtaining high
marks.
Cramming and extra studying are
necessary evils, and most young human beings can stand them twice a
year without any great harm. But
while they are working unusually hard
and under an unusual strain, students
should try to take every precaution
to keep themselves in the best possible shape for the approaching turmoil.
What Other Editors Say
>
INSIPIDUS
"Rotten!" says Insipidus, as he rolls
his juicy eyes from the scene of a
blundered pass on the gridiron.
"Terrible!" says Insipidus, as he
grunts in protest against the antics of
the yell squad.
"Pierce!" says Insipidus, as he
languidly peruses the editorial efforts
of a fellow-undergraduate.
Who is this Insipidus?
He might be you—or your brother—
or your brother's friend.
He is the individual who is forever
and aye finding fault—not the constructive critic, the leader, the worker, mind
you, but the lackadaisical loafer, the
pest, the chap with the "charming
personality" whose ambition lies dormant beneath the stagnant scrum of
laziness.
He likes to be noticed. He craves
limelight. He attains his end by destructive criticism, by yelling "Rotten!"
He hasn't any ideas which might
help leaders in activities to change.
He just yells, "Rotten!" He yells it
upon every and any occasion—so that
he may be noticed.
How can he be obliterated?
Sit upon him; close his babbling,
blithering mouth with a well-aimed cut
to the right; stamp on him. Prove to
him your disapproval by hard, vigorous action, verbal or physical.
He's not wanted—here at the University of a Thousand Years, where
ambition, new ideas, construction, are
all-important.
v An Oxford student, who toured eastern universities in Canada and the
States with a debating team, gives an
interesting account of the impression
made on him by Canadian debating
methods. Careful preparation even to
the extent of memorizing one's speech
gives, so the critic asserts, too much
rigidity to the form in which the Canadian debater presents his argument,
ties him too closely to his pre-rehears-
ed line of argument, and makes it more
difficult for him to combat an unexpected point brought up by his opponents. These remarks are the more
interesting as we will in a few day's
time have an opportunity of comparing at first hand English and Canadian methods of debate.
BIOLOGISTS DISCUSS
 fe^VTTAL QUESTIONS
Members of the Biological Discussion Club engaged in a keen debate
on "Vitalism vs. Mechanism," at their
regular bi-weekly meeting held last
Monday. Miss Mathers supported
the cause of Vitalism and spoke from
a philosophic point of view. Mr. Pee,
president of the club, submitted a
scientific treatment of the case for
Mechanism. Both speakers were inclined to stress the materialistic point
of view.
Mr. Spencer, a student of wide biological experience, summarized the
general points raised on both sides
and added valuable comment on the
subject.
Mr. C. H. Dugan reviewed the debate and quoted from noted authorities in European universities in criticism of the views  taken.
German StucUmt Life
Traced at^Women'sLit.
Miss Maclnnes Gives Interesting
Illustrated Lecture
At the last regular meeting before
Christmas of the Wojaen's Literary
Society, Miss Isabel Maclnneg gave a
very interesting illustrated lecture on
"Student Life in Germany."
Miss Maclnnes began by tracing
briefly the history of the various institutions of learning in Europe, emphasizing especially the growth of education in Germany.
Before the Restoration, said the
speaker, there were seventeen universities in that country but by 1914 the
number had increased to twenty-two.
Each college contains four faculties,
jurisprudence, philosophy, theology
and medicine. Besides the universities there are a great many so-called
"High Schools," which are really the
higher technical schools.
Referring to the preparation schools
of Germany, Miss Maclnnes stated that
one of the most important is the
"gymnasium," which has a nine year
course. These "gymnasiums" are
really more advanced than our high
schools, since they also cover the
work studied in the first two years of
University. In these schools there is
very little individuality. Students are
held down by the same grinding study,
day after day. Hence there is much
less freedom and independence than
is customary in our High Schools, and
the re-action when they are given freedom at university is very great.
Miss Maclnnes explained that as
German universities are under state
control, professors cannot make criticisms of the Government for fear of
being dismissed as radicals. She added that, since students travel from
one university to another, there is a
lack of that school spirit which is
fostered so strongly here.
The social life of these institutions
consists mainly of clubs and "Student
Corps," Miss Maclnnes said, adding,
too, that the lack of athletics there is
keenly felt by anyone accustomed to
our own institutions. This neglect of
physical training, together with the
fact that women were not allowed to
attend lectures until quite recently,
shows the conservative spirit which
rules in the universities of that country.
After the lecture, Miss Maclnnes exhibited some very interesting lantern
slides, depicting many phases of student life in Germany and showing some
fine views of different university buildings there.
V ANNUAL PHOTOS
Members of Arts '24, Agriculture '25
and Science '25 are reminded that our
contract with Hacking's makes it necessary that all photos be taken by THIS
Saturday noon. Besides the pictures of
Seniors, EXECUTIVES of the following
mutt have their individual pictures taken
by Saturday noon:
ARTS WOMEN'S UNDERGRAD.
ARTS MEN'S UNDERGRAD.
SCIENCE UNDERGRAD.
AGGIE UNDERGRAD.
STUDENTS' COUNCIL
PUBLICATIONS BOARD
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
MEN'S ATHLETICS
LIT. AND SCIENTIFIC
%
AT THE DOMINION
The "Covered Wagon" showing for
the second week at the Dominion
needs no comment. The appreciation
of the public and its reaction to this
masterpiece is sufficient to make all
comment unnecessary and superfluous.
Next week the famous Famous-
Lasky production "Manhattan" featuring Richard Dix and Jaqueline
Logan.    (Advt.)
A Special
Watch Value !
This dainty gold-filled Watch,
for girl or lady, has fully guaranteed 15-jewel movement in
gold-filled case, with solid
leather strap ord|1A A A
black silk ribbon $ I U.UU
Henry Birks & Sons
UMITED
DIAMOND MERCHANTS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WEAR   A   MANN'S   SHIRT
Pure Linen
SHIRTS
$1.50
Reg. $2.50 value.
British Shirting.
Guaranteed Fast Color.
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
Shirt Specialists
TWO   STORES:
411 and 474 Granville St.
WEAR   A  MANN'S SHIRT
MOUNT PLEASANT
I METHODIST CHURCH
I 10th Ave. and Ontario St.
j   Minister,  REV. O. M. SANFORD
f
t
1
Out-of-town Students
Specially Welcome
Good Music, Interesting Sermons,
Friendly Greeting.
BREAKFAST AFTERNOON TEA
LUNCH DINNER
Phone, Seymour 8403
Open 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.    Closed Sunday
KRGYLE TM ROOM
717 DUNSMUIR STREET
Just around the corner from Drysdale's
Afternoon Tea Parties for Students
by arrangement.
Mrs. Agnes Orr Robinson, Proprietress
Home Cooking.
Entire Staff Canadian Women. November 20th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
POPULAR
FOOTWEAR
For U. B. C. Students
Men's Brogues,
Black or Brown,
Dancing Oxfords
or Pumps,
Ladies' Brogues
and Sport Oxfords,
Evening Slippers,
Satin, Patent,  Suede,
Gold and Silver,    -
$5.85
UP
$4.95
UP
$5.45
$4.95
UP
WILSONS
TWIN SHOE STORE
157-159 Hastings St., W.
Central Public Stenographers
Foreign Translations
Miscellaneous Typewriting
Phone, Sey. 5078
414 Dominion Bldg.     207 Hastings St. W.
'-••4*
Evans & Hastings
-:-     -:-     PIONEER     -:-     -:-
BETTER QUALITY. PRINTERS
Prices Right
A    94-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL    BUSINESS    CAREER
IN    VANCOUVER    PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE ARE    FAVORED   MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING PUBLIC
WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
HONEY'S WORTH.
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
E. VUAGNAT
Private French Tuition
639 11th AVENUE, WEST
Phone, Fair. 2247-R
rENUS
PENCILS
Ufa laryett setting Oaslifyi
piwctf intjie world
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
229 Fifth Are.
New York
Write for
booklet on
VENUS Pencils and
Venus Everpointed
Mechanical Pencils
VARSITY TEAMS
A
NEED SUPPORT
Varsity has engaged in city competitions no fewer than four rugby and
three soccer teams. Yet week after
week a mere sprinkling of supporters
turn out with the boys. Surely here
is a sufficiently diversified program to
attract hundreds of live undergrads.
Last Saturday Varsity Juniors were
a goal down with but a few minutes
to go, fighting tooth and nail to maintain their record. The home team had
about 25 supporters with them. Varsity had three. As every body began
to regard the game as settled, these
three sportsmen got together and raised a yell between them. Varsity went
through and evened up. A week ago
the McKechnie Cup Squad beat Vancouver Rep to the post in a game that
was absolutely even. What did it?
Ask the players!
Here is a conclusive argument why
Varsity should get out and help the
teams which she puts in the field.
When shouts mean goals it is up to
the students to let loose and score
heavily. Let's see what you can do,
for once!
Pep Meeting Friday
/The long expected Aggie's pep meeting is at last scheduled for Friday,
noon. Just what form the programme
will take is not divulged, but the
Aggies in charge have a ferociously
hopeful expression and they are
known to be still smarting from their
discomfiture at the last meeting. It
is earnestly hoped by recipients of
offerings of fruit and vegetables at
the last meeting that the Aggies will
refrain from producing specimens of
their "hisher culture" in this meeting.
Fresjimen Tie With
\y      Ex-King George
The Freshmen rugby squad dropped their lirst point OL' the season on
Saturday when the ex-King George
fifteen held them to a tnree-air tie.
The Varsity touch came in the first
stanza when Ctappell secured the ball
from a loose scrum, ran about ten
yards and passed to Shields who went
over near th© flag. The ex-King
George squad pressed for the remainder of the half.
Upon resumption of play the ex-
High team continued to force the play
and their efforts were at length rewarded when one of their forwards
went over for a touch that was not
converted and hence tied the count.
The rest of the game was featured
by end to end play with the Freshies
mainly on the defensive. The absence of Adams and four other regulars who were playing Miller Cup,
weakened the Frosh considerably.
A tie was a good indication of the run
of play, however.
V    AT THE CAPITOL
The Capitol this week is putting on
an all fun bill. Anyone, not acquainted with the mirth-provoking ability of
Harold Lloyd, would have thought
that a free-for-all fight was taking
place inside the Capitol, if they could
have resisted the temptation to go
in. The audience howled and roared
with laughter. Originality is the keynote of Harold Lloyd's success, and
closely blended with that is his delightful sense of humor and ability
to make the public feel with him.
As if this was not enough another
2000 laughs are produced in the extra two-reel comedy.
Next Week the program is changed
from "real" comedy to "real" drama.
Gloria Swanson in "Wages of Virtue" is the feature.
SOC££R JUNIORS
ie wmrcpR.
Varsity Juniors met C. P. R. in a
return league fixture, and took a well
earned point, 3-3. As the score indicates the second encounter between
these two teams within a week was
strenuous, and following an early disaster, only Varsity's fighting spirit
enabled her to maintain her record.
Winning the toss the C. P. R. men
rushed into Varsity territory, but the
halves held. Then the backs who took
some time to settle down, first allowed
the opposing centre forward to walk
right in on Stewart, and their hasty
kicking resulted in the corners, from
the last of which the ball was headed
past the helpless Stewart. For the
next fifteen minutes Varsity turned and
simply bombarded the goal mouth
whenever they passed the centre line.
Only great work by the custodian kept
Varsity from getting half a dozen. At
last Gaudin beat him clearly, and
Spillsbury made it two-all with a
beautiful overhead shot. C. P. R.
fought back gamely and scored an apparently off-side goal which was allowed. This lead they held until a
few moments from full time, and were
often dangerous in the second half.
The backs were now playing a wonderful game, and following a charge, Gaudin slipped through to register the tie-
ing counter. The final whistle was a
relief to both teams.
Line-up—Stewart, Smith and Dyres,
Hawarth, Miller and Taylor, McKinnon,
Gaudin, Stevenson, Spillsbury and
Black.
Xlce Hockey Starts
The Vancouver Amateur Ice Hockey
Association having at last come to
terms with Frank Patrick concerning
the use of the Arena, the University
Hockey Club held its first workout
there last week. The turnout was
large and the enthusiasm of the players high. Among those appearing for
the first time were boys from the interior and ex-high school stars. The
greater part of last year's regulars
were also on hand but they will have to
play their best brand of hockey to
catch a place on this year's squad.
Everything points to a big year in
the speedy sport.
Varsity Shuttlecock
Experts Victorious
Varsity Badminton enthusiasts
emerged on the long end of a 12—10
count at Westminster last Monday
night in ""several closely contested
matches played with the Royals. Westminster won the majority of the mixed doubles, but the students piled up
a big lead in the men's and ladies'
singles and doubles.
Varsity was represented by Misses
Milliner, Davidson, Hallamore, Hillis,
and Messrs. Argue, Woodman, Hincks
and Shakespeare.
DEPARTMENT
MANAGERS'
SALE
NOW ON !
This is a splendid
chance for you to
buy   Xmas  Gifts
at
a very low price.
&
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver, B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
 OF	
COMMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
pt„„„ 1 Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
rnones ^ Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2094 Beach Avenue
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Plaees and all Accommodation.
AMBASSADOR CAFE
610 Seymour Street
  Headquarters for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Pinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING - - 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. THE   UBYSSEY
November 20th, 1924
Gift Stationery «g
BEAUTIFUL
and
ARTISTIC
Wonderful Assortment.
THE
Clarke & Stuart
Co., Ltd.
550 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE, SEYMOUR 3000
JUST THINK I
YOU CAN TRAVEL IN OT
A YELLOW CAB FOR Ld\..
One-third Mile.
Each additional One-third Mile    -   -   10c
Special rates for Shopping and
Business Calls.
Buy a book of coupons and save a further
10 per cent.
For Christmas Parties, Dances, Social
Functions—Closed Heated Cars.
Prompt, Safe and Reliable Service.
It is cheaper to ride in a Yellow Cab
than to drive your own car.
You pay only from the time you step into
the Cab until you reach your destination.
yellow eaB eo.
Phone. Sey. 4000
>«••••••••••••••••*•••*•«••
i
Phones ; Fair. 77,  Fair. 5660-R
WILLOW HftLL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties.
■    For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
• Proprietor.
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
NOTICE
The 1925 Graduating Students are
requested to note that the Hacking Photo
Studios, are situated at 553 Granville St.
and not at 445 Granville St., as announced
in error recently
,$.••-•.•1
■»^W«l^W.|l^^»..»|ll.»l",ll|MI
i CO-ED ATHLETICS \
• i
^•^•-•••«*»*»*»«««>«*n*.~a~o««..s>-«~»««*.»~«»*«*>^-«M^
MJSS BOVING'S ADDRESS
AjKrnteresting talk wasi^iven to the
"omen's Athletic Society by its Honorary President, Mrsi^Boving, at noon,
Wednesday, November 15th, in Room
Z. Mrs. Boving spoke of the great
pleasure it was to her to be connected
with University Athletic activities as
the honorary president of such a society, and dealt with the great importance of physical exercise in student
life. On the whole athletics have
gained greater support from the student body each year, but the present
number of 250 participants out of the
618 women registered is not sufficient.
The Swimming Club is popular, but
gym, basketball and hockey are not so
well favored. Mrs. Boving advocated
more inter-year sports, since they are
really more important than league
games. Inter-year matches require
both representative and practice teams
for each year, whereas league games
require only one team. Active interest in all branches of sport does more
than anything else to foster college
spirit. The meeting closed with a few
remarks from Miss Shorney, in which
the Victoria trip was explained.
.BASKETBALL NEWS,    ,,.^ w
The Varsity "A" Basketball team
met the Y.„5KZZL_A.Zsehior" girls in
the ope'ning'' game of the District
League last Wednesday in the Y. W.
C. A. Gym. The "Y" girls won with
a score of 7-4, May Brown winning 6
points for her team. Doris Shorney
and Isabel Russell scored the 4 points
for the Varsity, composed of Marjorie Bell, Flora Musgrave, Winona
Straight, Gay Swenciski, Isobel Russell and Doris Shorney.
On Saturday evening at the Normal
the Varsity girls opened with a flourishing success, the Senior "A" squad
walking over Normal "B" with a score
of 52-0. "Dons Shorney scared 20
points, making 16 of them in the first
half. Pearl Noble was the pick of the
Normal team, being one of the best
guards of the evening. Varsity's score
was 14, 26, 44, respectively, and the
co-eds brought this to 52 in the last
period.
Senior "A" Team—Isobel Russell
(2), Doris Shorney (20), Flora Musgrave (14), Gay Swenciski (6), Winona Straight (2), Marjorie Bell (8).
Varsity "B" was badly defeated by
Weshninster_iheir opponents keeping
the lead throughout with the periods
ending 7-0, 13-2, 17-4 and 27-8.
Senior "B" Team—Alda Moffat (4),
Doris Woods (2), Doris Allen (2), Marjorie Leeming, Mary Higginbotham.
I met a lightsome-hearted girl,
And she was ten and four,
And oh, the Spring of Love was ours—•
But never will be more.
We had a million magic thoughts,
We saw what only lovers see,
Sweet airy nothings, for in youth
We hope for things that cannot be.
But    as    the    Spring    and    Summer
changed,
Her   Youth   grew   shy,   and   lightly
led,
It disappeared with something strange,
And left a common girl instead.
Oh  why  should  Youth  so  fresh  and
fair,
Appear to thrill, and vanish then,
And leave a thousand memories
Of what will never be again/?
Life Saving Tests
Taken By Mermaids
On Wednesday, about eight members
of the Life Saving class were examined on their achievements by an official of the Royal Life Saving Society. As well as a knowledge of resusci-
■" —tation and the respiratory system, candidates are required to know three
methods of release and five ways of
rescue. Another requirement is the
picking up of an object from the bottom of the tank, and the ability to
swim breast-stroke. Successful candidates will be awarded the Society's
Bronze Medal. -.
^ AT THE STRAND.
The Strand is featuring an adaptation of the prize-winning novel "Sinners in Heaven" by Clive Arden. This
original story is filmed to perfection
by a masterly photographer. A
straight-laced English girl and an intrepid aviator are the sole survivors
of an ill-fated hydroplane expedition.
Cast away on a dsert island they
maintain a fight for life against nature, savages and conflicting emotions. The resulting complications
and original ending earn a well-merited support from the patrons.
Next week a First National picture "In Hollywood with Potash and
Perlmutter."
Have you made sure that you will
be able to attend THE BIG EVENT of
the College Year? If not, get your
tickets before it is too late, and follow
the crowd to the OXFORD DEBATE,
next Monday night.
t
u
Literary Comer
INES
./
Co-ed Teams Plan
For Victoria Trip
With Christmas comes the annual
trip to Victoria when Varsity sends
over her best teams with the hope of
coming out on top. This year, the
different clubs hope to send teams
which will prove themsleves the best
yet, and to this end much hard work
and practice are being done. The
Grass Hockey Club, which is playing
a more prominent part this term,
hopes to turn out an excellent team,
while the Basketballers promise to be
invincible. The Swimming and Badminton Clubs, as usual, are preparing
efficient and well-trained teams. Thus
the athletic prospects for the trip to
the Island look bright.
It has been decided by the Athletic
Executive that if the members of any
team have not bought their tickets
to Victoria within 24 hours of sailing,
the game will be cancelled. This is
to prevent Varsity from turning up to
play with incomplete teams.
<$M.*.»—««..•••*»••..«•_..•....
>~st-....-.-.-lt-.-.~m*j.
The Week's Events
Thurs., Nov. 20—Christmas Plays,
Curtain, 8.15. Pianists' Club, 1330
13th Ave. E. La Canadienne, 786
Gelford St.
Fri., Nov. 21—12.15: Address at "Ambassador," by A. S. Vogt of Toronto.
Tickets from Dean Clement and
Prof. Christie.
Sat., Nov. 22—Basketball; Women's
Senior A vs. Mission. First Soccer;
Allan Cup, Varsity vs. Hotel Vancouver, Recreation Park. Second
Soccer, U. B. C. vs. Shamrocks.
Xmas Plays. Doors open 7.45; Curtain 8.15.
Sun., Nov. 23—Social Hour at St.
George's Church, after evening service.    For out-of-town students.
Mon., Nov. 24—OXFORD DEBATE.    "
Wed., Nov. 26—Faculty Women's' Tea
for Juniors.
Midway ^
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
JFmtrral Bimtora
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE. FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
Nothing conveys thoughtfulness
and cheer like
A CHRISTMAS PORTRAIT
x
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hasting St., E.
(Juit E..t of B. C. E. Rly. «nd Carrall St.)
Phone, Seymour jj6q
Have You Tried
Our Hot Beverages
After the Show ?
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
The Heather
Formerly Cusick's
Try us for
FRUIT
CONFECTIONERY
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO
AFTERNOON TEAS
Phone, Fair. 2881
Cor. Broadway & Heather St. November 20th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster Ltd.
j^y Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See US Before Buying
IF
For your next
Haircut
Why not try the
Pacific Barber Shop
PACIFIC BUILDING
744 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Sey. 4863
C. SMALLEY, Proprietor.
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
Take Tea at Purdy's on
Your Shopping Day
Christmas shopping days mean
many a meal in town if one is to save
time and fatigue. Under the capable
and efficient management of Mr. R. G.
Hunter, Purdy's cafe and tea rooms
assure you of an appetising and refreshing meal of the kind that makes
you glad you stayed downtown. Weekend shoppers are also making a practice of taking home a box of Purdy's
confectionery for the family. Try
a box once and you will ask for no
other. A day in town is not complete
without  a visit  to Purdy's.    (Advt.)
TESTY
Cassius—Hooray,  the  prof  said we
would have a test to-day, rain or shine.
Brutus—Well?
Cassius—It's snowing.
—Purple Parrot.
Pat—"That was a foine sentiment
Casey got off at the banquet last
night."
Mike—"What was it?"
Pat—"He said that the sweetest
mimories in loife are the ricollections
of things forgotten."—Ex.
A-.-.-
STRAW FROM THE STACKS
..•»•»•«•»•-!
A TRAGEDY
At nine o'clock on one dark night,
A man arrived outside an inn.
His hat was coarse, his coat full long,
His face was lean and gaunt and thin.
"Rest for one," he cried to us,
"To-morrow I must catch the bus
To   Stackville  Town."   "We  have  no
room,"
The landlord said, "except the haunted
one."
"That will do," the stranger cried,
"Of ghosts I have no fear;
In case the supernatural roams
This pistol have I here."
At twelve o'clock on that same night
The stranger's sleep was shattered;
From out his bed a hand appeared,
But that's not all that mattered.
With look forlorn and pistol drawn
He shivered in his bed,
"Put down that hand or I will fire
And fill it up with lead."
It never moved, but to his mind
It seemed to grow much bigger
So taking in one deep, deep breath,
He pulled and pulled the trigger.
A flash of flame, a scorching pain—
His head was full of hazes;
A stunning crash, a puff of smoke—
He'd blown his foot to blazes.
Holy Moses.
Frosh—"Who was the smallest man
in history?"
Soph—"I give up."
Frosh—"Why the Roman soldier
who slept on his watch."
—Penn, Punch Bowl.
GOWNS!   !
Translated from "AESOP'S FABLES"
(More or Less Literally)
By "X.I.X."
The  Soph  and  His Gown
A Soph, having put on a gown,
roamed about in the University, and
amused himself by awing all the foolish freshies he met with in his wanderings. At last meeting a prof., he
tried to awe him also, but the prof,
no sooner heard the sound of his
voice, than he exclaimed, "I might possibly have been awed myself, if I had
not heard your bray."
P.S.—If you do not believe that
these are Mr. Aesop's personal sentiments in the matter, consult his story,
"The ASS in the LION'S SKIN," and
draw your own conclusions.
Freshman—"I smell cabbage burning."
Soph—"Then take your head away
from that radiator."-—Ex.
NOT A REPORT!
The Chess Club held a re-organization meeting recently at which no
members were present. Messrs. —
and — were unanimously elected to the
office of president and secretary respectively. The meetings will take
place sometime, in a room not yet decided upon, but presumably on the
fifth floor. It is hoped that other ches-
sites will grasp this opportunity by the
neck and avail themselves of the Club's
privileges. Players are requested to
bring their own boards and, incidentally, themselves.
Have you made sure that you will
be able to attend THE BIG EVENT of
the College Year? If not, get your
tickets before it is too late, and follow
the crowd to the OXFORD DEBATE,
next Monday night.
A humorist is one who knows how
to use other peoples jokes.
—Harvard    Lampoon.
••-••<§»••.•.
ONE   A   WEEK   OF   THIS    KIND    IS
OUR   LIMIT
Mamma—Why didn't you call me
when Kenny tried to kiss you last
night?
Daughter—Why, mamma, did you
want to be kissed, too?
•••••Kj;.....
TUUM   ET
"Hail, fellow?    Where from?"
"From the coliseum, your August
Altitude."
"And the score, indeed?"
"Four down, three out, six to kill,
and a lion with indigestion, may it
please your Magnificence."
—Harvard   Lampoon.
A friend of the magistrate came to
see the court.
"By jove!" he said, "you have a
tough crowd to deal with this morning."
"Hush," said the magistrate. "Those
are the solicitors."
—Liverpool Echo.
Prof.—How would you tell the height
of a tower by means of a barometer?
Stude—I'd     lower    the     barometer
from the top of the tower and then
measure the rope.—Stone Mill.
•.•.««£>.•••••
Doctor—Gargle your throat twice a
day with peroxide.
Sweet young thing—But why should
a brunette like me have blond tonsils?
»•■••.<§>••"•.
Prof, (giving a lecture)—"I don't
mind if a student looks at his watch
once in a while, but what gets me is
to see someone take out his watch,
shake it a few times and then put it
up to his ear."—Penn. Froth.
Instructor—Now Arts '28, what is
wrong with this sentence. "The horse
and cow is in the pasture."
Frosh—I know—The lady should
come first."
—Vamp.
STUDY   IN   ALCOHOL
First Inebriate—What'll you have?
Second Inebriate—Who?
First Inebriate—The gen'leman with
you.
Second Inebriate—Thash not gen'leman.   Thash me.
—Life.
••<•>.
"John," asked the nagging wife as
the bedtime hour approached, "is
everything shut up  for the night?"
"That depends on you," growled Mr.
Henpeck.
"Everything else is."
•••••«§>••..•.
PROFS.
Profs is those which:
Talkssodamnedfastthatyoucan'ttake
anote.
Spend three-quarters of an hour and
one box of chalk explaining, and then
after you have copied four pages of
notes, tell you the stuff is not important.
Wait till you are jammed with work
and then spring a quiz.
Think that their course is the only
important one that you are taking,
and hand out problems as if they were
giving away German marks.
Tell you not to bone for the exam,
because it will be general, and then
ask you if you agree with the statement on page 247.
Call the roll the day you cut.
3-Piece
Tuxedo
Suits
Fine quality fabrics, heavy
silk  facings   and   stylishly
cut.    Special.
$37.50
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
pOR MERIT and past
*■ achievements the 1925
Graduates have  selected
rf
STUDIOS
553 Granville St.
for Class Photographs.
Dr.LF.MARSHALL
DENTIST
CONVENIENT TO THE UNIVERSITY
WORK CAN BE ARRANGED
IN STUDY PERIODS
BETWEEN CLASSES
AND IN THE EVENINGS
2520 LAUREL (Cor. Broadway)
Phone, Fair. 896-Y
THE  SAND-MAN
The Sheik—Through the Sahara's
worst sandstorm I have come to thee,
Nellie.
The Sheikess—Aye, Roldolph, surely thou must be a man of grit!
—Washington Columns.
•••••»<§>•••.••
Young  Lady in  Distress—My   car's
stalled, have you a spare plug?
Farmer—Sorry  lady,   I   don't   chaw
but I got an old cigar I kin give you.
—Puppet.
••-••<§>••••••
BARELY   ACCURATE
Co-ed—"I   weighed   a   hundred  and
twenty-five pounds stripped."
Passionate Lover—"Dearest, you
can't tell anything about those scales
in the drug store."
—Maniac.
^ AT THE EMPRESS
If anyone wants to hear well-sustained and clever repartee they must
go to see Verna Felton and her company playing in "45 Minutes from
Broadway," at the Empress. The
play is a clever bit of comedy. The
music is good, the songs excellent.
Supported by her usual company Miss
Verna Felton keep the audience
amused from curtain to curtain. As
usual, Miss Felton is the life of the
party and in her part as a servant
girl keeps the audience in ecstacies.
Her part is neither overdone nor underdone, but executed with the usual
perception which marks all her acting.
(Advt.) 8
THE   UBYSSEY
November 20th, 1924
TRADE
Iggji
MARK
"fa. Ift can/vO*
Did It Ever Strike You
What a splendid exercise (or
body building BOXING is ?
Your set of
Boxing Gloves
is   waiting  for   you   here   at
SPALD1NGS'
and  at  a moderate  price.
Models  at
$4.00 a Set, and up.
Striking Bags
both Single and Double End
$5.00, and up.
f f Of CANADA/LIMITED
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER. B. C
BAGGAGE
TO        FROM
ALL, TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL TRANSFER
PHONE, SEY. 6
SHELLY'S
Bread and Cakes
are baked according
to modern standards
of quality, flavor and
purity.
DANCING
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
Freshette—"What do you call it
when two persons are thinking of the
same thing—mental telapathy?"
Sophomore—"Sometimes its that and
sometimes its just plain embarrassment."—Exchange.
Have you made sure that you will
be able to attend THE BIG EVENT of
the College Year? If not, get your
tickets before it is too late, and follow
the crowd to the OXFORD DEBATE,
next Monday night.
oxf6rd debate
i/monday NIGHT!
Debaters from the University of
Oxford will arrive here Sunday next,
to spend most of the following week
in Vancouver. On Monday night they
will meet with the representatives of
the University of B. C. to discuss the
mightiest question of the day, the
relative merits of Socialism and Capitalism. M. C. Hollis and J. D. Woodruff of Oxford, with the assistance of
Murray Hunter of our own University,
will defend the Capitalistic system
against the attacks of Malcolm MacDonald, S. Kobe, and James Craig,
speaking in the cause of Socialism.
The Oxford men are all arrayed on
the side to which their convictions
lead them, and indications point that
Vancouver will hear an exhibition of
public speaking unrivaled in its history of these events. Their methods
are anything but orthodox and in this
connection the Coach of Debate for
the University of Kansas has written
a tribate to their technique and of the
storm of discussion their speeches
raised. The Oxonians, he writes,
were easy, informal, frequently witty,
sometimes ironic, inclined to a philosophical rather than a severely logical attack, and familiar with classical,
historical and biblical material applicable to the subject. They abhor satisfies and quotations from authority, and
their attacks on seemingly impregnable
arguments will long be remembered by
the huge crowd of twenty-one hundred
people who attended.
The Oxford men will speak several
times before leaving to engage the
University of Washington speakers.
During their stay a long program has
been aranged for their benefit, Dal
Grauer, President of the Alma Mater
Society, being in charge of the arrangements.
Malcolm MacDonald, the socialistic
member of the visiting team, has had
a long and varied career as a debater
and a politician. In this latter connection he has run twice as a Labour
Candidate, and each time was defeated
by a small number of votes. James
Craig, who will assist him, is a well
known local debater. Craig rose to
fame in sensational fashion during the
famous debate in which the Wyoming
team was vanquished. S. Kobe was
the other member of the team on that
memorable occasion and he also will
support MacDonald. Kobe is a Japanese student of Arts '26 and is well
known in literary and debating circles
in this province.
J. D. Woodruff, capitalistic supporter
served with distinction in the Foreign
office and Admiralty in Holland, during the War. His scholastic record
includes the winning in 1921 of the
Lothian Prize and a first class in the
Final History School. He is a Liberal
party leader and a supporter of Mr.
Asquith. M. C. Hollis, the third Oxford man, who was educated at Eton-
ard, entered Bolliol College, Oxford in
1920. In 1923 he held the distinguished
position of President of the Oxford Union. He is well known in contemporary
literature through his work in the English papers. Murray Hunter, member
of Arts '26, is well fitted to support
these two men. His efforts in interclass debating have made him well
known.
The decision will rest with the audience, but it is not yet decided what
system will be followed. So that the
speeches may be more widely enjoyed
they will be broadcasted by radio from
Wesley Church, commencing at eight
o'clock on Monday night. Of course
it will be much better to be in attendance at the Church, and to what extent people are realizing this is shown
by the enormous sale of tickets.
SPEAKER DEALS
WITH EINSTEIN
A most comprehensive and elucidating   address   on   "The   Truth   About^
Einstein" was presented at the |3J^-4-
couyei/Institute last week by Mr. A.
L1Jtt6Killop. B.A.
'Einstein, the mysterious mathematical wizard and scientist, the first man
to discharge and direct an artificial
thunderbolt, is a man of marvellous if
not phenomenal powers of visualization.
In 1919 he published his theory of
relativity which set the world thinking. At the outset he vigorously
denied the possibility of absolute motion. He ignored Newton's contribution to the studies of physics and
mathematics by asserting that there
was no such thing as gravity.
"There are many problems in the
world which baffle and humiliate the
human intellect" continued the speaker in conclusion. "Countless generations of thinkers have pondered over
the questions of time and space,
and the broadest minds and keenest
intellects are able to conceive but
vague ideas of those two questions
which border on the Infinite." Yet
Einstein dismisses "time" and "space"
with a wave of the hand.
Early in 1925 Einstein purposes to
set forth his latest theory on "Attraction and Terrestrial Magnetism."
Scientists are looking forward with a
great deal of interest to this coming
publication.
Mr. McKillop is of the opinion that
Einstein's theory has not yet been
satisfactorily proved and established.
The scientist has obviously overlooked
some of the elementary principles of
relativity and his theory is somewhat
over-visualized.
To-night in the Physics Lecture
Room at 8.15 p.m., Professor W. E.
Duckering will deliver an address on
"Religion in Science, and Science in
Religion, by a Layman." Students are
invited to attend.
CO-EDS OF SCIENCE
V     HOLD PEPPY DANCE
The Nursing Undergrads made their
debut in social activity at an informal
dance held last Friday, November 14.
This is the first occasion that there
has been sufficient number. in the
group to require the Auditorium for
entertainment. The Cafeteria and
Auditorium were attractively decorated with evergreens and gold and blue
streamers. Patronesses were: Miss
E. I. Johns, Miss K. W. Ellis and Miss
Bollert. The party was evidently much
appreciated judging from the number
of Varsity students who accepted the
invitation.
Sommerlf
556  Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
Where you can
select Gifts  of
rare beauty at
reasonable
prices.
"it Costs No More to Shop
at Sommers"
New Floor
Searles' Dancing: School
has enlarged their dance floor
to accommodate their many
pupils.
Private lessons every day
and evening.
Class dance Friday and
Monday of each week.
Start any time.
JEAN SEARLES'
Private Dancing Schools
603  HASTINGS   ST.  W.
(Empire Building)
Residence:    Glencoe £odg»      Sey. 32.
If you learn here you can dance anywhere.
Prepare Now—
For your Xmas holidays by starting a few lessons
and enjoying yourself later on. We are close
enough for you to slip down during the day and
get STARTED—that's the main thing—we are
sure of the rest.
Appointments any time.
Phone, Bayview 5834. Office Hours :  1 to 9 p.m.
Broadway Dancing Academy
1400 BROADWAY, W.       (One Block East of Granville St.)
SEE YOU MONDAY NIGHT-OXFORD DEBATE,

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