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The Ubyssey Nov 17, 1945

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 'BIRDS   DROP   HOOP   OPENER,   50-58
1 Reviewing
The Plays
By PETER AJELLO
• MEMBERS of the Players'
Club are to be congratulated
on another successful performance.
Casts of the three plays were
fortunate on Wednesday evening
in having a mature, co-operative,
and appreciative student audience.
Three plays, The Rainmaker, by
Gwen Pharis, Altar Piece, by Emmanuel Levy, and Orange Blossom,
by Philip Johnson are being presented by the Club.
The Rainmaker is the second
successive experimental play to be
produced by the Club. Although
not so successful as last year's
Johnny Dunne, the play on the
whole is good. The set .though
very effective, does not detract
from the play itself. In some instances the make-up, requiring
more blending, was rather startling.
The individual characterizations
were very' good indeed. Ronald
Heal as Tim, remained in character
throughout the play, and so gave
one of the most convincing performances. Such cannot be said
of some members of the chorus.
Val Stewart, in the difficult role
of the religious paranoic, turned
in a very credible performance.
Dick Newman succeeded in capturing the psychology of the American
Negro. Others in the cast deserving specia Intention are John
Darling, Strowan Robertson, Ned
Larsen, and Arnold Watson.
Altar-Piece, the most sensietive
of the three plays, is set in a
Fifteenth century Florentine
ghetto. The subject-matter of the
play is particularly applicable to
present-day problems in racial and
religious prejudice.
Altar-Piece is the most aesthetically detached of the three plays,
and hence it the most artistic.
Until the "black-out", the cast
maintained the atmosphere of the
play very well. The "black-out"
not only destroyed the atmosphere,
but also interrupted the continuity
of the play itself. The transition
would have been more effective if
the blue lightning had remained in
the background.
Murray Sager was outstanding in
the role of Judah. Although Lois
Shaw as Haddasah, and Verne
Maurer as Miriam, ably supported
Sager, they might perhaps have
shown more restraint. Arthur
Alexander as Ezra, was second
only to Murray Sager. Val Stewart
as the priest, and Bill Vellutini as
the Cardinal, also turned in good
performances. Members of the
mob deserve a great deal of credit
for excellent timing.
Although Orange Blossom was
the weakest of the three plays, it
was amusing, and provided the
necessary comedy relief. The plot
and characterization are poor, so
that the success of the play was
entirely due to the efforts of the
cast. Norma Bloom as Gladys, and
Hilda Halpin as Amy, were both
good in their difficult parts.
Audrey Blanchard had a tendency
to speak too quickly. Neil Wilson
deserves praise for his amusing
portrayal of Mr. Duckworth, a part
which offers very little scope. The
characterizations of the spinster
sisters Lola and Lottie, by Helen
Wood and Shirley-Mae MacKenzie,
were exceptionally well done.
A great deal of credit for the
success of the plays is due the
Stage Committee, headed by
Chester Taylor and Richard Clifford, and to the Costume and
Make-up Committee, headed by
Donald McDougall and Adrienne
Cools.
Tfolktym
Vol. XXVIII	
Ainsworth Wiil
Contact Legion
About Paper
• "LEGIONETTE", the bi-monthly news-letter published by the
University Branch of the Canadian
Legion, comes partly under Article
14 of the AMS Code, according to
Allan Ainsworth, president of
AMS.
Article 14 states, in part, that
"no publications whatsoever shall
be carried on or distributed on the
campus without the consent of the
Students' Council."
Ainsworth   points   out   that  although the Legionette is distributed
by mail, it is still printed on the
campus.
WILL WRITE
Promising to get in touch with
the Legion by mail as soon as possible to straighten out the matter
Ainsworth said: "In view of the
co-operation of the AMS has given
the Legion, I think that at least
out of courtesy the Legion should
have notified us of this paper they
are putting out. I didn't know
anything about it until someone
from the Publications Board told
me."
Charm Gauged
At Tea Dance
"Hetti Outerbridge has the most
beautiful legs on the campus,"
was the flnal decision of judging
Thunderbirds at the Leg Contest
held at yesterday's Tea Dance.
Exhibiting their underpinnings
were: Joan Jarvis, Arts; Hetti
Outerbridge, Pre-Med; J a c q u I
Robinson, Commerce; I/tabel MacKenzie, Home Ec.; Joyce King,
Aggie; Margaret Boyce, Nursing,
Heeding such cryptic Instructions as "replace your eyes" the
team rated contestants on dainty
feet, trim ankles, well turned calf,
and dimpled knees. Dancing continued after the boys were revived.
Prize Given For
Snack Bar Name
• UBC STUDENTS aro invited
to submit names for a lunch
counter sponsored by the Canadian National Institute for the
Blind, Hut 7, south of the Library.
Manager Bill Irwin offers two
boxes of chocolates as a prize for
the best name suggested. Faculty
members will act as judges.
Contest rules are as follows:
1. Contest is open to oil UBC
students.
2. Dates are from Monday, November 19, to Wednesday, November 21.
3. Suggested names arc to be
placed in a box provided in Hut 7.
4. In case of duplication the first
name submitted will win the
prize.
VANCOUVER, B.C., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1945
No. 22
AINSWORTH REPRESENTS
UBC AT CONFERENCE
•    ALLAN AINSWORTH and Garry Miller will represent
UBC at the National Federation of Canadian University
Students conference at McGill University to be held December 27, 28, 29.
The object of the conference is
to discuss solutions to problems
besetting Universities all across
Canada. Finance and budgu, Canadian University Press, debates,
sports and students services are
problems which require n: tional
attention and it i.s felt that a national conference such a.s this is
essential   to   co-ordinate   activities,
Reports from the Congress oh
Students at Prague wil also be
discussed, along with a report from
fhe World Youth Council at London. In this connection students
aro reminded that to-day is International  Student  Day.
COMMERCE STUDENTS
•
THERE will he an
Important
meeting of Cl'S ii
Arts 100
Oil
Tuesday  at  12:IM
o clisiiiss
tin
• Commerce Dance
DVA CHEQUES
READY NOV. 24
• DVA CHEQUES aro expected
at the VCS office on or about
November 24, and will be issued
in alph..b"tical order betv/e-ii this
cia'e  and  December  1.
A very few allowance cheques
for October have not y:t been received. Each case is being individually invi striated. Most of
these are men who have dependents and the mistake is in the
amount   of  the  payment.
Correction of the list of veterans
to ri'cci\e the DVA allowance is
expected 'o reach compl lion before tho issuing of this month's
cheques. '
These Lovely Boys
—Photo by Bob Steiner.
• BY THE TIME next Monday midnight rolls around one of these happy chappies smiling at you from above
will be crowned "FALL BALL KING". Left to right they are Bob Lewis, representing Applied Science,
Bill McKay, representing Commerce, Bill Laudrum, repesentlng Arts, Herb Caporel, representing Pure Science,
Graham Mowatt, representing Agriculture, and Keith MacDonald, representing Pre-Medlcal.
After those attending Monday evening's Ball have scanned the gents' pictures In the Ball programs and
seen the KINGS on display, each accompanied by two beauteous handmaidens, the voting will take place. The
lucky fellow chosen will be crowned by last year's Queen of the Ball, Peggy Holt.
LSE ASKS MORE STUDENT OPINION
• RECOMMENDATIONS that the Ubyssey devote one page per issue to voluntary student
contributions on "social, economic, and political issues without change of context or
title" have been presented by the Literary and Scientific Executive to the Student Council
for consideration.
The recommendation was referred by Student Council to Mardee Dundas, Editor-in-
Chief of the Publications Board, who will discuss it with members of the LSE major executive at their meeting next Friday noon.
Following is the proposal which was moved originally by Peter Lindenfeld, president
of the Social Problems Club, and Kay Halpin, president of the Student Christian Movement.
WHEREAS the world has just passed through the most
destructive war in its
history and has produced the mightiest
weapons for the annihilation of human
life and work, and
WHEREAS an informed and active public is essential
if sanity is to prevail
against the insanity of
settling disputes by
war, and
WHEREAS university students
must help to create
such an informed and
active public by emphasizing the tremen-
, dous importance of
world affairs and international and national politics, and taking
every opportunity to
encourage and increase
knowledge and constructive discussion of
these subjects by every
available means,  and
WHEREAS it is desirable that the
Ubyssey become a forum for the interchange
of ideas among members of the student
body of this university,
as well as a medium
of expression for the
use of each of them,
THEREFORE, in accordance with
clause II, sections 1
and 4 of the constitution of the Literary
and Scientific Executive,
IT IS MOVED that this executive
recommend to the
Students' Council that
it instruct the Publications Board to encourage and accept —
without change of context or title — contributions from members of the student
body on any subject,
with preference for
articles dealing with
economic, political
and social matters as
well as for original
poems and stories,
under a set of rules
arrived at in consultation with tha Students'
Council and patterned
after that oel out in
the appendix to this
motion.
APPENDIX
i     Artid'-s may be on any subject
but   .Wild   aim   at   a   high
standard of English, and a
logical, scientific presentation
of fact or argument.
ii Provided that they meet the
required standards, all contributions not surpassing a
maximum of 1000 words must
be printed within a reasonable
time so long as not more than
one full page (exclusive of
advertisements) is necessary
for them in each issue.
iii If the number of contributions
exceed., all available space, the
editorial board shall choose the
ones to be accepted bearing in
mind the principles outlined
in this motion.
iv If, in the opinion of the editorial board, the number of
articles on any one subject
should reach unwieldy proportions, the situation might be
clarified by an editorial, an
article by an Impartial outside
authority, or two or more
articles by outside outhorities
representing the different
viewpoints.
v For the protection of the
Ubyssey and the Alma Mater
Society, a clause should be
inserted in the masthead,
asserting that responsibility
for the opinions expressed
rests with the authors alone.
Aggies Told Of
Rum And Mixer
• MIXER WORE expensive than
the rum it's mixed villi was
the report from Jamaica brought
t( member.; of tho junior d.vision,
Agricultural Institute of Canada
Wednesday by Iwj U13C agricultural stu louts from that Driti.sh
West   Indi;.u   island.
Actu.il vest of producing rum o.i
Jamaica is about six ccals a gallon. Winston Dombville told thc
meeting. Thc producer'.-! profit is
about 50 cents a gallon.
Tremendous tuxes boost thc retail price to about $l.i*5 a bottle.
h' said. A b jttle con'iins about
20 swigs, which makes ci.eh drink
co.st about ei'iht and a. c-half
e< nts.
COKE Ml\
"Jamaicans u-ually mi\ llvii
mm wilh coke, which costs 12
cents a battle all the i-latvi. So
the coke costs more than t'K rum."
he  stat  d.
NOTICE
• THE Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra under the direction
of William Steinberg has very
kindly agreed to come out to
the University at noon on Friday, November 23, and to give
a performance in thc Armoury.
In order that those who cure
to may attend this concert all
lectures and laboratories from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. will he
tunccllvd,
J. N. FINLAYSON,
Acting-President.
Free Ticket For
Science Ball Idea
•    SC1ENCKMEN   are   oft' "jc!   a
chunre  t>  win  a  fn\> ticket  io
ihe   Science  Ball.
To win this ticl'.ci lh" si'ence-
m n must write a them ■ er slogan
for this lag event and h aid it in
Ii. his class representative on thc
laiaineer's Undergraduate Society
ex entice, before 11:30 p.m. next
Tuesday.
Student Directory
Arrives Tuesday
• TUESDAY is thc day when the
BC Telephone Co.'s troubles start
to go up. This is because thc
Student Directory will nt long last
arrive on thc campus, Editor Bruce
Lowther announced Friday,
The harassed editor admitted
th* little hook is a trifle late, hut
explained this as n result of midterms and various other nuisances.
Thc price of thc indispensable
little book Is a mere ten cents. It
will he sold at the Quad box office,
the foot of the enf stairs, and the
AMS office.
Exchange Anxious
To Close Accounts
9 MONDAY November 1!). from
12:30 to 1:30 is positively the
last, opportunity for :ttudonts t >
pick up unsold books at the Boak
Exchange, states Boh lorrie,
manager.
MEET OREGON WEBFOOTS
AGAIN TO-NIGHT IN GYM
By LUKE MOYLS
•   UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Webfoots jumped to an 8-0
lead in the first few minutes of the opening hoop game
of the two-game series against UBC Thunderbirds and held
that lead right through tiie game to take a 58-50 victory over
the 'Birds at UBC Gym Friday night.
The Thunderbirds showed flashes of brilliant play in
the first half but they didn't have their shooting eyes.
Sandy Robertson, however, led the Blue and Gold cagers
by potting 22 points for the Thunderbird crowd.
The Ducks held a 31-23 lead as they walked off the
floor at half time.
———————'———————— During   the   intermission,   the
Jokers Club presented "Percy", a
crowd-shy duck, to Captain Bob
Hamilton of the Webfoots.
Ducks Advertise
Saturday's Game
• THREE MYSTERIOUS   white
ducks which appeared in the
Caf, Thursday afternoon, again
roamed the campus Friday.
The uproar started ln front of
the Brock Hall when each of these
web-footed creatures began towing a distracted Joker through the
mud. The procession, decked in
blue and gold streamers, paraded
toward the quad wbere they
caused a minor riot.
The purpose of this commotion
was to advertise Saturday's game
between the UBC Thunderbirds
and the Oregon "Web-foots. The
Jokers are attempting to build up
the UBC spirit by creating a disturbance. They hope it will bring
more of the students to Saturday's
game.
UBC Loan Drive
Passes Quota
• NINTH VICTORY loan on the
campus went over tho top with
a total of $100,100, announced Cal,
Whitehead, chairman of the loan
committee.
Loan officials at the Kitsilano-
West Point Grey unit headquarters expressed complete satisfaction with the results. They had
not set a quota for the campus but
had hoped to realize $50,000.
STUDENT EFFORT
"It must be remembered," said
Whitehead, "that the total raised
was from the student body. The
faculty were not canvassed."
Throughout the three weeks of
the drive Mr. V. J. Wolfenden,
victory loan salesman, operated a
sales booth in the Administration
building. Day to day result* were
recorded on a Victory Loan Barometer which was erecvod in the
quad.
In the second half of'the hoop
tilt the Thunderbirds poured on
the pressure and although ' they
never took the lead they came
within a basket of Oregon on two
occasions.
The Oregon quintet bounces back
for another appearance against
the UBC Thunderbirds in the Var-
• THE GAME will be broadcast
by the UBC Radio Society
through the facilities of CKWX.
Bill Mackinnon will handle the
play-by-play ..account. .Between
periods Ray Perrault and Lloyd
Bulmur are scheduled to give
game statistics and other extra
color stories about the battle,
sity Gym tonight with tip-off time
slated for 8:30 again.
Basketball fans will get a chance
to see the Webfoots in action on
another maple court when Ducks
move over to the Brock Hall for
the Webfoot Waddle, a dance
which the Men's Athletic Directorate is presenting In honor of
the Oregon cagers.
When at least one of a couple
can produce his or her AMS pass,
the couple will be admitted free to
the dance.
FUTURE GAMES
Next In line for the Thunderbird
cagers are the Victoria Dominoes.
The two clubs will probably play
in Victoria next Saturday night,
with the return game slated for
the UBC Gym on December 1.
Following that, the 'Birds hoopsters take on University cf Washington in a two-game series on
December 7 and 8, and conclude
the pre-season slate here with another two-game series against
Washington State Cougars on December 21 and 22.
ELECTIONEERS MEET WITH
GREAT VARIETY OF RESPONSE
By BOB MUNGALL
•   MOCK PARLIAMENT PARTY LEADERS wound up
their   campaigns   Thursday   noon   in   an   atmosphere
reminiscent of the good old days when an election was
essentially an excuse for a brawl between Whigs and Tories.
The first speaker, Grant Living
stone, Progressive Conservative,
referred his audience to the Thursday edition of The Ubyssey for
the outline of his party's platform.
He went on to extol the merits! of
free enterprise as advocated by
the Progressive Conservatives.
His statement that Canada as a
nation was built by the Tories met
with a varied but vocal response.
Tiie next speaker, Liberal leader
Harry Castillou, carefully donned
his spectacles and then proceeded
to outline    his party's policy.
Reminiscing, Castillou remarked.
"Why I can remember when I
was eight years old—" and at this
point was interrupted by loud
cheers of encouragement from tho
audience.
MAIN PLANKS
CCF leader Dob Harwood stress-
' d security and control of big
business as the main planks of his
party's platform. Undeterred by
repeated shouts of "Time" and
"Sit down." ho wenf on to say that
a CCF government would provide
state insurance covering ok! age,
unemployment, children and "othjr
unavoidable  accidents."
Least    gland-stimulating    and
most    serious    of   tho    election
speeches was made by Labor Progressive Gordon Martin.
LOADED
Savins his loaded language for
I lie last part of his address. Martin declared that the Labor Progressive policy of on.' rule of
justice for all could not be provided by a "Tory government of
colonels."
Cigar-flourishing  Dave  Williams
attempted to clarify the position
of the Retrogressive Progressives
and succeeded in getting more
laughs than any of his predecessors. Stated Williams, "We are
definitely to the left of the Pro-
pressive Conservatives, almost as
far to the left as the Labor Progressive Party.
The Retrogressive Progressives
are firmly anchored to the ground
while the CCF is located about
two feet above it, the Liberals
arc out on the reservations, and
the Progressive Conservatives are
way, way out in the hills."
New Elections
For Mock Parl't
• THUIISDAY'S Mod: Parliament elections resulted in a
threo way split between Progressive Conservatives, CCF and Labor   Progressives.
In the opinion of P.ulianientary
Forum executive the standing of
the parties is neither conducive
to a successful Mock Parliament,
nor is it representative of thc student body. They feel that the
.situation could result in very unfavorable and misleadin i publicity
for  tho  university.
Students are urged 'e> turn out
; iid record their votes a* the new
(lection io be held 12:Si), Monday,
in   thc  Auditorium. THE UBYSSEY, Saturday, November 17,1945, Page 2
Quite A Problem For All
EDITORIAL PACE   .   .   .
Judging from the length of our letters to
the editor columns, people are taking more
interest in the Ubyssey. This is natural, as
the Ubyssey, in attempting to reflect student
activities and opinions is having fresh transfusions of thought on controversial topics
because never before has there been such a
richly varied cross-section of students
attending university.
A recommendation forwarded to the Pub-
lications Board by the Literary and Scientific
executive in a meeting last week that The
Ubyssey publish voluntary student contributions touching on present social, economic,
and political problems is another healthy
sign, but is an old question which keeps
bobbing up again and again in AMS meetings every year. A representative of the
Publications Board is attending an LSE
meeting next week to answer the recommendation, and perhaps it might be just as
well to present the pros and cons of the
problem'before the student body at this
point.
The Publications Board constitution states
that the Ubyssey should provide a medium
for articles deemed acceptable by the editorial board. The little word "acceptable"
serves as a protection to the student body as
a whole against libel and indecency, and
against a few who might wish access to the
columns of the Ubyssey for political propaganda purposes.
It is logical that the onus of deciding
whether or not articles should be printed
should fall on the shoulders of the editors of
the Ubyssey who are fairly seasoned in
judging the readibility rating of various
articles. In regard to controversial topics,
it has never been the editorial policy of the
Ubyssey to play politics and sometimes one
has to be a Solomon to judge whether or
not controversial topics are being dealt with
fairly. We are doing the best we can.    .
Although we appreciate voluntary contributions for the Ubyssey we very seldom
receive them. This lack of student response
coupled with tightening of space in the
Ubyssey, led us to establish our literary
quarterly "The Thunderbird" in the hope
that students would be roused out of their
apathy to write about "social, economic, and
political" problems and ensure them a
medium for their articles. The editor of the
Thunderbird assures us that with the final
Thunderbird deadline five days away, there
have been no controversial articles handed
in.
As to expressions on highly speculative
and controversial topics, the Ubyssey takes
the view that instead of offering an expression of editorial opinion we leave students
to draw their own conclusions.
However, we are considering the establishment of a little rider above columns and
articles to the effect that they "do not
necessarily reflect the editorial policy of the
paper".
Meanwhile, if you want to write articles
turn them in first to the Thunderbird. We
are continually receiving complaints that we
are not giving enough news publicity to
activities on the campus.
What do you think of the problem?
Brock on Full Time Schedule
Club members on the campus are going
to have more room for club activities very
soon if plans now being investigated by
Students' Council to keep Brock Hall open
evenings materialize.
Although it will cost the students a larger
portion of their AMS fees to run the student
building on a full-tine basis, they "will find it
well worth the extra money, which is fairly
plentiful this year, even if the proposed
schedule served only to provide evening
lounging space for off-the-campus boarders.
As it is now, a few rooms in the building
are'booked several nights a week, and the
extra effort in throwing open the rest of the
building to clubs will not be great.
Several other students have suggested that
Brock Hall be kept open during the Christmas holidays for boarding servicemen and
others who are too far away from their
homes to go away for the Christmas holidays.
If the plan is at all feasible it should be
carried through.
PEEPER'S   PAPER
BY PEEPER
• "I deem it desirable," declared James
Steadfast of the Student Christian Movement, as he gazed fixedly at young D'Arcy
Westmoreland, "that a man should ever act
in accordance with the highest moral
precepts."
Westmoreland was on his feet of an instant, prepared to deliver himself of some
cheek, but I silenced him with a blow of my
cane upon his head. The action was unnecessary, for a strong voice broke upon us
from a far corner of the Alcove, and compelled our attention. The speaker was
Michael Flint, a student of law who has but
lately given up a commission with Montgomery's army after distinguished service
in the Italian Peninsular Campaign.
"And pray sir," quoth Flint, lighting his
pipe and fixing Steadfast with a keen, sidelong glance, "would you, for the benefit of
the Club, define a 'high moral precept'?"
Gave Him the 18th Century Air
Steadfast was silent for several moments
and then unaccountably he began to drum
his fingers upon the table, humming the
while an 18th century air. Flint sat amidst
a cloud of smoke, still looking intently upon
Steadfast, when of a sudden the latter was
upon his feet and, muttering the word
"blazes" several times over, he seized his
leathern jerkin and haversack, and flung out
of Underbill's in a great huff.
I am sensible that I should condemn the
haste of Steadfast's action but indeed I cannot, for I have heard him stopped upon the
first line of a discourse in a like manner
above a score of imes in as many days.
Moreover I recall that before Flint arrived
in our midst, Steadfast oftimes held the floor
for the better part of an afternoon, and
acquitted himself nobly too.
Charming Nelly Blythe
James Steadfast is in all ways an estimable
man. As I have already informed you, he is
active in the Student Christian Movement.
His exploits in the field of sports are well
known, and he is one of the stalwarts of the
Glee Club. I am given to understand that
it was through his affiliation with the Musical Society that he struck up an acquaintanceship with Nell Blythe, that most
excellent and promising young soprano, and
this romance happily continues. I believe
he is a member of a Greek letter society and
although the name of the group escapes me,
I recall hearing a member of the Club describe it as the largest in existence.
Smoking and Socrates
After the unhappy event I have commemorated occurred, the gentlemen of the Club
rose up and left one by one, till soon only
Flint and I remained.
We smoked in silence for several hours,
during which time I reflected upon philosophy. How unfortunate it is, and how
ironical, that Socrates should have given to
the world of philosophy the didactic method
of discourse — a method which perhaps he
alone of all men has been able to use to
constructive advantage! Here was poor
Flint, a sound enough fellow it is true, in all
good faith attempting to clarify and advance
a discourse with an instrument he was incapable of using, and succeeding only in
rendering our disagreement more precise
and alas! more violent.
The matter continued to occupy my attention even as I attended a most splendid
showing of flowers on the following evening,
and that same night I suffered a nightmare
in which I envisaged the whole world of
men discoursing in the didactic method.
I awoke the next morning with a severe
siezure of the colic, and was unable on that
account to attend a concert of some Purcell
concerto — an event which I had eagerly
anticipated for some weeks.
URGENTLY NEEDED
for EX-SERVICE UNDERGRADUATES
New or Second-hand Copies of
Short History of Engli.h       Century Reading, in
. . . Lnglish Literature
Literature - Legouis (F;fth Edition)
Please deliver or mail to
University Book Store
m the Auditorium Building
• Beauty-On-The-Sp#t
• THOSE STUDENTS whose perusal of the local press
transcends the activities of "Dagwood" and others of
that ilk, may not have noticed recent stories re the advisability of establishment of "Free Port Zones" in Vancouver
and other seaport cities. Being curious by nature and on the
spot by design, I decided to investigate what was meant by this
term and what advantages, if any, would accrue to Canada
and British Columbia if these "Zones" became a reality.
that
It appears that a "Free Port
Zone" (or "Foreign Trade Zone"
as it Ls sometimes called! means
an isolated, enclosed and policed
area, within a seaport. In this
area, goods may be imported without payment of custom duties, and
may be cleaned, sorted, re-packed,
manufactured into finished articles
and shipped to foraign countries.
The advocates of a "Free Port"
point to these advantages and urge
..A
JACQUIE ROBINSON
that they would contribute greatly
to the expansion of Canada's export trade.
The two largest and most suc-
cesful "Free Ports" are located in
what was Hamburg and in Trieste.
The only one on this continent ia
in the Port of New York In the
case of the European ports mentioned, there is evidently a real
need for this system, ;i3 thty are
located in high-tariff countries and
normally enjoy an immense reexport trade to the many contigu-
LETTERS To
The Editor
Dear Madam:
In wishing to draw the following
matter to one concerned I would
say to the Illegal Possessor of one
Brief Case and Contents therein.
I am annoyed and concerned.
Annoyed; not so much in that you
possess that which is rightfully
mine and which bears a monetary
value of approximately thirty dollars (my re-establishment credit),
than in that fact that it will be
very difficult to replace every one
of those most necessary articles.
Concerned; not so much that I have
been the victim of someone else's
wrongdoing, than in the very
nature and circumstances of this
event and the fantastic insincerity
of a person who could present himself in such a place as a University
on one hand and, on the other
demonstrate such complete moronity and lacking (more than a brief
case).
During the war we often dive-
bombed little schools; schools once
attended by children, now being
used by the Germans for headquarters or supply dumps throughout France, Belgium, and Holland.
And this always seemed to tne to
be exactly Bloody awful as neces-.
sary as it was. Bloody awful to
impede the education of anyone,
particularly the wretched and ragged little urchins below us whose
only hope in the future could be
found in what they would learn
and be taught after the Hun had
been beaten and the dust cleared
away.
But more damnable and sickening to mind, I find, is to return to
peace, to your own land, to your
native campus where the true intellectual worth and ethical quality
of a nation's people should be
found, and there be confronted
with common, sneaking, inmature
thievery. What hope for those
little urchins? What hope for you
— you illegal possessor of one
brief case and the contents therein.
And there is less hope, I fear, in
an appeal to what compromise and
consideration you might have and
one request I would make: though
you obviously feel the need for a
brief case could you please return,
by mail or otherwise, the lecture
notes you will find within it and
which represent all I have to show
for two months labor and difficulty.
And Sir — it is my deepest prayer
that you and I have no more in
common than we have at present
— namely one brief case nnd the
contents therein.
"NOMAD"
Note: Mailing Address: 2365 W. 15th
ous consuming states—as many as
twenty-six in the case of Hamburg.' The one in New York had
some success until the outbreak of
war, when the greater part of the
zone was pre-empted for war
purposes.
CANADA'S CASE
However, in the case of Canada,
I find that the present customs
laws (unlike European cr American regulations) are such that our
merchants and manufacturers may
now operate just as if they were
located in a "Free Port." Und.»r
our law .imported goods may be
placed into customs "Sufferance"
warehouses, or bonded premises
owned or rented by an importer,
and such goods may be cleaned,
packed or re-packed at any time
whilst in bond and exported whenever convenient, without payment
of duties.
Similarly, manufacturers may
import raw or finished materials,
incorporate them into finished articles, export them to China, or
Timbuctoo for that matter, and
receive from the customs .? refund
of 99 per cent of the duty paid on
the imported goods. The odd one
per cent is retained by the customs to cover the bookkeeping
costs involved In making the refund.
This being so, therefore, I am of
the opinion that "Free Ports" in
Canada would not enhance its export or import trade, and that
their establishment would only be
an expensive and unnecessary
duplication of existing facilities.
— Jacquie Robinson.
• NEXT WEEK'S Beauty-on-Uie-
Spot wUl be Trish Rogers. Her
article Is due ln the Pub office by
one p.m. Thursday. It must be
typed and double-spaced.
f/te   MinfUetf,
Offices Brock Hall    -    -    Phone ALma 1624
For Advertising
Campus Subscriptions—11.50
Mail Subscriptions—$2.00
KErrlsd ale 1811
Issued every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday by the Students'
Publication Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  MARDEE DUNDAS
GENERAL STAFF SATURDAY STAFF
News Editor Ron Haggart        Senior Editor  Jack Ferry
Features Editor .... Peter Duval        Associate Editors:  Don Ferguson,
.,,. _... _      _. .   , Harry     Castillou,     Rosmary
CUP Editor Don Stainsby „  , ,
Hodgins.
Business Manager .... Bob Estey
Photography Editor ... Pat Worth-        Assistant Editors: Bruce Lowther,
ington. Betty Motherwell.
Sports Editor Luke Moyls        Reporters: Howie Wolfe, Val Sears,
Associate Don McClean Phyllis Reid, PrisciUa Scott, Mary
Reynolds,   Gerry   Foote,   Grant
Reporters . . Fred Crombie, Dave Livingstone Jim Aitken, Beverley
Barker, Chuck Bryant, Dave Cornuer'    Charl°tte    Schroeder,
Comparelli, Pat Gardiner, Jo Peg*y Wilkinson, Bob Mungall,
Castillou ^oan Grimmett, P"'l Ashton, Jean
Jamieson, Irene Nelson.
First with the Late*
aad tfat
Classical,
Popular
R.C.A. Victor Recording
ENGLISH GRAMOPHONE
SHOP
549 Howe St. MAr. 0749
Your kitchen requires more down-to-earth
planning than any other room, for it it the
hub of living in the modern home. While
the perfect kitchen has yet to be built,
"kltcheneers" throughout the land are
coming closer all the time with step-
saving arrangements of range, refrigerator, sink and cabinets. For sound basic
plans and a variety of tried and tested
modern ideas, write to our Home Service
Department   for   your   FREE   copy   of
"KITCHEN PLANNING."
II       IS    lillSII ■■——Uk
R-44.45
Your bank it a link between the man
in Canada who has goods and services
fo buy or sell, and his customers abroad.
The business of your bank is not all done ia dollars and cents;
It readers valuable service to Canadian business in the far-off
market places of the world, overcoming the obstacles of strange
currencies, be they pesos' or piasters, escudos or rupees.
Through its commercial correspondents aad business conaectioas
all over the globe, your bank often has the specialized information necessary to bring buyer aad seller together, no matter
how far apart they live.
Your bank is able to gather information on the reliability of
foreign firms, to handle letters of credit, to arrange the complicated exchange of funds, performing an individual, intricate and
inexpensive service to importers aad exporters alike.
This feature of Canadian banking has a direct bearing .on your
Welfare. It has, through many years, developed the sale of Canadian goods abroad, resulting in more jobs for Canadian men
and women.
Tbli    Advertisement     is     Sponsored    by     your     Bank Saturday, November 17, 1945
Page 4
ma
0
LUKE MOYLS, Sports Editor
the gospel..
according to Luke Moyls      ,
HOSPITALITY AT UBC
• IF THERE'S ANYTHING I like about UBC, it's its
hospitality. There's nothing quite like it, for the
Thunderbirds go to all sorts of trouble to make visitors feel
at home.   And I'm glad to see it.
I've taken in such places as breed USC Trojans, UCLA
and Alberta Golden Bears, Washington and Saskatchewan-
Huskies, and even Gonzaga Bulldogs, but none of them can
be compared with the Thunderbirds' nest here on the bluffs
of Point Grey when it comes to hospitality.
It seems they even tell the weatherman what to do when
they're entertaining a, bunch of visitors. Only last week
they provided snow for the Alberta Polar Bears, and now
they're making the Oregon Webfoots feel right at home with
plenty of rain and extra puddles for the Ducks.
It was Only A High School
But speaking of visiting places reminds me of something
I saw down in California in September. We were driving
through Hollywood on our way to the Los Angeles Tennis
Club one bright, sunshiny day, when we happened upon a
large learning institution.
We thought it might be one of those small colleges (any
college that takes up less than 10 city blocks is considered
small down there) of which there are many in those parts.
But on second glance, we noticed a name on one of the
buildings which read, "Hollywood High School."
Driving around behind the layout, we discovered a small-
sized playing field of only about twice the dimensions of
UBC's Stadium, and a couple of hundred kids running
around on it.
We'll Be Kind To Victoria
Most of them were clad in colorful American football
uniforms, but over on one side there was a bunch of them
dressed in ordinary shorts and sweaters.
Looking at them more closely, we were amazed to discover
they were practising ENGLISH RUGBY.
We found out later that rugger is a popular game down
in California, and they have the same problem down there
that Vancouver high schools ran into this fall. Students
must choose between football and rugger, for both are played
in the fall.
All this talk of English rugby reminds me that UBC's
Thunderbird fifteen swings into action here next Saturday
when they open the McKechnie Cup competition by entertaining Victoria's Crimson Tide.
The Thunderbirds will probably be just as hospitable to
the Islanders as they have been to the other visitors. Mr.
Weatherman, we'll be looking for a big dose of fog next
weekend.
Bill's Haircutting Shop
3759 West 10th Ave.
Ladles and Gents Haircutting
Schick, Remington, Sunbeam
Electric Shaven For Sale
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Specialty
INVITATIONS, 'AT HOME'
LETTERHEADS  and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
566 Seymour St.
LOST
e BOOK OF about 40 interurban
tram tickets, lost In the quad at
12:30 Wednesday. Please return to
AMS office.
LOST
0   BLACK     RONSON     lighter,
Friday,  9:30   a.m.  In  Applied  Sc.
building.    Please  return  to AMS
office.
LOST
e ONE PAIR dark brown kid
gloves in or around caf or Georgia, Thursday last between 11:30
and 2 p.m. Reply to AMS office or
Joyce Carr, AL 1226L.
LOST
e GREEN SHAEFFER lifetime
pen between Ap. Sc. and Pure Sc.
Thursday last. Finder please phone
Merv. Stewart, AL 0056
LOST
e ONE STRING of pearls lost
Wednesday night, November 8.
Probably at football game (Capilano Stadium), South Granville
(Blue Boy) or on 12th Ave., near
Wallace. Reward. Return to AMS
office.
LOST
e BLACK WALLET with zipper
on campus, Saturday morning
November 10. Reward. Return to
0 LOST: A white raincoat from
the Mining Building on Wednesday.   Tag 'England' on the collar.
Dueck Chevrolet Oldsmobile
LTD.
USED CARS COMPLETE
COLLISION REPAIRS LUB1JCATION
TIRES SERVICE
CARS FOR HIRE BUDGET SERVICE
Everything For Your Car
1305 W. Broadway BAy. 4661
'BIRDS MEETIDUCKS
AGAIN  TONIGHT
•   THUNDERBIRD HOOPERS thunder onto the maple
courts here at UBC again tonight when they meet the
University of Oregon Ducks in the second game of their
annual two-game series.   Game time is 8:30,
The Blue and Gold cagers opened the series in the Varsity
Gym last night, and the Oregonians will fly back to Eugene
tomorrow morning.
e   McKECHNIE CUP BATTLES ON TAP - UBC's ru gger fans will see top flight English rugby here next
Saturday when the Varsity Thunderbirds tangle with Victoria's Crimson Tide in the opening game of the
McKechnie Cup Race.   Here's a shot from last year's McKechnie Cup final down at the Brockton Oval.   The
Thunderbirds had little trouble taking a 17-6 victory and the massive hunk of silverware.
MILLER CUP RACE RESUMES
VARSITY  XV'S PLAY
by Fred Crombie
TODAY
•   THE MILLER CUP RACE resumes this afternoon after a two week lay-off, with all three-
University fifteens seeing action.   Two of  these,  Varsity Thunderbirds  and  Varsity
Veterans, are in a tie for first place with Meralomas and so they will be going all out in an
endeavour to maintain their positions.
SPORT CARD
SATURDAY, NOV. 17
Basketball
8:30—Oregon Webfoots vs UBC
Thunderbirds,  Varsity
Oym.
English Rugby
2:45—UBC vs Ex-Britannia,
Varsity Qym.
3:00—Varsity Vets vs Meralomas
Brockton Oval.
3:00—Varsity vs Rowing Club,
Lower Brockton.
Soccer
2:30—Varsity vs Savoys,
Varsity's Upper Field.
2:30—UBC vs Coquitlam,
Kerrisdale Park.
INTRAMURALS
MONDAY'S SCHEDULE
Touch Football
Quarter Finals — Kappa Sigma vs
Jokers; Lambdas vs Phi Kappa
Sigma
Volleyball
Zeta Beta Tau vs Engineers; VCF
vs Psi Upsilon
TUESDAY'S SCHEDULE
Touch Football
Alpha   Delta   Phi   vs   VCF;   Zeta
Beta Tau vs Phi Kappa Pi
Volleyball
Jokers vs Anglican College; Delta
Upsilon vs Phi Delta Theta at 7:00
p.m.; Lambdas vs Sigma Phi Delta;
Phi Kappa Sigma vs Ex-Army at
7:30 p.m.
• LETTERS To
The Editor
Dear Madam:
In Saturday, November 10's issue
of The Ubyssey, Mr. Affleck, in a
letter to the editor, wrote: "Ever
so often your paper comer, out
with a dellciously ridiculous article." I might add that ever so
often your paper comes out with
an unbelievably ridiculous letter.
Mr. Affleck's is one of thorn.
There ia only one point that deserves mention among the mass of
puerile, idiotic drivd which constitutes tho thought of Mr. Affleck's letter, namely, that the
members of a fraternity have no
common  interests and aims.
Fraternities are aimed at moud-
ing bette: citizens by creating
fellowship and engaging in righteous and creditable activities.
Some of these activities include:
intramural sports, charitable undertakings like the Reel Cross
Rail, a more exemplary and pur;?
conduct in everyday life, a higher
standard of scholarship, and in
general, a more worthy participation in university and ccminunity
life. All fraternity men have a
common interest in these1 aims if
they belong to a fraternity at
UBC.
Some clubs, like tha Student
Christian Movement, endeavor to
follow these objectives, but the
methods employed are fundamentally different. The Play;rs' Club,
as Mr. Affleck rightly points out.
ha.s only one common intivcst ana
aim, the production of plays. This
i.s very worthy in its own right
but in the last a:i;,lysi, \~ not a.s
altruistic : . the aims of : ay fraternity   on  th •   campus.
Mr. Affleck'.-; unfortunate letter
will be excused, I hope. ,m tho
grounds of  ignorance.
TERRY JULIAN.
In the day's feature attraction,
the Vets are favored to win by a
close margin over Meralomas at
Brockton Oval at 3 o'clock. Thc
teams aro very closely matched
and it should be a great battle all
the way with the Varsity squad
having just a slight edge with their
tremendous speed In the baekfleld.
BIRDS VS. VRC
Down at Lower Brockton, thi
Thunderbirds will try to get back
into stride again using the dangerous Rowing Club as their stepping
stone.
The 'Birds have had a difficult
time in winning against two of
their last three opponents, just
scraping out a win against Ex-
Britannia and losing badly to the
Vets. This game may be just what
they need to establish them as the
club to beat the final dash to the
wire.
Also trying to hit a winning
stride is the UBC team which
meets * Ex-Britannia at Varsity
Stadium at 2:45. The Blue and
Gold's only win of the ycar came
against the Brits In th» season's
opener.
PRACTICES START
With the first McKechnie Cup
tilt of the season slated for the
Stadium in just one week, Head
Coach Dan Doswell request* the
following players to turn out to
practices next week. Forwards:
Dob Lawson, Tom McLaughlin.
Barrie Morris, Joo Pegues, Hartt
Crosby, Keith MacDonald. Harry
Kabush, Barney Curby, Alex Carlyle, Bill Lighthill and Chuck
Wills.
Backs: Bob Croll. Maury Moyls,
Bud Spiers, Lloyd Williams, Tom
McCusker, Len Mitten, Andy
Fleck, Fred Linsey, Gordle McKenzie, John Wheeler, and Doug
Caldescott.
Although the team has not practised yet, it is expected that this
year's McKechnie Cup sctuad will
be one of the most formidable to
ever take the field for the Blue
and Gold. Doswell has called
practices for Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday at 5
o'clock.
Legion To Help
Vets Find Homes
• IN AN EFFORT to help married ex-servicemen, Legion or
non-Legion, solve their accommodation problems the Canadian
Legion is asking that all concerned
call at tho Legion office in room 8.
hut 1. and give all information
concerning their difficulties to Mr:;.
Alice Keating, the Legion secretary.
It is essential that the office know
how many couples need accommodation and how urgent or
ihronic their problems arc. As
many of the Legion members received the letter announcing the
business meeting on November 7
too late, this will be a chance to
obtain   some   assistance.
CHEMISTRY I
and
MATHS I
Special Coaching
SHURPDSS
5th and GranviUe
BAy. 9497
• RUGGER  STAR-Joe   Pegues
strips for action this afternoon
when Varsity tackles the Vancouver Rowing Club fifteen down
at Lower Brockton. The blond
bomber will be working for a spot
on the McKechnie Cup team too
when practices start next week.
• LOST—Commerce  2  accounting  text  on  Friday  morning.
Please phone A. D. Scott, KErrls-
dale 0526, or the AMS office.
UBC Hoopers
Cop Two Tilts
• CONTRARY to the results
published in Thursday's News-
Herald, the Varsity cagers were
not walloped again; in fact it was
the Varsity cagers who did the
walloping, to the tune of 43-21 in
the Inter A game, and 51-23 in the
Inter B game.
The Inter A's, playing a zone
defence, took about half a game
to get cracking. The Lancers found
it almost Impossible to crack the
defence, but good shooting on
their part helped to keep the game
interesting.
The score at half time was 11-10
in favor of Varsity, but the boys
settled down In the second half
and played a good steady ball
game.
USE ZONE, TOO
The Inter B's' were also trying
out a zone defence, but switched
back and forth from man-to-man
throughout the game. Thc boys
were good on the defensive rebounds, but the forward breaks
were not clicking so well, due to
quite a few long passes.
Bill's Meat Market were really
fighting for their points, but the
Varsity team had it all over them
from the start.
High scorer for Varsity was
Boyes with 16 points, and close
behind him was Mathews with
14 points.
-BARKER
• LOST: White Waterman's pencil In Arts 204 on Tuesday. Please
turn In at AMS Office.
• LOST: A maroon Waterman's
fountain pen in Ap. Sc. 100 between
12:30 and 1:30 Wednesday, November 7. Please return to AMS
office.  Reward.
• LOST: Novado wrist watch,
brown leather strap. $20 reward
for recovery, Phone AL1761R.
Sandy Vye.
Bill Watts, president of thc UBC
Radio Society, annouced Friday
that tonight's hoop fiasco will be
broadcast over radio station
CKWX, and there is a possibility
that ths game may be sent south
over Mutual to Oregon.
WEBFOOT WADDLE
Following the tilt, th» Men's
Athletic Diretcorate is putting on
a dance, the "Webfoot Waddle," in
the Brock Hall, especially for the
Oregon Webfoots. Dancing will be
from 9 till 12.
Next in line for the Thunderbirds are Victoria Dominoes. The
Varsity quintet may play tne
island squad in Victoria next Saturday night with a return game
slated here for Saturday, December 1.
Following that, the 'Birds are
scheduled to meet Washington's
Huskies in a two-game terles here
at UBC, December 7 and 8.
VARSITY GALS
COP CAGE WIN
• VARSITY'S Senior B Girls'
basketball squad racked up a
51-16 victory as they shellacked the
inexperienced Army and Navy
quintet in their second game of
the season at King Ed Gym Wednesday night.
It was a victory for Vanity from
the opening tip-off, but the coed
outfit didn't start rolling until the
second half. TTiey excelled on
fast-breaks which Invariably netted
them baskets.
Outstanding for UBC were Nora
McDermott, who garnered II
points, Taddy Knapp, Phebe Man-
ley and Audrey McKlm.
• LOST: Last Wednesday, "Anatole France" and "French Review
Grammar". Urgently needed,
please return to AMS office or
phone Mercedes Fairfax, FRaser
4120.   Reward.
CUTE 'N COSY
and cuddlcsomc as can be!    Glowing
yellow angora spiced with embroidery . . .
the one-of-a-kind-set sketched   .    .    .   $7.95
Then too, there are wool and angora
sets in all your favorite colors —
red, blue, green, powder, beige, and
wine.    Gloves, Scarf, and Beret    ,    .    $5.73
(Did we hear someone say "Christmas
Gifts?" . . . it's a swell idea!)
—GIoi'cs. lU'int   Finn-.
Tj^ttl>£0ttVT5fln (Sompamt
INCOIPUHAliD •Week-end  Review
And Preview By lee gidney
• The MOST IMPORTANT evening   of  the  coming  week   is
that of Thursday, November 22,
when Joseph Szigeti will be playing at the Strand Theatre. That's
all you need to know if you have
hoard Szigeti—and if you haven't,
you should. Last time 'te played
here I sat in the second row with
an irate friend. Irate not with me,
you understand, but with o large
bald   person,   a   refugee,   in   the
• THE CHRISTMAS Plays went
in quite an elegant manner, though
the elegance cracked very realistically In the mob-scene in "Altar-
Piece." I was afraid for a moment
lest some of them had been let
loose in the audience in thc dark.
* *
• "TRUE ART springs out of the
lives of the people," said Elmore Philpott, at the official opening of the new show at the Art
Gallery, "B.C. at Work," which ls
sponsored   by   the   Labor   Arts
• Guild and the B.C. Trade Unions
to the tune of $500 in prizes.
Mr. Philpott's short address in
his usual calm and slightly grating
voice stressed these factors: tho
need of the artist for subsidy whether through private or group
sponsorship, so that he may eat;
economic conditions which will
permit the full development of
the creative arts; and the need for
consumers—"Artists also need appreciation, they need audiences."
lite prizes ranged in amounts
from that of $40, won by Elizabeth
Amess for her oil painting "Line
Testing," to $100. There were three
of these $100 prizes: one for wood-
* *
• LAST minute notes: Though I
hate to mar my unbroken record
by agreeing with someone I would
like to add my small support to
Ferry and the CBC. urnnted that
the CBC has plenty of things
wrong with It, the chief of these
in my opinion is the Canadian
audience.
Arrival in New York, with its
attendant  excitements   and   alar-
row ahead, who talked throughout
in penetrating whispers, to the an-
noyance not only of my friend,
but also, at one point, of Mr,
Szigeti, who, six feet in front of
him, was doing his damndest to
play an unaccompanied Bach Cha-
conne, Tire war's end has released
so many sufferers I may be pardoned for hoping it ha3 released
us from the whispering 'Baron."
And the sets for "The Rainmaker"
were very fine, and painted for
the play by Dorothy Willis, who
won an honorable mention in the
water color section of the "B.C.
at Work" show at the Art Gallery.
carving, won by Llllas Farley's
"End of Shift"; one for oi> painting, won by fifteen-year-old Arnold Belkln's "Workers on a
Streetcar"; and one for water
colors, won by the old master himself, John Leonard Shadbolt, recently returned from his stint as
a war records' artist In London
and winning prizes as usual before
he can properly get his feet wet
in the remarkably thick mist
we've been having lately.
There were two things In the
ahow I would like to own, Cliff
Robinson's oil, "Wharf at Steves-
ton," and Lieutenant Shadbolt's
"Workers Going Home, Marpole
Bridge." With Mr. Philpott, I
realize the need for confumers,
but as they cost respectively $40
and $150 the trouble Is I would
have to become subsidized to become one.
*    *
urns, seems to have left a recent
UBC graduate's syntax slightly
askew. He writes: "New York is
imposlble to say how lt got that
way."
If you want to know how Abstract Painting 'got that way' you
should go to Mr. Lawren Harris'
Lecture at 8 p.m. on Tuesday evening in the Art Gallery.
Arts Sophs Takes
New Yell Contest
"Varsity, Varsity, hear our cry,
V-I-C-T-O-R-Y!
Thunderbirds, Thunderbirds,
Let's go by,
V-A-R-S-I-T-Y!
Yea, VARSITY!"
• THIS YELL has just won a
ticket to the Fall Ball for Bill
Hughes, second year Arts student
in a Mamook-sponsored contest.
Bill E. Stewart, vice-president of
the Mamooks, states that it was a
very difficult decision, as there
were many excellent entries.
Those entries which came in
second, third, fourth, and fifth will
also be used, and any contestant
who does not wish his or her yell
to be among the regular cheers, is
requested to inform the Mamooks
as soon as possible.
• Have that Prized Black and
White Photograph Beautifully
Tinted in Permanent Oil Colors,
Charges Reasonable.
THE GIFT SHOP
4288 Dunbar Street
Near 27th Ave.
Phone BAy. 5461L
For your
PRINTING
or
ENGRAVING
Stationery Supplies
Fountain Pens
Slide Rules
Scales, etc.,
for the present term
SEE
"»Clirk6& Stuart
CO. LIMITED
550 Seymour St
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone PAciflc 7311
• CLASSIFIED
LT51T
• LOST: Brown leather tobacco
pouch between parking lot and
Caf. on Tuesday, November 6.
Finder please return to AMS office.
Reward.
• LOST: Set of Kand E Mercury
drafting instruments in Ap. Sc. on
November 6. Finder contact B.
Gibson, Section D, 2nd Year
Science.
• LOST: A Shaeffer Lifetime
pen, green mottled with black
stripes. Sentimental value, belongs
to Ormond Eckley, Ap. Sc. Section
"E".   Return to AMS office.
• LOST: Light brown leather
wallet containing registration card
with name Lily Genis. Will finder
please turn in to the AMS office.
• LOST: Raincoat at 3:30 to 4:30
gym class. Please return to the
gym office.
• LOST: A green Parker pencil
in the Auditorium . Please return
to AMS office or phone Glenn
Fell, KErr. 0050.
• LOST: A brown leather wallet
in the caf on Thursday. Finder
may keep the money as long as
valuables are returned. Papers
are badly needed. Return to AMS
office or phone AL1670L.
WANTED
• WANTED: Coaching in Senior
Matric Math, Physics, Chem.
KE3638L after 7 p.m., M. Burdett.
• WANTED to buy, beg, borrow
or steal: a copy of "Le Crime de
Sylvestre Bonard" for French 2.
Contact K. E. Bell, Arts letter rack,
or phone DE1873L.
PRE-MED BALL
TICKETS MON.
• TICKETS   FOR   the   Medical
Ball, to be held in Brock Hall
on Wednesday, November 28, from
9 p.m. to 1 a.m., may be obtained
starting Monday in the quad box
office on presentation of Pre-
Medical Undergraduate Society
passes.
'Music for the dance will be supplied by Dave McLelland and the
Varsity Dance Band. Special bus
service will be arranged.        %
Co-chairmen of the committee
for the dance arc Pat Fowler,
president of P-MUS, and Mary
Wilkinson,  president  of NUS.
Montreal
Head Office
UNIVERSITY PEOPLE—students and
faculty alike—will find a friendly, helpful banking service at Canada's Oldest
Bank.
BANK OF MONTREAL
working  with   Canadians   in
eveiy    walk   of   life   since
1817
West Point Grey Branch Sasamat and Tenth
E. J. Schiedel, Mgr.
Fahrni Raps
Bills 15 & 20
• SPEAKING on "Canadian Citizenship," Dr. Mildred Fahrni
addressed the social-economic
group of tho Student Christian
Movement Wednesday noon.
Dr. Fahrni, a graduate of UBC,
spoke mostly on Bills 15 and 20,
now standing before the Ottawa
Government. She criticized the
particular sub-section of Bill 15,
the National Emergency Powers
Act, giving a governor-in-council
authority over the "entry into
Canada, exclusion and deportation,
and revocation of nationality."
DEPORTATION FEARED
She said she feared the subsection would be used to deport
the Japanese-Canadians, and that
it would be a threat to every minority group in Canada.
Dr. Fahrni, who attended the
San Francisco Conference, is chairman of the Women's International
League for Peace. She is on the
advisory board of the Civil Liberties Union, and will be a CCF
candidate for the school board in
the forthcoming Vancouver civic
election. On a trip to the Far
East she once had an audience with
Mohandas K. Ghandi.
ANTI-DEPORTATION MEET
She told her audience that a
mass meeting in protest of Bill 15
will be held in the Boilermakers'
Hall, Nov. 27. Elmore Philpott,
local radio commentator, will
address the gathering.
UBC Library Reaches
160,000 VolumeslMark
•    THE LIBRARY of the University of British Columbia
is now stocked with well over 160,000 books.    This is
revealed in the sixteenth annual report of the Library Committee to the Senate.
During the lust sixteen months
a total of 7,224 volumes have been
acquired. This nurnber, however,
represents only a fraction of the
total number of books received
during the past year, as the cataloguing department has been faced
with a flood of new material.
At least 15,000 items wer? received
during this period.
Circulation for the 1944-45 session
Increased. Total circulation was
92,470, as compared with 85,749 of
the former year.
Special services given by the
Library to various outside groups
Increased in popularity during the
year. Study groups, evening
course students, and others registered with the department of
University Extension borrowed
4,787 voldmes,   while   125   drama
groups borrowed 4,747 plays, Total
circulation through this department was 9,534, an increase of 35
per cent over the the previous
year.
RECORD SERVICE
The record service of the Library
also recorded a busy year. Through
the extension department 110 registered listening groups were served. Army and Air Force stations
received packages of :ecordings
regularly by mail. A total of 9,479
records were loaned during 1944-45.
MEETINGS
• MEETING: Students interested
in forming an archery club will
meet in Arts 103, Tuesday at 12:30.
An executive will be elected.
• MEETING: Jokers mass meeting 12:30 Monday in Aggie. 100.
THE UBYSSEY, Saturday, November 17,1945, Page 3
Women To Meet
Ex-Service Wives
• DATE FOR THE ex-service
wives' tea has not been settled
as yet.
Barbara Kclsburg, secretary of
University Women's Association,
says It won't be held unlil January, because there are too many
things happening during the next
two months.
Purpose of the tea is for women
in the university to get to know
wives of ex-service students. Invitations are to be sent out, and
wil also include the children.
• APPLIED SCIENCE pictures will be taken for the
Totem beginning Monday, November 19. All Sciencemen are
requested to sign up immediately on the lists in the Applied
Science building on the main
notice board beside the Dean's
office.
There will be no differentiation in the times for the various years; all classes will be
taken at the same times.
• LOST: String of pearls. Please
return to AMS or phone Betty
Hobdin, West 1072R.
TlLMED FROM THE GREAT BROADWAY PLAY!
COLUMBIA PICTURES pratMtS
URIVERSITV BOOH STORE
Mrs.: 9 ajn. to S p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTB BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper
Leose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pan* and Ink
and Drawing Instrument*
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
IMTBREiVIMtt   MCTi
SCIINTIMCAUY
AIR-CONDITIONED _
AN ODION THIATRI
NOW SHOWING
AB017V   €J»M1L
THAI OU EIJLS IAT CRUDE OIL
Through hundreds of miles of underground pipe
lines and by tanker and tank car, crude oil flows
for processing to the seven Canadian refineries of
Imperial Oil Limited. If you looked at some of this
crude oil in a test tube m you would see only a
dark colored fluid. But if you looked at it with a
chemist's eye, you would see that crude oil is a
mixture of carbon and hydrogen. These two ele-
fir
ments in crude oil U combine in hundreds of
different ways, giving hundreds of different "hydrocarbons". While they are all closely related, the
members of the petroleum hydrocarbon "family"
vary considerably... some are very light and volatile
n others are heavy and sluggish   Wft with
many "in-between's".   By separating the crude oil
family into its various groups of hydrocarbons,
Imperial Oil Limited jM produces over 500 different petroleum products—all of them very useful
servants of Canadians today.
Tht very light hydrocarbon! in crude
oil help provide synthetic rubber . . ,
domestic and industrial fuel gases ...
blending agents for aviation gasolines.
These peppy "naphtha" hydrocarbons
' give us the gasoline that drives our
cars, trucks, tractors and airplanes
and solvents used in paint and polish
manufacturing. ,
These hydrocarbons of the kerosene
family aren't as active as their lighter
brothers, but give very steady light
and heat.
The fuel oil family of hydrocarbons
are sturdy fellows that provide Diesel
fuel oils . . . fuel oils for ships and
industry . . . and fuel to keep tht
home fires burning.
The "lube oil" hydrocarbons have
just the right "body" to lubricate
our car and airplane engines and
Industrial machines.
The wax family of hydrocarbons are
heavy and slow-moving but bring us
floor wax, candles, paraffine wax,
petroleum jelly for medicinal uses
and cosmetics. ,
The asphalts let people walk all over
them in the form of asphalt roads.
You find them in airport landing
strips and over your head in asphalt
shingles and roofing materials.
In the old days, refiners made only a few product*. Today, thanks to modern progress, ALL
THE CRUDE OIL WE GET OUT OF THE
GROUND IS MADE INTO USEFUL PRODUCTS.
KHPIRIAl Oil, (imperial) LlilllTED
This message is tht sixth of a series) tht next advertisement will tell
what goes on in "Oil's House of Magic." Saturday, November 17,1945
Page 4
* ,
0
LUKE MOYLS, Sports Editor
the gospel..
according to Luke Moyls
HOSPITALITY AT UBC
• IF THERE'S ANYTHING I like about UBC, it's its
hospitality. There's nothing quite like it, for the
Thunderbirds go to all sorts of trouble to make visitors feel
at home.   And I'm glad to see it.
I've taken in such places as breed USC Trojans, UCLA
and Alberta Golden Bears, Washington and Saskatchewan-
Huskies, and even Gonzaga Bulldogs, but none of them can
be compared with the Thunderbirds' nest here on the bluffs
of Point Grey when it comes to hospitality.
It seems they even tell the weatherman what to do when
they're entertaining a, bunch of visitors. Only last week
they provided snow for the Alberta Polar Bears, and now
they're making the Oregon Webfoots feel right at home with
plenty of rain and extra puddles for the Ducks.
It was Only A High School
But speaking of visiting places reminds me of something
I saw down in California in September. We were driving
through Hollywood on our way to the Los Angeles Tennis
Club one bright, sunshiny dax, when we happened upon a
large learning institution.
We thought it might be one of those small colleges (any
college that takes up less than 10 city blocks is considered
small down there) of which there are many in those parts.
But on second glance, we noticed a name on one of the
buildings which read, "Hollywood High School."
Driving around behind the layout, we discovered a small-
gized playing field of only about twice the dimensions of
UBC's Stadium, and a couple of hundred kids running
around on it.
We'll Be Kind To Victoria
Most of them were clad in colorful American football
uniforms, but over on one side there was a bunch of them
dressed in ordinary shorts and sweaters.
Looking at them more closely, we were amazed to discover
they were practising ENGLISH RUGBY.
We found out later that rugger is a popular game down
in California, and they have the same problem down there
that Vancouver high schools ran into this fall. Students
must choose between football and rugger, for both are played
in the fall.
All this talk of English rugby reminds me that UBC's
Thunderbird fifteen swings into action here next Saturday
when they open the McKechnie Cup competition by entertaining Victoria's Crimson Tide.
The Thunderbirds will probably be just as hospitable to
the Islanders as they have been to the other visitors. Mr.
Weatherman, we'll be looking for a big dose of fog next
weekend.
Bill's Haircutting Shop
3759 West 10th Ave.
Ladles and Gents Haircutting
Schick, Remington, Sunbeam
Electric Shavers For Sale
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Specialty
INVITATIONS, 'AT HOME'
LETTERHEADS and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
566 Seymour St.
LOST
• BOOK OF about 40 interurban
tram tickets, lost In the quad at
12:30 Wednesday. Please return to
AMS office.
LOST
• BLACK RONSON lighter,
Friday, 9:30 a.m. In Applied Sc.
building. Please return to AMS
office.
LOST
• ONE PAIR dark brown kid
gloves in or around caf or Georgia, Thursday last between 11:30
and 2 p.m. Reply to AMS office or
Joyce Carr, AL 1226L.
LOST
• GREEN SHAEFFER lifetime
pen between Ap. Sc. and Pure Sc.
Thursday last. Finder please phono
Merv. Stewart, AL 0056
LOST
• ONE STRING of pearls lost
Wednesday night, November 8.
Probably nt football game (Capilano Stadium), South Granville
(Blue Boy) or on 12th Ave., near
Wallace. Reward. Return to AMS
office.
LOST
• BLACK WALLET with zipper
on campus, Saturday morning
November   10.  Reward.  Return to
• LOST: A white raincoat from
the Mining Building on Wednesday.   Tag 'England' on the collar.
Dueck Chevrolet Oldsmobile
LTD.
USED CARS COMPLETE
COLLISION REPAIRS LUBRICATION
TIRES SERVICE
CARS FOR HIRE BUDGET SERVICE
Everything For Your Car
1305 W. Broadway BAy. 4661
'BIRDS MEETIDUCKS
AGAIN TONIGHT
•   THUNDERBIRD  HOOPERS thunder onto the maple
courts here at UBC again tonight when they meet the
University of Oregon Ducks in the second game of their
annual two-game series.   Game time is 8:30.
The Blue and Gold cagers opened the series in the Varsity
Gym last night, and the Oregonians will fly back to Eugene
tomorrow morning.
•   McKECHNIE CUP BATTLES ON TAP — UBC's ru gger fans will see top flight English rugby here next
Saturday when the Varsity Thunderbirds tangle with Victoria's Crimson Tide ln the opening game of the
McKechnie Cup Race.   Here's a shot from last year's McKechnie Cup final down at the Brockton Oval.   The
Thunderbirds had little trouble taking a 17-6 victory and the massive hunk of silverware.
MILLER CUP RACE RESUMES
by Fred Crombie
VARSITY  XV'S PLAY  TODAY
•   THE MILLER CUP RACE resumes this af ternoon after a two week lay-off, with all three-
University fifteens seeing action.   Two of  these,  Varsity  Thunderbirds  and  Varsity
Veterans, are in a tie for first place with Meralomas and so they will be going all out in an
endeavour to maintain their positions.
SPORT CARD
SATURDAY, NOV.  17
Basketball
8:30—Oregon Webfoots vs UBC
Thunderbirds,  Varsity
Oym.
English Rugby
2:45—UBC vs Ex-Britannia,
Varsity Oym.
3:00—Varsity Vets vs Meralomas
Brockton Oval.
3:00—Varsity vs Rowing Club,
Lower Brockton.
Soccer
2:30—Varsity vs Savoys,
Varsity's Upper Field.
2:30—UBC vs Coquitlam,
Kerrisdale Park.
INTRAMURALS
MONDAY'S SCHEDULE
Touch Football
Quarter Finals — Kappa Sigma vs
Jokers; Lambdas vs Phi Kappa
Sigma
Volleyball
Zeta Beta Tau vs Engineers; VCF
vs Psi Upsilon
TUESDAY'S SCHEDULE
Touch Football
Alpha   Delta   Phi   vs   VCF;   Zeta
Beta Tau vs Phi Kappa Pi
Volleyball
Jokers vs Anglican College; Delta
Upsilon vs Phi Delta Theta at 7:00
p.m.; Lambdas vs Sigma Phi Delta;
Phi Kappa Sigma vs Ex-Army at
7:30 p.m.
LETTERS To
The Editor
Dear Madam:
In Saturday, November 10's issue
of The Ubyssey, Mr. Affleck, in a
letter to the editor, wrote: "Ever
so often your paper comer, out
with a deliciously ridiculous article." I might add that ever so
often your paper comes out with
an unbelievably ridiculous letter.
Mr. Affleck's is one of them.
There is only one point that deserves mention among the mass of
puerile, idiotic drivel which constitutes the thought of Mr. Affleck's letter, namely, that the
members of a fraternity hav; no
common  interests and  aims.
Fraternities are aimed al moud-
ing better citizens by creating
fellowship and engaging in righteous and creditable activities.
Some of these activities include:
intramural sports, charitable undertakings like tho Rod Cross
Call, a more exemplary and pur;
conduct in everyday life. a higher
standard of scholarship, and in
general, a more worthy participation in university and ccmniunity
life. All fraternity men have a
common interest in these aims if
they belong to a fraternity at
UBC.
Some clubs, like the Student
Christian Movement, endeavor to
follow these objectives, but the
methods employed are fundamentally different. Thc Players' Club,
as Mr, Affleck lightly points out.
has only ono common interest anil
aim, tin- production of plays. This
is very worthy in its own right
hut in tlr> last analysis ir not as
altruistic : . the aims of
tiTiiity  on  tli •  campus.
Mr. Affleck's unforluiv
will he excused, 1 hope,
grounds  of  ignorance.
TERRY JULIAN.
ry   fi-a-
•   letter
on   the
In the day's feature attraction,
the Vets are favored to win by a
close margin over Meralomas at
Brockton Oval at 3 o'clock. Thc
teams aro very closely matched
and it should be a great buttle all
the way with the Varsity squad
having just a slight edge with their
tremendous speed In the backfield.
BIRDS VS. VRC
Down at Lower Brockton, the
Thunderbirds will try to get back
into stride again using the dangerous Rowing Club as their stepping
stone.
The 'Birds have had a difficult
time in winning against two of
their last three opponents, just
scraping out a win against Ex-
Britannia and losing badly to the
Vets. This game may be Just what
they need to establish them as the
club to beat the final dash to tha
wire.
Also trying to hit a winning
stride Is the UBC team which
meets "Ex-Britannia at Varsity
Stadium at 2:45. The Blue and
Gold's only win of the ycar came
against the Brits in tha season's
opener.
PRACTICES START
With the first McKechnie Cup
tilt of the season slated for the
Stadium in just one week, Head
Coach Dan Doswell requests the
following players to turn out to
practices next week. Forwards:
Dob Lawson, Tom McLaughlin,
Barrie Morris, Joe Pegues, Hartt
Crosby, Keith MacDonald. Harry
Kabush, Barney Curby, Alex Carlyle, Bill Lighthall and Chuck
Wills.
Backs: Bob Croll, Maury Moyls,
Bud Spiers, Lloyd Williams, Tom
McCusker, Len Mitten, Andy
Fleck, Fred Llnscy, Gordle McKenzie, John Wheeler, and Doug
Caldescott.
Although the team has not practised yet, it Is expected that this
year's McKechnie Cup squad will
be one of the most formidable to
ever take the field for the Blue
and Gold. Doswell has called
practices    for    Monday,  Tuesday,
Wednesday,
o'clock.
and   Thursday   at
Legion To Help
Vets Find Homes
• IN AN EFFORT to help married cx-servieemen, Legion or
non-Legion, solve their accommodation problems the Canadian
Legion is asking that all concerned
call at tho Legion office in room 8.
hut 1, and give all information
concerning their difficulties to Mrs.
Alice Keating, the Legion secretary.
It is essential that the office know
how many couples need accommodation and how urgent or
chronic their problems are. As
many of the Legion members received (.he letter announcing the
business meeting on November 7
too late, this will be a chance to
obtain   some   assistance.
CHEMISTRY I
and
MATHS I
Special Coaching
SHURPflSS
5th and Granville
BAy. 9497
• RUGGER  STAR-Joe   Pegues
strips for action this afternoon
when Varsity tackles the Vancouver Rowing Club fifteen down
at Lower Brockton. The blond
bomber will be working for a spot
on the McKechnie Cup team too
when practices start next week.
• LOST—Commerce  2  accounting text on  Friday morning.
Please phone A. D. Scott, KErrls-
dale 0526, or the AMS office.
UBC Hoopers
Cop Two Tilts
• CONTRARY to the results
published in Thursday's News-
Herald, the Varsity casers were
not walloped again; in fact it was
the Varsity cagers who did the
walloping, to the tune of 43-21 in
the Inter A game, and 54-23 in the
Inter B game.
The Inter A's, playing a zone
defence, took about half a game
to get cracking. The Lancers found
it almost impossible to crack the
defence, but good shooting on
their part helped to keep the game
Interesting.
The score at half time was 11-10
in favor of Varsity, but the boys
settled down in the second half
and played a good steady ball
game.
USE ZONE, TOO
The Inter B's' were ako trying
out a zone defence, but switched
back and forth from man-to-man
throughout the game. Thc boys
were good on the defensive rebounds, but the forward breaks
were not clicking so well, due to
quite a few long passes,
Bill's Meat Market wore really
fighting for their points, but the
Varsity team had it all ovei them
from the start.
High scorer for Varsity was
Boyes with 16 points, and close
behind him was Mathews with
14 points.
-BARKER
• LOST: White Waterman's pencil in Arts 204 on Tuesday. Please
turn In at AMS Office.
• LOST: A maroon Waterman's
fountain pen in Ap. Sc. 100 between
12:30 and 1:30 Wednesday, November 7. Please return to AMS
office.  Reward.
• LOST: Novado wrist watch,
brown leather strap. $20 reward
for recovery. Phone AL1761R.
Sandy Vye.
Bill Watts, president of the UBC
Radio Society, annouced Friday
that tonight's hoop fiasco will be
broadcast over radio station
CKWX, and there is a possibility
that ths game may be sent south
over Mutual to Oregon.
WEBFOOT WADDLE
Following the tilt, th« Men's
Athletic Diretcorate is putting on
a dance, the "Webfoot Waddle," in
the Brock Hall, especially for the
Oregon Webfoots. Dancing will be
from 9 till 12.
Next in line for the Thunderbirds are Victoria Dominoes. The
Varsity quintet may play tne
island squad in Victoria next Saturday night with a return game
slated here for Saturday, December 1.
Following that, the 'Birds are
scheduled to meet Washington's
Huskies in a two-game series here
at UBC, December 7 and 8.
VARSITY GALS
COP CAGE WIN
• VARSITY'S Senior B Girls'
basketball squad racked up a
51-16 victory as they shellacked the
Inexperienced Army and Navy
quintet In their second game of
the season at King Ed Gym Wednesday night.
It was a victory for Vanity from
the opening tip-off, but the coed
outfit didn't start rolling until the
second half. They excelled on
fast-breaks which Invariably netted
them baskets.
Outstanding for UBC were Nora
McDermott, who garnered 16
points, Taddy Knapp, Phebe Man-
ley and Audrey McKlm.
• LOST: Last Wednesday, "Ana.
tole France" and "French Review
Grammar". Urgently needed,
please return to AMS office or
phone Mercedes Fairfax, FRater
4120.   Reward.
CUTE 'N COSY
and cuddlcsome as can be!    Glowing
yellow angora spiced with embroidery . . .
the one-of-a-kind-set sketched   .    .    .   $7.95
Then too, there are wool and angora
sets in all your favorite colors —
red, blue, green, powder, beige, and
wine.    Gloves, Scarf, and Beret    .    .    $5.73
(Did we hear someone say ''Christmas
Gifts?" . . . it's a swell idea!)
—Glores, Jll'ini   Kloo".
^tttotonv'Batt (Eompami
INCOAKJNATID

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