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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1920

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 Wty lhjj0S£g
Issued
Weekly by
the
Publications
Board
of the
University
of
British
Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, <
DCTOBER 28, 1920
Number
3
'Varsity Draws
With South Hill
EXCITING FINISH TO CLOSE
GAME
'Varsity soccer fans (they seem to lie
very few in number) were delighted with
the excellent form shown by the soccer
team on Saturday last when they drew
with the South Hill eleven. The score
was 1-1. The 'Varsity goal came early in
the first half, when Crute placed a free
kick neatly in one corner pf the net.
Crute, as usual, put up a sterling game,
and his score was a feature. The free
kick was awarded some distance outside
the penalty area, but Ed. was equal to
the occasion.
The South Hill score was made on a
penalty kick in the second half. Wolver-
ton's big feet had somehow got tangled
up with a South Hill man while the latter was in mid-air, and a penalty was
awarded.
The College soccer men owe a lot to
Henderson for the brilliant goal-keeping
which he has put up in every game this
season. He is wonderfully cool, and
rarely misses a chance to clear. Crute
and Wolverton are two of the best backs
in the second division, and their playing
has saved 'Varsity many a time this season.
It is the forward line that needs improvement, if a casual observer, who has
seen several games, may be allowed a
suggestion. The forwards are fast, and
play a very neat game, but they are sadly lacking in their shooting. A little
strengthening there will assure 'Varsity
of a leading position in the league. Bobby-
Jackson plays an unexcelled game at centre half, and he is ably supported by
Jimmie Mitchell and George Cant. But
until there is an improvement in the
shooting of the forwards, the team cannot win its games.
The new sweaters showed up to advantage, and every man on the team was
proud to wear the College colors instead
of borrowed sweaters. The soccer team
has had the misfortune to meet all the
best teams of the league in its first three
games, and, as its members are showing
up better each week, it would seem entirely safe to predict that it will be in the
running for the league honors.
The team lined up as follows: Goal,
Cliff Henderson; half-backs, Jimmie Mitchell, Bobby Jackson, George Cant; forwards, Johnny MacLeod, Rushbury, Jock
Lundie,  Merkel, and Rex Cameron.
Juniors and Sophs
Brave the Rain
ARTS '22
Some thirty members of Arts '22 have
learnt the charm of a comfortable cottage
in the wilderness when the rain comes
down. The class hike to Lynn Valley on
Wednesday was a huge success, thanks
to Mr. and Mrs. Arkley, whose house
was the base of operations during the
day. In the intervals of wandering by the
creek, the party enjoyed two satisfying
meals, reviewed recent songs, and played
cards.
Thrilling incidents were too frequent to
be listed. Noteworthy was Jimmie's consumption of a whole cake, while interfering with shingle bolts proved disastrous
to more than one adventurer. Two prominent journalists won the spotlight by
being lost for a time, and fording the
torrent. But the palm for versatility must
go to Dr. Sedgewick, who dispensed
beans and music, or performed on the
horizontal bar, without turning a hair.
ARTS '23
The foresight of the sophomore committee which was placed in charge of
arrangements for the hike last Wednesday was responsible for its entire success.
About 75 enthusiastic '23 people gathered
at the 9.40 ferry and crossed over to
North Vancouver.
George Shipp caused a diversion by
getting himself arrested by the authorities. He was haled before the captain of
Ferry No. 2, and it was only after long
argument on the part of Arts '23 leaders
tlat he was released. His only offence
was to jump over the railing of the ferry
in his rush to be the first to land. On
the way up to Capilano Canyon the
hikers created considerable disturbance,
pre-empting an entire street car for themselves, and running up quite a bill for
broken glass.
Having arrived at the Canyon View
Hotel, Capilano, they proceeded to make
merry. Lunch was served in the pavilion
of the hotel; and in the afternon, when
Jupe Pluvius commenced operations, they
were able to dance and defy the rain.
Miss Eveleigh, Miss McLennan and H.
M. Cassidy, members of the committee,
deserve the credit of having saved the
day.
'VARSITY  VS.  CENTRALS,
BROCKTON POINT, SATURDAY
Shocking Scenes
at Smoker
SCIENCE  MEN   MAKE  MERRY  AT
PAVLOWA
Do you want to know what all that
laughing and cheering was about that you
heard last Saturday night? "Well, them
was those there Science guys, and it come
right slam bang from Pavlowa Court."
Shortly after 8 o'clock Dean Brock set
the ball rolling for the fourth annual
smoker by addressing a few words to the
students. He brought forth the advantages enjoyed by our men over those
of the older universities, namely, a faculty with practical experience, a good student spirit, excellent laboratory equipment, and practice in roughing it. He
also mentioned the three new departments of Forestry, Nursing and Mechanical Engineering which were introduced
this year. The smoker was then declared
open.
The first item on the programme, as
announced by our president, Sid Anderson, was a turn from the Regent Cabaret,
represented by Teddy Magnus, Verna
Taylor, Mary Tokke, Betty Lee, Edie
Baker and Jean Spencer. Owing to the
greater experience and personal attractions of the members of the Faculty, some
of the students were rather disappointed
in not being able to make a better impression  upon  the fair ones.
Dr. Davidson then honored us with a
few of his original jokes, and also prepared us for one that Mr. Killam was
about to tell. He ended his remark by
explaining, "Why is an honorary president?"
Lillian Gilbert, assisted by Richard
Willis, from the Sullivan Cabaret, entertained us with several songs and dances.
Three very snappy songs were given
by Mr. Kent, the big hit being "I'm On
tue Staff," after which Mr. West favored
us with several of his mysterious tricks,
such as putting a four-bit piece through
Sid Anderson's head. However, someone
gave this one away by explaining that
there was nothing there to stop it!
S. A. Kamino, Koyama and Okijaima
gave some very fine exhibitions of Japanese fencing and jiujitsu.
Wallace Baker and Clegg topped off
the evening by displaying their skill as
pugilists in a three-round bout, Rae and
Coffin acting as seconds. Thus ended a
most joyful evening, for which we are
deeply indebted to the efforts of our energetic committee, namely, Sid Anderson,
Mike McLennan, Neil McCallum, Bill
Scott and Peewee Evans. THE   UBYSSEY
October 28, 1920
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth Ave. and Heather St.
Where you meet your College friends
at lunch or tea time
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
CANDY AND TOBACCO
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
We    carry    a    complete    stock    of
LOOSE-LEAF FOLDERS
LOOSE-LEAF REFILLS
EXERCISE BOOKS
WATERMAN PENS
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
THE PLAYERS' CLUB RECEPTION
Much credit is due to the executive of
the Players' Club for the unqualified success of the reception given to the new
members last Friday evening. Amid an
array of autumn leaves, corn and sheaves
of grain, the revellers glided over the
floor to the tune of an excellent orchestra; the harsher tones of the piano, drums
and banjo being pleasingly softened by
the soothing tones of Mr. Goldstein's
saxophone. A broad-faced harvest moon
smiled down upon the happy throng; but
more especially did its beams appear to
be directed towards the cosy-corner,
where the patronesses, Mrs. Clark, Mrs.
Larson and Mrs. Wood, comfortably reclined  in  easy-chairs.
During the first part of the evening the
doors were closed upon the western end
of the auditorium, but after the supper-
dance a snowy table was revealed, daintily decorated with flowers and red-shaded
candle-sticks, while large plates of delicious cakes and sandwiches put the finishing touches to a scene of beauty and
abundance. The excellence of the supper
was equalled only by that of a large bowl
of punch, which, through its qualities as
a thirst-quencher, held a place among the
many thjngs which will make the memories of that evening pleasant to all concerned.
Although the judges have spent two
arduous days over the Christmas play
try-outs, they are still undecided as to
the placing of some of the characters; but
by next week we hope to have more
definite information for "Ubyssey"
readers.
NEW DRAMATIC SOCIETY
On Monday, October 25th, a meeting
of students interested in producing plays
in French was held. It was proposed to
organize a club for this purpose in the
near future. A committee was elected to
draw up a constitution and to make arrangements for a meeting early next
week for the election of officers. The
committee consists of Miss McConnell,
Miss McLennan, Miss Anderson, Miss
Dallas, and Mr. Coope.
I.O.D.E.  CAPT.  SCOTT  MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED
Among the many University problems
considered at the last sitting of the Senate was the question relating to the I. O.
D. E. Capt. Scott Memorial Scholarship
to be awarded to the most efficient and
most practical third-year distinction student in Biology. After carefully considering the situation, the Senate awarded
the scholarship to Norman Leon Cutler,
who, we all agree, has well merited this
consideration.
As a result of his summer's work, we
will soon have access to a splendid clasi-
fied collection of beetles, bugs, butterflies
and other insects that are found in the
Kootenay district.
Like a true scientist, however, "Norm"
is a college sport, and, whether it be a
call to lead us in a "theatre night thriller,' by dashing through town as a frantic woman in dreamland attire, or to be
head "coon ' director of the coons' box at
the Orpheum, he will just wink his scientific eye and answer, "Tuum est."
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE   DISHES  UPSTAIRS
6 to 3 A.M.
DELMONICO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,   Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM   BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
French
Velour Hats
for
CLASSY DRESSERS
To be had in all the new colors and
shapes.
You   know   what   I   am,   Mertel!
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville October 28, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
'VARSITY SECONDS
SLAUGHTER ROWERS
The 'Varsity Seconds waded through
the Rowing Club Seconds to the tune of
13-4 on Saturday. The weather was nice
and cool and the ground was dry, so that
it was an ideal day for Rugby.
Resplendent in the cast-off sweaters of
last year's Senior team, our fighting fifteen lined up promptly at 2.20. Captain
Hurst lost the toss and was given the
kick-off. "Cosine" sent the ball into foreign territory, and the game was on.
Play see-sawed up and down the field for
a few minutes, until 'Varsity was awarded a free kick near the Rowing Club line.
With a splendid place kick, Hurst sent
the ball spinning between the posts and
put 'Varsity three points up. From then
on the issue was never in doubt, and the
play was kept in the Rowing Club end of
the field. The next scoring was done by
Ed. Solloway when he dived over the
line for a touch from a three-quarter
rush. About five minutes later the forwards made a sally down the field and
Hodgson scored, but the try was not converted. The whistle blew, with 'Varsity
pressing hard.    Score, 9-0.
The opening of the second half put
'Varsity on the defensive, and Rowing
Club scored on a penalty kick. This revived our men, and they resumed the play
of the first half. Hurst took a chance
and put 'Varsity four more points in the
lead by a drop kick over the bar.
Hurst, the 'Varsity captain, was the
life and soul of our team, taking part in
nearly every play and scoring seven of
the thirteen points. His kicking was a
feature of the game. Purdy, our wing
three-quarter, also played a good game,
making many good runs and tackles. Of
the forwards, Hodgson and Meekison
were the shining lights. Rout Harvey,
who played for us last year, effectively
supported the Rowing Club at full-back.
The personnel of the 'Varsity Seconds
is: Hodgson, Hatch, Swanson, Wallace,
Meekison, Jones, Gunning, Underhill,
Scott, Hurst (captain), Solloway, C.
Jones, Russell, Purdy and Anderson.
The work of the referee was exceedingly fair and an exhibition of how a
game should be handled. "He called 'em
as he saw em, and he saw em as they
were."
LADIES' GRASS HOCKEY
There will be a hockey practice at
Bridge Street grounds on Friday at 3.15
p.m. The coach, Mrs. Boving, will be
there to choose a team for the coming
matches.    Everybody come!
GIRLS'  SWIMMING CLUB
The Girls' Swimming Club has secured Chalmers Church tank for Mondays, from 2 o'clock till 9.30. There are
still a limited number of tickets, and these
may be secured from the president, Miss
Harrison, or from the treasurer, Miss
Verchere.
TENNIS
"Mickey" McDougall, tennis champ,
for 1919, won in three straight sets from
Harold MacLean, this year's singles
champion, in the challenge match which
took place at Laurel courts on Tuesday.
Both men played excellent tennis; but
Mickey proved his superiority, winning
6-0, 6-2, 6-3.
INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL
The following schedule has been issued
by the committee in charge of the inter-
class basketball league. The first-mentioned team in each case will be the home
team, which must provide the referee.
The home team will report the results of
each game to Mr. K. Carlyle, Science '24.
A win will count two points and a draw
one point. A default will count as a win,
but if  both  teams  default no points  will
SKATING
THE   RINK   HAS   OPENED,   and   thousands   are   taking   advantage   of
splendid pleasant hours gliding over the finest sheet of ice in Canada.
To those who need new Shoes and Skates, we may say that our stock of
high-grade Canadian-make Skates and Shoes is complete and reasonably priced.
We guarantee to give you perfect fit and satisfaction.
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
Phone, Seymour 7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 464 GRANVILLE STREET
be awarded. All games will be played in
the King Edward High School gymnasium.
The Science '22 team will be composed
of players from both Science '22 and
Science '21.
Schedule of Games
Thursday, October 28—
Arts '21 vs. Arts '22, S.1S p.m.
Arts '23 vs. Arts '24, 6.00 p.m.
Friday, October 29—
Sc. '22 vs. Sc. '23, 5.15 p.m.
Sc. '24 vs. Agriculture, 6.00 p.m.
Thursday, November 4—
Arts '23 vs. Arts '21, S.1S p.m.
Arts  22 vs.'Arts '24, 6.00 p.m.
Friday, November S—
Sc. '22 vs. Sc. '24, 5.15 p.m.
Sc. '23 vs. Agriculture, 6.00 p.m.
Thursday,  November  11—
Arts '22 vs. Arts '23, 5.15 p.m.
Arts '24 vs. Sc. '22, 6.00 p.m.
Friday,  November  12—
Sc. '23 vs. Sc. '24, 5.15 p.m.
Arts '21 vs. Agriculture, 6.00 p.m.
Thursday,  November  18—
Sc. '22 vs. Arts '23, 5.15 p.m.
Arts '24 vs. Agriculture, 6.00 p.m.
Friday, November 19—
Arts '21 vs. Sc. '22, 5.15 p.m.
Arts '22 vs. Sc. '23, 6.00 p.m.
Thursday, November 25—
Arts '24 vs. Sc. '24, 5.15 p.m.
Agriculture vs. Sc. '22, 6.00 p.m.
Friday, November 26—
Arts  23 vs. Sc. '23, 5.15 p.m.
Sc. '24 vs. Arts  22, 6.00 p.m.
Thursday, January 20—
Arts '21 vs. Arts '24, 5.15 p.m.
Agriculture vs. Arts '23, 6.00 p.m.
Friday, January 21—
Arts '22 vs. Sc. '22, 5.15 p.m.
Sc. '23 vs. Arts '21, 6.00 p.m.
Thursday, January 27—
Agriculture vs. Arts '22, 5.15 p.m.
Arts '23 vs. Sc. '24, 6.00 p.m.
Friday, January 28—
Sc. '24 vs. Arts '21, 5.15 p.m.
Arts '24 vs. Sc. '23, 6.00 p.m.
MCDONALD'S
eH©e0LATES
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee! it's a lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One block south of old store,  corner
Robson Street)
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
Oldest  and  most reliable  Business
College in B. C.
AUTUMN  TERM  NOW   OPEN
As the method of instruction is individual, students may commence
at any time.
422 RICHARDS STREET
Cor. Hastings Phone, Sey. 9135 THE   UBYSSEY
October 28, 1920
THANKS,
EVERYONE
We were sincerely glad to
have you—noise  and  all.
And we regret we do not
have seats enough to accommodate the whole student
body.
Purbys
KEYSTONE
ARE SIMPLE
They are plain, business-like,
loose-leaf books for students.
Fillers are punched, which have
permanent records that can be
bound and held for reference.
If they are used for hurried
work and notes, sheets may be
inserted and removed very quickly.    Made in several sizes.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers and Wholesale
Paper Dealers
VICTORIA  AND   VANCOUVER,   B.C.
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
AVENUE THEATRE
Oct.  27th-Nov.   3rd
Captain Plunkett's  "MAPLE LEAFS"
In  Their Original  Overseas Revue
CAMOUFLAGE
Prices:    55c,  85c,   $1.10,   $1.65,   $2.20
Matinees   on   Saturday,   October   30th,
and Wednesday,  November 3rd
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00  per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
i-A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors { S.  M.  Scott
V Miss R.   E.   Verchere
Chief Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
{Miss A.  Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
Miss P. Stewart
Exchange   Editor Miss   K.   M.   Portsmouth
T .^           „,.. ) A,  L. Stevenson
Literary  Editors -j G   G   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
CD. A.  Wallace
.     . I Wm. McKee
Assistants i p   y   McLane
1 H. G. Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the Week Miss R.  E.  Verchere
GOOD BUSINESS
Shall the University be an issue in the
provincial elections in December? Surely
it is time that those who offer themselves
as candidates for the Legislature should
make a frank declaration upon this question. Electors who believe in progress
and education should be influenced in no
small degree by the expressed attitude of
these men toward the U.B.C. Legislators
are seldom willing to lead public opinion,
but are ever ready to act according to
the popular will of the community. If
the people of British Columbia believe
with Alfred Marshall, the eminent English economist, that "the most valuable
of all capital is that invested in human
beings," and that the constant shelving
of the necessary financial support to the
University is a great detriment to the
province, then some definite action may
be expected at Victoria.
A University is not a luxury, but a
vital necessity. Since progress depends
upon the conservation and utilization of
the skill and talents of every citizen, and
the only way in which such development
can be afforded to all is by adequate
means of education, it is undoubtedly
good business to support a provincial institution. If the men who are to constitute our Government during the next
four years are capable of appreciating the
view that, on both economic and ethical
grounds, the continuance and expansion
of the University of B. C. can be more
than justified, then before many years
Point Grey may be the home of one of
the largest student bodies in Canada.
A NEW CHAIR?
If press reports be true, Dean S. I.
Miller, head of the Business Administration Department of the University of
Washington, made such a distinct impression upon the members of the Kiwanis
Club last week that a number of prominent men in Vancouver are now canvassing the local situation with a view to
establishing a similar chair in our own
University.   All will agree with the Dean
when he states that the value of a broad
education must be recognized if business
is to be elevated to the dignity of a profession. Industrial relations are becoming
so complex, and trade organization is advancing so quickly, that no longer can a
man, who intends to succeed in the business world, learn from experience alone.
It is necessary now for him to spend a
considerable time as a student, receiving
a know'edge of the fundamental prin-
cip'es which are seen working themselves
out in the society of our day. Shall the
future business men of Western Canada
receive their training at home or abroad?
There are many who fail to see the
desirability of devoting three or four
years to studies, which promise them a
general education, but which do not fit
them in any definite manner for the work
which they intend to pursue throughout
life. This, of course, leads to the question of additional faculties, such as Medicine, Law and Forestry. It is clear that,
until such a time as the Government decides to widen the scope of the University
curriculum, an ever increasing number of
students will be lost to the U.B.C. each
year. For this reason, those who have
the interest of the 'Varsity at heart will
await, with interest, the developments
wlich are expected as a result of Dean
A'filler's address.
BY THE WAY
The Publications Department is in receipt of a letter from the University of
Washington School of Journalism, asking
that we send a representative, or representatives, to a conference of College
Paper Folk to be held at the University
of Oregon about November 12th.
Have you met the pest who says,
"Have   you   got   vour   last   year's   notes
in ? "?
The question, "Why did we not continue with twelve pages, as in the first
issue?' is answered in the editorial of
that issue.
The women's common room is to be
well supplied with magazines this year.«
Those which have been chosen are Scrib-
ner's, Harper's, The Century, The House
Beautiful, and Harper's Bazaar.
The poetry in the "Ubyssey"
Ain't half so bad as it might be;
And the reason is, as you'll recall,
That we ain't had any in yet, at all.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Thursday, October 28!—Vancouver Institute  lecture;   Mrs.  J.  Stuart Jamieson.
Saturday, October 30—Rugby at Brockton Point,   Varsity vs. Centrals, 2.30 p.m.
Sunday, October 31—University Service Club service at St. George's Church,
7.30 p.m. .
Tuesday, November 2—Letters Club
meeting at the home of Dr. McGuire.
Subject, "J. M. Synge," by A. L. Stevenson.
Wednesday, November 3—Men's Literary  Society.
Friday, November S—Arts '22 class
party.
Wednesday, November 3—Men's Literary Society, opening meeting, at 8 p.m. October 28, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
(ftorrapmt&Pttrp
"^
J* II correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Since our fourth-year class
fails to realize the gravity of the situation,
I take it upon myself to enlist the aid of the
University as a whole in the solution of this
difficulty.
Let us examine the class of Arts '21.
Wherein lies its unity? In only one respect
do we form a unit—in that we are all pursuing certain diverse courses of study, in
the hope of attaining a similar reward in
the spring. Aside from this fact, we are not
a unit. We are made up of this student
with his various interests and small group
of special friends, plus that student with her
different interests, etc. We have no common interests, and the spirit of clanship is
not in us. We do not even know each other,
having been only three years together! The
situation  is  indeed  deplorable.
This is a little early in the term to register a complaint. Later would be too late.
We have lived together thus for three years.
Is there any security against the fourth following in the same trend?
Our class party comes off a few weeks
hence. Is this the remedy required? Not if
it is to follow the lead of former Arts '21
parties, in representing only about half of
the class membership. If our Senior year is
to be a success, we Seniors have to get together, and at once! Now, executive, you
are not to blame; don't hold up your hands
in despair. This is a real problem, and must
be met fairly. Arts '21 must adopt a new
policy. The class party may yet be our salvation. But we must get everybody out to
it. To do this, I think the first requisite is
the assurance of a good time to all. And
the pre-requisite of this is a new policy of
entertainment.
Active members of Arts '21, advertise a
new policy, if it exists' only in your realization of its need! Dormant members of Arts
'21, wake up—there is work to be done!
Seniors, get together!
J. E.  G.
A CRITICISM
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—The University has two publications, the "Ubyssey" and the "Annual."
Both of these periodicals entail a great
amount of work and money, and, unfortunately,  are worth  neither.
Let us consider the "Ubyssey." This organ consists of a "rehash" of all the events
of the preceding week, advertisements, and
a few literary (?) contributions. The write-
ups of College activities are both badly
written and unnecessary. For, if students
were at the function, they do not wish to
waste time reading an anaemic account of
it days later; and if they were not willing to
go, they are plainly disinterested. Week
after week of a paper full of dull write-ups
is no sort of standard for a college publication. As for notices of meetings to be held,
I am certain that the work could be carried
out much more efficiently by a good, organized system of notice-boards. Mind, I said
a good system. As for advertisements, they
are of no value to students, in themselves;
and if all the so-called literary contributions
were omitted, nobody would be the loser.
The best our special editors have been able
to do so far is to insert a few third-rate
parodies and twaddly verses. What they
will  do is equally promising.
The "Ubyssey" is a glorified gutter newspaper, that has to resort to catch headlines
and sensational liners to draw interest. The
paper is dull, weak, anaemic, and empty.
It provides ten minutes' amusement and
costs ten hours' steady work. After ten
minutes it is discarded and forgotten.
The   "Annual"   is   merely  a  record   of   the
College  year;   so  its   editors   claim.     What  I
should like to ask is,  "How many of us, Ave
years from date, will be able to produce this
year's   'Annual'?"    Not  many,   I assure  you;
most of them will have been scrapped.    The
jy "Annual"    is    seized    upon    most    avidiously
B when it comes out,  signatures are  collected
LB feverishly,   and   then   the   copy—which    has
Bcost so much labor—is put in the boot-cup-
■ board until it is thrown out.
What I mean to point out is this—that our
College publications are nothing we can look
back to with pleasure, ten or twenty years
from now. We can never be proud of therm
They are more in the nature of a "stunt"
than anything else. They follow that insane
convention which says that all high schools
and colleges should concoct some sort of
periodical. .
A college paper should be in the nature of
a magazine. It should be composed largely
of interesting articles on subjects of immediate concern. It should be meaty and
substantial. Above all, it should not be a
rehash of weekly events. Do not mistake
me however. I do not wish to depreciate
the' efforts of our Publications Board. They
are well-intentioned, but very much misdirected. . COGNOVI.
EXCHANGE
(From a  Colyumist s  Garden of Verses)
In winter I sit up at night,
And write this by electric light;
In summer, spring, and also fall,
That programme varies not at all.
And does it not seem strange to you
That I should have such work to do,
A-chasing the elusive jest,
And never, never sleep, nor rest?
The world is so full of a number of folks,
I'm  sure   we  should  always   have  plenty
of jokes!
MEMORIAL  SERVICE
Members of the University are reminded of the memorial service which the
University Service Club will hold on
Sunday in memory of fallen comrades.
The service will be at 7.30 p.m., in St.
George's Church, Fourteenth and Laurel.
The offering will be for the benefit of the
Leroy  Scholarship.
Members of the club who have changed
their residence are requested to notify the
secretary, Prof. Larsen, as soon as possible, in order that notice may be sent
them of the smoker and concert to be
held in Pavlowa Court on Saturday, November 6th.
Sarah Felix
Toilet
Preparations
Powders
Fougere, Ambree and Poudre des
Fles, in Blanche, Flesh or Rachel,
at       $1.50
Rouge
Andalou-Clair shade at    75c
Vanishing Cream
Creme des Fles at  $1.25
•—Main Floor
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
ORPHEUM
Week  Commencing
Monday,   November 1st,  1920
The   Eminent   Stage   and   Screen   Star
MISS
KITTY GORDON
(HERSELF)
Assisted   by  MARVEL,   Dancing  Phenomenon;   JULES   DeVORZON,   HECTOR CARLTON and MABEL JAMES,
in
A CYCLE OF SONGS AND
DANCES
Costumes   Designed   and   Executed   by
Baron DeMeyer
TONY— —CORINNE
HUNTING & FRANCES
In Their Comedy,
 "THE   FLOWER   SHOP"	
RAE    ELEANOR    BALL    AND
BROTHER
In   "MOMENTS   MUSICAL"
ROYAL GASCOIGNES
In    an    Unique    Offering,    Introducing
"Bertha,"     World's    Greatest    Double
Somersaulting Dog
THREE WEBER GIRLS
In   "A  VAUDEVILLE  SURPRISE"
DOTSON
In  Lightning Steps and Laughs
JACK WILSON
Assisted   by   FRANK   GRIFFITH   and
VERA BERESFORD,  and an
All-Star Cast,   in
"THE SURPRISE"
British  Weekly Concert Orchestra
JUST PUBLISHED
30th  ISSUE
The Canadian
Customs Tariff
Showing List of Articles Subject to
Luxury Tax, etc.
Price, $2.75
We have it.    Get yours to-day.
OUarkr Sc Stuart GIo.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
October 28, 1920
JUST OUT-
STAR DANCE FOLIO
Containing,    among    other    pieces,
such wonderful hits as—
"Venetian Moon"
"Just Like a Gypsy"
"La Veeda"
"Lullaby Time"
"Your Eyes  Have  Told  Me  So"
"Isle of Golden  Dreams"
Every  pianist   should   have   one   of
these books.
Price       $1.00
Ask our pianist to play any of the
following big hits:
"Whispering"
"Hold Me"
"My Little Bimbo"
"Japanese  Sandman"
"Love Ship"
"Naughty Waltz"
"Apple Blossom Time"
"Cinderella"
"My Love Is AH for You"
"So Long Oo Long"
"I'll Be With You When the Clouds
Roll By"
—Music Dept.,  Main Floor.
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
-of—
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A  SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
At a short and snappy meeting of the
Historical Society, held in room 24 of
the Arts building at noon on Monday,
five new members were elected, and the
constitution was amended to make it possible to increase the membership to 20
members. Also an offer was received
from Mr. Hugh Keenleyside to present a
silver medal to the society for competition among the third-year students in
History.
THE LETTERS CLUB
A meeting of the club was held on
October 19th, at the home of Mr. Dubois
Phillips. Mr. Alfred Rive, who read a
paper on the "Novels of Thomas Hardy,"
gave a very comprehensive study of this
author. After an introductory talk on
the life of Hardy, Mr. Rive discussed the
most characteristic novels of this writer.
The paper concluded with an outline of
his philosophy, which prompted much interesting and profitable discussion among
the members of the club, until the refreshments put an end to the more
serious part of the evening's entertainment.
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
The Chemistry Society held its first
meeting on Tuesday, when the new executive was elected. It was only after a
great deal of argument that the society
gave up the cause of trying to retain Mr.
K. B. Gillie as president. Mr. Gillie was
elected last spring, but claims that he is
too busy this year to attend to the duties.
The following executive was chosen:
Honorary president, Dr. Archibald; president, Mr. Steve Plummer; vice-president,
Miss Dunbar; secretary-treasurer, Mr. A.
E.  Boss.
MEN'S LITERARY SOCIETY
Owing to the resignation of Arnold
Webster from the presidency, to assume
the senior editorship of the "Ubyssey,"
the society has been without a president
for the past three weeks. But now we
have secured Mr. Allan McL. Hurst, Arts
'22. Under his guidance an extensive
programme has been drawn up. The success of this programme will depend on
the hearty support of every male member
of this institution. We especially desire
to direct the attention of the freshmen
toward this society, as we know of no
other which will so adequately repay an
active  interest.
At a meeting of the executive of the
Lit. department, which took place on
Friday, it was decided that the international debates this year should be
handled by a College committee rather
than by the separate organizations. There
will be debates with Oregon, Idaho,
Washington and Alberta. The committee in charge will consist of the president
of the department, the presidents of the
Men s, the Women's and the Sigma Delta
Kappa societies, and the debating secretary, Mr. A.  E. Richards.
ON THE ARTS '23 HIKE
Sally—Gee! I feel like a ginger cooky
that has been out in the rain for several
days.
Mel.—Why ginger?
Sally—Lost the snap, you see.
Vancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE  BIG   CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent '
MERCHANTS'   LUNCH
TABLE   D'HOTE   DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER  PARTIES  and   BANQUETS,
with  private  rooms,  our  specialty
SUPPER  DANSANT  Wednesday  and
Saturday evenings,  from 9 to 12,  $1.00
Phone, Sey. 796
A. WATTS, Mgr.
PREPARE
for the  world of
BUSINESS
by  taking a short course  in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and  Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.   J.   SPROTT,   B.A.,   Manager.
A SAVINGS
ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We    welcome    small   accounts.
The Canadian Bank
of Commerce October 28, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND .
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE   SELL   CLOTHES   FOR   YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
UNIVERSITY  STUDENTS
We carry a large assortment of
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Fillers, Waterman Fountain Pens, and all requisites to complete your records in your
studies.
Che Uancouver Stationers Eta.
SOCIETY STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
PROFS. MIGRATE
We cannot but feel deeply grieved at
the loss of five professors, whose contributions to the life of our young University have been very real, and whose places
will be very difficult to fill. The student
body joins in wishing them the best of
success in their new fields of endeavor.
Professor J. A. McLean, B.A., B.S.A.,
who came to the U.B.C. from Amhurst,
Mass., to become head of the Department
of Animal Husbandry, has accepted a position in agricultural journalism He is now
eastern editor of "K'mball's Dairy
Farms," a publication printed in Waterloo, Iowa.
Dr. D. Mcintosh, M.A., F.R.S.C, until
this session was Professor of Chemistry
and head of the department. He is now
engaged in research work for the Cranston
Paint Works, Cranston, Rhode Island.
Professor E. H. Russell, B.A.. came from
the Victoria High School in 1915 to become Assistant Professor of Mathematics
in the U.B.C. During the years he spent
here the Musical Society was the object
of his chief interest in student life, and to
him is due a large portion of the credit for
the successful annual entertainments of
that organization. Dur'ng the summer, Mr.
Russell severed his connection with the
U.B.C. and joined the staff of Victoria
College.
To those interested in athletics the absence of Mr. P. H. Eliot, M.Sc, from
U.B.C. circles will be especially regretted.
He was always popular with freshmen
classes in Physics. As a booster of clean
sport in the 'Varsity, Mr. Eliot had few
equals, the boxing club being one of his
"Pet" organizations. He, too, has joined
the staff of Victoria College as Associate
Professor  of  Science.
Fink—You could serenade a girl all
night, and she never comes near a window.
McCallum—Yes; but just honk-honk
twice, and she is in the front seat.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make  sure you go  to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
FACULTY OF NURSING
Members of the U. S. of the Faculty
of Nursing organized Monday last. This
is a new branch belonging to the Faculty
of Applied Science. The officers elected
are as follows: Honorary president, Miss
Ethel Johns, R. N.; president, Miss
Beatrice Pearce; vice-president, Miss
Aileen Aylard; secretary-treasurer, Miss
Esther Naden. Plans for the coming year
were discussed. The opening social event
will take place Friday, the 29th, in the
form of a banquet.
Yes, we know we are still in the infant
stage. Just old enough, however, to
realize that smokers are evidently not intended for such as we are, even although
given by members of our own family.
But, seriously speaking, do we understand what a wonderful opportunity is
being offered in the course? Ours is the
first University to realize the necessity
for raising the standard of nursing. The
nursing degree, to be granted in 23, is
the first of its kind in Canada. Two years
of practical training, combined with three
years of academic, work, will admirably fit
those taking the course for institutional
work, also for the large field of public
health. Girls, it is hard, but more than
worth while.
FACULTY NEWS
Prof. L. Killam, associate professor of
Mechanical Engineering, and acting head
of the department, was granted one
year's leave of absence by the Board of
Governors on Monday night. It is understood that Prof. Killam has been
offered an attractive industrial position.
Until recently he has had practical charge
of S. C. R. in the University, and during
Dean Brock's absence was chairman of
the Faculty of Applied Science. During
his absence Prof. C. C. Ryan will be acting head of the department. Prof. Killam
will leave about the first of the month.
Mr. H. P. Archibald, B.A.Sc. (McGill),
has been appointed instructor in Mechanical Engineering, and Mr A. Lightall,
B.Sc. (McGill), and G. M. Irwin, B.Sc.
(McGiil), assistants in Civil Engineering.
Miss Mary Ard MacKenzie, B.A. (Tor.),
R.N., was appointed Red Cross Inspector
in Public Health. Miss MacKenzie is at
present in Colorado, but was for ten
years chief superintendent of the Victorian Order of Nurses in Canada.
Thomas Pattison, M.A., former Registrar, returns to the University as Instructor  in   Mathematics.
The total registration was announced
as 947, an increase of eight since the
figures printed in the first issue of the
"Ubyssey." It was reported that the
University Farm had won the following
prizes at the New Westminster fair:
Cash prizes, $202; one silver cup, one
junior championship, three grand championships, three diplomas.
Prof. Mack Eastman, of the University
of British Columbia, last week received
word that his mother had just died at
her home in London, Ontario. She was
of Canadian birth and Highland parentage, and was one of the pioneers in the
London district.
Mrs. Eastman is survived by one
daughter, Miss Kate, who lives at the
London home, and one son, Professor
Eastman, of Vancouver. THE   UBYSSEY
October 28, 1980
MERTEL AND JOE
Deer Mertel:—
We are wet Mertel and I gess I am to
blame. When that fello sed hed beet me
up if we were dry after last Wed. I saw
that he wanted it wet pretty bad so I
went out and worked for him and got a
hole lot of people to vote wet witch maybe woodnt of and I gess we did it, witch
the Americans and our too rugby teems
say. You no what I am Mertel. Always
reddy to pleese sumbuddy. I coodnt see
that fello suffer but in case it went dry
I had Val Gwyther and a hole lot of
other big fellos from this University to
go round with me for a few days in case
I met this fello so they cood keep me
from hurteing him if he got ruff. You no
what I am, Mertel, when Im mad. I stop
at nothing, not even murder, so I gess I
needed those big fellos.
When you get this lettre Mertel I gess
111 be a champyen becus I am going in
the trak meat witch they are haveing in
this University. They is a hole lot of fast
fellos in this University witch is good
athleets but you no what I am Mertel
when Im in a hurry. Ill make Wolverton, witch is the champyen now and the
rest of them look as if they wer chaseing
an aroplain with a otomobile witch had
3 flat tires and no gasalean and 111 be the
aroplain. This is what Mr. Wood calls
a simmilee,  Mertel.
I went to the Sience smoker last Sat.
nite Mertel witch only Sience men was
supposed to go to but I put sum dirte
on my face and an old sweater and they
coodnt tell me from the rest. I was
haveing a fine time until Mr. Kingham
witch is boss of the Sience men gave me
a segar. When I had neerly smoked it
Specks Melville hit me on the back and
sed arent you enjoyeing yourself and I
sed No and went home. I never did like
strong segars, Mertel, but Doc. Sedgewick does.
Well Mertel it looks as if they is no
teem witch can beet either of the rugby
teems of this University becus the second
teem won there game on Sat. and I gess
that we will win all our games agane this
yr. like last and you can leed a horse to
water but a roleing stone gathers no
moss, witch is a fabel, Mertel, and meens
that they may make us walk all the way
to Brockton Pt. but they cant get enuf
points against our rugby teem to win a
game. I must close now Mertel becus it
is late and I have to go to bed early to
keep in condishun for the trak meat and
when I am in traneing I think of nothing
else.    You no what I am, Mertel.
JOE.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
The Alumni Association held its general fall meeting in the University on
Friday evening. As the offices of president, first vice-president and assistant
secretary were vacant, Mr. Ian Gibson
was elected president, Mr. Letson first
vice-president, and Miss Irvine assistant
secretary.
An amendment to the constitution,
making eligible for membership in the
association students who took as much
of their courses as possible in M.B.C. or
U.B.C. and had to go elsewhere to obtain their degrees, was passed.
L. A. Morrison, secretary-treasurer,
144S Seventh Avenue, West.
AND ANOTHER THING
ABOUT HIM—
HE WAS .WELL DRESSED
That's exactly what the manager of a big company said a few days ago, after selecting a travelling salesman out of twenty-three applicants!
After summing up all his good points, he
said: "Another good thing I noticed, he was
nicely dressed."
Say what you like, boys, the fellow who shows
good taste in his dress reveals good judgment,
tact and common sense, and certainly makes an
impression in a  business  career.
You should make a selection at CLELLAND'S.
He has the finest range of patterns and models
we've ever seen; and if you'll ask anybody who's
had a made-to-measure from him, they'll tell you
more than we like to put in print.
Don't forget about the special reduction given
when ordering suits with extra pair of pants.
The express elevator takes you right up to
Clelland's room in less 'n a minute.
He stays open till 6 o'clock on Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510  Hastings Street,  West Vancouver, B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
HAS IT OCCURRED
TO YOU
—that  your  Photograph  as  a  Christmas gift would be  highly appreciated
, by your friends,  especially the absent
ones?
Pictures are very easy to mail, very
inexpensive, and very appropriate.
You'll get  the  quality kind at
Bridgmans Studio
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Vancouver,  B. C.
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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