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The Ubyssey Jan 24, 1950

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 I
BASKETBALL
GYM - 12:30
TODAY
The Ubyssey
^r-T"
BASKETBALL
GYM - 12:30
TODAY
vouxxxn
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1950
No. 40
Peppy Pep Club Executive
Resign Over Lack Of Help
Ubyssey Photo by Bob Steiner
Newest Addition to University Queens
PRETTY ANITA HENDERSON receives a congratulating kiss
from George ^<?i^mningham, member of the Senate, after she
wu proncWncod! Cjueen of the Mardi Gras.
Ewirtg Wrinkles Gone;
Has Possible Successor
Gone are the, wrinkles from the care-worn brow of AMS
Treasurer Walt Ewing.
A potential successor for the harrowing position has indicated willingness
to etn tss^-^a^
shoeu. Ha is Bob Currie, who today
•aid to tha Council, "I'd like to do
it if you want ma to do it."
Previously Bob had entertained no
intentions of running for the position
of Treasurer.
Mr. Currie was approached to run
by numerous students but was cautious in. accepting because of his long
association with the Student Council.
His numerous services, which in
elude presidentship of last year
Open House,' offices of 'public relations, chairmanship of ISS of two
years ago all contribute to evidence
of his great sympathy and love of
the university.
(Many that understand the intricacies of the position of treasurer advised him not to run but because of
his interest in UBC he has placed
nomination.
Treasurer of MAD, John Jr. Tennant
nominated Mr. Currie for treasurer and
was seconded by Gordon Baum ex
position on Council.
He intends to do as much as poss-
ibel to prevent future press articles
on "dwindling student IttdftcMT Bid
to watch student funds carefully,
though this will not mean necessarily
that austerity will continue.
First step will be to attempt the
curbing of AMS administration expenses and channel the monies saved
into student activities.
, I0DE Give V 00 To
UBC in Bursaries
I    Primary IODE chapters have given
' bursaries totaling $700 to the University of Evitish Columbia for 1050-51.
1    Admiral Jellicoe Chapter has given
two   bursaries   valued   at   $50   each.
I Triple Entente Chapter  is  providing
' two bursaries valued at $75 each. A
bursary for $200 has been donated by
Canadian  Scottish  Chapter  and  one
 .._ for   $100   by   Worthington   Memorial
sophomore member of council, who  chapter.
will handle the campaign. |    Fifty dollar bursaries are the con-
Currie attends UBC as a MA tributions of Sir Charles Tupper, Rt.
student in History and Is the first Hon. Anthony Eden and Valcartier
graduate student ever to run for a   Camp Chapters.
BOB CURRIE NOMINATED
FOR AMS TREASURER
Well-known campus figure and Public Relations Officer
this year for Student Council, Bob Currie has again thrown
his hat into the ring, this time as candidate for AMS treasurer.
Candidate   for   a   Master   of   Arts *■
degree,  Bob  graduated  with  a  BA
from UBC last spring.
He actively entered campus affairs
in 1947-48 term when he held the
offices of USC Chairman and Chairman of ISS.
Last year Bob was chairman of the
committee which produced the very t
successful  Open  House.  It  was  the
largest Open House  that UBC  had
ever seen.
Normal attendance had been between fifteen and twenty thousand
and_ last year broke all existing records as the campus was crowded
with fifty thousand visitors.
Currie has been closely associated
with former treasurers Paul Plant
snd Walt Ewirtg, serving with them
on various boards und committees on
the campus.
BOB CURRIE
treasure candidate
STUDENTS GET SECOND
CHANCE TO GIVE BLOOD
Students will have a second chance to donate their
blood to the Red Cross this year.
There will be a full blood clinic in the Armouries from
February 14 to 16,
Object of the drive is to secure 2500 pints of blood
for the 1949-50 year.
Last fall 1637 pints of blood were obtained.
Faculty
Cop
And
Festival
Students
Honours
Two members of the faculty and two Players Club mem*
oers received special commendation for their part in the
Everyman production of "Noah," the winning play in the
Dominion Festival regionals held in Vancouver all last week.
Maxwell Wray, the London West-$>
end adjudicator gave high praise to |
Sidney Risk, founder and director of
Everyman Theatre for his direction
'Student Apathy Has Beat Us'
Claim Franklin and Knight
"Student npathy has beat us. We're folding up."
With these words Doug Franklin, President of the Ftp
and Booster Club, threw in the towel on behalf of his orginl**
ation. Simultaneously, Don Knight, Chairman of the Thuft^er-
bird Rally Cominittee, announced that THUNRAL ia closing
shop.
"The disbanding of these clubs
means that the fight to boost student
morale in support of campus athletics has been lost," said Franklin.
Knight, in announcing his decision,
<*-
"Noah," which is one of the Everyman Theatre's professional repertoire,
will be presented in the UBC audi-
.torium early in February. The play
was originally presented in Paris in
1935, and enjoyed great popularity
in London in 1937 with John Oielguid
in the title role.
heartelly. I asked Frosh to half; (hay
completely" ... I'm through irtth
tha whole thing," ha aaid daspoodant*
ly.
NO COOPERATION
__ Both  Knight  and  Franklin  #1*1
outlined the history of THUNRAL,. dtamayed by ±t kck of M-ordjiilflA
and spoke bitterly against the lack  and   co.operttlon   ^n^       ^
of co-operation he had received from
other campus clubs.
SUPPORT NEEDED
A football player himself, he said
that a team must have vigorous
student support to give it vitality.
Appalled by the lack of support in
last season's games, he tried to establish a twelve member cheer section, town dally recently scored tha •»•
six-member majorette section, and   athetic  support UBC students «jtve
clubs, and by tha negative sttituda
of students.
"Cheerleaders have told mt that
they are sura that they art tha only
ones cheering at recent ba*«ti*ll
games," said Franklin.
"This attitude does not go v*A*t*
iced, as tha sports-editor ol a down-
end for the high standard of excellence set by his company. Mr. Risk
is a lecturer in Drama at UBC, and
Is directing the Players Club spring
production, "An Inspector Calls." He
has been very active in both amateur
and professional theatre circles in
Vancouver. ' »
PRESIDENT
Ron Wilson, president of the Players
Club, and John Mllllgan, another
green-roomer, received special mention for their excellent acting in
difficult roles. Both actors will ba
seen in leading rolea in "Inspector
Calls" this March.
Cliff Robinson, resident artist and
lecturer in painting and visual theatre with the Extension Department,
also received high praise for his
imaginative masks, which added
much to the affective stylizatlon of
"Noah." Mr. Robinson has designed
the sets and costumes for "Inspector
Calls," and the costumes for "Masses'
and Man."
HIGHLY IMAGINATIVE
Andre Obey's "Noah" is a highly
imaginative and upusual treatment
of the Bible story. Adjudicator Wray
congratulated the young group for I over the world to join together this
their team-play, their imagination, and j spring in presenting plays with PEACE
their sincerity in this difficult play.       as their theme.
'Masses and Man'.
Here This Week
Department of English announces
the production of Ernst Toller's famous expressionistic play, "Masses and
Man" on Thursday and Friday, January 26 and 27 at 8:30 p.m. in the
University Auditorium.
Play is being presented as a Student
Workshop performance, without admission charge to the student body
and members of the general public
who are interested in student work
and in the production of great plays.
Performance of "Masses and Man"
at this time has a particular significance. It is a play that deals with the
problem of human relationship to
violence and peace and, as such, it
is a response to the appeal addressed
by   UNESCO   to   theatre  groups   all
BEARS STILL IN CUP RACE
AFTER OVERTIME WIN 1
Fast-breaking University of Alberta Golden Bears hockey
six fought back gamely last night, firing home a last minute
goal in the overtime period, to beat UBC Thunderbirds 3-2,
giving themselves another chance to take the Hamber Cup
back to Edmonton.
Bears rebounded from a 2-goal deficit*-
recorded early in the first canto to tie
a forty-piece band.
THUNRAL and the Pep and Booster
Club have had about a dozen meetings, all of which have been poorly
attended. With a weak committee,
because of lack of interest, the clubs
have been able to accomplish little.
"There was a poor responss to the
pep-meet yesterday, Knight said, "I
asked various clubs on the campus
to  assist;   they   did  —  very  half-
thelr teams."
"However, Doug and I will try fat
tha last time to saa what raspoaat Wa
can get from students," Knight *«»•
eluded.-"We ara holding our flaal
meeting in tha Brock Board-Room on
Thursday, January 26, at 11:10, PM.
We will cover what wa had hoped
to do for tha rest of ths year, nd,
if possible, pass tha job on to scant-
one else."
'Tween Claisti
Film Society Cancel
PKtwe ■Skew.hee*.
Film Society officials today announced that the piotuf*
show scheduled for today has been cancelled.
They gave no reason for cancel- •»
the score, forcing a ten minute over-
tire period.
With only 59 seconds remaining m
the extra session, speedy Bill McQuay,
breaking up the ice with two team
mates, cut in front of thu net to complete Barney Adair's psasout, scoring
the winning goal.
UBC took an early lead when at
3.28 centre Clare Drake finished off
a pass from Terry Nelford while birds
had two men in the penalty box. Drake
shifted around the lone defenseman,
broke into the clear, and made no mistake at the goal mouth.
IIODGERT UNASSISTED
At 5.10 Ken Hodgert went through
the Bear defense all by himself to
score the second and last Thunderbird
goal. ■>■
After repeated attempts to get past
Adams in the UBC goal, Bill Dockery
finished off a pass from Jim Fleming
right in front of the net to beat
Adams completely with only 70 seconds remaining in the first period.
Big feature of second canto was the
lack of scoring, even though the play
was faster.
Scramble in front of the UBC net
brought on the tieing goal for the
Bears when Ken Cox completed a
slap pass from Bill Dockery at 3.35
of the third period.
End to end hockey in the overtime
period, as both teams seemed revitalized even after there hard-working
third period, finally brought Bears
the goal they were looking for all
night.
Play resumes tonight for the fourth] continues its series of free film pro
and final game of the Hamber Cup
Tickets are still  available in
lation.
* * *
"CANADA'S   FOREIGN   POLICY"
will be the subject of a review by
Professor Geoffrey Andrews at thc
United Nation's Club meeting in Arts
100 at 12:30 p.m. today.
* * *
HAROLD MASON will address the
regular meeting of the CCF Club in
Engineering 200 tomorrow at 12:30
p.m. on thc topic "The Class Struggle
and You."
* * *
MODEL ASSEMBLY, presented by
the United Nations Club, will be held
February 16.
Meeting of prospective delegates
and all interested in the assembly
will be held in Arts 108 at 12:30- p.m.
tomorrow.
* * *
ALL ARCHITECTURE and Forestry students will meet in Applied
Science 100 tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. to
select a candidate for Queen of Science
Ball.
* * *
UBC CONTINGENT of the COTC
series.
Ole Bakken's office.
grams tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. in Physics 200 with an hour long schedule of
travelogues and cartoons.
ADVANCE SALE of Plebeian Mardi
Gras tickets go on sale today.
Tickets may be purchased ei the
AMS office for fifty cents each.  • •
Dance will be held in the BrOck
Hall Friday night.
* * *
GEORGE WEAVER continue* eft
lectures on the economics of reVelu*
tionary socialism in Arts 2M, todajr tt
12:30 p.m. These classees hlva Mt
switched to Tuesdays.
* * *...,
THERE WILL BE A smallpox vgc-
cination clinic held at tha Studgnt
Health Office, Hut 2 A, 'Tuesday,
January 24 and Wednesday, January
25. Students who have not had a Hie*
cessful vaccination since 1MI art Id-
vised to be re-vaccinated. Afipolitt-
ments are being made at the KttKh
Office now.
* * *
A SIBELIUS PROGRAM will 1%
presented tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. itt
the Men's Club Room, Brock HaH.
* * * '
REV. ANGUS MacQUEEN oontjnttsi
hl3 outstanding presentation of. the
theme "The Growth of Christian Personality" today at 12:30 p.m. in the
Auditorium.
Dr. MacQueen is speaking for the
SCM sponsored Religion and Life
Week.
Re-Broadcast Over 'NW
Cullen Broadcast Here lomoirow
By ANN LANGBEIN
'Mid drum rolls and fanfares, neatly
dressed in black issues of "Downbeat'',
and with a rolled up disc smoking
like a stogie, the Madcap Disc Jockey
is coming to the campus.
The one and only "Jackson" Cullen
will do a one-day stand at UBC from
12:30 to 2:30 in Radsoc and Brock
Lounge tomorrow.
Brother Cullen will record his famous "Owl Prowl" for rebroadcast over
CKNW tomorrow night at 10:30,
Cullen will take over the radio time
generally allotted by Radsoc to the
Midday Mixing Bowl.
No newcomer to UBC, Cullen' his
recorded his show for the amusement
of varsity students at Open House and
Homecoming celebrations in the past.
With his natural wit and acid humor*
the popular disc jockey haa become a
campus favorite, and Radsoc is glad
to be able to give students a chance
to meet the fabulous hero in person.
Cullen is the forerunner of a series
of Vancouver radio artists who will
broadcast from the campus.
In the future, Radsoc will present
Wilf Ray, Reo Thompson, and Vic
Waters,
Pub To Smash Council At Noon In Gym V.
T
Page 2
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class ^leil, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptlons-f2.00 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of tha Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of tha editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
'   necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of tha University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
* EDITOR-IN-CHIEF    •—    JIM   BANHAM
MANAGING EDITOR «  CHUCK MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vic Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Asst. Les Armour
Senior Edltor-HUGH CAMERON
Associates BETTY HORTIN Assistant JOAN CHURCHILL
Step In Right Direction
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   January   24,   19^0
UBC, long used to stock theatrical productions, is about to see two play's of ideas
involving experimental techniques.
This week, under faculty direction, students
will put on "Masses and Man" and next week
Everyman Theatre production "Noah"—winner of the Dominion Drama Festival—will
appear in the auditorium.
Aa our drama critic pointed out, last
week, the important thing is the idea; and
we must have new and experimental technique! to put ideas across.
The theatre is a medium for the
portrayal of certain facets or aspects of life
and the significant thing is the validity of the
aspect aa an abstraction from complex relationships of actual living.
All too often our critics deal with the
actors, the acting, the stage setting, the props
and the audience reaction and think, somehow, that they have done an adequate job.
What they have done is to criticise all the
props for the idea and left the core of the
thing—the idea itself—completely untouched.
It might be argued, perhaps, that the
legitimate function of the theatre ia the
production of entertainment.
Even if this be true—and we are inclined
to think that it is only part of the story—
the entertainment itself will be good or bad
depending on the validity of the abstraction
from life.
In any case, it is encouraging to see a
change on the campus from the usual stock
productions. It is a step in the right direction.
Who Owns Brock Hall
;. Students are beginning to wonder who,
after all, owns Brock Hall.
The building, it will be recalled, was
bwiit with money raised by student endeavor.
Students, through student government, officially own the building. Administration is
handled by the university authorities in return lor use of part of the building for lec-
But, despite this agreement, students still
•nd all that
The confused muddling, petty party
bickerings, wholesale surrenders to political
expediency, and general rabble-rousing tactics of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation are beginning to make Canadian
socialists somewhat ill at the stomach.
It is this process, we think, that resulted
directly in the apathetic showing of the CCF
in the last Federal election and which, to all
Intents and purposes, seems likely to result
in the disintegration of the party.
The ever-present growth of capitalism
toward monopolistic control, the obvious inability of capitalism to prevent recurrent and
chaotic depressions, the increasing awareness
of everyone of the need for a security program to maintain a minimum standard of
decent living for everyone all point to the
need for a strong and militant socialist party.
The Regina Manifesto held out a brilliant
hope for the foundation of such a party. But
the wishy-washy attitude of many CCF'ers
which has led to a subscription in fact if
not in principle of the party to the stop-gap
doctrine of the "welfare state."
If the CCF is to regain its strength and
enthusiasm and if it is to take its place as the
rightful builder of Canadian socialism it
must develop a strong program and stand
fearlessly behind this program.
It must stand for the nationalization of
basic industry—this is, of those industries
upon which the remainder of the economy
depends. It is such industry in which the
trend toward monopolism is most evident.
Monopolies in such industry can exert a
strangle-hold on the entire economy.
Combines Acts are no security against
such monopolies since not only are they
never adequately enforced but, what is worse,
they are little or no use against under-the-
table agreements between so-called competitors.
Rigid controls must be extended over all
national resources to ensure their continued
existence and to ensure their use for the
most good of the most citizens. Rape of our
forests and our mines has continued too long
May we borrow your union card toniyht, Pinkkinaton?
Critic on the hearth      * w ^Wn«w
The playing of British pianist, Moura I
Lympany presents the reviewer with
a problem. He knows that the performance was unsatisfying and he
knows what was lacking but why it
was an empty experience Is more
difficult to discsrn. Miss Lympany did
nothing wrong but neither did she
do anything right. Practically every
piece that she performed was faithful in spirit to the composer, completely adequate technically and boring. Why?
The most obvious reason is that
Miss Lympany is a woman. Both ln
appearance and manner she ls maternal and, if such an adjective can be
applied to her performance, her interpretations were for the most part
also motherly. Inevitably such a remark brings up the controversial
question of whether women can become great musicians. My answer to
that would be "No," unless the woman
in question embodies the qualities of
human understanding and compassion,
Intensity, wit and. charm, attributes
that one might consider sexless. The
outstanding example of such a woman
is Madame Wanda Landowska, the
harpsichordist, whose art is as sexless as it is perfect. Miss Lympany
ought to have some say in the running of the
building.
This week, on orders from Mr. Lee's-
office, student candidates in AMS election
have been barred from placing posters in
front of the Brock.
We think that, in a matter like this,
Student Council and not the university administration sHbuld have the power to decide.
by les armour
now. This control must exist over agricultural
lands as well. We must face the fact that some
sort of collectivism will be the only ultimate
solution to the food problem. Production by
small farmers is, in general, inefficient and
results in the deterioration of farm lands
through ignorance and the tendency to "get
rich quick at any price."
Farmers who would rather starve to
death on their own little plot than enjoy a
decent standard of living under a collectivised
agreement will have to be educated for the
good of the nation as a whole.
Probably the solution in agriculture and
in secondary industry will depend upon the
fostering of the co-operative movement. A
socialist party must not adopt a merely passive attitude toward co-operatives; it must
actively support and encourage them and,
if it becomes the government, it must pledge
itself to offer long-term government loans to
such projects.
In those areas where small business is
shown to be most efficient, we must foster
free enterprise—and keep it free and competitive.
Above all no socialist party can afford
to be doctrinaire. Nationalization, the cooperative movement, and free enterprise must
be knitted together in the most efficient fabric. .....        ,.        „.,   ,
pieces submitted are the candidates
The proper mixture of the elements will   raided work. A nom de plume which
require long experience and careful planning  has not been used before in competl
and no stock immediate programs for individual actions can be laid down.
Further, the socialist party must cease
to emphasize the so-called class war for such
an emphasis can only lead to dissention, industrial strife, the arousing of hostility and
enmity and a triumph for the negative elements of society.
Rather, a socialist party must remember
that its foundation lies in co-operation, not
in strife. It must strive to convince all elements in society that only in co-operation
can mankind's problems be solved.
The CCF has a big job to do and the
time to start is now.
Association Offers
Scholarship For
Musical Scripts
A $750 scholarship to students of
musical composition has been announced by the Composers, Authors,
and Publishers Association of Canada, Ltd., for any resident of Canada
under 22 on March 31, 1950.
The scholarship for the Royal Conservatory of Music, or McGill University Conservatorium of Music, will be
awarded to the student showing the
most talented and imagination in his
work.
Two works, one a song, should be
submitted, and entries must be accompanied   by   a   declaration   that   the
spent the entire evening bringing her
womanly point of view to a program
of virle, masculine music.
Another reason is that Miss Lympany has been too well taught. Her
good schooling is too obvious. One
was reminded of an examination pupil,
perfectly prepared, every note correct,
evetry rest scrupulously observed,
snd every breath of inspiration routed
out by overpreparation. Perhaps the
fault is not entirely that of Miss
Lympany. Too often a famous teacher
specializes in turning out pupils that
are representatives of his own teaching methods rather than fully developed artists. To a certain extent this
might be applied to the pupils of vio-
linist»Leopold Auer, among whom are
Helflts, Milatein, and Elman. All
these violinists display the same glit
terlng polish but fortunately enough
musical genius to present something
more than the credo of a supcrlm
posed personality. 'Miss Lympany has
not yet cast off the yoke of her -il
lustrious teacher Thobias Mathay.
The program itself was unusually
rich in acknowledged piano masterpieces. The Bach "Chromatic Fantasy"
lacked the architectual grandeur of
the Barogue period and the recitative
section missed the proper improvisa-
tional tone. The following Fugue although a model of clarity seemed a
trifle glib and the towerng clmax was,
m  . i •,     /
ClOAAHH
34
to say the least, underdeveloped.
Schumann's "Symphonic Etudes"
suffered from a similar lack of intensity. Although there were some arresting moments, the majority of the
variations lacked sufficient Individ-
uolity and poetic insight.
The second half of the program was
somewhat more rewarding. The Chopin "B minor Scherzo,''! certain of the
Chopin Etudes, and the Toccata by
Ravel were nimbly and gracefully
despatched. On the other hand "L'Isle
Joyeuse" by Debussy degenerated
into a seething mais' of nothing in
particular.!     < s   .w
All in all, It was a disappointing
concert, too full of tmfjjied promises.
II
'-■'.iA   I'-!   \L\'--
Ir/A-y* At
ONLY *••
**    M.'VV   i
YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
tions must be clearly written on the
manuscript. Each composition must
have the contestant's name and address pinned to it in a sealed envelope.
Travelling expenses to Toronto or
Montreal must be paid by the student,
but the amount provided for maintenance will be paid monthly In advance.
A further $50, to be divided among
not more than three persons, is offered to all entrants, including juniors.
Deadline for entries, together with
application form and birth certificates
(which will be returned by registered
mail), is March 31, at the Association's
offices, 1232 St. George St., Toronto.
Interested UBC students may obtain
further information and registration
forms at Dean Gage's office.
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WE DON'T APPROVE
THE EDITOR,
THE UBYSSEY,
I should like to correct any wrong
impression that may have arisen as a
result of your article headed "MacKenzie defies hoodlum-like campagin
tactics." First, the Arts Undergraduate
Society Executive is not collectively
sponsoring any of the candidates for
Student Council positions. It is amazing that a law student, seconded by a
Forestry student, can claim to be the
Artsmen's   candidate.   Secondly   (we
disapprove of faculty parties in campus elections. Alma Mater Society officers should represent the student
body as a whole, not organized minority groups.
The Arts Undergraduate Society Executive urges every student to consider carefully the qualifications and
program of each candidate, and then
to cast their vote.
Yours truly,
David N. Ker,
President, Arts Undergraduate Society.
ARTS IN FIRST YEAR
THE EDITOR,
I was quite surprised to note in
the last issue of Ubyssey that Peter
,de Vooght, who is running for AMS
President, has, through his campaign
manager Ian McKenzie, called upon
the Artsmen to fight a Holy War
against sciencemen. This candidate who
was formerly an Engineer and is now
a law .student, seems to have denied
both faculties with which he has been
or is associated.
It seems strange that this AMS
presidential candidate should garner
unto himself another faculty, a faculty with which he has had little or
no association. He has called upon
Artsmen to wage a Holy War! This
hardly seems the mature position a
university student should take, let
alone one who is running for an office
with such  responsibility.
Let us bring unity and responsibility
into student politics, and avoid the
temptation of using these elections in
order to arouse inter-facutly hostility.
Sincerely,
An Observer.
Your Bank on the Campus — ln the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager Tuesday,   January   24,   1950
fHE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
Eltction Highlights
At Last Beet And Pretiles
"Ifl catch any more election ad-
vereising strung up ln front of Brock
Hall, I'll string up the person responsible," was the irate retort of Brock
Hall's main attendant, who is tired of
cleaning up caihpalgn debris.
Twice has Charlie "Fireball" Walker
tried to erect signs in front of the
Brock and on lawns around the
campus. It seems'that janitors have
been told'to |fr out and remove such
sitfis as soon s> they appear. Oeorge
Deavin, heed janitor of Brock Hall,
said that Mr. Lee's building office
has been laying down the law.
DEAWOBADS
Cy Wflte, president of Engineering
Un«Jergr4dUate Society, summed up
his feelings on the Walker election dispute with "Tiie election* committee is
such a buncn of deadheads that they
have had to slow dowh Charlie "Fire-
Sta* Walker to their own pace."
It has been reported that the keg
of'cider ih front of the bus stop is
JWt'jtttt for show. The glasses are for
Ste elder that le in the bottle.
give them a real beer and
»1 campaign" cried Walker.
tfc ?'. i  •« '-' -	
The history of the cider goes back
four years. It was presented at a law
party, and after it was removed from
the gathering it was left to bask in the
sun. It blew. After being in the sun
for some time it was put in the nearest
wine cellar. In the great freeze of 1950,
it froze, and this seems to have had a
reverse effect on the aged liquid.
The stuff is now drinkable.
. Campaign plans including other
members in the presidential running,
have come from Foster Isherwood, an
ex-federal candidate who was defeated in Vancouver Quadra in the last
federal election.
He plans to revamp the whole Alma
Mater Society, enlarge student Council and "make an organization out of
it." It won't be so big that I won't
be able to handle it, Isherwood said
about the larger council, which now
includes about 35 members.
In the running for AMS treasurer,
Walt Ewing Is whole heartedly relieved to see that there Is at least
"one darn fool In the field who will
run. They'd have to have holes ln their
heads," as he put it.
To complete election plans, a booth
will be set up in the Vancouver General Hospital for those UBC nurses,
who are in training.
W Unfair Tq Teachers '
BCTF Officer Tells CLU
2...:    •. .       :'.    : «,s, .      ,.
In being barred from running for muniicpal office, B.C.'s
school teachers are objects of unfair discrimination.
C.  Dk Ovans,  secretary  of B.   C. *■
Teachers' Federation, laid that charge
'<*»#
II
Campus Thursday
Famed Liberal figure, the Hon.
Stuart Cktrson, KC, MP, present Minister of Justice, will'speak to UBC
students in an open' meeting Thursday st 3:30 in the Auditorium.'
Sponsored by'the Studeht Liberal
Club, Justice member Carson will
apeak for a short time and then the
meeting will be -turned over to the
audience while'thr-minister answers
their Questions.
Students will remember that Garson
wan recently under heavy fire in the
House for suppressing the Combines-
Injostigattop, JUttfe
Liberal Club presented four speaker! yesterday in Aggie 100. MPs Art
Lalng, Jack MatDougall, TomGoode
and Ralph Qariw&0gave reports on
the list session of the House dwelling
mainly on the Combines-lnvestigiriori
Act, the g|j(^<tgt of appeals to the
Privy Ceurlpl, '£0[ me" discussion of
power to oif^xioWfk constitution.
All Out War Wog.d
On Tri1*V*s ar WO
LONDON, Ont:,—(pUP)^An all out from taking his seat on council when
campaign Ho end * petty  thievery   is
before the UBC branch of the Civil
Liberties Union Friday.
Under a province-wide ruling, no
teacher may run for municipal office
in the municipality in which he
teaches, the speaker explained.
Efforts of the BCTF to have the
ruling amended have been consistently
opposed by the B. C. Union of Municipalities, he declared.
The BCUM's chief argument against
allowing teachers to hold municipal
office is that teachers "would be
biased in favor of education," when
voting on a council,' he said.
"But they (BCUM opponents) never
say anything about businessmen on
council who may be biased in favor
of business interests," Secretary Ovans
declared.
Aid. Alex Miller, Vancouver representative on the BCUM and an avowed
opponent of the proposed amendment,
"was unable to accept*' a CLU invitation to debate the question With
Secretary Ovans, CLU Chairman Bernice Levhz told the meeting.
"Very few teachers" would seek
municipal office in their own teaching municipalities if allowed to do
so, but the law "puts a stigma on us
that we don't like," the BCTF secretary said. *
TEACHER ELECTED, BARRED
He recalled the recent case of a
North Vancouver school teacher who
was  elected  alderman    but    barred
"We're not asking for the right
to run for school board seats in
our own districts."
If the amendment were granted,
ii's supporters would waive the right
of teachers to vote on school board
budgets, he said.
Silly Students;
Want Xmas Tests
Latest reports Indicate the Italian
Government will comply with demands
' of students of the university In Rome
for winter sessional examinations.
Barricaded inside their university
buildings, student's demanded that
winter exams Ve held so that students
who are ptepared to write can continue their studies without waiting for
the fall term.
After occupying the classrooms to
emphasize their unusual demands, the
students have obtained assurance of
satisfaction.
the.   Western   Ontario
a court ruled him ineligible.
The court  acted  according  to the
ruling  which  bars  all  persons  who
planned   for
campus.
The wave of thefts started soon after' are "under contract, directly or in-
the begiiupngjqf \th£ tyst term and directly," to the municipality.
students  have  lost  more   thant|150  "under   contact"   to   tfieir   school
cash, In dddhJpn to coats and books, boards, not to their city or municipal
Authorities expressed the view that |   But teachers, the speaker said, are
outsiders may be responsible. councils. '
Ocean Hop Futile
For Newspapeimen
LONDON, Ont. — (CUFi — Last November two young
newspapermen left New Zealand on the first leg of a trip to the
University of Western Onttfrio. The ship was bound for Europe
but tney hoped to arrive in time to become students during the
Nude, Plebs Shown
In Canvas Display
Palitings of a well-known Easterr
artist, Louis Mulstock will be on display in the Library Art Gallery for
three weeks commencing January 31
Most of tho 22 paintings are for sale
at prices ranging from $20 to $300.
Born in Poland, Mr. Muhlstcck cam;
to Canada in 1911 and studied at the
Art Association of Montreal and Ecolc
des Beaux Arts.
The paintings are mainly of humbh
subjects, unemployed or old people
laborers, shabby streets, empty rooms,
and an occasional nude.
Also on display are a series of panels on interior design by the students
of the School of Interior Design at
Manitoba. These panels have captions
and illustrations showing better furniture design and new ideas on interior
decoration.
second term at UWO. ^
Recently the two prospective students arrived in London to find they
could neither enter the university nor
find a job. The steamer, on which
they arrived in Gulfport, Mississippi,
is minus a steward and galley boy and
the Canadian custom officials are
■till scratching their'heads.
Ait Gulfport the boys left ship on
leave and, "Within a quarter of an
hour were on board a Greyhound bus
heading north."
The five day trip north was a series
of short bus hope. In Nashville, Tenn.,
a student and his wife befriended the
sold a valuable German camera.
"We didn't even have a dollar that
time," said one.
When they, arrived at the border, on
the Detroit tunnel bus, they decided to
bluff their way into Canada. One had
a new bristling American haircut,
"which would have branded me as a
jailbird at home," and neither had any
baggage.
The two rovers sauntered into the
customs office and told the officers
they were from Na-a-ashvllle. The
customs men passed them as American
college boys on a one day  visit to
wanderers and in Indianapolis they! Canada.
Owner Professor
mmm
Dog Finds Pub Aftei
Scenery Shop Rule
Violated by Students
Borrowing Props
Stage Committee regulations are
being violated.
According to Stage Committee regulations, an application form must be
obtained from the Committee and
countersigned by the Vice-Chairman
before any scenery or stage equipment
can be borrowed or any use made of
the Scenery Shop.
These forms, available at the Booking office, AMS Information Desk,
must be submitted at least three (3)
days before the day on which the
scenery or equipment is to be loaned.
H. Pedrini, vice-chairman of the
Stage Committee, will be in the Scenery Shop from 12:30 to 1 p.m. Monday
through Friday for the convenience of
clubs and groups (off and on the
campus).
L
earning German
By VIC HAY
self with  a German textbook,  from
A great many curious things have  which he lias learned the rudiments
turned up on the campus, but none  of the language."
more curious'than Whiffenpoof, the     No. Whiffy does not read textbooks.
bi-llngual dog. We  have  never  seen  a   dog  of  his
Not that Whiffenpoof (Whiffy for indeterminate breed that does. Whiffy
short, and for another, equally ob- belongs to Miss Miller, of the German
vious reason) speaks two languages. Department. She came to her as a
She actually Jpeaks only plain old stray, two years ago. and because of
dog talk, but understands both Eng- the interest she expressed in thc sub-
lish and German commands. Inasmuch joct Miss Miller teaches, she decided
as Whiffy has never been to Germany, to keep her.
is neither Alsatian or Doberman, and Whiffy visited the Publications
has not, as far as we know, attended Board on Saturday last. Everybody
high school, this is quite a remarkable tripped over him, and he didn't smell
feat. ^^ like violets, exactly.
"Ha " you wflfcsay, "The explana- "RAUS!" we roared. She hasn't been
tion is simple. The dog provided him- back since.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-Squares, Protractors, Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE kC» US
AMES  LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Complete with  Sheets and  Index
From $2.63
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
Stationers and  Printers
550 Seymour St.     Vancouver, B.C.
- - - Ubyssey Classified - -
Wanted    •
ANY ARTMEN INTERESTED IN DE-
bating in file forthcoming Legion Cup
Debates are asked to contact Bruce Lee
at KE. 3036.
RIDE FROM 25TH AND CAMBIE
for 8:30*8 Monday to Saturday. Please
phone Ben at FA. 8849Y.
THE WELL-MEANING AND HON-
est person who picketed my Commercial pilot's license in the Periodical room for a souvenir on December
5th. Don't be hesitant or shy—why
dont you phone Nick at LA. 0889R or
leave it Lost and Found.
RIDERS WANTED-CAR LEAVES
Norgate Park, North Van., Through'
West End to 25th and Dunbar to UBC.
Foi 9:30's every day. Phone CE. 4421.
PASSENGERS FOR 9:3(fr"s daily from
vicinity of Broadway and Nanaimo.
Ask for Dave at 1866 Nanaimo St.
FOR ENGINEER'S BALL-E'EAUTI-
ful girl with money for ticket and
bottle. Preference given to girls with
cars. Phone Bill, FR. 2285 between 7
and 8 p.m.
Miscellaneous
TYPING: ENGLISH AND FOREIGN
languages. Essays, theses, card work,
letters 6f application. Campus rates,
AL. 0655R.
TYPING      ACCURATELY      DONE.
Reasonable rates.  PA.  2963
BADMINTON   AND   TENNIS   RAC-
quets repaired (nylon). Apply Equipment Room in the gym. ,
Meetings i
PHILATELIC SOCIETY MEETS IN j
Hut L 12 Wednesday noon. New mem- j
bers welcomed. |
JA^Z   SOCIETY  ON  WEDNESDAY!
will have Bill Hill and what should ]
be an interesting program. Bring your
own sugar.
Lost
LAPEL PIN-REO, EEARING LET-
ters CX and figures 1870-1945 and
surmounted by crown. Finder please
return to Lost and Found.
GREY WATERMAN'S PEN LOST
Friday January 20. With striped metallic top. I need this urgently. Phone
Rill, CH. 2463.
ROLEX WRIST WATCH-INITIALS
OFWH on back. On Wednesday, between Eng. Building and downtown
bus. Please return to O. F. W. Hughes
in Hydraulics Lab., or phons West
1225Y.
GREEN WALLET BEffWEEN AC-
adia and Tolmie St. Wednesday. January 18, Contents and wallet are valuable to owner. Please return to Lost
and Found.
PARKER PEN-COMB IN ZIPPER
case in Library. Return to Lost and
Found in Brock.
GCLD AND RHINESTONE BRACE-
let dropped som;whero in vicinity
E'rock Hall. Finder please phone KE.
4244L.
BLACK GLOVES IN NEW EeVOe'e- ,'
coring Buliding last Thursday, Room !
202. Finder please phone Dick at AL. l
0390R. |
E&TWEFN   HOME   EC    BUILDING I
and Acadia Camp—Maroon Waterman
pen. Finder please notify Nellie Ash-
worth, Hut 18, Acadia Camp. AL. 0026.
FAWN TOPCOAT REMOVED FROM
Eng. 200 at 2:30 last Friday after
lecture for 3 and 4th year Elec. Eng.
Owner would appreciate return of
same to Lost and Found.
BROWN Shaeffer pen. Please return
to Lost and Found.
For Sale
TUXEDO,  SIZE 36. GOOD  CONDI-
tion. Phono KE'. 5215M.
CAMERA FOR SALE-ROLLEICORD
Reflex,   2'/4x2'/4,   f   4.5,   l-300th   sec.
Flash gun. KE. 3862Y.
Room and Board
ROOM AND BOARD FOR TWO
male students. $50 per month. Close
to bus. 4411 West 11th. AL. 3256M.
SELF - CONTAINED BASEMENT
suite for rent or board. One large
bedroom, 3 tingle beds. Separate study
room and fhowcr. Suitable for 3
girls or 3 boys. AL. 3256M.
COMFORTABLE BED - SITTING
room with sigle beds lor two students
sharing, with breakfast, ?25 each per
month. Also noorn with double bed,
$30 with breakfast. AL. 3459L.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR ONE OR
two boys. Double room with single
beds, $55 per month with lunch made.
Apply 4118 West 11th, AL. 1658M.
Notices
NOTICE TO ALL THOSE INTER-
ested in the biggest and best cup of
coffee on tho campus. The Legion Canteen serves you daily. Open evenings
7-10:15  p.m. .. *      ' :
CCF CLUB PRESENTS •tfJORGE
Weaver in his weekly disottslion on
"Scientific Socialism" in Arts 206 Tuesday, January 24th at 12:30 'noon.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY REHEAR-
sal in UBC Auditorium every.Wednesday at 6 p.m.
CAMERA CLUB WILL MUST AT
Phil Tourner's, Hut fc, Suit*! Hi Little
fountain Camp, Friday, JapfOary 27
at 7:30 p.m. for Print Criticism^ Bring
a print or two.
MR. PING TI HO WILL AOttRESS
members of the Chinese Vafsity club
at 3:30 on Wednesday, January 25
in Theatre Room, Brock Hall.
M
•:"7*».'
r^    nr
Hmmh^^mwkmm^}
*#■■ ^*of$S&m    -SB*, i 	
Whan yoa'v* plok*4
your pip* right—pick your
tobacco right Pick PioobM
tht pick of pip* tobgoeot,
^^P^H^sl^B^kPssW^WOTlJI
jjheeeeii It BuiUy I Tobacco—Ih* ceolott, mlldott t*b*x«* •v*rt*«*Ml
■'1 " _L_LJL_- ;■■",! l!,W»i
Save Wisely TODAY ...
for TOMORROW
Consult any of thc following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
HAROLD COWHIG
SYD BAKER
LLOYD JACKSON
AUBREY  SMITH
DOUG. KIBBLF,
KEN  DEANE
JIM BRANDON
JOHN TENER
ED. PECK
LARRY WRIGHT (Supervisor)
PACific 5321
ROYAL DANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
UFE ©F-CANADA (jM^.^t-Stt^''
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   January   24,   1950
Tlfe"
Road Trips Still Go Awry
But Coming Rest May Cure
CPS, St. Martins
Both Dump 'Birds
Two weeks at home and two weeks
away from conference basketball may
do the Thunderbird basketball team
a lot Of good.
Over the weekend the 'Birds ended
their disastrous series of conference
road trips with a double loss, first
against College of *Puget Sound Log-
gers and then against the cellar dwelling St. Martin's Rangers.
Now with no conference games
scheduled for next weekend when
the *B^ds meet the Senior A Clover
LeafS'IK two exhibition tilts at UBC,
a fcrt of the tension the 'Birds have
work46" up over conference competition %fii be realized.
CLOS* FIGHT
' In thi Friday night game against the
Loggers, the 'Birds managed to stay
with tn* CPS club right through until
almost three-quarter time. It was then
that the 'Birds noticed the loss of Big
Bill Bell on the backboards.
It was a story of six foot six boys
against six foot two players. That's all
there was to it.
Against St. Martin's the following
flight the 'Birds really lost a tough
one. Cellar team or no cellar team,
St. Martin's has parts of a ball club
floating around their college.
COULDNT CATCH UP
There the 'Birds fell behind some
15 points through a series of unfortunate circumstances, and then just
didn't quite make the long, uphill
pull to victory.
' (Birdmen Munro, Mitchell, and
Southcott really showed up well over
tho iwsekend. Munro is playing some
of the best ball that he has played for
some time.
St. MARTIN S AGAIN
A woek after the Clover Leaf fracas,
the %rds will again run into battle
with St. Martin's and CPS. By then it
is hoped that Bell will be back in
•trip.
And then there will be some ten
'Birds and a coach that are going to
make sure that CPS won't get away
without a fight, and St. Martin's won't
leave with another win at UBC's'expense.
Noon Gomt
UBC Volleyball
All-Stars Play
UW Here Friday
University of Washington
will play a UBC All-Star
volleyball team on Friday in
the gym at 12:30.
UBC All Star team has not been
picked as yet, but will be chosen
from the finalist's In Intramural
volleyball. That means that the members of Betas, Kappa Sigs, DU's and
Engineers II will comprise the All-
Star aggregation.
University of Washington's squad is
playing ln a volleyball league which
takes oh Coast Conference teams, even
though this league is not an official
conference loop.
The Huskies' volleyball club is a
real sharp team and will have some
tough competition in store for UBC.
Admission fee is 10 cents.
pline committee members will
try to stop the Publications
poard from trouncing Student
Council at 12:30 pm today in
the gym.
BASEBALL NOTICE
Two managers are needed for the
new Baseball team. Those interested
please contact Jelly Anderson in the \
Gymnasium or leave your name with |
thc secretary.
SWIM  NOTICE
Women's swim classes will be cancelled today.
SPORTS EDITOR — RAY FROST
Editor This Issue: HAROLD BERSON
Watermen Eke Out Win
In Triangular Meet
First test of the season for the UBC swim team brought
them their first win as they slipped past a strong Idaho aggregation to win the triangular meet by two points.
THUNDERBIRDS RECEIVE
NEW BASKETBALL STRIP
Morale bolster for the UBC Thunderbird basketball
team may be here.
Just arrived on campus is a complete set of new strip
for the basketballers. Pure white, the satin shorts and
rayon shirts are edged with blue and gold trim.
Thunderbirds will make their debut in their shiny new
outfits in their games with Clover Leafs on Frday arid
Saturday.
Strip has been on order for the last month, but the
uniforms took « long time coming.
• It was hoped that the new regalia would be here for the
'Bird's opening conference game.
Finally getting the affair under way
at Cheney on Sunday morning after
being held up from the bad weather
until late Saturday night, the Thunderbird team managed to overcome
University of Idaho and Eastern
Washington CoUege, scoring 52 points
fo 50 with Eastern catching only 7.
PREPARED FOR NEXT WEEK
Stiff competition met at Cheney
over the weekend will prepare the
'Birds watermen for their meet with
Gray Harbour College from Aberdeen, Washington, the top Junior
College team in the state, supplying
many of UW's starry swimmers.
At the Cheney triangular affair,
UBC topped the field in six out of
the ten events, Idaho gaining high
points in the other four.
In the 100 yard free-style event,
UBC took first honors with George
Knight placing first, followed by
Kinney of Idaho, Don Smyth of UBC,
and Stewart of Idaho.
150 yard back stroke was taken by
Lyons from Idaho, Don Marshall of
UBC was second with Reytainter of
Eastern and Stewart of Idaho ln the
third and fourth spots.
IDAHO AGAIN
Idaho's Gentry took the 200 yard
breast stroke, while the only UBC
placing was Pete Lusztig, coming
fourth.
Lyons of Idaho beat UBC's Jim
Hawthorne in the 150 yard medley,
whiel Vazoa of Idaho came third, and
UBC's Lusztig coming fourth.
I Arnie Armstrong took UBC honors
in the 440 yard free style, brother
Marshall placing fourth. Miller and
Guest of Idaho came second and third.
I
UBC PLACED SECOND
In the 300 yard medley, Idaho came
In first, UBC second and Eastern
third.
Armstrong won the 200 yard free
style over Farmer of Idaho, Leeman
of Eastern, and Walker of UBC.
50 yard free style was taken by Bob
Thistle of the 'Birdmen. Team mate
Smyth came second, Keller and Vazoa
third and fourth.
Don Thorn of UBC copped diving
honors, followed by Farmer and
Clark of Idaho and im Hawthorne of
UBC.
MEN'S BIG BLOCKS
Men's Big Block Glfib members will
... >'j'-
meet in Arts 108 a$ 12:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday, January %. Everyone wear
sweaters for Totef) picture.
Coming election «f officers will bO
discussed and Don Knight of Thunral
will be out to give a talk.
Much oil refinery equipment is made of Nickel
alloys to stand up under intense heat, under subzero cold, and to resist corrosion by acids. The
modern refinery contains hundreds of tons of
Nickel alloys.
-Corty-three years of research have uncovered
hundreds of uses for Nickel in the United States
and other countries. Now Nickel exports bring in
millions of U.S. dollars yearly. These dollars help
pay the 14,000 Nickel employees and also help pay
railwaymen, lumbermen, steel and iron workers
and other men and women making supplies for
the Nickel mines, smelters and refineries.
In the tankers at sea, in the tank carswhich trans*
port oil products, in the tank trucks which bring
oil and gasoline to the service station, Nickel
alloys are used in many ways.
■h *
ftv,        -T.
f     ..&i
'?•:'■& " l;
. \umana e*
McM"a M-ftif
tut fully Hint
mild, mil tr uM
fnt •» rciucii rt-
«g«M iMtrqltd.
f SM S7kVSTeJ*:sY MsfeTST )
Canadian NickeL
[Jjtf   INTERNATIONAL   NICKEL   COMPANY   OF   CANADA,   LIMITED,   25_ KING    STREET^WEST,   TORQfTO

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