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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1937

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 LAST CHANCE FOR
PRESIDENTIAL
NOMINATIONS
TOMORROW
Published TwiceWeekly by the    Publications Board of theUniversity of British Columbia
BASKETBALL FINALS
SECOND GAME
GYM WEDNESDAY
Vol. XIV
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 1937
No. 36
jjil'l-HiiitniimMiii iiHiinmiiiiHtmitiHini
Exchange
NeWS and
Views
By J. D. MACFARLANE
SUNDAY IN
WINNIPEG
Do any of you big bad Vancou-
veritea know what a Blue Law ia?
Would any of you object very much
if your Illustrious mayor and alder
men and all their confreres sudden
ly told you that you could not buy
that much-desired cigarette with
which to bring to a state of sublime
perfection your after-dinner coffee
while partaking of your Sunday
dinner in a downtown restaurant?
I have a funny feeling that you
would do more than just object!
FREE CIGARETTES
This, however, seems to be the
position of people in Winnipeg, according to the Manltoban, U. of
Man. student paper. Not being satisfied with the Lord's Day Alliance
Act, our prairie friends seem to
think that their impressive sinful
natures require a little addtiional
curbing. According to the law, one
must practically suspend breathing
from Saturday midnight to Monday
morning. I feel rather sorry for
Mrs. Housewife when she faces that
pile of dishes Monday a.m. if she
practices the theories of her so-
called spiritual elders.
An   Interesting   way   of   sidestepping some of the difficulties
of the situation Is shown in the
tale of a gentleman who required
those  after-dinner   smokes   .   .   .
and got them t' But when he came
to pay hia bill he found that he
waa paying twenty-five cents for
toast and  coffee I   According  to
the cashier, "Meals are up today
. . . cigarettes are free!"
But  the  most  interesting  thing
about the whole discussion as conducted in the Manltoban is the opin
ion   of  the President  of the  University of Manitoba Student's Un-*
ion    who    declared    with    puritan
stoutness,   "My  girl-friend   doesn't
smoke and  I  gave  them   up   for
Lent!"
NO MENACE THERE
During the past year Manitoba
has proved to be a rather interest'
ing place. We have all heard, by
this time, of the desecrated Venus
de Milo, ad nauseam. Outside of
Blue Laws nothing much else seems
to have been worrying them of late
. . . except the problems of politics
in atudent affairs which seem to
have received their elementary Irrigation from a shiny bubble re U.
B. C. campus politics in the form
of a well wind-blown story to Manitoba by my honored and cxciteable
assistant.
Manitoba student heads cry with
horror-stricken indulgence that
there is no evil menace such as this
on their campus. In fact, it is perfectly clean. To use a time-worn
and much mis-used phrase, we are
the "great unwashed." Our intelligent friends declare "it is generally
felt that when parties are in control of student affairs greater possibilities of misgovernment are
presented than are possible under
the present system where membera
of Council make decslions according
to their individual opinions rather
than along party lines."
We  haven't   any   statistics   on
Manitoba    Student    government,
but we might venture the opinion
that, we trust that the treatment
of Venus was not the best effort
that  such   a   high-flying system
could produce. We, for one, would
not   be   proud   of   it,   especially
since  it has been  advertised  all
over Canada.
Such things  are the province of
Council.   And we rather think that
a unified church could better guide
such things.   In this case they were
either guilty of misdemeanor or of
(Continued on Page 8)
G.L. Pop To Speak
On Fur Business
In This Province
Vocational Guidance
Speaker For
Wednesday
"The Opportunities of the
Fur Business In B. C." will be
the subject of the address of
O. L. Pop, noted local natur
alist, hunter, furrier and tax
ldermist, who will be the
guest speaker at the Vocational Guidance Lecture ln
Arts 100 on Wednesday noon.
Mr. Pop, who is assisted by his
brother, K. J. Pop, is the donor of
a $2,600 collection of 12 heads of
B. C. game which now adorn the
walls of Applied Science 100. The
presentation was made at a Vancouver Institute lecture on Jan. 28
when Mr. Pop addressed the meeting on Big Game Hunting ln B. C.
and supplemented his talk with
some very fine pictures.
BOffN   IN  BUDAPEST
Mr. Pop, who is originally from
Budapest, came to Vancouver as a
visitor 26 years ago and was so
impressed that he returned again
after the War to make lt his home.
He has been active both ln Africa
and Asia.
The distinguished naturalist and
hunter is an advocate of the capitalisation of the Big Game Industry
In B. C. In the previous lecture he
stated that Alaska is thriving on
tourists from the States who come
there for the hunting and that B.C.
far exceeds any other province in
ita supply ot wild animals. He is
also in favor of a systematic campaign against cougar, which are
making severe Inroads on our
game. The lecture should afford
plenty of food for thought and provide a great deal of information
on the subject.
The address will be supplemented by a series ot films presenting
different species in their natural
environment.
Plays
"Charlotte"
In "The Brontes"
Starting Maroh 11
—Audrey Phillips
"Isis" Suggests Marriage
For Oxford Students
Be Subsidized
(Prom  the  New  Unlveralty)
Subsidies to enable Oxford Undergraduates—and Undergraduettes
—to marry and help to check the
falling birthrate have 'been suggested by the Bdltor of the Isis, in
an article, "More Nurseries—Fewer Bursaries." He writes: "Many
a sombre quadrangle will be a happier and brighter place when bab-
ln crawlers disport themselves on
its pleasant sward and their Joyous
gurgles are wafted through the
windows of tutors' rooms as the
tutors Instruct their proud parents.
We are told today that one of tbe
most serious problems confronting
this country is itB declining birthrate. But what ls Oxford doing
about lt? A board must be set up
at once to decide which undergraduates and undergraduettes should
be granted subsidies to enable
them to marry. Both the undergraduates and the undergraduettes
waste a great deal of time seeking
each other's company, and bemoan
the fact that tbey are unable to get
married because they have not
enough money. Provide them with
Just enough money to get married
on, and promise to provide for
their children, and all this will
automatically be saved. The intellectual standard of Oxford will
show an astonishing improvement.
Less money will be dissipated on
Idle  pleasures."
OBOLENSKY   COMMENTS
Of course this article provoked
comment, Prince Obolensky, the
fatuous rugby international, from
Brasenose, comments: "There is no
reason why undergraduates and
undergraduettes should not marTy.
Indeed, in many cases, a wife
would be an Inspiration. I suggest
that before the marriages are subsidized the bride-to-be should pass
a test proving that she ls not a
social butterfly and that preferably, she possesses more brains
than her Intended spouse. She
could then do all his essays for
him; see that he attends all his
tutorials ln time; cook his meals.
. . . In this Utopia, life would be
wonderful'."
(Continued on Page 3)
PLANT   BREEDING   WORTH
$40,000,000 TO CANADA
Dr. Moe Discusses "Plant Breeding and Its
Relation to Canadian Welfare"
At the Vancouver Institute Lecture, Saturday, February
27, in Arts 100, Dr. O. G. Moe, head of the Agronomy Department, discussed the problems and methods of "Plant Breeding and Its Relation to Canadian Welfare."
He pointed out that the Dominion of Canada, being essentially an
agricultural country depends on
the work of the plant breeder and
pathologist for its prosperity, to
the extent of forty million dollars
annually. Not only does this work
benefit the nation as a whole, but
also the individual farmer — by
finding the strain or variety of
plant which can stand the rigors of
our climate, the farmer is assured
of a good crop.
CROSSING   IMPORTANT
Tbe process of producing a new
variety consists of, crossing the
plants, sorting out the predominant
types — these are the various
strains; these strains are then tested comparatively in plots for
growth, 'the survival of the fittest'
are then tested in different districts
and climates. A further milling
and baking test is required for
wheat, to ensure a high protein
and gluten strength and the color
of flour that results—white flour
being the ideal.
Most of the knowledge of procedure has been derived from the
work of Dr. Wm. Saunders and his
son, Dr. Charles Saunders, with Dr.
O. O. Moe as the latter's assistant.
In 1889, the Dominion Experimental Farms were started with
Dr. Wm. Saunders as flrst director.
His ideal was to find an early maturing variety of wheat with a good
production rate. Much of this work
was  done at Agassis,  B.  C.
VARIETIES OF WHEAT
In 1903, Dr. Charles Saunders
was appointed cerealist. One of his
outstanding achievements was the
finding of a method of purifying a
mixture, i.e., by planting single
heads of the -grain. Many well
known varieties such as Marquis,
Garnet and Reward are the results
of such experiments. Among the
rust-resistant wheats are Apex, produced at the University of Saskatchewan and Thatcher at tbe University of Manitoba.
Dr. L. S. Kllnck, while professor
of Agronomy at MacDonald College, worked on alfalfa and corn
breeding. At present, Dr. G. G. Moe
and Prof. A. T. Boving are working on the breeding of disease resistant clover, the particular disease being sclerotlna.
The work of the agriculturist
does not stop with the production
of the grain, but he must also con-
(Continued on Page 8)
Players Struggle
To Unearth Props
For Coming Play
Period Furniture
Difficult to
Find
"Thimble, thimble! Who's got the thim
ble?" Such might well be the cry of the
properties' committee of the Players' Club
these last few weeks as they have carried
out a relentless search for props, for "The
Brontes."
It ls their job to furnish completely the
various sets of the play and everything from
little pieces of pewter-ware to Period furniture are Included on their list. The job ls
made even more difficult, since everything
must be authentic and ln keeping with the
time of the play. In their feverish search,
they have undertaken a systematic and thorough invasion of antique shops and furniture stores and have even Invaded the homes
of the Club members.
PIANO A PROBLEM
The most difficult article to obtain was
a piano, which to be in keeping with the
other furniture had to be a spinner piano.
Modern ones looked too modern; antique
ones couldn't be- found. At last, after three
weeks a suitable one was unearthed.
Flowers have also proved a thorn
In the flesh of Jovial BUI Nicker-
son, who heads this committee. In
one of the scenes, a bouquet of
Sweet Williams figure largely.
However, this particular flower is
out of season right now, and so
after a fruitless search, an order
for artificial flowers had to be
placed. Real flowers will be used
for Charlotte's wedding bouquet,
which will be made of white roses
and carnations.
BARKING   DOd
Another item which taxed the ingenuity of the committee, was a
dog's bark, which ls heard offstage.
Not everyone can bark convincingly, apparently, and only after an
exhaustive tryout, was a suitable
bark found.
Accidents have played their part
in the search to further try the pa*
tience of the committee. In the
office scene, brandy glasses are required, and after some time authentic ones were found. These were
carried all over town with no mishap, and until almost as they arrived home, they were broken.
Another accident, amusing to the
onlookers, but not to the subject,
concerned a large mirror. A suitable one had been located ln an
antique shop. When the proprietor
came to lift it down oft the wall,
lt slipped, falling over the head of
the unfortunate student below, and
neatly framing his aching head.
Campus Teachers
At Conventions
The teachers and student-teachers on the campus are to be represented at tbe Annual Teachers'
Convention to be held ln Hotel
Vancouver, March 29 to April 1.
A brief meeting will be held Friday noon for discussing resolutions
and selecting delegates to represent the University group. The
teachers are requested to prepare
any resolutions they may wish to
submit to the Convention, and to
hand in the written resolutions
to the secretary, Miss Wind, before
Friday's meeting.
All members of the Teachers'
Club have been invited to attend
the convention. The constitution
also bas to be finally accepted. So
be sure you are tbere ln Arts 204
at 12.15 noon on  Friday, March  S.
Two Forums Meet
In First Debate
Thursday noon of this week tbe
Parliamentary Forum and the Literary Forum meet iti, their flrst debate.
Kay Armstrong and Clara St.
Johns, representing the Literary
Forum, will uphold the affirmative
of the subject under debate: "Resolved that the government regulation of a national radio hookup can
best serve the Canadian public."
Jim MacDonald and Bill Sibley,
who have taken active parts in Par-'
llamentary Forum debating this
year," will oppose the representatives of the women's  society.
Last Day For Exchange
Scholarships
Last day for application for .exchange Student Federation Scholarships has been extended to Wednesday. Students entering third
year are eligible, with exceptions
permissable under certain circumstances. Apply Student Council
Offices.
PERIOD FURNITURE
The furniture ln all sets ls period. In the act taking place at
Brussels, only gilt Louise Quatorze
fttrniture ls used. These are mainly tables and chairs. At the Bronte
parsonage tbe furniture ls Victorian, made of dark mahogany and
rosewood. The sets will be an exact copy of tbe original rooms, for
Branwell Bronte's drawings are being used as the models.
Scholarships, Prizes,
Bursaries
Applications for Medals, Scholarships* Prizes and Bursaries,,
other than those awarded for
General Proficiency, must be
handed to the Registrar not
later than the LAST DAY OF
EXAMINATIONS, FRIDAY, APRIL 23rd. See Calendar, Section "M e d a 1 s, Scholarships,
Prizes, Bursaries and Loans."
Scholarships, prizes and bursaries to be awarded to returned
soldiers or dependends of soldiers, on the basis of academic
standing will be allotted to students who are known to be returned soldiers of dependents of
soldiers. Information in this regard supplied by students at the
time of registration for the
present session will, along with
academic standing, be the basis
on which the awards are made.
If any student has failed to pro*
vide this information he should
submit lt without further delay.
PRESIDENTIAL
NOMINATIONS
WEDNESDAY
Dave Carey Only
Name Filed
In Office
Up to Monday noon, no nominations for President besides Dave
Carey's had been received in Council office. Deadline for the submission ot nominations for President
ls 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 8.
KEEN  CONTEST  EXPEOTED
Nominations for remaining Council offices must be In by Maroh l<h
So far none have been reoelved,
but campus rumors indicate a fairly keenly oontested  eleotion.
Two oandldates for the aoore-
tarlal    position    may    be    Mary
Blaok and Marjorie Jessup.    Bob
Smith   may   run   for   Treasurer,
while  Maleolm  Brown and Tom
Marshall have Intentions of running for President of the  L.S.E.
John Bird, star flrst string rugby player, may enter as an M.U.S.
candidate.   Present contestants for
M.A.S. representative appear to be
Howie   MoPhee   and   Bid   Walker,
with possibly Jean Meredith for the
leadership of the W.A.8.
QUALIFICATIONS
A.M.S. regulations stipulate that
the President must be an under*
graduate of a graduating class of
any Faculty, who has attended the
University  for at least two  years.
The Secretary, the President of
the Literary and Scientific executive, the President of the Men's
Athletic Association, and the President of the Women's Athletic Association must be undergraduates
of any Faculty who have acquired
the  standing of a  Junior.
The Presidents of the Men's and
of the Women's Undergraduate
Societies must be undergraduate
members of tbe graduating year
of any faculty.
The Treasurer and the Junior
Member must have acquired the
standing of a Junior and must not
be ln the graduating year of any
Faculty. John Logan's motion to
change tbe constitution so tbat a
member of the graduating year
might hold the position of Treasurer was defeated at the last Council meeting.
ii
Economics Course
At Edmonton Omits
"Husband-Hunting
By FRED PRITCHARD
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Feb. 27 (W.I.P.U.)—Although household economic students
of the University of Alberta are
trained to be nutritionists, dieticians,, institutional managers and
home-makers, they deny that there
ever was or ever will be a course in
husband-hunting" in this department.
The House Ec. training is very
complete, including dressmaking,
cleaning, laundering, serving, marketing, home-nursing, dietetics,
meal planning, food preparation,
invalid diets, budgeting, home management, child care and training.
The girls are very enthusiastic
about the child-care training on
their course, although they have not
a practice house or home management house as on other campuses,
where each girl spends part of her
time as mother and hostess. Until
the day comes when the authorities provide a campus home, "junior" will have to look elsewhere for
his care. The gJrls feel that to have
a practice house and to have to take
care of junior would be fun—except
one blue-eyed blonde who said:
"Yes, catch me staying home with
him the night of the Pembina
Prance."
HISTORICAL   SOCIETV
Will all students Interested in
joining the Historical Society and
expecting to enter the third year
next September, please submit applications before Tuesday, March
9th, to Joan Pinhorn, Arts Letter
Rack. Two
SB-BBS
THE   UBYSSEY
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SINIOR IDITORS
TUESDAY: Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY: Dorwin Baird
SPORTS IDITOR
Dick Elton
ASSOCIATI IDITORS ASSOCIATI SPORTS IDITORS
Ken Grant       Dorothy Cumminga Frank Perry    Frank Turner
Peggy Hlggs
STAFF FHOTOQRAFHIR IXCHANOI IDITOR
Stewart Calvert Jim Macfarlane
Y S S E Y
Tuesday, March 2, 1937
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Student rate, $1.00 per year. Rate for non-students, $1.50 per year.
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 194S
Advertising Staff:  Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher  *
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited
ELECTION DECISIONS
With the Student Council elections beginning a week
from today the annual Ubyssey election editorial seems to
be indicated.
Seriously though, we wonder if the majority of students
really realize what power we have given to our Council. Ask
the average student what system of government we use .and
he would probably reply, "a democracy." He would, however, be wrong.
A real democracy Implies the presence of a loyal opposition and thus of a government.dependent for Its continued
existence on the will of the people. Students' Council has
during its one-year term no opposition other than that offered ln the two annual Alma Mater meetings. Once elected,
Student Council members can serve their full term no matter how flt they may prove to be for the office. Therefore,
lt would seem to be a wise policy to exercise real care in
choosing this powerful body.
If you let such trivial considerations as personal prejudices or fraternity affiliations influence your vote you will
have only yourselves to blame if th eresult is an incompetent
council.
Remember that experience, mature Judgement, initiative and tact are important qualities for those holding executive offices.
FRESHMEN ESSAYS ON THE UBYSSEY
We learn with interest that a class in Freshman English
has been asked to write an essay on the Ubyssey, its policies
and its comparative value with other university publications. t
We never knew that freshmen had any opportunity to
compare this paper with others of a similar type. Certainly
there ls no rush of inquiring youngsters coming in to the
Pub Office to read the 50-odd college papers that we receive.
Furthermore, it is highly unlikely that the solons of the
Ubyssey staff would consent to such an Invasion.
And another thing . . . what freshman on this campus
has enough experience in the field of Journalism to be able
to give a considered appreciation of any newspaper, campus
or city daily? They can throw pedantic shafts of criticism
at us regarding out writing style, but we don't give a hoot.
Journalistic style has always been distinctive, to the eternal
despair of English departments all over the world.
All things considered, we think that the assignment of
such an essay is a mistake. We would not object to the
criticism that the eager frosh might offer. What we do
believe, however, ls that no group of flrst year students has
sufficient specialized knowledge in this field to do properly
the Job set out by this unnamed English professor.
CLUBS, TAKE NOTICE
Class and olub oopy not rsoslvsd within ths nsxt
two days is liable to bs out or entirely sxoludsd from
ths 1937 Totem. Soisnoo olassss, undergraduate societies, minor olubs, PLAYERS' CLUB, ars all expected" to submit writeups Immediately at ths Publications
offloe.
Clubs written up last year that have as yet
turned In no report: Phrateres, Panhsllsnio Counoil,
Historioal Sooiety, Student League, Cosmopolitan
Club, Menorah Sooiety, S.C.M., Newman Club, V.C.U.,
Oeutsohe Verein, Classlos Club, Chemistry Sooiety,
Agricultural Dlsousslon Club, A.I.C.E. and Forest Club.
Arts '37 Sclenoe '37, '38, '39 and '40, and Com-
meroe '37, pleass note.
Office For Canadian
Students in London
Again This Year
TORONTO, Ont. (NFCUS) — A
moat important organisation has
been formed during the past three
years to assist Canadian university
students wbo are studying or travelling ln Europe. The large increase ln the number of Canadian
students going overseas to "broaden" themselves led to tbe belief
that an office should be opened in
London, England, to assist these
students.
During the summer of 1034 the
effort made was largely through
the Interest of Mr. J. B. Bicker-
stetb, Warden of Hart House, and
Mr. P. K. Hodgson of London, England, wbo arranged for Mr. James
P. Johnston, late of the Hart House
Staff, to spend five months—from
May to September—in London. In
the summers of 1086 and 1086 the
experiment waa repeated, when the
N.F.C.U.S. appointed Mr. Johnston
its Travel Secretary, and made a
financial contribution to bis work.
TOURS MAPPED
During the last three years over
850 students have called on Mr.
Johnston and taken advantage of
MS guidance  in mapping out their
tours or studies; in many cases Mr.
Johnston has been able to make
suggestions, through Introductions,
and otherwise, which have added
greatly to the enjoyment of the
trip, as many Canadian students
wbo land in England are unacquainted and uncertain in their
plans.
For two summers a small cottage
was rented in a beautiful part of
Kent, only 22 miles from .London;
here each week-end a group ot
young Canadians would be found
discussing questions of international importance with young Englishmen, Australians, Ger mans,
etc. Canadian Cottage was for tbe
use of any Canadian student. Mr.
Johnston's services are available
without charge, although a small
charge is made tor staying at Canadian Cottage. The "Secretary for
England of the N.F.C.U.S. ls ln
Canada House, London, every morning, for consultation; advance information required can be obtained
by writing him (Mr. J. P. Johnston) care-ot Canada House, Trafalgar  Square,  London,
BAD habit.
There haa grown up among
party-goers on this campus a custom that for sheer stupdlty is seldom equalled. I refer to the habit
of "going somewhere" after varsity
danoes. The folly of lt all was
brought more closely home to me
after the Co-ed when I sat ln a
booth at La Fonda and watched
half a hundred tired, dopey students pushing themselves around a
dance floor.
.If you must eat after dances, and
the habit of "going somewhere"
bas food as its most Important basis, why not go home and raid the
ice box? Have you ever stopped to
think of the horrible results of
hamburgers, coffee, waffles, sundaes, sodas, and sloe gin in the
stomach? Or have you ever tried
sleeping after one of these all-night
revelB?   And the morning after . ..
On the other hand, have you
ever tasted the ful Joy ot sitting in
a kitchen at 2 a.m., eating toasted
cheese sandwiches and drinking
some cool, sweet fruit juice?
Dances should cease with the home
waits. Let's start a new custom,
no more trips to La Fonda, The
Manderin Gardens or Tony's. Home
sweet home before dawn.
• »        *
TOO much work.
An interesting sidelight on
our system ot student government
arose at Council last Monday night
during the debate on the "Logan
Amendment." Treasurer Lyall Vine,
who has carried out the duties of
his position with efficiency, despite
the howls ot those with decreased
budgets, remarked that "you oan't
be a good treasurer and a good
student, too."
As the Councillors warmed up
to tbe subject, lt turned out that
all of their offices call for more
time and nergy than any student
can afford to spare.
I can offer no solution for this
problem, and it seems to be a serious one. Possibly two or three
more on the Council would help or
maybe another assistant for Mr.
Home. It might also be suggested
that a good deal of the petty Items
that have to be decided by Council members could be dealt with by
other student officers.
Here is something for aspiring
Council candidates to worry over.
If they win, they lose—unless they
bring with their victory a new setup for our Board  of Directors.
• •        •
FEBRUARY movies.
Again the monthly round-up
of pictures, the ones you'll want to
see when they show at the district
houses. Taking a leaf from Liberty,
I use the star method.
Four stars: Wlnterset, the finest
thing to show here for a long tmie.
God's Country and tho Woman,
some excellent color photography in
this story of Vancouver and the
B. C. logging industry. Local shots
are true to facts, and performance
of Robert Barrat good. Camllle,
already reviewed in the Ubyssey.
Three stars: On tho Avenue, Irving Berlin tunes that bolster up a
weak story. Rita Brothers, insane
funsters, also bring another weak
plot, Ono in a Million, to tho three-
star class. Green Light, stil Ito
show here, loses its fourth star becauae of sentimental pish-tosh.
Two stars: Main of Affairs, in
which George Arliss accomplishes
exactly nothing. Crack-Up, Peter
Lorre'a particular type of bad-man
antics make him the cleverest of
the "hevlee."
One star: Rainbow on the River,
which deserves credit for keeping
Wlnterset here two weeks, so the
Student Prince could see it three
times.
Book About China
Often Annoys
a-M___________a__»
Author Regards Was tarn
Superiority Sarcastically
Sin. Vufangj
My Country and My People
If we who live in British Columbia are to learn to understand anything of the culture of China, we
must learn from those who know
it thoroughly and who yet understand our point ot view well enough
to make auch a subject clear to us.
Pearl Buck, who writes an introduction to "My Country and My
People," points out that many modern English-writing Chinese are
either too impressed by Western
culture as to depreciate their own,
or else so patriotic as to cover up
any faults in their country. Sin
Yut-ang does not go to either of
these extremes.
The book is written in a way that
holds tho reader's interest. In parts
it tends either to annoy the Westerner, or to convince him that he is,
after all, a barbarian in comparison with the people of a far older
civilisation. Tho author regards
with sarcasm some of the standards
by which we tend to regard ourselves superior. And yet. he acknowledge" that his point of view
would be called unpatriotic by
some df his people.
First we are given an analysis
of the Chinese character and
thought. This leaves the reader
with the idea that the people of
China are like old men in their lack
of idealism and enthusiasm, and in
their enjoyment of simple things.
Each ot the characteristics described is so explained by the
author as to make it easy to understand, if not always td admire.
Then follows a description of Chinese life. The chapter on "Social
and Political Life," together with
the discussion in the "epilogue" go
a long way toward explaining the
disorder and lack of good government under which the country *uf-
fers.  (Contributed.)
"Let at* i*rve year ter, and year ear wtll tare* yea."
"PRANK" FICKB
U.B.C. 8ERVI0E 8TATI0N
24-Hsur Imargency Servlee — Complete Repair Faallltles
SOUTH END OP McGILL ROAD
PT. QREY 53
Educational Stationery Loose-Leaf Binders
FOUNTAIN PENS
Drawing Instruments Slide Rules
Social Printing and Engraving
The
CLARKE & STUART
STATIONERS
550 Seymour Street
Company Limited
PRINTERS
•none Trinity 1141
ENGRAVERS
Vancouvar. •. C.
//
//
National Research Council Fellowships, Studentships and Bursaries. 1937
BURSARIES of the value of 1600
will be open to award to applicants who have graduated with
high distinction ln scientific
study.
STUDENTSHIPS of the value ot
$600 will be open to award to applicants who have already done
some original graduate research
in science.
FELLOWSHIPS of the value of
3700 will be open to award to
applicants who have given distinct evidence of capacity to conduct Independent research in
science.
ATTENTION is called to the fact
that only a limited number of
awards can be granted. Consequently, applications should be
strictly confined to candidates
with oustandlng records, both ln
their undergraduate and postgraduate courses.
MARCH FIR8T is the final date on
which applications may be
mailed,
APPLICATION BLANKS and copies of the regulations governing
these awards may be obtained
from the Registrar ot your University. Mail applications direct
to "The Secretary, National Research Counoil, Ottawa."
S.  P.  BAGLBSON,
Secretary-Treasurer.
Duty Of Empire
Waves No Flags
The Duty of Empire, by Leonard
Barnoa, London, Victor Hollancs
Ltd., 1985.
Mixing ethics with economics, of
morality with politics often has the
annoying result of producing a
socialist. Mr. Leonard Barnes consistently mixes his ethics with his
economics, and his morality with
his politics and succeeds in becoming an annoying socialist—annoying, that is, for the flag-waving
"Pan-Britain" type and the die-hard
imperialist.
But for the average white inhabitant of the Bmpire who still chariah
the Illusion that the British Empire
is a perennial spring of universal
justice and benevolence oh wliich
the sun never sets, Mr. Barnes*
message will be at once revealing
and inspiring. Leonard Barnes, In
his "Tho Duty of the Empire" will
bo judged by many to be a first-
rate iconoclast. He is an iconoclast
indeed: but in this book he proves
himself to be something more than
just   an   idol-smasher.   He proves
himself to bo one of the most'eon-
struotlve thinkers in the Empire today. His work merits the attention
ot anyone who would understand
moro clearly the obligations of the
British people as holders of a vast
empire, and as rulers of the destinies of many millions of backward
peoples. —R.M.
The Nearest Bank is
The Canadian
Bank of
Commerce
Tenth snd Sassmst Branch
A general banking business la transacted and accounts of the Faculty
and   Students   of   the   University   of
British Columbia aro welcomed.
Bankers to the
Alma Mater
Society
C. R. MYERS, Msnsgsr
WESTERN MUSIC COMPANY LTD.
Special lata In
SHBBT MUSIO *nS
MUSIO LITBRATURB
570 Seymour Street
___ Suaaiiaa for all
FESTIVALS and  MUi
EXAMINATIONS
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPACT LOST
Lost at the Co-ed, a blue and
cream enamel compact in blue
leather case. Finder please return
to  Students' Council  Office.
One Test of A Newspaper
A TEST ef ths value ef a newspaper te ita readers is its nearness to
** Its own tlmas. Many a respectable family Journal will net mast tbe
test successfully . . . but- the Vancouver Sun dees. The Vancouver Sun
Is a newspaper written and edited by people who live NOW and the
things It ia chlafly cencernad with are tha events of today, tha history
that la being made every minute, Intelligently interpretad In tha light
of the lessens of tha past. But "the lessens of tho past" doss not mean
slavary te tha complexes of tha massed mediocrity of tha day before
yesterday; te gat a clear slgjht on tomorrow requlras hindsight based
on more than a firm conviction that Quean Anne is net yat dead. If you
sematlmas have tha feeling, when you are reading your dally newspaper,
that perhaps you have picked up in mistake a copy of tha Aleshire Whig
and Stockbreeders' Companion of Juno, 1193, tha obvious remedy Is to
phena Trinity 4111 and subscribe to tha Sun.
Vancouver Sun is A Newspaper of TODAY
Jfargittttm iWtnt
(Being Letters Received by Us)
Dear Sir:
I have noticed the clothing you make for my brother. Do you make
suits for girls, and if so, what style do you recommend.
We have a number of suits being "tattered for girts in our workrooms.
They ere all vory mannish, models with the Ingllsh drape which glvas the
Jacket such a soft becoming line. Single-button closings seem to bo most
popular. Tho trend is te smooth fabrics to stripes, to grays, and for square
but not exaggerated shoulders. Thoy are chic under s fur coat now, perfect
alone for laster.
Send ua your clothing problema.  Thay will
ba anawarad  In thle column or by latter.
E. A. LEE,
LTD.
"Distinctive Cloth**"
1005 GRANVILLE STREET
- Pricas $25.00 and up
SEYMOUR 2507
RULE No. 1—
"ALL MANUSCRIPTS MUST BE
TYPEWRITTEN!"
• All editors agree
that typed articles
and stories get first
attention. And teachers say that typing
of homework results
in fewer mistakes,
clearer thinking, and
hotter expression.
Road what Lena B.
Hooker, Ph.D. (Iowa
State University),
says: "I scored the
handwriting of themes done by college atudenta ranging
from sophomores to post doctors . . . 490 were in longhand
and 445 were typed. It waa interesting to note that two-
thirds of those marked unsatisfactory or failure were done
in longhand. Some of these papera in longhand were better
in content than tho flrat grades indicated, but, because
I had difficulty in deciphering the script, the marks were
low." »v   tmt.t
THE
CONSOLIDATED
TYPEWRITERS    LTD
416 RICHARDS STREET SEY. 7394 Tuesday, March 2, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Thrae
Leave:
MAY 9th
Return:
JUNE 22nd
THREE WEEK
PLANNED TOUR
IN JAPAN-$397
Inelu-lns  Hotel.  Maal and Transportation Bspeneee snd Pacta*  Round-Trip I
Vancouvar—Yokohama—Vancouvar
SPECIAL TOURIST CABIN CLASS
Rosularly   a   Round-Trip   In   Ordinary  Tourlat  Cabin  Claaa   alona  eoata  (MT.
Japanvs* lansuass   loaaona will bo slvan frao on board.
PL.BA8B APPLY BBPORB MARCH  ISUl
Writ* or Phone tot _
TANAKA INSURANCE AGENCY
914 Credit Foncisr Building     Vancouvsr, B. C.    Trinity 1662
Grain
Continued from Pago 1)
alder the methods of transportation
to other countries. Vancouver, being the western seaport, pours
through Us grain elevatora eighty
million bushels per year, which
represents all grain produced west
ot Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.
The lecture was illustrated with
slides and graphs. At the conclusion of the leoture. Dr. R. E. MoKeohnle and Mr. J. Ridington proposed a vote of thanks.
Exchange
(Contihuod from Pago 1)
inefficient co-operation. It is this
editor's determined view that politico and affairs force a declared and
definite policy, and that auch conditions mako for a co-operative and
efficient business executive. Figure
it out. Such a system is better fitted for "action."
I could go on muttering for hours
•bout intensification of interest, a
struggle for moro forward things,
a wide and untrammelled discussion
of affaire and cases instead of personalities, but I am better satisfied
to request gently of our wheat-
ahovelling frienda that they tako a
good long look at world politics
and decide what, today, la tho fore-
moat system . . . 'member, 60 million Frenchmen?
COUPLETS
Someone once wrote m poem:
"How odd
Of God
To choose
The Jews."
Mr. Butterfleld (whom Ood preserve in hia genialwitlessness) added a couplet:
"But how queer
To chooao McGeer."
The Muck Page now presents Its
last, final and irrevocable couplet:
"But how much sillier
To choose George Millior."
Good, don't you think?   We will
stop now.
Ode to the Frosh Frolic
How strange these fresh
Are In Sunday suits.
Their noses shine
And they act in manner
Sophisticated and subdued.
Behind the scenes
A bottle disappears.
Somebody ought to be shot
If they're not half
Shot already. . . .
UMBRELLA  LOST
A  brown  umbrella with  a  green
handle loot In the Library.    Pleaae
oommunleate with Violet Fsrguaon.
LOST
Science '38 pin at the Co-ed
Thursday night. Please return to
ftob Robinson, via Arts letter rack.
LOST
Pair of rubbers, sise 10, in Library. Pleaae return to Students'
Council  Office.
Oxford Babies
(Continued from Pago 1)
Miss Edith Shawcross, of St. Hilda's, took a serious view, saying:
"I do not believe ln bearing children to be consumed as cannon fodder, and this is apparaently what
Is being suggested. Suoh a system
as this suggested one oan never be
productive of real happiness." And
one of the senior members of the
college, perhaps not unnaturally,
remarked, "Like much undergraduate nonsense, there's a vein of
aound sense behind it. Marriage
would curb restless spirits and
teach a truer sense of values and
responsibility. Just the same I
can't help commenting that there
are already 'babes crawling on the
green swards of Oxford colleges'—
but they wear long trousers, and
many of them are six-footers." Thla
seems to be so typically Oxford
that I have put it into this month's
notes, after m* comment on the
Proctors' Ban.
SUBMITTED BY THE
V. C. U.
During the month of March Mr.
George Birch will lead the study
group of the Varsity Christian Union, the topic for discussion being:
"The World Mission of Christianity." The study group meets every
Tuesday at 2.30 in the lower Sunday school room at Union College.
Mr. Birch is a young man, formerly of Vancouver, who has recently returned on furlough from
missionary activity in China. At
prossnt he ia in chargo of tho China
Inland Mission home tn tho city.
While in China ho laboured In tho
same province in which wero Mr.
and Mrs. Stam. Tho murder of
these two young missionaries two
years ago caused world-wide attention. At that time Mr. Birch had
much to do with tho care ot the
Stems' little child, whom the bandits left alive.
Having first-hand information
from the mission field, Mr. Birch
will lead interesting discussions on
mission work, and a worthwhile
time ia assured all who attend.
On Friday, March S, 1937, at 8
p.m., an informal evening group
will meet at 3968 West 12th avenue.
Entertainment will be provided, following which the guest speaker,
Mr. G. Bee, will give a short address. An invitation is extended to
all.
Mr. Bee is a missionary from
Japan, and while on furlough he is
now working with tho Japanese
Mission in Vancouver. He is a very
interesting speaker.
Editor, the  "Ubyssey."
Dear Madam:
I wish to express my regret
with tbe complaint of our sophomore friends, and my surprise
that so little notice has hitherto
been taken of the noise in the
Library. After alt, ours ls a
modest request—that one building be reserved for the students
(I give the word its literal meaning). The rest of tbe oampus ls
surely large enough to accommodate those who are not interested in study. May I suggest
that the two gentlemen so passionately interested in lipstick
finish their enlightening discussion elsewhere.
A  Disgusted Freshette.
LOST
Red scarf with white and black
checks . . outside library Friday
afternoon. Finder please leave at
Students'  Council Office.
CHANG   SUEY
CHAPTER   PIVB
"The Feather Bath"
(Aa you no doubt remember,
children, the Campus hero Is in the
clutches of the arch fiend, Chang
Suey, a prisoner ln the shrine of
Ooon.)
The rising wall of a siren Interrupted the nefast vengeance of
Chang Suey. "So solly no can out-
tern out glands," exclaimed the
doctor with regret, "untie the car*
Hon." A minor priest, high Ah Sen
Tu loose Jowled, who rushed over
to Suey. Suddenly a trap door
opened the floor, and the ace
detective found himself falling.
FALLING, FALLING. Then he
landed on a soft, silky substance,
while "a sweet, sticky perfume filled
the air. "MIQAWD," exclaimed
the groaning ghoul," "Chang Suey's
feather bath. I must hold my
breath."
From above came peal after peal
of fiendlah laughter. "Let me out,"
said Jowled. "I want to go to the
Co-ed Ball." But Chang Suey
laughed and laughed because he
knew that Jowled didn't get a bid.
and he slammed the trap door with
thla parting shot, "Your pal Hogan
will join you in a fow hours."
Meanwhile the bewildered flogan
waa wandering about on the Cam*
pus in Search of his beloved mas*
ter. Disguising himself as a Dean
of Women he went down to the
Tavern at the Vancouver, but to
his great surprise everyone ln the
place left Immediately in undignified haste. He hopped a street car
to look again under the caf tables,
but as he arrived at Sasamat the
last bus pulled out.
Suddenly a low, black limousine
pulled up to the ourb, and a high-
pitched feminine voice offered him
a lift. "No thank you," replied tbe
earnest seeker. "I promised my
mother never to take tides from
strangers." The oar drew away,
circled the block, and returned.
"We aren't strangers now," she
said. "Well, my feet do hurt a bit,"
replied Hogan.
He sat down in the back seat,
and the woman said, "Kiss me,
quick," her blue eyes burning into
his. "Mlgawd," said Hogan, "Sha
Meen, Chang Suey's fatal female
ward. Let me out at the Bus
Stand. Help, help." But the long,
muscular arms of Bee Oh, Sha
Meen's Oriental maid, clutched him
to the seat and at the same time
pushed a chloroform rag under his
nose.
"What an odor," exclaimed the
strugglylng sybarite. "B e e Ob
smells bad," tittered Sba Meen,
"But her father, Life Boy, smells
worse." His mental faculties un-
dimmed by the sedative, Hogan
continued to struggle, so Bee Ob
held him out the window by his
feet. Pretending that the continual
thumping of his head against the
curb was knocking him unconscious, Hogan went limp and was
thrown like a aaok on the floor of
the car,
Keeping his head, he recognised
tho red light as the car turned off
Oeorgla Street down Hogan's Alley,
and counted "one- and, two- and,
three- and, four- and turn to the
tight, honk three tlmea, and the
password Is Kasha Chek, and you
are within the hangout of Ooon.
It waa his capacity for details that
had made him Jowed's right hand
man, but that la anothe rstory.
Will Hung and Doom By carried
him to the presence of Suey. "Into the feather bath with him," was
all tbe notloe he got, and soon he
Joined  Jowled.
"At last," exclaimed the flash
furore, "this place la all right if
you hold your breath. I've been
holding mine for 48 hours." In the
same breath he continued, "Lend
me your lighter. I will set fire to
the feathers and burn the shrine
of Ooon to the ground."
With a quick flick ot the wrist,
he struck a light, and kindled a
blase. "Mlgawd, we will burn to
death," screamed Hogan. "I tor-
got about that," said Jowled. "Never mind, all will turn out all right
ln the end."
How will Jowled get out of this
mess? Can he 7 Will the wily
Chang Suey triumph? Will the
beauteous Sha Meen have a change
ot heart and call the Fire Department. Read the next instalment ln
tbe Ubyssey after the next.
****%
CLASSIFI
UNIVERSITY
BUSINESS
DIRECTORY
Listed below are leading Vancouver Professional, Business and
Manufacturing Concerns, compiled for easy reference, ly referring
to the firms and Individuals represented, your every need can ba
easily and completely satisfied. You will find It Convenient and
profitable to do to.
Retain This Directory for Immediate and Future Use.
Churches
Editor,  Ubyaaey.
Madame:
I suggest that you suggest to
all our Co-ed societies that they
take as their motto, and emblas-
on lt upon their banners (or
whatever they really call thoso
things!) the opening words ot
Virgil's  AEneid:
ARM A  VIRUMQUB   CANO!
Such a motto would encourage
some of us shy and neglected
males to take heart and try
t.gain.
Yours hopefully,
VIR  SOUTARUS.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
CHURCHES
Branches of The Mother Churoh,
The Flrat Churoh  of Christ,
Scientist,   In   Boston,   Maaa.
Sunday Services, 11 a.m. and 7.80 p.m.
Wed.   Even Ins  Meetings  at  (   o'clock,
ide
tnotude teattmonlala of
christian  Sclenoe Healing
Sunday Sohool, 9.80 a.m. and 11 a.m.
First Church ef Christ, Scisntitt
1160 W. Georgia Street
Reading Room, "B'rka  Bldg.
Second Church of Christ, Scisntitt
Twelfth Ava. and Oypreaa St.
Reading  Room,  Dick  Bldg.
1481 W. Broadway, at Granville St.
Third Church of Chrltt, Scisntitt
Thurlew ana Burnaby ttreete
Reeding Room, Churoh Bdlfloe .
Chrlttlsn Scisncs Society
Belvedere Hall, Tenth Ave. and Main
Reading  Room,  Churoh  JDdlfloe..
Tba   publio   la   cordially   Invited   to
" — ■*   the   ar—'—   —-"    --*-*-    -*--
 aadlng  . _  r	
and authorised Chrlatlan Soience literature may ba read, borrowed or purchased.
attend   the   aarvioes   and   vlalt   the
FRB1-0 reading rooma where Tha Bible
Diesel Engines
VIVIAN DIESELS
Manufactured by
VIVIAN ENGINE WORKS
LIMITED
1090 Wstt Sixth Avsnus
Vsncouvsr, B.C.
Bsyvisw 1526
Dentists
DR. G. R. NIMMONS
Dentistry
Bank of Commerce Building
Trinity 1443       817 Grsnvllls St.
Banks
THE CANADIAN BANK OP
COMMERCE
Tenth snd Sasamat Branch
Tslsphons Ell. 1502
C. R. Myers, Mgr.
The Banking business of the
Faculty and Students of the
University is invited.
Compliments of . . .
MR. WALTER WINSBY
Manager BANK OF CANADA
Vsncouvsr, B. C.
Barber Shops
THE HOTEL VANCOUVER
BARBER SHOP
appreciates and prides the
esteemed patronage and contact of
the U.B.C Students and Professors
Francis Frederic!, Prop.
Barristers & Solicitors
MURPHY, FREEMAN fr MURPHY
470 Grsnvllls St.
Tsfcphonss Trin. 1741-1744
MAITLAND, MAITLAND,
REMNANT fr HUTCHESON
626 W. Psndsr
Trin. 4231
Chiropractors
ELMO MARSHALL
Chiropractor
528-529 Rogers Building
470 Grsnvllls St. Ssy. 6021
Clubs
Compliments of
THE PACIFIC ATHLETIC CLUB
Jack Patterson, Mgr.
531  Howe St. Sey. 1654
Contractors
PITHKETHLY  BROS.
Sand, Gravel Plaster, Brick and
Builders' Supplies
773 Eatt 63rd Ave.   Marpole 240
Compliments of . . .
THE NORTHERN
CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD.
A. R. Mann, Presid-nt
DR. A. E. WARK
Dentist
Dick Building,
Cor. Broadway and Grsnvllls
Bay. 7319
DR. H. HARCOURT HEAL
Dental Surgeon
X-Ray     General Dentistry     Gas
3030 Grsnvllls Street
Bsy. 6363
Geologist
VICTOR DOLMAGE
Consulting Geologist
1318 Msrins Bldg. Ssy. 8738
Hotels
Compliments of . . .
GROSVENOR HOTEL
HOTEL STIRLING
A Home Away from Home
M. E. Gerhart, Proprietor
Cor. Csmbis snd Cordova Streets
Vsncouvsr, B. C.
HOTEL ANGELUS
Duntmuir snd Hows Streets
Seymour 4094
Norman Thomas, Mgr.
Meet Downstairs at
BELMONT HOTEL
Grsnvllls snd Nelson
"I'll meet you at the Castle."
THE CASTLE HOTEL
Bev. Davis, Manager
750 Grsnvllls St. Ssy. 7907
Insurance
THE DOMINION LIFE
ASSURANCE CO.
Insuring Canadians for 48 Years
John T. McCay
Manager for B. C.
1831  Msrins Building
INSURANCE
and
AUTO FINANCING
BELL ty MITCHELL LTD.
541 West Georgia      Trinity 1391
Compliments of . . .
THE CANADA  LIFE
ASSURANCE COMPANY
Canadas Pioneer Insurance
Institution
Established 1847
J. J. Grozelle, Manager
CROWN LIFE INSURANCE CO.
Life Insurance
Endowments Annuities
PARSONS BROWN LTD.
General  Insurance
Ralph M. Brown, '31
823 Rogers Bldg.       Douglaa 5101
Dairies
Phone: Fsir. 2800
TURNER'S DAIRY LTD.
MILK and CREAM
666 Eatt Sixtesnth Avsnus
Vsncouvsr, B. C.
Laundries
Compliments of .
I. X. L. LAUNDRY
130 Wstt 5th Avs.
Machinery
Compliments of
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO. LTD.
551 Hows Street
Men's Furnishings
JIM SIWELL LTD.
We have what the well-dressed
young man wears.
Everything New Inspection Invited
615 Hows St. Trin. 460
Shoe Repairs
Ths Solst Last Longsr becouse of
the Quality of Our Leather
SASAMAT SHOE REPAIR SHOP
One Door Wstt of Hswer't
Hardware    4463 W. Tenth
Pt. Grey 138
J. A. Tot tie Prop.
We Call and Deliver
Recreations
Make your headquarter
rendezvous at the
COMMODORE RECREATION and
OLYMPIC RECREATIONS
Canada's Most Modern Bowling
Academy
838 Grsnvllls St.        Trinity 1042
777 Grsnvllls St.       Ssy. 5509-0
«g_a*_B_--EV r. ijirii,_____E:________________a__B_________£_________aww______M
Stevedoring
Compliments of
THE VICTORIA 6- VANCOUVER
STEVEDORING COMPANY LTD.
Operating in all British Columbia
Ports
300 Alsxsndsr St. Vsncouvsr
3S-_________________S
Tailor
E. C. POTKINS
Fine Tailoring
4406 West 10th Avs.    Pt. Gray 21
Towing
McKEEN & WILSON, LTD.
Scows and Towing
Established 1894
Telephone High. 46
Ft. Heatlsy Avs. Vsncouvsr
Undertakers
G. W.HAMILTON
UNDERTAKING CO. LTD.
Funeral  Directors and Embalmers
Msin snd Kingsway, at 7th Avs.
Tslephone Fairmont 268
6215 fraser Avs. Frassr 19
Welfare
FIRST UNITED CHURCH
WELFARE  DEPARTMENT
Superintendent,
Rev. Andrew Roddan
HELP  US TO HELP OTHERS!
We need shoes, clothing, beds and
furniture   for   the   less   fortunate
members of the community.
Phone Trinity 3807 or Ssy. 6266 Four
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1937
Newsies   Win  First Playoff:   Game Here   Wednesday
TRACK STARS
PREPARE FOR
LONG RUN
Paddy In Better Shape
—Determined to Beat
McComber, Pendray
By Frank Perry
Competition for the hazardous
cross-country is reaching fever
pitch this week as Coach Van
Vliet's distance men sharpen their
mythical spikos in preparation for
the classic long-distance run. Rather than spikes and shorts, old boots
•nd tattered pants will be the dress
vogue when the long-winded trekkers take to the woods over the
rustic fence-strewn, marsh-covered
route.
SEE LOWER-RIOHT1
The race atarta at the Central
Mall and proceeds aa depicted In
today's   rotogravure   section   to
tho lower-right of the page.
PADDT OUT FOR REVENGE
Although many are of the opinion that Paddy Colthurst sang his
racing swan song after the Arts '80,
it is not ao certain that McComber,
Pendray and Burden will show their
heels to Brobdingnaglan Bowen-
Colthurst, as they did tho longdistance run last week. Determined
to wreak revenge on theae youthful
upstarts, Paddy has been training
faithfully in the gym throughout
tho week.
The record time for the trans-
country distance Is 14:40, established by Leo Ganser in 1981.
BO polnta for first, 40 for second, 88 for third, 88 for fourth,
•nd so on for the first ten contestants will be awarded by
Maury Van Vliet's new scoring
system. *
VARSITY GRASS MEN WIN!
Playing in the first round of the
Allan Cup playoffs on Saturday, U.
B.C. grass hockeyists defeated
Cricketers, 4-0. Ames and Soul led
the Blue and Gold attaok, while
MacAulay did stellar work in goal.
JACK SCOTT
Radio Miter
READ
'The Daily Dial'
The smartest,
most informative
and widely
quoted radio
column in the
city.
Daily in
THE NEWS HERALD
YOUR MORNING PAPER
Dr. C. M. Whitworth
Dantlft
Telephone Billot 1766
Hours: 9 to 6
Saturday: 9 to 1
Cor.  10th and Sasamat St.
Organised for Effloient  Servloe
■faaiT
Osborne Leads Province To
36-25 Win Over U.B.C. Sat.;
Ellensburg Here On Thursday
Ex-Varsity Ace
la Top Scorer
With Bob Osborne, a former Varsity ace leading the way, a olassy
Province hoop quintet downed the
Thunderbirds, 36-26, in the flrst
game of the Intercity finals at V.
A.O.,  Saturday night.
Although the atudenta tried
hard all the way, their passaa
Juat didn't oliok and their "fast
braaka' 'usually ended In mlsssd
setups, while Provlnee'a rebound
snatching and deadly sniping
gave them a definite edge all the
way.
PIRST   HALF   EVEN
In the flrst half Varsity managed
to keep on even terms with the
Newsies until five minutes before
the breather, when Kennlngton
and Osborne found the hoop to put
the Jones' Boys ahead 21-16 at half
time.
The Qlanta eontlnued to forge
ahead In the aeeond atansa, looping them from all anglea to build
up a 10-polnt lead whieh thay
held without difficulty to the end
of the game.
OSBORNE  STARS
Osborne starred for the Jones'
Boys, accounting for 16 of their 86
markers, and at the same time
holding Bardsley to Ave points.
Hunk Henderson led the losers,
with six counts.
GAME  TOMORROW
Tomorrow night, the Thunderbirds will bave their chance to
wreak revenge on the "Tall Ones"
when they play them at the campus
gym in the second of the best three
out of five series. The last time
the Newsies played here, the students went to town, running the
Jones' Boys oft their feet and they
expect to repeat tomorrow.
Trickster at Guard    |
Here's Varsity's "Migthy Atom"
Rann Matthison, who turns in a
mighty smooth game at guard.
Saturday night Ranny was one
of the few Varsity players who
seemed to know what the ball
was for. His aggressive play
resulted in many toss-ups, in
one of which he outjumped
"Long John" Purves. Wednesday night if he gets a little
luck on his shots he'll be a real
thorn in the collective Province
flesh.
THE ADVERTISERS REPRESENTED IN THB UBYSSEY
make possible tbe size of your
student newspaper. Tbey will
appreciate your patronage.
Maury's Gym
Aces To Show
In an attempt to regain their old
form, which vanished when they
stopped playing regular games, the
Varsity Senior "A" basketball team
are going to entertain the Ellensburg Normal on Thursday noon. On
their post-Christmas tour through
Washington this •fore-mentioned
team administered the only real
shelaching to tho Studea that they
had. In fact, thoy doubled the score
the final count being 40-28. Since
then a lot of water has flowed under
the basketball bridge and the Thunderbirds are confident that they can
wipe out that humiliating defeat,
not in blood, but in baskets.
Ellensburg   waa   recently   defeated   by   Cheney,    who   were
taken by Varaity when they came
up here a few weeks ago.  With
Swan,    Wllloughby    and    Armstrong who did not make the trip
going full blast, the local melon
tossers' chances look very bright.
As an added attraction the tumbling  artists  of  Maury  Van Vliet
will put on their act between halfs.
Led by Bill Wolfe, of soccer fame,
and Harry Lumsden, equally famous as a rugby player, these torso
twisters   will   bounce   and   gyrate
around in a manner that will make
your spine tingle.  This Damon and
Pythias   duo   of  the  campus  have
been    practicing    faithfully    ever
since   they   saw   Ian   Eisenhardt's
performers  and  are  now  acknowledged   to   be  the   best    that    the
Varsity has. Jimmy "Midget" Lowe,
who  stands  only  about   five   feet,
makes up for his lack in siae with
his  quickness  and  wiriness.   Ably
backing up these notables will be
Fred   Kollsneck   and   Ches   Lyons,
who  are equally  versatile  at this
intricate work.       —SHIRREFF.
VAN VLIET
HAS MURALS
IN HAND
Winner of Volleyball,
Basketball Finals Will
Gain 30 Points Towards
Governor's Trophy
Mauray Van Vliet's involved double knockout schedule is getting
down near the end, and it is becoming tougher and tougher to figure
out what teams are doing what.
ALL TOO SIMPLE . . .
On  Wednesday,  Arts '88 will
play Sc. '87, and the winner of
this game will meet Agrlc. Immediately after. While next week
the toam that emerges from this
fray will engage Sc. '88 In ono
seml-flnal.   Arts '89 and Sc. '40
meet In the other seml-flnal. The
loser of this last seml-flnal play
the winner of tho other and tho
winner of thia  game plays tho
winner  of tho  Arta  '89.Sc.  '40
tilt for the championship.
The same setup is to be used in
the   basketball   playoffs.    Arts   '87
and Sc. '88 play in the flrst game
on Friday, and Arts '80 plays Sc.
'80 in the second game.  Next week
Sc. '40 plays Sc. '87.  In each sport
the winner of the final will get 80
points and tho loser 20 points.
—JONES.
THE ROUTE OF THE CROSS-COUNTRY RACE
INTER-CLA33
CKOSS COUNJKY
»*tAC£
tat*.".       *r.ei*f
H-aV4-   *".?-      r
L—J   Jl/J »^__^
ParmCetteaa*
_r/-r-
-*—  ptovrtr
■ a—  trot/rtr iNoeriNtre
• • • •   reNC*
——— eOOK   O'SAOSH
a___j_a__fe-'
Just about all you could ask for . . .
Aristocratic Hamburgers
Limited
Klngiway at Praaar    —    Tenth at Alma
Vancouver, B. C.
Fairmont 106 Bayviaw 4448
"Take Some Home"
DANCING
Every Wednesday and  Saturday
ALMA ACADEMY
*        Stan Patton's Orchestra        *
The annual mud-slushing derby commonly known as the
oross-country, will be run this Friday over the route indicated below. The raoe will start on the west side of the central Mall at a point opposite the middle of the sidewalk leading from the Quad between the Art's Building and the
Auditorium. The finish line is on the East side of the Mall
and opposite the Administration Building, at the line painted
near the end of the pavement, which is marked "finish" In
paint.
I  GET MY CLOTHES and
FURNISHINGS
from
CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
The PICCADILLY
Tlie  Only Shop la Sown
Wliera Varsity atnAeats
Oat a 10% __*OnottoaI
Smart  Shirt Shop »«• Hew* at.
Tisdall Tilts
Start Saturday,
Ruggers Ready
Captain Dobbie's Bnglish ruggers
are champing at the bit to get
back into tiptop sbape and by so
doing carry on their tradition of
romping through opposing teams in
the local league.
After impatiently waiting for old
man weather to get kind-hearted
for the past month or so, they've
finally been guaranteed action,
when the ever-revised schedule,
now fairly well organized, has
them playing in Tisdall cup compe-
tion this Saturday. Two teams
have been entered in this knockout
series, the first playing Nippon*,
while the seconds tackle the all-
powerful All-Black flft.en.
Dave Carey wants all ye ruggabs
out for the trio of practices to be
held Tuesday noon, Wednesday afternoon, and Thursday noon. All
these workouts, believe it or not,
will be held in the wide-open
spaces, and not in the winter
premises—the gym.
SKIERS   NAME
Team For
U.S. TOURNEY
U. B. C. will be represented at
the finals ot the, Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Ski Tournament on
Mount Rainier, March 4th, 6th and
8th, by Bob Taylor, Don Clark,
Gerry Clayton, Mldfcey Pogue, John
Granger and Tom Church. These
board artists wilt be the guests of
College of Puget Sound at their
eyrie on the American Hill. They
will compete against crack skiers
from several of trie southern universities for supremacy on the
snowy slopes, and Judging from the
excellent showing they made
against University of Washington
not long ago, they should be a definite threat this year.
SPECIAL   RKQUKSTII
Will all Varaity supporters
paaaa refrain from boo-lng and
hlaalng during free-throw at-
tempta. This requeat oama aa
a raault of unaportamanllke attitude of aome atudent fana at
the flrat game of the flnala on
Saturday.
Intermediate Girls
Triumph At 'Week
A miracle happened—the intermediate hoopettes, the scoreless
wonders actually defeated Chllllwaek 25-12 in an exhibition thero
Saturday night.
TOO TIRED TO TROT
Desperately sleepy after a long
night at the Co-ed, the Varsity
players simply did not have tho
energy to hceck the fighting local
aquad and atlll break to scoro. To
overcome this difficulty* tho bright
young collegians stationed ono of
their number under tho basket
while the other four went out
snaffling rebounds and psasea to
feed her. Thia system worked remarkably well.
     91^1
STAR CABS *
Manager: Bob Strain. 'SS
Alma Service Station
24-HOUR JJARAGE SERVICE
Broadway at Alms
Bayviaw 74
CRITICAL MOMENTS
WHSN YOU
AR* THC
CLOSING
SPfAKIR
ON YOUR
D«BATING
TIAM
-AND TrlERt'S  A FROG  IN  YOUR
THROAT-YOUR SHOE ttURTS-AND
YOU CAN'T MAKE HEAD OR TAIL
OF YOUR NOTES - DON'T WORRY-
**>©!
1H%
B*ST
VAW*

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