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The Daily Ubyssey Oct 19, 1948

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 The Daily Ubyss
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1948
No. 16
Force Debate:
Leftists Find
Reactionaries
"Still Capable"
Student Progressive Conservative Club was adjudged "still
capable of bringing its own
speakers to the campus" by the
CCF Club at its weekend
meeting.
After a heated debate in which
some members charged "that we are
getting so saturated with our own
propoganda that we fail to see the
other side of the question" it was decided to leave Progressive Conservative speakers to the Progressive Conservative Club.
WEAK AND TOTTERING
Ex-presideht Murray Bryce said
that "while the Progressive Club is
Weak and tottering it is still able to
bring out the occasional speaker and
will undoubtedly welcome CCF members at its public meetings if only to
fill its auditoriums."
At the same meeting membership
voted to invite the "Red Dean" of
Canterbury, Hewlitt Johnson, to
speak at UBC during his tour of Canada and to ask Senator Glen Taylor
Progressive Party Candidate for Vice
President of the United States to address the club.
In answer to council's refusal to
permit the club to sell literature at
its meetings, members voted to continue the fight but take up a collection at its meetings to enable the club
to carry on meanwhile Twenty dollars
and twenty one cents was collected
Wednesday.
WE'RE SORRY
In this space we had planned
to print a picture showing two
applied science professors clowning innocently with an enter-
tainer at the engineers' ban-
quet. We regret, however, that
pressure exerted by the Dean
of Applied Science and the
acting president forced us to
withdraw it.
—The Editors
Photo By Mickey Jones
ENGINEER'S CHORUS LINE at the annual Science Dinner
Thursday night' featured Miss Mary Mack, "Canada's Sophie
Tucker,'' Professor Wm. M. Armstrong and Acting Dean Dr.
H. J. McLeod. The playful professors drew roars of approval
from the merry engineers.
Totem Extends
Photo Deadlines
For Late Rush
Due to an overwhelming
flood of late appointments,
Totem deadlines for graduating students have been extended.
The photography studios behind
^rock Hall have literally been
swamped with prospective graduates who have left everything to the
last minute, and as a consequence,
the cameramen have been unable to
cope with the demand for pictures.
APPOINTMENT  DEADLINE
In an effort to spread this influx
over a larger area, the photographers
will be accepting appointments today
of any faculty or department. It is
emphasized that this does not mean
that all pictures will be taken on
that day, but rather that all
appointments must be made within
this time.
Photography studios are located in
the huts behind Brock Hall, and the
cost to each student is $1.50. In re-
# turn for this sum, the graduate will
receive two proofs, and one mounted
portrait of his own choosing.
The deadline for appointments is
next Tuesday, October 19.
Talent Scarcity
Hits Radio Show
Have UBC students no talent?
URS ofificials (pondered this question today after cancelling their talent qdest because of lack of talent.
Onlyfslx applicants appeared at the
otganization meeting last week.
A talent show, broadcast over a
downtown station, is to be presented
once a week by URS. Next organization meeting is Friday in the Brock
Hall stage room. Prospective "talent"
is invited.
—
Redshirts Reach Quota,
Arts Lag In Blood Race
'tween dosses
Script Writing
Class To Hear
Ernie Perrault
Second of a series of lectures
for prospective script writers
will be given by Mr. Ernie Perrault, university public relations officer on Friday, October 29, at 12:30 in .Brock Hall
stage room.
Mr. Perrault, former president of
URS and well known script writer,
will talk informally on the "Producers
Viewpoint." He will stress the importance of successful co-ordination
between producer and the writer.
The series was originated by Warren Darner,
4> Engineers are rapidly gaining on
nurses in the race for supremecy in
the blood drive leaving artsmen far
behind.
Engineers jumped forty-four percent of their quota to one hundred
percent in a rally today. Artsmen registered only a five percent gain to
bring them to sixty-five percent.
Nurses are still far in the lead with
one hundred and fifty-one percent.
Bloodletting commenced Monday
and students will be notified of their
appointments by postcard. They are
requested to bring, their cards with
them when appearing for appointment.
Results are as follows:
Quota Registered Percent
*
*\     *
Co-sponsored by the Visual Arts
Committee and the Literary and
Scientific Executive, will be an address by Sir Eric MacLagen, former
director of the Victoria and Albert
Museum, London. Sir Eric will speak
in room 200 of the Physics building
on Thursday.
*
New president of the student LPP
is Jack Howard, third year commerce
man.
Howard was elected Thursday to
replace Norm Littlewood, who resigned because of the pressure of
personal affairs.
Arts
^ggie.
Phys. Ed.
Law
Home Ec.
Commerce
Nursing
Education
Pharmacy
Engineers
Total
940
129
34
112
50
144
24
36
47
500
2016
610
91
31
73
19
65
37
22
11
500
1459
65
80
90
65
38
45
151
62
23
100
71
UBC SOCIAL WORK PROF
IS CHAMP OF COMMUTERS
Students who come to classes from New Westminster
or North Vancouver have nothing on Dr. Fritz Schmidl,
lecturer in the Department of Social Work.
Dr. Schmidl commutes between UBC and Seattle
every week. Each Thursday he catches the 5 p.m. train
from Seattle for Vancouver, Friday at 9 a.m. he begins a
two hour lecture in case work to UBC social work students.
At 1:30 p.m. he is aboard a plane returning to his job as
case work supervisor for the Family  Society of Seattle.
President's Speech
To U.S. Conference
Is Pessimistic
Our present civilization is in
danger, Dr. Norman MacKenzie told a University of Wisconsin audience recently.
UBC's president was speaking on
the moral and spiritual values of
higher education before theNational
Educational Conference of the U.S.A.
The conference marked the opening
of t'he year-long centennial celebration of the University of Wisconsin.
Dr. MacKenzie said civilization will
live only if an international society
in which all people can live and work
together in peace and security is organized.
"Internationally, we are in the
primitive stages of organization," he
added ."Western society is not giving
enough attention <D creating and
keeping a united people."
"1 do not believe it is enough to
damn the communists nor to suppress
tern," said Dr. MacKenzie. "Our appeal must be to the idealistic as well
as to the practical. One of our
common objectives should be the establishment of conditions and opportunities for a good life here among
men and for all men." He added that
there is much education can do in
litis field.
Bloodletting Hits Pace
As Student Donors Mount
One Hundred Per Cent Turnout ,
i
For Monday Blood Donations
Admin Is Not
Concerned At
AMS Spending
University administration is "only
concerned to know that university
affairs such as the War Memorial
Gymnasium have not been delayed
or impeded" acting president Dean
F.M. Clement said Monday in a statement on student over-spending.
Since the gymnasium ^has neither
been delayed nor impeded, the administration is not concerned in the
case, he asserted.
"The question of whether one StuT
dent Council does or does not overspend in a given year and thus impose
economies on succeeding councils is
a matter which concerns only the
student body," he said.
Statement was made to "clear up
misinformation which students held
with regard to administration views
on the current financial difficulties
of the AMS" Dean Clement told the
Daily Ubyssey.
Research Awards
Offered By Society
Blood was shed freely yesterday in the Armories as the
first 135 students kept their appointments for the current Red,
Cross Blood drive. Red Cross officials lauded the excellent
showing made by the students as Donor Clinic opened.
Nurses in charge of the blood- ®Z
letting stated that morale was high
and no fear was shown by any of
the donors. "Many donors from previous years are back for repeats,"
one blond nurse told the Daily Ubyssey. She added that there was still
time to sign up for those who have
not done so. The clinic will be on
the campus for two weeks.
Any new donors are advised by
Red Cross officials to eat a good
breakfast on the day of their appointments. They also insist, for the benefit of those who are still hesitant
about registering, that the process is
entirely painless owing to the use
of a new, smaller, type of needle.
Donors are provided with a comfortable bed during the operation and
are given food afterwards.
The clinic is supervised! by two doctors and attended by a staff of trained
nurses whose presence help to make
the process smooth and comfortable.
The Royal Society of Canada is offering research fellowships of $1,500
to be awarded in 1949.
There will be two scholarships for
students who have done advanced
work in science or in literature.
In all but very special cases the
candidate should have obtained the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy or Its
equivalent.
Copies of regulations and application forms may be obtained from P.
J. Alcock, National Research Building, Ottawa.
Application and supporting form!
must be in the hands of the fellowship Board not later than February 1
1949.
McGill Grads
Seek Funds
For College
Montreal, Oct. 19-(CUP)- The
Graduates' Society of McGill University last Saturday issued an appeal to all graduates to support the
Alma Mater fund of the Society
through  a  plan of  "annual  giving."
In a circular letter, E.P, Taylor,
fund chairman, appealed for the "avalanche that will Smother McGill's
growing forest of financial troubles."
"We know thai1 McGill has earned
and held an important place in the
development of education in North
America,"  the  booklet  says.
"Why  is McGill's position of leadership  now  threatened?"
"The reason  is  entirely  financial."
"As a privately endowed university
McGill is supported by student ifees
and by the income from its invested
capital."
The shift in our economy to high
operating costs and low return on
investments has made it increasingly
difficult for McGill to balance its
operating budget. Additional funds
are needed now primarily to maintain and equip libraries, laboratories and lecture halls and to pay salaries which will attract and retain
the teaching staff to keep McGill in
the forefront of American universities.
Meet Seeks Government
Probe Of Lawyers1 Edict
Chaotic mass meeting of all campus organization," decided
Friday to call for an immediate investigation into B. C. Law
Society's decision to bar Gordon Martin, veteran Communist
law graduate, from law practice.
Motion to call for an investigation <$>-
into the case and to petition the Provincial Government to curb powers
of the Law Society to delve im'o a
man's political affiliations passed by
a narrow majority after a meeting
in which all attempt to establish
order had to be abandoned.
Dr. G.G. Sedgewick, former head
of the department of English told the
meeting that neither he nor any
.student present could be sure they
had enough information to protest decision of the benchers in the Martin
case and therefore advised that the
resolution calling for a protest be reworded to call for an investigation
into the case by the Attorney General.
After a hectic debate on the issue
Don Lanskail, Cannadian Legion official, moved that clause calling for
a protest be deleted from the resolution and be amended to read "we demand that the benchers of the B.C.
Law Society make public their reasons for refusing to admit Gordon
Martin and if the benchers refuse to
reply or if their reply is unsatisfactory we demand a full investigation
into the case by the Attorney General
of  British  Columbia."
Lanskail said he did not wish to
protest the case until he had all the
facts because since Norm Littlewood
a fellow Communist was admitted
at the same time Martin was refused
it would seem that there might be
something more than political affiliations involved.
This brought a chorus of boos,
hisses and jeers from the crowd but
Landskail's amendment passed by a
ninety percent majority.
Les Bewley, Daily Ubyssey columnist asked the meeting if it proposed
to protest unions banning Communists and t'o enquire into whether the
Law Society of the Soviet Union
bans   capitalists  from   membership.
Snake Parade:
EUS Banqueters
Stage Annual
Traffic Holdup
A mammoth snake parade
which disrupted downtown
traffic once again terminated
the annual EUS banquet Thursday night.
Previously, 1000 engineers jamming
the Commodore Cabaret heard an address by Dr. Anderson, speaking for
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie. Guest speaker was Mr. D. McK. Brown, well
known city lawyer.
First rate entertainment was given
by stars billed at downtown supper
clubs. Among them were Carl and
Judy, accordianists from the Cave,
and singer Mary Knight.
Band Has "New Look" Jazz:
New Campus Dance Band
Has Symphonic Effects
By JIM BANHAM
Thc "new look" has even invaded the field of music on the
campus this year.
Jazz and dancing enthusiasts will
find it listening to the music of
Al Macmillan and his orchestra
who are utilizing symphonic instruments for the first time this
year to produce startling and unorthodox   effects.
The long-hair instruments being
used are the flute, oboe and bass
clarinet which give the reed section, a new voicing and a Glenn
Miller effect. Most versatile of the
reeds is Chuck Rowley, who as
well as playing barileno sax v:\\\
play alto sax and clarinet. His
contribution lo the "new look" is
playing   the   flute.
NIGHTINGALE BACK
Last year's leader, Frank Nightingale is still firmly seated in the
sax section playing alto, clarinet
and oboe. The third member of
tlie unorthodox trio is tenor sax-
man Doug Smithers, who doubles
on bass clarinet.
The big name bands—Harry
James and Sam Donahue—vied
for the attention of the orchestra's
lead alto Fraser McPherson before
he came from Victoria to UBC,
At 21. year's of age, their leader,
Al Macmillan, is an old hand at tlie
music game. At 18 he had his own.
orchestra in downtown Vancouver.
Besides presiding over the "88's,"
Al dues all the arranging for the
campus orchestra. He has contributed many original eompositbns
ai) well.
Of Al's original 15-piece orchestra, only one member remains, Doug Smithers.
ONE TRUMPET
A slashed budget has necessitated
cutting the brass section to one
trumpet this year. It is played by
Vic Keating, also from Victoria,
who dons a pair of dark glasses,
brushes out his goutee and puts on
a beret, when the time comes
around to play some "bebop."
Marylin Frederickson, who admires Sarah Vaughn and shows it,
does the vocal chores for the orchestra.
It all adds up to a smartly pre-
cisioned, original orchestra that
can't fail lo please for an evening
of dancing or listening, be they "le
jazz hot" or sweet and low. Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday,    October   19,    1948.
<0%e Daily Ubyssey        I
$, -% Member Cunudiun University Press       '''
Authorized  ns .Soctwrf Class Mail,  Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
Published   throughout  tho  university  ye;ir  by  the  Student Publications Board of thu Alma Mater Society of the
University of Br.tisli Columbia.
if. .f, if.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the edit >rial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily uiose
of the Alma  Mater Sifiety  nor of  the University.
a        ....       .   :     -. '»'• Y- •"/• i      ; .,,.,    r-      -:w.
Offices  in  Brock  Hall,  Phone  ALma  KilM For  display  advertising  phone   ALma  3253
KmrOK-IN-CIIIEF   -   -   -   -   RON   HAGGART
MANAGING   IDITOH   -   -   -   -   VAL  SEARS i
GENERAL STAFF:  News Editor, Bob Cave, Chuck Mar hall; Features Kdilor, Ray Dairies; Photography Director,
Ellanor  Hall;  Sports  Editor,  Jack  Wasserman;   '" - '    Editnr. uLoni    Francis.
t.    ,. . Editors   this   iMi'.;c:-      CHRI^ CROMBIE      1HICKKY   FYNN    ,. ,v .,.
:;•■■•     ' -..■•(    Associate Kdifor:-    • ■■ -PETE   11EPHER
i. ■...  11 ii      ,• ■ ,     , s •,
Lost
Let The Lawyers Blush
StlflW lav^/ofe3'on the c*«f>us* have $eefv
scurrying around for tho past couple of weeks
rallying their ranks behind a resolution which
"is reported into today's'Letters to the Editor
' s-U 1 U 11 I -        ■    ' '       ■ ■' '•   ■      '
column.
It's an apologetic, Milquetoast little thing
passed on October 1 ty the Law Undergraduate' Society  who  apparently  wish  to   "dis-
asspciate" themselves froi?i one of our editor-
" ials concerning Cordon Martin'and his bout
' with tne benchers of tlie Law Society.
v i-The lawyers neither supported nor condemned the action of the Law Society in banning  Martin,  they  simply   said  our  words
' weren't polite.
" .Their sense' of decency in protecting tho
gpod name of students against the outrageous
edttorials of The Daily Ubyssey touches us
deeply.
We would be the last to suggest, of course,
that the filial year law students who sponsored
(,the resolution condemning the "offensive'
language  of  this  paper  were  in  any  way
, motivated by self-interest.
.In a democracy it h just too fantastic to
assume that the law students realized they,
too, would soon be run through the same inquisition as Martin and would probably be
more welcome at the bar if their hands were
'completely clean of any connection with the
Martin case. '    •■,
The manner in the which the lawyers
passed their resolution is an interesting lesson in democracy. Tlie motion first camp, up
al. a general meeting of the Law Undergracju-
nte Society October 1. When the hair-splitting discussion was over, the lawyers finally
passed the resolution, but left the actual wording to one student. He worked out the exact
text after the meeting was over, somewhat
in tho same way a chap named Hitler once
operated.
*■'     ■ ' .' ■  '    l   ■     i .a .1   ■  a ,,, .     Oj
But the climax was yet to come. Then the
senior law students went to "the people" to
get approval for their motion. It was presented
to classes ip first and second year law and
passed by them.
One student in the lower years, so he tells
ii", asked that his drum-beating seniors read
the editorial to tho class so they might judge
on its own merits. But ,the editorial was
never read and a mob of confused students
who mumbled a chorus of ayes and nays were
told they had just passed the resolution.
The plain fact of the matter is, the resolution does not represent the opinions of law
students on this campus. We'd still like to
know what they really think..
people are saying
LIGHT BROWN WALLET IN HM1.
Reward. Phono Dullo at I1A 424.'!.
IN BROCK TUESDAY OCTOBER 5
blue skirt in bag. Name Kay Lcwis-
on on it. Phone KE 1853-R.. Reward.
PARKER "51" BLUE-GEEN. OCT.
8th. Call Don MacDonald at AL
0372-R.
PAIR OF RIMLESS GLASSES IN
black hard ca.se. Please turn in to
Lost and Found.
HOME ECONOMICS ACCOUNT-
ing bock "Accounting and Food Control." (or Commence 259. 'Needed' urgently. BA 3916-H.
LOST IN GYMNASIUM WEDNES-
day a gold ring set with three zircons.
Finder please phone Bev Burlef at
KE 1981. Reward. '      '
LOST IN AP. SC, ion THURS. OCT.
14 at 2:30 p.m. Elementary Accounting. Return to Lost' and Found.
LOST ON SATURDAY OCT. 1G PAIR
of glasses—blue leather case—can't
.see. Please return W tdst and 'Found.
LOST WATERMAN FOUNTAIN
pen, Wine barrel and gold top, between HL-2 and Brock. Finder please
turn in at Lost and Found.
REWARD. BLACK LOOSE-LEAF
book. Name A. R. Latham Chem Eng
Turn in at Lost and Found.
LOST. ONE BLUE, FIGURED SILK
square on Thurs. in the parking lot,
I think. Phone Shirley. AL 0292-L.
ONE PAIR SPECTACLES BROWN
flexible case. Name and address on
flap, lease turn in to Lost and Found.
Wanted
HIDE WANTED FOR 8:3') LECTURE
from Chilco corner Robson. TA 1714.
Alex,
WANTED TO BUY OR RENT SHEET
music and, or, record of Noel Cow-
urd's "Has Anybody Seen our Ship,"
and, or, "Mon About Town" from
"Red Peppers." Contact thc Player's
Club.
WANTED TO BUY BORROW OR
share. A "Fundamentals ot Economic
Geography" by Bengsten and Van
Roycn.   Phono  Scnia   KE  3990-L.
.WANTED: GUTTERMAN'S ORGAN-
ic Chemistry, (for Chem 300) Phone
'I. A 2«M'R.'Ask for Roy.
WANTED PASSENGERS FOR 8:30's
vicinity 26th and Blenheim starting
Oct. 25. Phone Olive at PA 2611-L.
alter 7:00 p.m,
ANYONE COMING FROM HAST-
ings East? A ride wanted frcm vicinity of Mnlri and Hastings every
morning 8:30 lectures, HA G132-L.
Doug.
'Miscellaneous
SINGLE BREASTED TUXjEDO GOOD
condition, wizu 38. Cuinplete with shirt
$23. MA 1344 from 9  to  5
M     .    ■ ,•  e ; i    .     i
.size   15'/2
only.
::.;    v      .?.>.,   iit-.i  :i
TYEWRITER FOR SALE.  REMING-
ton,   fairly   recent   model,   excellent
condUidn', 'lcmy'carriajje. $£ ALma
0874-L. 6-9 p.m. Ask for Murray.
BOOK OF LATIN PpW, COtaPOSI-
vion. KE 0797-L.
PORTABLE TYEWRITER IN GOOD
condition. Phone Flo. Fraser at AL
0942.
VACANCY FOR MALE STUDENT.
Single bed. Sharing room. Breakfast.
AL 1366-M.
FOR SALE. ONE PAIR OF MEN'S
ski bdote size 9. Phone AL 0049. Pete
Day.   '   '    -"■ ■      '"■  •'     "v"
LEAVE 29th AND LONSDALE FOR
8:30's every morning. Have ropm for
2 passengers. Call Don N ii85-'it.'
RIDE WANTED 8:30'S-VICINITY
25th Ave. and Main St. Phono Jean
FA 3493-L.
Don't Forget
RED   CROSS
Blood Donor Appointment
CflnflDlfln R€D CROSS
feni <»'  8* SKje*/ -tmi* f
d.i
=»*?A\ti¥ElliS REPLY ! \^-.-    >.
Dear Sir:
The following resolution Is for publication   should   you  see   fit.
Resolution passed by the Law Undergraduate Society at tho University o.1 British Columbia, tn Friday,
October l:,l, 1948. Moved by: Willhm
D. Roach',' seconded by Michael
Lakes.
We, the member:; of the I.iw Under
graduate Society of tho University
of British Cblumbia,' do hereby resolve "that/ we do disassociate ourselves' from the Edi'lerial comment
headed, "Dropping the Bar on Reels"
tcnki.no I in Volume ,'lfi of the Daily
Uhyee-ey of Tuesday, September 28,
M48,   In   reftrriiu;   to   the  decision   of
1 the Benchers of the B." C, Law Society re'us.'n.; Gordon Martin admission''to-the Bar,'tlie editorial employs
malicidua and offensive language in
describing the Bencher's action. While
rqrognising the1 right cf die University organ to fair criticism on any
relevant    issue,    we    deprecate    the
'•means !choaen in this instance to cf-
'"fe'et'ofehat  purpose.
Yours  truly
Diana   M,   Priestly,   Secretory
I.. Taggart,  President
PROOFREADERS
.My Dfiar Mr. Cnngor:
In publishing the front, pane box
re proofreaders, 1 was fully aware
of what goes on nt Qneen'.r University. ATso 1 knew that the institution
was situated at Kingston.
If you checked Thursday's Daily
Ubyssey you would discover less
mLtalu1; than have appeared in any
other ic-litir.n nf tha Daily Ubyssey
this year. Positive proof that the girls
are pr'oolPreaders,  at least of sorts.
Tl:e'irnplicStiorr1 lnfen'a%d with the
"in Toronto" was to be that they went
So Kingston but came from Toronto.
If you feel the two girls are not
competent proofreaders please feel
free to volunteer your services. We
need some more strong people to
stay up until three in the morning as
some  of  u-  dei  to  put.  cm' a   Daily
ULysey."     '       '
Art Welsh
Editor   Thursday   Editirn
EDITORS' NOTE: re thc second paragraph of Hie above letter, wc wioiild
suggest Mr. Welsh refer to the Oct.
1 issue of Tlie Daily Ubyssey.
PLAGIARISM
Donr Sir:
On Friday Ihoirari'b of students
read Jim Banlieun's column "In this
Corner" in which tho film Hamlet
v.as   reviewed.
I am sure most of the students Will
ar;ieee that it was tho best movie review ever written by Time Magazine.
Roland Borroman
INVF.CTIVE FOOD
Dear Editor:
After digesting and disgorging last
Friday's D.jily Ubyssey, I decitled a
good many of the utterances which
found their way lo pages 1 and 2
were filled wii'ii invective, and nothing eb'.e, Just because the Pub representatives chjeet to being excluded
from tiie proceedings of the investigating committee, why should the
.student body (which is after all, Mr.
Be wley, the 'bloodsucking AMS) be
subjected lo n propaganda campaign
vhe.se medium is our paper, the
Ubyssey? There's little doubt that
v.e'd all like lo hear about the pro
gress of the committee, as findings are
made, but in view of. tho examples
hibited in the avefage Ubyssey, 1 l'eel
the decision to hold the investigation
in camera is well justified. In the
meantime, surely there are other
campus topics yet Uncovered, which
arc worthy of space in the paperi
Lastlyi I submit that the derogatory description of our Student Council as 8 tin gods will do nothing tn
improve their chances of performing
a good jdb for us this year. On !the
other hand, 1 am sure they will welcome constructive criticism offered
in  the  right spirit. '
Lewis Hughes
3rd Year App. Science
ALCOIIOLCS
Dear   Sir:
A,A. is a serious business of
serious-minded people with a real
problem. It is a fellowship of men
and women iwho share their experience, strength and hdpe With each
other, that they may solve' their
common problem and help others to
recover  from  alcoholism.
The only requirement for membership is a sincere and honest desire
to stop drinking. AA has no dues' or
fees. It is not allied willr any sect,
denomination, politics, organization,
or institution, doe3 not wish to engage in any controversy, and neither
endorses nor opposes any causes. Our
primary purpose Is lo stay sober and
t'o help other alcoholics to achieve
sobriety.
II you feci you would like information about this programme write to
Box 33 this paper. These letters are
handed unopened directly to rhe fend
from there on you are strictly anonymous.
An  Alcoholic
YOUR TEXT BOOK • YOUR
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BOOK
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THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
AX, < iA.A. It
i fv '■», •     ■-£/ Ai    ' $:\ *4
UNIVERSITY DISTRICT, VANCOUVER. BRANCH - H. M. CORNWALL MGR.
21 BRANCHES IN VANCOUVER DISTRICT - 65 BRANCHES IN B. t.
1 OVER 500 BRANCHES IN CAHABA
The Children s Hour
.'-. si*1
Frngh from glill annt.her licking at brutal
liand.«; ot hntlal AMS and -campus Powers
That Be, your undo' i.s pi'epara.1 to extend
ihoihand of IVieridshi]) to hloodsudving AMS
;ind;PTB, this week.
BJoodsuckin;; AMS, whijiping ugly Boacl't-
ccay diariot over Ijodirs of liolpless under-
j'.i'acjiiale'.i, la :l \veok failed to hoed so'emn
w.tiniii;! of I'uol oolimiiiisl thai pro.;onl. ruin-
oii.'j'oci iii.niy (h'i\-e> will ro.'.ull in vonal, im-
peA'T-i'lshod pro.'.;;.
I'Voil coliinniisl, ]a,-)|, unaeqiiainlod wit'a
biii'oaiici'alio U> I Iy ;md re'iii"inl,)oi'ini>; awful
falCa ol Pdalo, .L-;eai'iot, Nero, Napoleon, Mus-
.solihi, ,Bela Kuu, Rasputin, and Hitler, i.s will-
ins'y,to lot that. o;o lor itAomonl.
Fool roll mini -,l. is, ovon willino; to fni'^h/e
,iii;t In' ,- ! 11ji!e;ov.-i\-e-;; 1.!i■ diipheily of I roaoh-
i.ai';  AM! i  e.lfl'icial  u lio  swiped   fool  colum
nists' girl hy offering foolish girl ride in expensive glittering limousine, probably purchased from Wall street bribe money, when
fool columnist turned back for moment to
pick up injured puppy, left behind to die by
intoxicated AMS official.
Fool columnist is even prepared to overlook
allieislio, (iod-hating, soul-crushing, iconoclastic, callous action of AMS in withdrawing
!mam.-ial ..uppnrl; from God by denying rs-
lioiuu; club.-; funds to find recruits for Maker
v ia I'digioiis club's teas.
And lool columnist, rubbing tender cheek,
is even prepared to forgive brutal, jack-booted
AMS official who laughed and struck fool
c.'mniust over head with riding-crop, when
iad columnist asked for noon-hour booking
. ,' Auditorium, in order that fool columnist
might deliver lecture on topic: "God or Anti-
God?" or, "The Bloodsuckers Above Us."
P\)ol columnist is even prepared to drop
favorite dream of $65,000 combined student
flophouse and steam, bath,' with individual
maple bunks and clean sheet! each occupancy,
and free copies of Police Gazette, where tired
male undergraduates may repair at firM sign
of drooping eyelid, result of debilitating food
(.-ll'ered for'.sate by profit-macl AMS and PTB.
And fool columnist, surrounded by fore-it
ol olive branches, will forgive and forget -ill
this, if bloodsucking AMS', linked in unsavoury alliance with campus Powers That
Be, will only inform fool columnist of whereabouts of stolen blueprints showing beyond
proof that hallowed Cairn was originally designed to be campus comfort station.
Fool  columnist  is  not  such  a  fool  as  to
by les
-      ,       ,    ' -*-«;: tv»    .       *»-»     %»-!    ■}'   ■' -k*ii" .jtf- '
overlook fact that last surviving F$nyv*w
trek member, from whom fool celunjnjjst first
learned of original plans for Cairn, met strange
death last week in Robson street room, with
copper pipe driven, through che$t^ riding-crop
marks on cheek, and every* drawej: in room
ransceked.
And fool columnist is not such a fool as
not to know that party of Jack-booted, riding-
ciop-canyi ig AMS and PTB officials took
long drive into country last week, in 'big,
shiny car, returning with mud on shiny jackboots.
But fool columnist will overlook all this,
if AMS and PTB officials, ceasing to pull
wool over freshrrten eyes with fantastic Cairn
ceremony, will stop prancing about Mall and
begin laying pipes and restore true glory of
Cairn as tortured pioneers planned. " Tuesday,    October    19,    1948.
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
wsi ftltitw Brawn Orf Citffip^
ONE OF 200 STUDENTS to give blood Monday was this pretty UBC coed, seen resting in the
Red Cposs., blood, clinic, university armories. Use of a new, smaller needle makes the donation
painless. .After the bleeding, donors rest, receive hot coffee or soup and the attention of a
r,*fff ^j fo^fe   ■' •.    ' ■  Photo'By Dave Staccy
M--GLEE   CLUB   REHEARSAL   TUES. ' *""""
Oct. 19 in HM-1 at 12:30.
^pfGlO^:;' GENERAL MEETING
Wed. "Oct.' 2() at 7:30 p.m. in Brock
Hall.
GENERAL MEETING OF MUSICAL
Society today in HM-1 at 12:30.
LOST   LAST   WEEK   A   PAIR   OF
navy blue kid gloves. Please return to
Jecelyn' Marshall. BA 4051-M.
LOST FRIDAY OCTOBER 9, IN
Stadium, blue pocket book containing identification, Michael Hind-
Smh'h. Please return to Pub Lest and
Found
Moon Says "Mars"
Coming Very Soon
"The world is destined to go
to war in the very near future."
This'was the pessimistic statement
of Dr. Irwin A. Moon, director of the
Moody Instituet of Science and the
Mocdy Bible Institute, when interviewed by the Daily Ubyssey, Friday.
Dr, Moon visited UBC as a guest
of the Varsity Christian Fellowship,
members of which he addressed on
Thursday noon.
"In less than ninety days after thc
first shot is fired there will bc only
Russian uniforms in Europe," he
said.
The preacher-scientist has just returned from a tour of Europe with
the films "God of Creation" and "God
of the Atom," where he was in a position to talk with "men of science
and theology," He found them pessimistic at thc turn of events in world
affairs.
Roferring to the Moody Institute
films of science he said that they
were being translated into , many
languages, Of these, Dutch, Gemran,
Chinese and Japanese dialect films
are being circulated,
New System Eases Bids
mm j*p^ -• ■• _m±      ;•   i «'   *■•
For Government Service
The   Canadian   Legion   canteen   is
now open to student' patrons in the
evenings between 7 and 10.
 *	
,J**ii
e ^ t~  'a      ass ¥?     *
Graduating students no longer need file separate applications
for each position in the Canadian Civil Servjce, d^ie ip a new
system being instituted by the Commission.
Under this new plan a student in
his graduating year, may file a single
application—specifying the general
field of interest—and thereby assure
himsejf of consideration in all comp-'
etition arising from vacancies in that
field.
The Commission has initiated a
scries: of "continuing competitions'"
which will bc advertised by three7
pamphlets. The pamphlets will be
distributed when the Commission examiners make their annual fall visit
(o thc campus, probably in November.
In addition to the data supplied on
the application form, information will
be gathered from the candidate, his
university teachers, and former employers.
A rating board will then register
all suitable candidates according to
their classes of interest.
As vacancies arise, an Examining
Board will review the register, select
those with the particular qualifications needed for the vacancy, and
then draw up an eligibility list from
which candidates will be assigned in
order of rank.
D
4
O)
Js
How Nickel Steel in
automobiles makes
for Canadians
The sell-propelled vehicle dates back
to the 18th century. As developed by
-tAftrf^ ^^   •-    xiy       engineers-and designers of the present century, motor cars have widened horizons through
providing fast, economical transportation.
Through intensive industrial research on design and
materials the rugged durability of trucks and buses was
improved through the use of Nickel Alloy Steels for parts
subjected to heavy stress, strain and wear.
^ ,, Cars became more endurlngly beautiful
<p /,0^v\       through the use of heavy Nickel plating
((-SU~y' v*'-     under that gleaming chromium finish. In
' the development of better Nickel alloys
and improved Nickel plating methods, Nickel research
laboratories gave their full co-opergtion.
So as a result of scientific research, more and more
Nickel was used for rugged dependability, and to give
gleaming beauty to passenger cars.
VN,fvlf I'
fA
d$
m
■ '//./'
bV'
.*"
/
a,
?!
Today the automotive industry is
^sr-^       ^ the largest single user of Canadian
Nickel. This market for Canadian Nickel has created
jobs for a large number of Canadians.
Thus does research develop better products, create more
employment.
^>
5? $
--JLJ
kU'
s
WtWMMm
Converters in
operation ia tbe
Nickel   smelting
plant at Copper Cliff,
Ontario,
' l-put*
book fully Hint, i
Imieil. Kill be Mill
fm *n r«(iii»t f»
any*** inktfik&j
British" d^mWe claims
that nationalization of ,,,coal
mines was a '' Socialist,J)lu»der''
are "sheer noM^iWf,'f,fjCC(pjpding
to Sir Alexander Ciut^erjbuck,
British High Commi«8ior>er to
Canada,   ,    ■•,■..,.■. ;A,>-,ii,>r
Clutterbuck who has served under
both Conservative and Labour governments arid whose position is strictly
non-political told The Daily Ubyssey
in a special interview, that "Nationalization was an essential move if Britain's economy was to recover."
"Conservatives,'' he said, "would
have been forced to nationalize the
mines in ordere to obtain the flexibility the industry had to have If recovery was desired." "'*'"
"It was essential that tome mines
be closed and others vastly expanded/'
he said. "Private enterprise d)d hot
have the capital to carry but;:jtjirTpe>
essary expansion arid wbtild have been
| faced with a general strike if it had
dared to close any mines." '
"Workers have confidence in public
ownership, and this confidence prevented many strikes that might have
been  disastrous,"  he added.
■   ■ * ' s
I
In a frank discussion of the International situation he justified the
Labour Party's broken pledge to assist Spanish Republicans to' overthrow
the Franco regime by pointing'but the
"necessity for all countries representing Western culture to band together
to resist the Communist advance.''
"At a time like this Britain must
concern herself solely with the external policies of the rest' of' the
world," he asserted. r
"We have no time to worry over
other people's internal affairs and we
do not expect them to worry over
ours."
He was gloomy about the prospects
of a political union of Western Europe.
"Economic union is vital and will
be carried out,'' he predicted "but
you cannot overnight finite a large
number of countries with vastly different national characteristics, backgrounds and languages."
He expressed hope that emmigra-
tion of Britons to Canada and Ihe
other Dominions would increase "tremendously" over a long-term period
but doubted whether any immediate
large-scale emmigration would be desirable "because Britain needs all
ner available manpower to get her
economy running smoothly again."
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
Fropi ilQ.Qft.
T-Squares, Protractors, Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RtlLES    -
SH*
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENT
ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Complete  with Sheets and Intex
From $2.89 ,
fountain pens
Stationers and Printers
550 Seymour St.     Vancouver, B.C
THI INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY  OF CANADA, LIMITED, 25  KING STREET  WEST, TORONTO
Specializing in
Printing
FOR
FRATERNITIES
AND
SORORITIES
i.»*a
Stationery   and   Printing   Co.
566 Seymour St.
L R*l
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tues3ay,   OcfoEef   19,   1918,
The
Armchair
, Athlete
By CHUCK MARSHALL
Last Saturday the Thunderbirds
lost another football game but If
the score board didn'e credit them
with a win most certainly they
chalked up a moral conquest which
should help carry them over to a
more concrete victory in te near
future.
_}_________   & ,
The plain
facts are that
for the first
time this
year the Birds
looked like a
real honest to
goodness foot
ball team
and in the
process came mighty close to beating the toughest opposition that
their league has to offer.
Even the most optomistic of the
pre-game predictions slated the
Wilson men to go down by four
or. five touchdowns while their
chances of scoring were said to be
rather questionable.
The Unpredictable 'Birds, however, fooled more than a few spectators and perhaps even themselves during the first half of the
tilt, particularly, by matching the
highly touted Willamette squad
play for play and point for point.
>. That the man-hungry Blue and
Gold crew should wilt somewhat
during the later part of the game
was only to be expected but their
spectacular march down the field
during the dying minutes proved
that they still had plenty of fight
left.'
All For Now
, Enough of post mortems however, except to hand out a few
words of praise to the much im-
froved Thunderbirds,
Ever since the team has been
organized, their blocking has been
absolutely pitiful in most cases
but this year Don Wilson deserves
a lot of credit for finally having
hitched up the boot straps of that
department.
His charges finally seem to have
grasped the fundamentals of taking out enemy tacklers and made
good use of their new found talent
during the game.
! On the offensive side the 'Birds
matched tl>e Bearcats in every department but two.
, The Wilson men completed 7 out
of .their \% passes for a total of 150
yards. On the other hand, the
visitors made 8 out of 17 tosses for
a mere 59 yards.
. The Thunderbirds made a total
of' 11 first downs to the 'Cats 12
and chalked up 247 by punting
compared to the 265 of the opposi-
tidn;
' ?Ehe only departments in which
the 'Birds were outclassed was on
ground rushes, in which they made
only 120 yards to the Bearcats 190,
and punts which averaged 7 or 8
yards less than those of the visitors.
First Downs
And now for a prediction. Thc
Thunderbirds are undoubtedly going to win one and probably more
games this season, One of the victories may be next Saturday against Whitman College or perhaps
it may not come for a little while
longer.
The point is that a win is just
around the corner so we advise
porters but also the "win or we
not only the teams staunch sup-
won't come" spectators not to muss
any of the next few games.
If they do they will have to
learn of the 'Birds first victory of
the season from the newspapers.
Ubyssey Photo By Bob Steiner
PASSES PAID OFF for the UBC Thunderbirds during their Saturday tilt with Willamette.
Pictureed above is end Dimitri Goloubef scampering for yardage after nabbing a toss from
quarterback Bob Murphy. Altogether the 'Birds completed 7 out of their 18 throws for a total
gain of 150 yards in the air.
Score First Touchdown
R
Divide
uggermen
In Miller Cup Series
Varsity and UBC  ruggermen split games  in the Miller
Cup series for the second straight week.
The  scores  were  reversed;   Varsity  coming  out  on  top
with a 15-3 win over Meralomas at Douglas Park, and UBQ
the under-dog with a 15-3 loss to North Shore at (Brockton OvaL
Varsity playing their  usual steady ®~
Vastly
Edged
Improved 'Birds
By Willamette
game, scored first shortly after the
starting whistle. Lomas came back
to tie it up with a penalty kick a
few minutes later. After this it was
the students game completely, threes
and scrum worked in perfect unison
and at half time the score stood 9-3.
In the second half Varsity racked
up six more points while Lomas were
held scoreless. Varsity, however,
seemed i'o miss that educated toe of
Hilary Wotherspoon. Despite the efforts of Russ Latham, and Marshall
Smith kicking on the whole was very
poor. They missed several penalty
kicks and converts which might ha,ve
proved to be very important.
The less experienced UBC squad
went down before North Shore All-
Blacks for t'he second loss of the
season. The students, however, have
improved immensly in the past week.
Although they took a 15-3 beating,
the team was working far better
than it has since the begining of the
season. Mike Hein-Smith booted the
lone tally for the students.
GRID SCORES
EASTERN CANADIANS
Queen's 8, Toronto Varsity 9,
West. Mustangs 24, McGill Redmen 19
PACIFIC NORTHWEST
Whitman  38, Northern Idaho CE. 0
Eastern Washington 14, Whitworth 13
College of Idaho 40, Eastern Oregon 6
Pacific U. 28, Eastern Oregon 6
NOTICES
RUGBY NOTICE
Attention all freshman rugby players. All interested freshmen should
turn out to practice this coming Wednesday, October 20 south playing field
3:30.
I
TENNIS NOTICE
There will be a meeting for all interested in joining the Tennis Club
today in Arts 104 at 12:30. Election of
officers will be held and the playing
schedule for the Field House will be
announced.
Eddie started
There was joy in the Thun-f
derbird  camp  Saturday  even
though they took another American football beating.
Although they went down before a heavier and more experienced Willamette squad, 21-7,
the 'Birds showed beyond a
shadow of a doubt that they
could play great ball.
Ending a scoring drought which
extended back into last season the
UBC boys pushed over a touchdown
in the first half and threatened more
than once in the exciting contest.
It was apparent righi from the
opening kick-off which the conference champion Bearcats received
that the visitors were not going to
have any push over. A hard charging
UBC line forced them to kick on
fourth down and from there on until
the end ot the quarter the home team
had the edge in play.
DOWNFIELD MARON
It wasn't until midway through tht
second period that the 'Cats were abli
to penetrate the Blue and Gold defense. They climaxed a 55-yard
downfield march with a 16-yard heave
by John Burleigh into the waiting
arms of Roy Harrington who loped
over for the first score of the game.
Not to be outdone thc 'Birds came
right back. Sparked by thc running of
Dougie Reid, playing one of the finest games of his career, Dave Storey,
and the bombsigh't passing of Bob
Murphy, UBC moved the ball from
mid-field to the Bearcat twenty
i
A pass from Murphy to Storey in
the end zone put UBC on the scoring
records for the first time this season.
Hillary Wotherspoon made i'he convert good to tie tthe score.
FAULTY PASS
A faulty 'Bird pass defense gave the
Willamette team its two touchdowns.
one in the third quarter and one in
the final canto. Both were thrown by
Burleigh, the first one to Bill Ewaliko
and the other t'o Harrington again.
But on the ground a hard charging
UBC line went on tossing visiting
backs to the ground for negligible
gains. Only twice in the game did
they gel' away for anything like the
long runs that local fans have come
to expect from 'Bird opponents.
Smart, Practical
NAVY BLUE BLAZERS
ENGLISH GREY WORSTED SLACKS
All sizes in stock or carefully tailored to
your individual style and measurements.
n'.^ppt
T
Richards" &
Limited
577 HOWE ST.
PA. C724
"The shop for men that are going places"
SPORTS EDITOR CHUCK MARSHALL
Associate Editor - HUGH CAMERIN
UBC Soccermen Tied 2-2
For Second Straight Tilt
Varsity is still unbeaten in Vancouver and District league
play, but due to some erratic shooting coupled with a few tough
breaks coach Davies' charges had to settle for their second
jtraight draw Saturday.
Raniers came from behind twice to<§>	
gain a 2-2 tie in a game that Varsity
might well have won, had they not
flowed clown in the second half. The
students had a clear edge in the first
half, and led 2-1 at the breather, but
n the late stages the Raniers put on a
eeal display of power to outplay the
campus eleven, and finally tied tho
-score  midway  through  thc last hall.
Ken Campbell got his first goal of
the season to give Varsity the lead
after five minutes of play, lofting a
slow drifter that veered with the
wind and glanced in off the goalpost.
After Raniers had nullified tli i.s
with tho neatest setup of the game,
Don   Gleig   put   his   mates   one   up
again, driving in a nice relay from
Jim Foster and Bobby Moulds.
Tlie hotelmen came to life in the
second half, while the students appeared to tire. Jack Cowan, who
seemed a bit off his usual form, never
theless came to the rescue here on
several occasions, acting almost as
a .second goaltender.
In the last few minutes Varsity
missed two or three golden chances
to pick up a win. Gleig got a clear
breakaway and charged in on the
Ranier goal, but the ball got away
from him. Howie Oborne and Bobby
Moulds, who was probably the pick
of the campus team, both missed op-
ortuities in the closing minutes.
A SPECIAL
STUDENT   MATINEE
October
T I C K E T
TUESDAY,
AT    QUAD
S ON SALE
OCTOBER 19
BOX    OFFICE
RK
NODEON
C A M. B I E
T H E A T It E
A T    18th
The manager of the
furniture factory in Eddie's town
landed a big order. It meant he
had to buy a lot of extra
lumber, increase his payroll;
He lost no time in putting
the whole thing up to
the manager of his local
bank. Together they
worked out how much
money he would need to
take care of wages and other
costs until he delivered the goods.
Then, with the backing of his bank, he got
to work on the order.
.. .And that's where Eddie came in. He
was put on the payroll—given his first chance
to learn a trade. Right now he's on his
way home to tell Mom and Dad
how much he likes his new job;
BANK

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