UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 25, 1938

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124118.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124118.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124118-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124118-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124118-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124118-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124118-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124118-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124118-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124118.ris

Full Text

 FOOTBALL
HUSKIES vs. VARSITY
3.00 p.m. Wednesday
at Stadium
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
FOOTBALL
HUSKIES vs. VARSITY
3.00 p.m. Wednesday
at Stadium
Vol. XXI.
VANOOUVER, B.O., TUESDAY, OOTOBER 25, 1038
No. 10
HEADLINE
From Canadian
University Press
FEATURES
By   ROSS   MUNRO
C.U.P. Correspondent
OTTAWA, Oct. 16—The proposed
visit of the King and Queen to Canada next summer will have far-
reaching political Implications which
will Influence foreign policy and possibly the government leadership.
Apart from spectacular receptions
planned for Their Majesties and the
loyal enthusiasm that will be engendered, lt ls believed by many well-
informed observers here, that the
occasion of the tour will provide an
opportunity for close advisors of the
British government to determine at
first hand the exact attitude of the
Canadian, government concerning
Empire relations which became a
little obscure during the European
crisis.
DOMINION   SUPPORT
Considerable criticism has been
directed at Prime Minister Mackensie King and his cabinet colleagues
for not assuring Britain that the
Dominion fully supported the Chamberlain policy.
The prime minister's cautious attitude displayed throughout the
crisis and his determination that
Parliament muat decide the issue of
peace and war has been generally
accepted In the capital as sound.
SECRET MILITARY  PARLEYS?
But there are Indications that during the visit of the monarch the
position of Canada in the Empire—
particularly military—will be the
subject of many secret parleys. It
has been sugested that high British
government officials are somewhat
perturbed over the apparent coolness of Canada to any commitment
on  even  the  Empire  Issue.
It is notable that the national
defence department is assisting
the state and external affairs departments ln drawing up plans for
the trip and aiding in the arrangements.
EDUCATIONALIST DIRECTOR
One of Canada's best-known educationalists of a decade and a half
ago, who has risen to one of the
most influential positions in the government service will direct the plans
for the visit.
He is Dr. O. D. Skelton, undersecretary of state for external affairs, former professor of polltleal
selenee and dean of the faculty of
arts at Queen's University.
Since  1025 he has handled  all  Important foreign relations matters for
both   Conservative   and   Liberal   governments   and   will   play  an   Important,   If   anonymous,   part   ln   the   behind-the-scenes   discussions   Incident
on   the   June   sojourn   of   the   King
end  Queen  in  this  country.
FEDERAL ELECTION
POSTPONED?
It la taken for granted here now
that the federal election will not
be held until next fall due to the
royal visit. Tho government appears
to feel that nothing should be allowed to interfere with the complete
success of the tour.
A   personal   element   also   enters
Into   the   situation.   Mr.   Mackenzie
King will bi> the tlrst prime minister  ever  to  play   host to the  King
nnd   Queen   ln   (unadti   and   lt   is
only  liuniun vanity that ho  should
wish to be able to enjoy that honour  without first  going  through  a
difficult   and   acrimonious   general
eleotion.
These    of   course,   are   only   a   few
considerations,   but   they   all   point   to
an    eleotion    after    the    royal     party
has   left  the  country.
SOLIDARITY
Political observers interested in
problems of national unity, affirm
that the royal visit will have a definite influence In aiding the movement
for solidarity within Canada, and
will contribute in no small way to
silencing the voices of dissension
heard  in  certain provinces.
It is understood federal officials
are   watching   particularly   the   reac-
(Continued on Page 3)
INNOVATOR
STRUAN  RORERTSON
W. I. JENNINGS
TO SPEAK AT
CONGREGATN
FALL   GRADUATES   TO
RECEIVE DIPLOMAS
WEDNESDAY
Music and color will be the background for the annual fall Congregation of the University of B.C. -on
Wednesday afternoon in the Auditorium when scarlet robed Chancellor
McKechnie pronounces the words "Te
admltto" over the bowed heads of
new graduates.
Preceded by the academic procession,   the  ceremony  proper  will  be
at     4.45.   W.   Ivor   Jennings,   M.A.,
LL.B. (Cambridge), LL.D. (London),
Reader In English Law at the University of London, and now visiting
professor at U.B.C, will deliver the
address.
A musical background and program
will be provided by an orchestra and
tea  will  be served  afterwards ln  the
University grill.
The congregation Is a means of
granting degrees to those who would
otherwise have to wait until the
spring. Originally held ln Arts 100 the
numbers of graduates have been
steadily reaching such proportions
that lt was found necessary to transfer the setting to the Auditorium,
where lt has been carried on for some
years.
INCREASE IN NUMBERS.
This fall the numbers again show
an Increase. Those taking their Master's degree number 10; Bachelor of
Arts, 58; Bachelor of Commerce, 3;
Master of Applied Science, 2; Bachelor of Applied Science, 4; Bachelor
of Science and Agriculture, B.
CLASSES DISMISSED  EARLY.
As usual all classes will be dismissed after 2.25 so that those who
wish to attend the ceremony may do
so without their conscience pricking
too strongly.
ARTSMENS UNDERGRAD
NAME BRAIDWOOD
PRESIDENT
New officers of the A.M.U.S., resulting from the elections held on
Friday noon in Arts 100, are as follows:
President:   Darrel Hraldwood.
Vice-President:   Jim Ferris.
Secretary:  Frank Turner:
Treasurer:   Byron   Straight.
DEBATERS   ELECTED.
Darrell is president of the Political
Discussions Club, and also takes an
active interest in the Parliamentary
Forum. As President of the A.M.U.S.,
lie is automatically a member of the
standing   committee   on   discipline.
Jim  Ferris  is also a  prominent  debater,   and   a   one-time   Junior   Member of  the Students' Council.
BASKETEERS.
Frank Turner, one of our star basketball players, is president of the
Big Block Club.
Byron Straight plays on the Senior
League Basketball  team.
ARTS-AGOIE.
The Arts-Aggie Ball, one of the
biggest social events of the year, to
be held on November 17, Is being arranged  by  the  A.M.U.S.
TWELVE L.S.E
AWARDS ARE
ANNOUNCED
RECOGNITION   GIVEN
L.S.E. ACTIVITIES
The L.S.E., under President Struan
Robertson, ls developing a new honorary fraternity which, they expect,
will spread from coast to coast. Its
elm will be to recognize the work
done by the students of this University ln Literary and Scientific activities.
Faculty   members,   and   students
In   their   senior   years   will   be   the
only    eligible    candidates   for   this
awards  system  and  will  be chosen
according  to their significant contribution  to  the  Literary  and  Scientific work at the University. The
Honorary President and the President of the Literary and Scientific
Society automatically become members of this Honorary Society.
Each    permanent    society    of    the
Major   Executive   will   nominate   two
of   their  number  and   the   remaining
constituent  societies   will   be   able   to
nominate   one   member   for   election.
The Awards Committee as well may
nominate   students   for   election   at
their   own   discretion.   A   simple   majority is  required  for   these nominations and they must be ln the hands
of   the   Secretary-Treasurer   by   the
end of the first week in March.
Two faculty members and ten
members from these nominations will
be elected each year by the committee.
PRESENTATION   ON
AWARDS DAY.
The awards committee shall consist of: The President of the Alma
Mater Society, the Honorary President of the L.S.E., the President of
the L.S.E., and the two faculty members most recently elected to the society. This committee will meet ln
the third week of March of each year
and elect the members. The presentation of Awards will be made on
Awards day.
Members will be distinguished by a
gold pin with the name of the Society
engraved on It.
WINS BURSARY
JACK  DAVIS
SWAN BURSE
GIVEN DAVIS
AND GARVIE
BURSARY SHARED BY
OUTSTANDING
ENGINEERS
Jack Davis and Laurence Garvle
have been awarded the William Mac-
Kenzle Swan Memorial Bursary of
$250, each receiving $125. This bursary is given to students ln 3rd, 4th,
and 5th years Applied Science for
academic record and participation ln
undergraduate affairs.
This Is the second time Jack has
'won the bursary. "  '
He ls a student ln 5th year Chemical Engineering, and ls president of
the M.U.S. He won his Big Block two
years ago, while on the Canadian
Championship Basketball team.
NEW   WESTMINSTER   STUDENT.
Laurence Qarvle ls a New Westminster student ln 5th year Electrical
Engineering, and has always taken a
prominent part ln student affairs. He
ls president of Class '30 Science.
He was president of the U.E.S. last
year, and as a student engineer Is a
member of the I.A.E.E.
Last  year  he  won  the  $25  Book
Prise given by the Society for Professional    Engineers,    and    In   Snd
year he won a scholarship for general  proficiency.
It   ls   somewhat   of   a   coincidence
that both Oarvle and Davies were on
the   same   geological   survey   trip   ln
1937.
COME TO THE SENIOR CLASS PARTY
HERE WE HAVE MARION REID AND MART KENNEY,
t lie two people who will be featured nt the Senior ('lass parly
this Thursday evening'. This picture was taken at Arts MO's .Ftinioi'
Prom. Clarion has this year graduated from the position of l'rom
(,)uecn lo vice-president ol' the elass. Mart Kenney will he the
music   maestro  at   Arts   MO's  Class   Party  again   this  year.
Put a ring around this Thursday on your calendar, Senior.
That's the date for your Class Party which lias the honour of
being Ihe (irst campus function of the year to feature Mart
Kenny's Orchestra. The proceedings will take place from 0MO to
I2M0 at  the  Spanish  < J fill.
Art Clarke, president of Arts MO, who is collaborating with
Marion IJ-cid and Audrey Chowne to make the affair a bin success,
says the dance programmes will be as novel and as pleasing ns
Ihe Lambeth Walk. Mart Kenny, wbo returns from the Kast
where recordings have been made of his music, brings back n
belief band than ever. From reports it's just five times as good
as it used to be.
Senior Class members will g<S their tickets on the pass system
—free, while outsiders pay SpM.Ofl a couple and $1.50 for single
tickets.  Art  Clarke says,  "Take  a girl  from the  class."
CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT
REORGANIZING THIS WEEK
DR. BUCHANAN FOLLOWING CAMPAIGN
COMMITTEE EFFICIENCY  PLAN
The Chemistry department of the Arts Faculty is being
reorganized this week by Dean Buchanan. The reorganization is
being carried out along the lines recommended this fall by the
Campaign committee and will result in a more concentrated and
efficient use of laboratory space.
 ■ EFFICIENT  PLAN
FORMER EDITOR
OF "UBYSSEY"
TEACHING   HERE
A former editor-in-chief of the
"Ubyssey" has returned to the campus, wearing the cap and gown of a
Faculty Member. He ls Professor Edmund Morrison of the Department of
English.
Mr. Morrison, after early training
in Vancouver city school, graduated
from U.B.C. ln 1937. During his undergraduate years he took considerable Interest in campus activities,
particularly the Publications Board.
In 1926 he was feature editor for the
"Ubyssey", and ln 1927 he became
editor-in-chief.
During the latter year, he was also
president of the Inter-Collegiate Press
Association, and was present at the
convention held by that Association
in Vancouver in 1928.
1AUGHT  AT  BERKELEY.
Since his graduation. Mr. Morrison
has taught at the University of
Berkeley, in California, and at the
University of Idaho at Pocatello. He
was Faculty Director of Publications
at the latter University.
Of his former love, the "Ubyssey",
Mr. Morrison had the following to
say: "I am glad to see that the
"Ubyssey" has enlarged Itself—but it
still has the same trouble with proof
readers that was present when I was
here as an undergraduate—I think
that the staff does a nicer Job than
we did ten years ago—thet the Totem
1*. much Improved—these things are
very gratifying, If they wouldn't
make such a secret of the times at
which rugby games are to be played."
"As for the students, of course they
are a fine lot. The standard of their
work is as high as any that I have
seen, and higher than a good many."
CARNEGIE RECORDS
TO BE PRESENTED
AGAIN THIS YEAR
Inaugurating a new series of noon-
hour   recorded   programs,   five   selections will be heard today ln Arts 100
at   12.40.
SWINO  INCLUDED.
The records will be from the University's Carnegie Set, a collection
which contains most of the world's
great music. It Includes most major
symphonies, as well as chamber, vocal and choral pieces, 12th century
folk songs, Japanese and Eskimo music, and even swing (classified under
Goodman, Benjamin).
Today's   program,   chosen   by   Bob
McDougall  and  Pat Keatley,  Is  very
much of a  pot-pourri,  and  Includes:
Overture     to     Merry     Wives     of
Windsor   (Nlcolai).
Walt* of the Flowers   (Tchaikow-
skl).
Night  on Bare  Mountain   (Mous-
sorgsky).
Negro     Spirituals,     and     Grand
March   (Aida).
HEWAR'S HARDWARE
ASK RETURN OF ALL
D. L.  LOCKS  SOLD
Will all those students who purchased D.L. locks at Hewar's Hardware Store return them as soon as
possible. This request Is due to the
fact that some of these locks were
picked open and the contents of
the lockers stolen.
"These locks were guaranteed by
the manufacturers," said Mr. Hew-
ar, "and It should not have been
possible to open them without the
aid of the combination."
Mr. Rewar has had an excellent
reputation for years as a reliable
lock salesman for University students and wishes to keep It. So return these locks to Mr. Hewar as
he wishes to make them good as
quickly as possible.
"An effort is being made to subdivide large laboratory classes to
make more use of laboratories before
the noon hour," stated Dean Buchanan ln an Interview with Ubyssey.
Up until this time labs in the Chemistry Department were held ln the
afternoons. More lockers wtll be
bought to provide accommodation
for extra students and another fan,
which has not been used for a number of years, will be put Into operation in order to clear fumes which
have annoyed classes ln the Sclenoe
building.
Dean Buchanan explained that
seven full time and three part time
assistants have been appointed ln
this department. The last three assistants and part time workers oould
not have been appointed earlier because the student fees over and
above those expected had not been
paid   until  last  Wednesday.
Dean Buchanan had issued orders
earlier ln the year that all departments should arrange morning labs
to accommodate the extra students
who registered after limitation had
been removed. These arrangements
had not bean carried out to the extent necessary and Dean Buchanan
.ast week began a thorough investigation of the possibilities of increased efficiency in all congested departments.
The campaign committee stated
Its pleasure that the value of their
extensive study of time tables is being recognized ln this matter. According to their plan all over-crowding could be organized ln such a
way that congestion would not be
so acutely felt. The main point of
their report was that lab courses
could be organised during the morning to supplement the already existent   afternoon   labs.
This subdivision of laboratory periods will have the extra beneficial
effect, Dr. Buchanan declared "of
relieving congestion In the supply
storeroom."
The action taken on the matter
last week is, lt ls believed, a direct
result of the Ubyssey's work ln
bringing the unfortunate conditions
to light.
DR. R. J. MANION
OUTLINES SUCCESS
In the Auditorium on Friday last.
Dr. Manion. the newly-elected leader
of the National Conservative Party,
pointed out to an attentive audience
the essentials towards making a success of life.
Dividing the essentials into two
main classes—spiritual and material—Dr. Manion gave many Illustrations to prove his points.
Concerning the spiritual value in
success, he advised the necessity of
avoiding hypocrisy, besides the necessity of belief in some form of religion.
NO  LIGHTS  UNDER BUSHELS.
"Above all," said Dr. Manion. "be
true   to  yourself."
He divided the material values into
three elements: hard work, thrift and
temperance, which he allied with
moderation.
"The only masterword to success,"
he observed, "is hard and consistent
work."
In   regard   to   tlie  second   essential,
thrift, he emphasized the necessity of
living  within one's income. "That is,"
remarked Dr. Manion, "the difference
between content and  misery."
MODERATION.
Dealing with temperance, he observed that moderation in thought,
actions and feelings towards others
was absolutely essential. Here he advised tlie student to avoid 'booms'
and   get rich quick' schemes. T™ro
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 25, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ...
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy  Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Ozzy Durkin Jack Mercer
Phone Point Grey 206
Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
Friday
Robert King
Irene Eedy
Joyce Cooper
Rosemary Collins
Van  Perry Lester Pronger
SPORTS EDITOR
Orme  Dier
ASSOCIATE  SPORTS  EDITORS
Basil Robinson Myrne Nevison
C.  U.  P.   STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Van Perry Ann Jeremy Joyce Cooper
PUB. SECRETARY CIRCULATION  MGR.
Virginia Galloway Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL   STAFF
Jack Margeson, Helen Hann, Pat Keatley.. Joan Thompson, BUI Backman,
Joan Haslam, Ted Underhiil, Jack Metford, Ruth Millar, Janet Walker,
Brlta Vesterback, Bob Manson, Florence Hurndall, BUI Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Doreen Henderson.
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
COMMERCIALISM
The Students' Council will shortly make a very important
decision. They believe that the Hrock Memorial Huilding should
not be delayed another year and seriously intend to erect it this
summer. But the first unit will cost $75,000—approximately
$25,000 more than the total funds collected to date. Various
members of the council have put forward ideas whereby the extra
funds, and interest on increased appropriations may be realized
through commercial means. Lending their name to the sponsor
of one radio program would bring in $300; acting as agents for
selling coal would bring commissions.
However, the University of British Columbia as a cultural
organization has, up to this time, shunned any' connection with
commercialism. A number of councillods think that the money,
badly needed though it is, is not worth the sacrifice which they
believe would  be entailed.
The university policy on this matter has been commendable
but surely this long expected building is more necessary than
doubtful dignity. Surely there would be no harm in making
exception to a rule of this sort for a short time when the material
returns would be so beneficial to the university. Commercial
methods are the only means left by which we can construct the
building.
Lastly we believe that this decision, whether or not it is as
momentous a one as we have here made out, is one for the student
body and not their executive to make. Wc feel sure that our
dignity would not suffer from a short lapse into commercialism
when it   is a  means to so  laudable  an
■nd.
BUS SCHEDULE
It would seem unfair, at first glance, to do anything but laud
the transportation company which has this year provided the
university route with a comfortable, fast bust service Hut a
rather ridiculous situation exists in the bus schedules which makes
the  whole   svstem   appear   rather   foolish   find   useless.
It is we'll known to all that lectures begin at I.I..C. on the
half hour and further that most students plan to arrive on the
campus app'-fximately five minutes before that half hour which
i.s 25 minutes past, the hour. ,,._,._       i
On Saturday morning at 10:15 a bus load ot students stood
on the corner of Sasamat St. and Tenth Ave. confident that they
were in time for lectures. They waited and waited but no bus
arrived. They waited until twenty-live past ten and still there
was  no  bus. . .
\t half past ten the bus left Sasamat and arrived on the
campus (ive minutes later with the result that the majority ot
students cither disturbed a well started lecture or considered their
professor   and   missed   the   hour   altogether.
The misfortune was not caused by a late driver. His bus was
scheduled to leave Sasamat at 10 M0. There must be some grave
neglect on the part of the company when students have to arrive
at the end of the street car line at ten past the hour, tor that is
the last bus whieh makes the* five-minute trip before 10 M0, in
order to avail themselves of transportation whieh is supported
almost solely by them, and further is supposedly arranged tor
their  convenience.
THE BAND
\t the pep meet on Saturday the Varsity Hand, a dream ot
over'a vear's standing, became a living reality. Much discussion
and much more work has gone into the organization. Ihe result
is   something   that    every    student    on   the    campus   can    well    be
lm>Urnfortunatclv there are rumors hinting that the Hand is not
ours It is a fact that the uniforms used onee belonged to the
Kitsilano Hov's Hand. It is also true tha* eight instrumentalists,
out of necessity,  were asked to  fill out  weak sect ions
The Other Thirty-two Men were U.B.C. Students
It is also unfortunate that it was necessary to go outside the
campus I'or even eight men, when there are more than enough
musicians on the campus lo nuike a ban-1 ot twice the size It is to
be hoped that those men who have so lar tailed to join the Land
will, now that it is a success, make it unnecessary to borrow musicians  in  the   future.
CHEMICAL SOCIETY
An open meeting of the Chemical
Society will be held in Science 300,
on Wednesday at 12.30. Dr. H. V.
Warren will speak on "Gems and
Precious   Stones."
LOST
In the Science Building last week.
a green and black pen and an
oranse Eversharp with a black top.
Finder pleaae return to tho Ubyssey
Office.
M9**
ALONG /   -T-<
THE MALL
By PROXY
Millions of them for Evan ap. the
old heel. In spite of—or because of
—all the taking that was
BOKAY. done by our Evan, Homecoming was Just what he
said It would be. It was even better.
It was terrific.
Unfortunately, perhaps, very few
of the people who enjoyed the Homecoming week-end realize how much
time and effort went Into the organization of each particular function.
apRoberts Is not the kind of lad who
talks much about what he does, so
you'll never nnd out from him. But
as an unprejudiced onlooker, I can
talk for him. And if anybody wants
to know, I'm busy right now thinking
up superlatives to toss In his direction.
Evan had help, of course. No living
person could have done lt all by himself. There was an advertising committee that did a swell Job. There
were other committees that did other
swell Jobs. Most of the Jobs were done
right because Evan was at the top.
The guy had ideas, and he put them
across. Nice going, ap. Congrats, bouquets, and all the rest. Now I'd advise
you to start attending a few lectures.
Science should come first from here
in.
Superlative, too, was the work done
by Jean Stordy on the Tea Dance ln
the Gym. I defy
TEA DAWNCE. anyone to recall a
tea dance that has
been even half so successful. As a
matter of fact, it was too successful.
There were far too many people there
for the good of the building.
Which suggests the obvious, 1
think. Apparently the students like
the Idea of a good dance once every
Saturday P.M. or so. But It's too bad
that such a dance is held at the expense of a very fine gymnasium floor.
For there was expense connected with
the cleaning up of the floor in preparation for the basketball game. And
there always ts.
And so tlie obvious—a Union Building. If Miss Stordy and her W.U.S.
could hold a few more such tea
dances—preferably in some other
pace—it's possible that the profits
would pile up. And ttie profits would
mean help on the Union Building
idea. And then we'd have a place to
hold more dances, at less expense,
and could- build more Union Buildings. Build the mall over the place,
I say. And the sooner the quicker.
How  about  it, Jean?
Oertrude Pitman, so I'm told, was
responsible for decorations on the
eventful Sattddy. And so a
P.S. gardenia or so to Oert. The
clay wouldn't have been quite
the same without tlie yards of bunting and etc. that covered up poor
paint Jobs and overcrowding and
showed people that the students were
cheerful, in spite of everything. Stiff
upper lip and all that. Sure, It all
helped a lot. Our new Secretary is a
good  worker,  it seems.
Hie, Sec! Here's hoping you didn't
catch  cold at  the game!
What can be said for the Pep
Club?????
The noon hour pep meet,
PEP. I think, was probably the
most successful in years.
Some credit goes to the Pep Club for
that. It seems hardly necessary to
point out. however, that the show
was more or less stolen by Arthur
Delamont and the Varsity Band—for
which the Pep Club was ln no way
responsible. So what?
And if tlie Pep Club did put over
the mechanical end of the pep meet,
O.K. But where were they at the
game? A single Pepstor—and he not
even a student here this year—was
tlie sole yell-stimulator. It's too bad,
but I can't give out a bouquet in that
direction at the moment. There
should have been at least three of
the boys out there at the same time,
and yells should have been oftener
and  less between.
The point. I  think, is this.. Can an
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at  the  Spanish  OrUt
SENIORS WANTED
FOR TOTEM PIGS
With hundreds of photographs already taken, Artona studios, ofliciul
photographers for the Totem, are
heading down the homestretch in the
greatest race against time ever staged on this campus. All photographs,
of all Yetus, must be finished by November  4th.
Seniors In particular are wanted
now.    All Seniors should be In the
book,  according  to   the  editor—and
not   enough   have   been   taken   yet.
Tht.  studio   Is   In   the   Gymnasium,
The appointment booth Is the Aud.
Itorlum   Box   Olllce   which   Is  open
every   noon   hour.      Appointments
can  also  be  made  at  the  office  of
the  Ubyssey ut any  other time.
It  is imperative  that  the  portraits
be  taken  now.  ln  order that the annual   may   be   out   early,   so   It    Is   a
humble request that comes from the
editor   asking   for   Immediate   action
on tho part of the students.
BASHFUL UNDERGRADS
Students in any other year but
Seniors are asked to hurry up and
figure out whether they wish to be
in the book. If they were photographed for the Totem last year,
they need not have another one taken this year; but if they have not
been taken before, they must be shot
now.
After the deadline on November
4th, nil photographs will have to
be taken ut Artona Studio In town.
Students should understand that
they will save ubout half un hour
by having their picture taken now,
on the campus, where It will only
take about Ave  minues.
organization be called a club when 11
only has two members—a president
and a secretary? The two remaining
visible members of the Pep Club
would probably do some work—and
perhaps even good work—if they had
any backing. But they're all alone on
the Job. That's their own Jault. For
Alma Mater's sake, can't somebody
do something about  it???
A short change of subject. And a
few platitudes.
Society is built, at
NOBOKAY. present, upon a system of graded levels.
In such a system, a person has to
follow before he can lead. In the
same way. an organization must imitate before lt can set precedents,
Paddling your own canoe i.s a fine
tiling, but first you've got to be
taught how to paddle. And so. I
think, our red-tied diplomat of Council made hts flrst mistake. Struan
Robertson, who ls the guiding genius
of all campus clubs, and who strives
over-hard to keep from making mistakes, slipped  up last week.
When the University of Washington Olee Club asked permission to
put on a concert here at U.B.C
Struan turned tlief down. He thought,
apparently, that a display such as
they could put on would endanger
the development of our own struggling male singers. Which is pretty bad.
Look. Struan. We have a tough
time with our clubs. Consider the Pep
Club. Wouldn't it be better if we
imitated the established Pepsters of
Washington — the Malamutes —- than
to stagger on as we are? If our Students could hear the 120 piece Washington Band, might not the Varsity
Band get a bit more idea of what
should be what? And if we could
once hear a decent Olee Club, wouldn't the latent spirit of competition
that's ln every one of us scream for
recognition?
If the University of British Columbia would overcome some of Its Ingrained snobbishness. If It would once
get the idea that other people and
other schools can, and do, accomplish
worth while thlnsts, the situation
might be bettered. U.B.C. ls a young
school. And In its adolescent conceit,
lt wants to do things in its own way,
regardless of consequences. And
sometimes those consequences are
pretty incredible.
For our own good, let's get the idea
that we're not really so hot. Let's discover that we have a lot to learn
Let's decide that we can learn from
our superiors, and stop trying to do
things the hard way.
I'm asking you. Struan, to «recant
your decision. Oet that Washington
outfit up here to give us a concert.
It won't do any harm. And it might
jive our own lads something to shoot
at.
Special University Tuition
Pure   and    Applied   Sciences —
first  year.
Advanced  Mathematics,   Mathematical  Physics, History, Philosophy,   Languages,  eto.
1479 Went   8th Ave. (Cor. Own.)
"Let me serve your car and your car will serve you"
"Prank" Ficke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McOILL ROAD PT. OREY 53
iHtllllllllltHIIIIIIHHIIIIIIIIimiHHHIIMHIIIIIIIHtMIIIIIIHltllllMIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIItl Illllll ||.IHIIIIIHIII.I.IHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 0 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF  NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS  AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Oraphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper, ALL YOUR
Loose  Leaf Refills,  Fountain  Pens  and  Ink      BOOK SUPPLIES
and Drawing Instruments. SOLD  HERE
l,tttltlttltttt,ltt,tlttll»»M,ltllltll|ll»lllll*tlllllllMHII„||l(tlll,«,lllll„„„|l„l|„|„|,l,„(„|||lllllll||||,||,(|(H,l||„,||((,||||,,|(
SUITS,   COATS,   DRESSES   BEAUTIFULLY   CLEANED
AND   PRESSED
SANITARY
DRY CLEANING & DYE WORKS LTD.
Bayvlew 41>1 8730 West 10th Ave.
CONVENIENT BANKING
for University people . . .
Students and members of the faculty of the
University of British Columbia will find the
West Point Orey Branch of the Bank of
Montreal convenient to the University, and
will tlnd a friendly helpful service awaiting
them   here.
BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817
Wist   Point  Orey   Uranch:   SASAMAT  AND  TENTH
A.   B.   MOORE,   Mana_[«r
~*J
CORRESPONDENCE
The Editor.
Madam:
From behind the rather shaky security of my nom-de-plume I venture
to achuck the following criticism ln
the general direction of that august
group, the faculty members of the
Players'  Club  Advisory  Board.
My criticism concerns their activities ln connection with the "Players'
Club Prize", notice of which appears
annually in the University Calendar,
from which I quote:
"A priae of $90.00, given by the
Players' Club, is ottered for an original play suitable for the Club's
Christmas performance. The award
will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty members of the
Advisory Board of the Players'
Club."
In the current competition, I am
reliably informed, twelve one-act
plays by undergraduates were submitted. A very encouraging sign, one
might suggest, of an urge toward
original composition. However, none
of them was considered by the Judges
to be of sufficient merit to Justify
the award being given.
Can It be that the Judges are confidently awaiting the appearance of
a perfect play before sanctioning the
removal of the now dusty seals from
the prize coffers?
For that matter, would any group
of   critics    (professors,   even)    give
unanimous and unqualified approval  of  any  play  by anybody, living
or dead?
Would lt be Impossible to select the
least   unworthy   of   the  twelve   plays
and,   withholding   the   prize,   Include
the  amateur  monstrosity  among  the
perfect gems of dramatic  art which
would   form   the   remainder   of   the
Christmas program?
Would    not   student   Interest   in
that   prog-ram  and  in  play-writing
be stimulated by sueh a play?
PALMAM QUI MERUIT FERAT.
Editor,  the Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
The quartette which performed ln
Varsity Time last Friday was not
representing the University Olee
Club. The group sang without the
permission of the conductor and
against his advice music not of the
standard presented by the club. Furthermore, the announcer was instructed not to use the Olee Club's
name.
Yours  faithfully,
DONALD C. B. BAKER. L.R.S.M.,
Conductor.      4
BRINO BACK, O' BRINO BACK
THE HARDY CUP TO VANCOUVER
WORLD WIDE NEWS
Across from the Commodore
867
Oranville
$4-
Shoes that can take
It! Deslguea upe-
olnlly for Vancouver's   Young Fellows!
SOLD   EXCLUSIVELY
COPP'S
339 West  Hastings  St
AT
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
LIFE INSURANCE
GET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB  FUNCTIONS
THE
CLARKE & STUART
0O. LIMITED
Stationers and Printers
550   SEYMOUR   STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Jsss
U.B.C.  ROOST
SALISBURY LODGE ANNEX
"Where The Gang  Meet3"
LUNCH 25o
DINNER 35c Tuesday, October 25, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
iloofetng
33actUuart)G
It is a lovely day—in fact lt ls too
lovely for my peace of mind. The
thought that I must spend the next
few hours mulling over old Ubysseys
and writing them up ln an Intelligent
and amusing fashion is hardly an
appealing one.
CRIBBING.
However, I have struck upon a plan
whereby I shall reduce my labours:
I shall copy the Inspired contributions of the more industrious past,
which, though amusing, are quite
capable of being read without explanation or comment.
DELIGHTED  FROSH.
The following ls a letter, written
by one highly co-operative Freshman:
"As a violently verdant Freshie, I
am convulsed with delight at the Immense amount of attention paid to
my manners and morals ln the columns of the Ubyssey."
While   heartily   approving  of   all
rules suggested, such aa giving our
superiors the right of way on sidewalks, wearing badges of ignominy,
etc.,   it   seems    to    me    that  these
measures are not severe enough.
In  the  first  place,   merely  to step
out   of   the   way   on   meeting   these
exalted personages appears to me to
be  an    entirely    Insufficient   way  of
showing   respect.
DESIRES  SEVERITY.
I would suggest that the salute be
much more demonstrative, consisting
for instance, of a piercing shriek, a
back somersault and several lowly
salaams, followed by a rapid recital
of the Oreek hexlcon and the first
year timetable.
The label which we are to wear has
not as yet been specified. A coat of
arms might be appropriate, a senior
rampant on a freshman prostrate.
The background, a field verdant, liberally marked with bars sinister. Or,
If this falls to please, a neck yoke and
shackles would serve admirably as
tokens of submission.
MUZZLED FROSH.
The sufferings of the  learned senior whose studious meditations In the
library were so rudely disturbed, excite in me  the  most lively sympathy.
In  order  that  great  minds,  such
as   his,   may   work   unhampered,   I
submit   that  all   Frosh   on   entering
the  library  remove  their shoes and
stockings and don muzzles.
BOHEMIAN   PUB.
In 1919 the problem of the Publications Office was not to exclude
outsiders lured there by the Bohemian atmosphere lent by the presence
of empty pop bottles, cups of stagnant coffee, and the newspapers of
the ages, but to find some - place to
house  their own members.
Since   the   beginning   of   the   term,
they   had    been   scheming,    pleading
and  quarreling   to secure  a   place   to
lay  their  literary  leads.
MORE  RULES.
But their sufferings were rewarded
for they Anally found new quarters
where the following rules were to be
observed:
1.    Knock  before entering.
3.    Enter   the  sanctum  on   tiptoe.
3. Reporters must converse in
whispers, only editors may laugh,
(Apparently the lowly columnists
was a law unto himself.)
4. No puns.  (Very commendable.)
5. If by any chance, you have a
contribution, break the news gently; don't shock the editors.
6. Don't contribute jokes from
current magazines or the Orpheum.
7. Only six people allowed to sit
on one desk at a time.
GOOD  NIGHT   PLEASE.
With these  parting  words  .  .  .
I will now leave you to brood on
these words of wisdom. Next week
perhaps it will vain and I shall be
able to concentrate sufficiently to
make personal comments on the
problems  of   tlie   years  gone   by.
NEW PROFESSOR
WAS IN FIRST
FROSH_CLASS
WAS       BIG       BLOCKER
AND      COUNCIL
SECRETARY
Dr. John Allardyce *at present assistant professor of biology in the
department of botany, has the enviable distinction of being the only
faculty member who graduated from
the first freshman class of the U.B.C.
—the class of 1919.
After his graduation he served as
Instructor for two years the flrst ln
chemistry and biology, the second in
chemistry  only.
Then he was given a permanent
position on the staff as assistant
Instructor In chemistry—a position
which he held until 1939. In that
year he obtained leave of absence
to continue his studies at McOill
University.
STUDIED  AT  McOILL.
At   McOlll   he   obtained   his   Ph.D.
degree    majoring    ln   chemistry   and
mlnorlng In physiology. After this he
returned   to   his   Alma   Mater   where
he resumed his duties;   this  time  as
assistant  professor  in  chemistry.
Along with others  when  the depression's Influence became felt, he
was released.  During this time Dr.
Allardyce   married   a   graduate   of
this  university,  the  former  Henri-
ette Mackenzie.
He   returned   to   the   university   ln
July  as  blochemlsitry  Instructor  and
professor In biology, after serving six
years   on   the   science   staff   of   King
Edward  High school.
COUNCIL  SECRETARY.
As an undergrad he obtained his
big block playing rugby. His political
career was a combined one—he simultaneously held the positions of
Secretary of the A. M. S. and president of the A. M. U. S.
He is affiliated with Phi Kappa Pi,
and ls faculty representative on the
Inter fraternity council  this year.
THUNDERING
HOOFS
OR
CHANG SUEY
AT THE PALOMAR
SCIENCE BANQUET
AND SENIORS' PARTY
FILM  REVIEW
Scribblers attention! Meeting In
Arts 306 at 13.30 today of all Interested in writing for the campus
film   review,  "Films  on   Parade."
NOTICE
The Arts '40 elections will Vie held
today at 12.40 in Arts 100. Alt Juniors
turn   out!
The evening of October 27 will be
the time of two social events, the
Science Banquet and the Senior Class
Party.
The former, in charge of Alfle
Allen, president of the Sciencemens'
Undergraduate Society. has been
planned to take place at the Commodore. Mr. Taylor of British Properties   has   been   secured   as   speaker.
Patrons of the banquet will be
Dean Finlayson, Colonel Wilkin and
Major Finlay; guests, Dean Buchanan and the Honourary Presidents of
each Science class. Sclencemen will
be admitted  on their  passes.
Art Clark, president of Arts '39,
i.s supervising the arrangements for
the Senior Class Party. This is to be
a formal affair held at the Spanish
Orlll with Mart Kenny's orchestra.
Single   tickets   are  $1.50.
HEADLINE
(Continued from Page One)
tion of Premier Hepburn of Ontario to the plans being made for
the   reception   of   the   monarch.
Mr. Hepburn's indifference displayed when President Roosevelt
came to Canada last August, caused
some misgiving here and with the
feud between Mr. Mackenzie King
and Mr. Hepburn accumulating Are
with every exchange of correspondence, the relationship between
Queens Park and Parliament Hill
i.s not exactly amicable even when
considerations such as the royal visit
arise.
THE  STAG AT EVE
As  if In answer to a call
The   stag   line   forms   along   the   wall.
Too  nervous or too broke to bring
A  date   to   any  campus   fling;
The   only   rnaxim   they   believe
Is early to come and  late to leave.
Why  is  it  when   you  draw  some  bag
Yu'd  glady give  to any  stag
The stag lino polishes It's nails
And  looka  for more  attractive  frails,
While f you bring a Queen t's chance
If you  get   more  than half a dance?
—Gateway.
897
ORANVILLE
i At  Smythe)
ICE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY, Arts '31
JACK PARKER, Arts '30
CHAPTER  FIVE
It was pretty generally agreed that
Elvira M^y Ooggleflsher was no
beauty. People thought she looked
uglier than most anybody. She had,
on several occasions, been given the
nod over Frankenstein. Her figure
was a series of sharp-breaking curves,
and her shoes might have been comfortably launched into the Clyde. In
short, she looked like an enlarged
version of something that Jiggles up
and down a stick. But Elvira knew
which side her bread was buttered
on. The side that always fell on the
floor. And what was more Important,
she knew that Horace Q. Fizzle was
out to kill her chief, Chang Suey.
She had also actually seen him get
into a meeting of the Senate without
showing  his pass.
Fog swirled around her as she
groped her way in the blinding darkness along the dripping tunnel which
led to the secret cavern of Chang
Suey.
She screamed as a fuzzy Freshman
scuttled across the slimy ground with
an essay ln Its mouth. But she pressed forward. Suddenly she heard a
slow, monotonous chant ahead of her,
and it was growing louder and louder.
"We   live   inside   an   Erlenmeyer;
We swim in acid, feed on fire;
We   tramp, on   Artsmen.   raise   a
smell.
And when we die we got to hell.
For we are the Sclencemen!"
The chanting bounced off the walls
In still greater volume. Elvira's inadequate knees started to knock like
a stack of Mary Ann columns. At last
a long, brown line of bowed figures
plodded into view. Each one of them
carried a test tube ln his withered
hands, and they seemed to stretch
out in an endless procession.
The leader had a lighted Bunsen
behind each ear. He stopped before
Elvira, and stared dully Into her face
without flinching.
"Have you seen one?" he moaned
dismally.
Elvira  hesitated,  so  he  clarified.
"Have  you  seen  A  Chem.  Lab.   Assistant?"
Elvira sighed, and said she didn't
even know that it had been definitely
proved  that one  existed.
The leader nodded his head resignedly,  then cried out:
"Ood knows there's no such animal,   but  we've  got   to  look  anyhow!"
And the long column struggled by
her, chanting, and moaning, and
smelling horribly. Elvira stumbled on.
But when she felt an unseen hand
tap her on the shoulder, she wondered If it was worth while. She
turned slowly to see two swaying figures with glowing noses right behind
her.
One of them opened his mouth, put
liis finger in it. and winked at her
slyly. The other one beckoned to her.
and hiccoughed in a  low voice:
"Shay, babe, we're the Clash of
r.lnety-sheven. Wish way lsh the
Homecoming? Eh?"
Elvira tried to shake him off. but
the other illuminated Alumni successfully lit a match, and gazed earnestly into her unmitigated face. He
quickly blew it out, and, leaning
heavily on his friend's shoulder,
pressed his nose Into his bosom and
sobbed:
"Oeorge. we're tighter'n a drum!
We're sheeing  thingsh!"
They crawled away together, and
Elvira staggered forward. At last she
reached the battered ' door to the
cavern; but it was guarded by a great
mountain of flesh. It was Carsize Mc-
Mire again. She wiggled her ears, he
wiggled his shoulder pads.
"What is the password?" he roared.
"Don't pay your fees yet!" she replied.
She passed in quickly, and was soon
telling her story to the mighty Chang
Suey. But long after she had gone,
the guttering indirect lighting showed tlie Dirty Nine plotting a horrible
death for the traitor, Horace Q.
Fizzle.
Negro Debators
Will Be Here On
November   18th
Morris Belkin and Struan Robertson will meet a group of Negro do'
bators from the LeMoyne College in
a   novel   debate   on   Nov.   18.
Tho topic of the debate will be,
"Resolved that the continued world
peace ls Impossible as well as undesirable." The subject is the one
which the debaters found most interesting during their tour of the
Antipodes.
The  debating    team   of   the   LeMoyne  College of Memphis,  Tenn-
esse will  be passing through  Vancouver on Nov. 18, after a successful tour of the universities of New
Zealand,   Australia   and   Honolulu,
and have expressed a desire to debate   with   a  team   from   the  Unlveralty of British Columbia. In tho
pust    debating    teams    from    this
college     have     competed    against
such   well   known   universities   as
Oxford,    Stanford,    Southern   California, and Texas Christian.
In  1930 they  were  the  only  Negro
school   to   participate   in   a   national
debate     tournament     held     In     Iowa
City.
CAPABLE
The object of the present tour is
to establish the fact that negroes
are capable of expressing their minds
on economic, social and International and Interracial questions. This
fact Is at present known to a limited
tew.
LeMoyne College ls the only institution offering a standard four year
arts course to over 100.000 negroes
in   the   city   of   Memphis.
M
»
GEN. MCNAUGHTON
SPEAKS AT INSTITUTE
Research, extending into all
realms of science, was outlined by
Gen. A. O. L. McNaughton, director
of the National Research Council of
Canada, when he addressed the
Vancouved Institute on Saturday
evening.
Inspection  of   aircraft  construction,   using  low   range   X-ray   machines of seventy  to eighty thousand  volts  for  minute  examination
or light alloy castings.  Is mandatory.
"People's    lives    depend    on     these
and   a   hidden   flaw   would   spell   disaster,"   added   the   speaker.
RADIUM   TESTED
The National Research Council
tests and certifies the new supplies
of radium either for medical or industrial use. The responsibility for
standardizing meters and other medical apparatus is incurred by the
Council.
Laboratories for agricultural purposes havo made tremendous strides
in experimental and practical accuracy through the co-operation of
the Research Council with the Department of Agriculture of the
western universities and individuals
vitally concerned in agricultural production.
In conclusion General McNartlgh-
ton outlined the structure of the
Council and Its relation to all branches   of  Canadian   life.
FILM  SOCIETY
"En Saga," the next show of the
Film Society, will be shown Monday October 31, at 8 p.m. In the
Auditorium. This Im a Swedish picture taken In Lnplnnd.
Rooks of tickets still out should
be turned In to the Quad box office
at noon on October 20 and 31. A
speclul effort should he made by t
all those selling tickets to complete
their books before that time.
VOCATIONAL LECTURES
TO START THURSDAY
The "First Narrows Bridge" will
come to the campus by lecture and
motion pictures Thursday at 12.45
when S. R. Banks speaks on that
subject in Science  100.
The lectures will be the flrst of a
series of Vocational Guidance lectures sponsored by the Men's Undergraduate Society with the co-operation of special executives from each
of  the  three  faculties.
Speakers of special interest to Science will be invited to the University
throughout the year by the University Engineering Society under the
chairmanship of Bill Bacon.
Lectures ln Arts 100 will be arranged by the new Arts M.U.S. president,
Darrel Braidwood.
Aggie President Jack Oray is in
charge of the Vocational Guidance
progrum for that faculty.
The special executives from the
three faculties are working together
under the M.U.S. with the purpose
of bringing to the campus lecturers
and distinguished speakers who will
bt of interest to members of each
faculty.
,(,,,(I.MIIM<lli,llllllllllt,l|l,,,ll,,,lltll))tiltll,,,,,l,,,lll|,t.H
Just   about   all   you   could ask     1
for    ... 1
ARISTOCRATIC 1
HAMBURGERS 1
j |                               Limited |
i 3                       10th  and  Alma _
I I     TAKE    SOME    HOME     f
" 111111111It 1111111111111111» M111111111111111111111111(111111111MI«111H.
MUSICAL SOC.
TO PRESENT
SERENADE
MOST DIFFICULT
OPERA EVER
TRIED
Castanets will be clicking on the
campus soon! For si, si, Honors
senoritas, "Senerade" ls coming in
the spring as the Musical Society's
annual  production.
Spanish dancers s'wirl to the music of gypsy violins, gay banditti
sing by their camp-fires, and a peas-
and maid is wooed by a duke, in this
—Victor Herbert's most exciting operetta.
SPAIN
The spirit of sunny Spain—its romance, its music, its bull fights-
is caught in this sprightly piece by
the writer of "The Red Mill," "Mademoiselle Modiste" and many other
modern   successes.
In It is combined smooth, fascinating melodies with perhaps the
most thrilling and amusing action
ever to be seen on the University
stage. *
WIDE   APPEAL
Fully aware that "Serenade" is by
far the most ambitious opera It has
ever attempted, the Society feels
Justified in Its selection by the success of last year's production, the
unusually excellent Influx of new
talent, and the wide appeal of all
Victor Herbert's music.
As the contract with the copyright
owners was signed on Friday, the
orchestra and chorus are now awaiting the arrival of scores, scripts, orchestrations, etc., in order to begin
earnest rehearsals. This material ls
expected  within  a week.
SOFTBALL
The Society has accepted the challenge from "Oods Above in the
Green Rrom" to an Informal little
Joust at Softball. "Seconds" have
chosen the time and place to be the
soccer Held, Saturday, October 29th,
at 1.30 p.m It Is rumored that Mr.
Walter Oage will see that neither
side wins.
No More
Stalling? . . .
RAIN IS HERE
YEAH-MAM!
"You   can't   swim   here,"   the   Sheriff
said
To a lady bathing,  bare.
She   quickly    turned,    and     blushing
said:
"Oh.   sir,  I   do declare
You should have told me of this  law
Ere I removed my dress."
He   looked   away,  discreetly  saying:
"Miss,   I  must  confess
The  law's  a   kinda  funny  thing;
It keeps a feller guessing
But    it    only    says:     "No    swimming
here,"
It don't say:    No undressln'!"
—Oateway.
TRAOK NOTICE
Meeting—Gym—13.30 today.
All  cross-country  men  wishing  to
make  Portland  trip turn out.
'**—.*.**.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS.   'AT   HOMES.'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS  CARDS
GEHRKE'S
sea  Seymour  St.
Men's  Half  Soles 65c
Men's  Rubber  Heels           30c
Men's Leather Heels ..... 40c
Ladies' Top  Lifts 20c
Ladles'  Rubber  Heels 35c
Full  Soles,  Rubber  Heels
and Shine $1.75
Shoes  Dyed  Black 40c
Work Done  While You Walt
HATS CLEANED & BLOCKED
—  Expert  Work  —
Free  Pick-up  and Delivery
Empire   Shoe   Rebuilders
713  Oranvllle Trinity 4733
BALMAC
RAINCOATS
$14.95
Cheers to these new Coats! Here's
absolute protection—they're 100%
rainproof! Of exceptionally high
quality, they add distinction to
any college man's wardrobe—and
give his purse a treat, because
we've priced them way down low!
Oood looking, longest wearing
ton-ooat-ralnooat you can get anywhere, praetloal for any weather
. . . and season . . . any purpose]
Magnificently tailored to look
smart and expensive and stay
that way, but, liest of ail they're
priced to make them easy to buy.
. . . They're the Esquire's Value
.Triumph!
ESQUIRE
Men's Apparel
Exclusive Tip Top
Agents
on South Granville
"Clothes  Styled  for  To-day"
3064 Oranvllle St.,        Bay. 9680
IHtHHIHIMIHMllHHHMMItHIIHHtHHIHHIIIIHHMMHIIIlim
Have a real
HOME-COOKED   MEAL
with Mr. and Mrs. Thomson at
THE   GABLES  INN
iiiiitiiiiiiiitiHmiititiiiiiiMiiMmiiiiiiiitHMHtiiititiHiitfiiin
THE NEAREST BANK IS
The Canadian
BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
"A general bank business
is transacted and accounts
of the faculty and students
of the University of British
Columbia  are  weloomed.''
RANKERS   TO   THE
.ALMA MATER
SOCIETY
0. R. Myers, Manager
MIMI,MIIIMIII(ll«H«ltt,,l,|MMIIMIIIIMIIIMHHM„t,|,^<|||l,MII,Mtllt,llll(IM*MII<tllllM(l„l,l,,l>l,lttllll<IIU,M IKMtMMMtl
1 Pioneer Laundry & Dry Cleaners
I Seymour 8334
I A  complete   Laundry and  Dry ('lcaninji'  Service
1 Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaner
i*llinllltllllllllltlllHIIIIIIIHHHIIIIIIIIHIIItlllllltlllHIIIIIIIIIIIIII||llllllltltll.lll
Illllll I
"AS  NEAR   A3  YOUR  PHONE"
SEYMOUR 2405
livery   Anywhere  in  City  Limits
E ' S   .   .   .    840 ORANVILLE GRANDSTAND SEATS
For Tomorrow's Oame
Bring Your Pass and a Quarter
OR.T
GRANDSTAND SEATS
For Tomorrow's Game
Bring Your Pass and a Quarter
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Ootober 25, 1938
'BIRDS  DOWN  HUSKIES,  WIN HARDY CUP
U. B. C. IN 2-1  GRID VICTORY,
STADIUM BATTLE WEDN'DAY
Shading a fighting band of Saskatchewan Huskies 2-1, the
Blue and Gold of Varsity won the Hardy Cup, emblematic of
Western Inter-collegiate football championship at the Stadium,
Saturday. The students held the play all through and lacked but
a scoring punch to boost tho score higher.
The    Huskies    found     themselves
 ' ' •"    blocked at every turn, with the Var-
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
IHHtHHHHHIIIIIIHIIIIIHIMHHMHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIHMMMHIII
The oh-so superior U.B.C. hockeyists are relaxing in peace now
for they played a regular league
game against their Varsity cohorts the other day—and defeated
thein S-O. This win greatly surprised the senior eleven aa they
were very muoh afraid the young
team would unset their dignity by
beating them.
VARSITY  PROMISING
When the Varsity eleven gets some
combination, they'll be a going concern. Pat Carey, centre forward,
turned ln a stellar performance ably
backed up by Captain Elisabeth Mclnnls on the half line. Mary Ann
Teagle, Mae McQueen, Betty Henderson, and Elspeth Munroe complete a potentially atrong defense.
(Oosh, but the U.B.C. team must be
good). Wings Viola Davies and Wanda Kenny are showing up well while
little Peggy Crowe, goalie, Is tops of
oourse.
After a few days practice under
the   competent   new   coach,    Mr.
White, watch their dust.
INTRA-MURALS
Rumours have it that the pride
and Joy of the class reps, the intramurals, are not flourishing as well
as they might—to put lt mildly. It
seem sthat the people they were
planned for, the girls who haven't
the time for major games, are neglecting them. Aggie and Nurses
have given up the ghost, Freshettes
—do they really exist? Sophs, Juniors, Seniors, and  Education—feeble.
Appeals for help are going to busy
Big Blockers. Don't let them have to
run Intra-murals too. Come on, girls,
give your class (and yourself)
break, by turning out.
HOOPERS LOSE
TOHOMECOMERS
Homecoming from a grad point
of view waa a remarkable success
last Saturday night to Judge from
the way the all-star «-.-collegian
oage team whipped the yet-Inexperienced and unpractised Thunderbirds 44-30.
Playing without Captain Rann
Matthison and the veteran Hooker
Wright, the campusmen showed a
striking lack of cohesion, which,
however, can be attributed mainly
tc a lack of practice workouts and a
superfluity of Homecoming celebrations.
ORADS OOOD
Outstanding for the grads were
Art Willoughby with 16 points, Jim
Bardsley with 10, and Wally Mayers
—yes he's still around—with 9.
Freddie Bolton, although his material contribution only amounted to 2
markers, was nevertheless an entertainment in himself, suddenly finding himself suffering mortal injuries, and producing timely liquid refreshment to keep himself and his
comrades   functioning.
Brud Matheson with 7 points led
the collegians, who took the opportunity to experiment with their promising   freshman   talent.
slty line breaking through continually to smear running stars Weaver,
Hall and Borden. On the other hand,
Varsity mixed up their powerful
running attack with a Williams to
Henderson passing attack that netted valuable yardage. In four completed passes the students gained
forty-seven yards. •
VARSITY   SCORES
Receiving the kick-off the Varsity
backfleld started rolling with four
successive flrst downs to take them
down to the Husky 28-yard line. Henderson tried for a field-goal and
missed, but the ball went over the
deal-line for one point.
Varsity missed another chance to
score when Farina fumbled a blocked kick on the Husky 20-yard line
and Saskatchewan recovered. The
rest of the quarter was the battle
of the Varsity backfleld against the
running and kicking of Bud Weaver.
Freddie Smith blocked three punts.
WATTA   PASS!
The second quarter found the
backfleld stars Williams, ap Roberts,
and Oray tearing off great gobs of
territory but lacking In a scoring
punch to take them over. Late ln
the quarter Williams fumbled the
ball on the 80-yard stripe and the
Husky attack started towards the
students' goal.
But the line held and Weaver trying for a dead-line kick fumbled the
ball and with two Varsity tacklers
on his back, turned his face the
other way and threw a pass that
was completed on the Varsity thirty
by Skipper Hall. This time Weaver's
kick was good and Williams was
rouged behind the line by Smith-
wick -when he tried to run around
wide.
FINLAY STARS
The third quarter was all Fin-
lay's. This freshman Varsity back
went through the Saskatchewan
line for nineteen yards, threw a
pass that got thein ten, then ripped off another ten through the
line to carry the ball down to the
sixteen. Henderson kicked and
rouged Weaver for what proved to
be the winning point.
GAME TOMORROW
Wednesday afternoon will see the
two teams fighting lt out again at
the Stadium although the Hardy
Cup is now back at Varsity after a
lengthy sojourn at Saskatchewan
where It stayed from 1934-37. The
Huskies, tired after long train ride
will rest up for the game taking in
the sights and doing a little studying. Light work-outs will put them
into first-class shape for the game
tomorrow when they plant to blast
the  win-streak  of the  Varsity team.
GRASS HOCKEY
INTRA-MURAL
SCHEDULE
Varsity Men's Gras. hockey team
went down fighting to a faster Cricketer team by a 3-0 score at Connaught   Park   Saturd ly   afternoon.
The Blue and Gold team just failed
to click all the way through, and
when the score stood at 1-0 in the
first half, the students put on the
pressure play only to have the Cricketers break away to slap two goals
past John Hysler in the Varsity nets.
Despite the lack of co-operation
on the part of the students, especially Artsmen, Maury Van Vllet is
continuing with the fall schedule of
intra-mural sports with these events
on the docket:
Yollyball,   Wednesday,   October  36:
1.   Art* 40 vs. Arts 41.
3.   Sc.   43  vs.  Sc.   3D.
Friday,  October  38:
1.    Sc.   39  vs.   Sc.  43.
3.   Arts   39   vs.   winner   of   Arts   40
vs.   Arts  41.
Also on tap for the athletes is the
Cross Country run scheduled for
November 8. Tho first thirty to cross
the line (If thirty do.) will win points
for their class and Maury is expecting a great turnout to make the run
an   epic   in   intra-mural   history.
In the background In the forthcoming trip the track squad will
he making to Portland where they
take on the Hill Military Academy.
The trip takes, the place of the
Prairie trip which waa shelved due
to  financial  difficulties.
LET'S GO VARSITY!
—Photo  by  Ted  Underhiil
Yes, sir! It's Just another of those smashing Thunderbird plays which
went around, under, over and sometimes through the valiant Husky line.
In this picture you can see Tom Williams, No. 7, carrying the ball, and
also Aub Orey, No. 16, Fred Joplln, No. 1, Johnny Farina, No. 22, Brian
Martin, No. 31, Lee Straight, No. 4, Plnder of the Huskies No. 18, Carson
MoOuire, No. 14, and Hunk Henderson, No. 29.
FIRST DIVISION RUGGERMEN
BREAK EVEN OVER WEEK-END
Varsity's high flying Sngllsh rugby
team marched a step closer to capturing the Miller Cup Saturday when
they bewildered the famed Meraloma
defense and scored a clear-cut 17-6
victory over the highly rated orange
and black from Kitsilano. The game
was featured by the deadly tackling
of the clubbers and the fancy backfleld play of the collegians and put
the Thunderbirds Into first place In
the league standings.
Ernie Teagle, who has come to the
fore as a kicker of late, started the
point parade by booting a pair of
penalty goats early ln the game to
give Varsity 6-0 lead.
After the Interval the Varsity
machine started to funotion in
high gear and proceeded to pierce
the very tough Meraloma defenae
for a pair of trys. Tod Tremblay
blasted over near the corner flag
for the flrst one that was started
by Sandy Lang, and Howie MoPhee brought the spectators to
their feet by dashing half the
length of the field for a score that
was a thriller all the way. McPhee Just managed to get the Jump
on the "Loma backfleld and once
he was away there waa no stopping him.
Tremblay booted the convert and
then teed a penalty shot up at the
35-yard line and smacked It between
the posts for another trio of points.
The Meraloma's desparately tried
to even lt up but Bud Ooldstone's
long penalty goal from the 40-yard
line was the only other score.
According to Coach Carey, and
many other university supporters,
the old rugby bucket was dumped
again on Saturday when U.B.C. were
beaten 26-14 by the Rowing Club.
The powerful Clubbers probably
thought they had a "soft touch," till
the smart young U Bee's opened the
day's scoring spree through Waddle
Robertson's field goal and later
matched them point for point during practically the whole game.
Rowing Club's much vaunted
scrum was hustled completely off
their respective feet by the U.B.C.
boys, while Robertson, Hall, Smith,
and Mackle tackled the opposing
three line to a stand-still.
Half-time found the Varsity team
on the short end of a 16-8 score,
their points resulting from field
goals by Hall, Robertson, and a penalty kick by scrum-half Basil Robinson.
Although   the   backfleld   did   aU
the scoring except Taylor's touchdown the bouquets must be given
to  the   forwards  especially   Urquhart,   Billings,   and   Mason.   Their
hounding   play    bottled   the   Club
squad   in   their  own   territory   *or
moat of the play and only in the
last few minutes did the Coal Harbor boys show their superiority.
Basil Robinson was the spearhead
of nearly every Varsity attack, while
his   feats   of   kicking   to   touch   with
three    or    four    Clubbers    dangling
around his neck drew rounds of applause    from    the   assembled    multitude.  (?)
-    Used Cars   -
YOU CAN'T GO WRONG
dealing with
Fordyce Motors
They treat you right
Oood selection of cars. All prices. No finance
company to deal with. I.ow rates and payments made to suit  purchaser.
1345 Granville Street
Trinity 5397
MORE MILES PER $
BEGGS
CERTIFIED CARS
Prepare Yourself For Safe Winter Driving'
BEGG CERTIFIED OARS are reconditioned to give the
purchaser transportation satisfaction
TERMS
TRADES
BEGG'S
1056 West'Georgia
HOME OF
CERTIFIED CARS
__.
A
DOUBLE
DELIGHT
fintst roasted filberts
J«rs«y Milk Chocolat*
A TREAT-ANYTIME
ENJOYANEILSON BAR-DAILY
C.3713R
SOCCERMEN FADE IN
ST. REGIS FRAY
Varsity   soccerites  were   handed
their seoond setback of the current
season laat Saturday at Cambie St.
grounds when they went down 4-1
before a superior St.  Regis team.
Rod    McMillan    sent    collegiate
hopes soaring In the flrst Ave minutes of the battle by netting from
a scramble in front of the Hotel-
men's goal.    But before long, with
the campus defence putting up  a
rather  shaky   stand   at   tlmea,   St.
Regis had taken a 8-1 lead through
Temoln and  Newbold, which  they
held   until  the   breather.
After   the   crossover    neither    the
steady    clearing    of    Captain    Alan
Croll nor the stellar goal-keeping exhibition  put   on    by    Dennis    Leong
could stop the Hotelmen scoring two
more tallies without  reply.
Outstanding for the campusmen
were Croll at fullback, Sasaki at left-
half and Leong In goal, while Jack
Rush turned In a steady performance
In  the   pivot   spot.
ROWING CLUB
Rowing Club, General Meeting
Tuesday, October SS, at 13.30 noon.
. , . Very Important. . . . Outline
of transportation, crew schedules.
All out!
LOST
A purse, containing about $5.00 in
small change, was lost ln the Stadium on Saturday. Finder. please return to Peggy Crowe, 2945 West 37th
Ave.
HONEY BRAN MUFFINS
Cream a tablespoon butter and
add a half cup strained honey. Blend
veil and add 1 well-beaten egg. Sift
together IH cups flour, 3 teaspoons
baking powder and a V. teaspoon
salt and add 2 cups of bran. Add
this alternately with a cup of mill-
to the first mixture. Bake in greased
muffin tins in a moderate oven (350
degrees  Fahrenheit)   for  30  minutes.
offside
-orme dier
It must be spring or maybe we
are   Just   the   screwbaU   as   every
one claims.   Anyway, the mailman
turned up with an epistle yesterday
stating In no uncertain terms that
the sports ed. la nothing more or
less than a yo-yo champ.
We are Invited by the distributors
of   these   gagets   to   engage    ln    the
B.C. finals for the honor of the Blue
and Oold.    We have been sent a list
of the  contortions  these experts engage   ln    and    after    reading    about
"backhand  flips,  the  sally   rands   In
reverse" and numerous other tongue
twisters, we have come to the awed
conclusion  that  It  must  be great  to
be an  athlete.    Or would  somebody
be  kidding us?
Oettlng around to the less strenuous pastimes, that football game" last
Saturday was one of the soundest
exhibitions of fundamental gridiron
tactics ever played ln the Vahslty
Stadium. And conversely, it was
Just about the dullest game from
the spectators' point of view that
any killjoy could  hope for.
The only thing that kept the ennut
from throttling the customers was
the all-round ability of Bud Weaver
of the Huskies. And one of the
brainiest plays any Einstein ever
pulled was that forward pass from
Weaver to Hall In the second quarter. The pass had the appearances
of a prayer more than anything else,
and the way lt clicked, the Saskatoon boys must live right or carry
a flock of horseshoes.
BOUQUETS
First, to the Varsity line, especially
Freddy Smith, Carson McGuire and
Brian Martin. Second, to the U.B.C.
Military Band. These boys are deal-
ly good, and when they start to
swing it, even the players forget
they art at a football game. Nice
going   Mr.   Delamont!
Speed...
Seymour 4484
Quality...
Service. * *
MITCHELL PRINTING and
PUBLISHING  OO.  LTD.
1037    WEST    PENDER    STREET
 •••••< <*•••* "•„ Illll I Illll PII , MM III hi
HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals of the Oolf
Swing. The winter season Is the time to Iron
out your difficulties and
learn how to enjoy
Oolf.
Hal Rhodes Golf School
11 • < i • >_,
3
3
I
1155 W. Pender Street        Seymour 5333
I    ^IIIIMMMIMIIIIHIMIIMIUIIIMMIinll IIK IMIIMMII1HI I Mill Mill lit MM t Illllll M I '.IHMMMM1II Illllll

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124118/manifest

Comment

Related Items