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The Ubyssey Oct 23, 1951

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 r v
—Ptfoto by Tommy Hatcher
AN HOURS WAIT for the arrival of Princess Elisabeth and
Prince Philip was forgotten in the thrill of first sight of the
royf 1 couple as .they stepped from their car in Varsity Stadium. Thousands cheered as Dr. MacKemie greeted them.
The royal couple saw their football game in semi-darkness.
—Photo by *iob Steiner
ROYAL SIGNATURE is written in
a bold hand by Elizabeth to be kept
as one of the treasured souvenirs of
the royal visit to the University Philip
also signed the register.
—Courtesy Dally Provlnee
ROUSING SENDOFF for Elizabeth is led by a cheering and a waiving
Dr. MacKenzie, The enthusiastic shouting of students topped even the
tumult that was raised when UBC Thunderbirds defeated Eastern Oregon   :
13 to 8 minutes earlier. It was the 'Birds first victory in two years. The
game football was presented to Philip.
TUG
See  First  Football
'!.*''•'.* By LES ARMOUR
' j Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief i
Till |jlIrtCosS liffltwfl f nnrnrrl intently in her chair.
Prince ftrilip looked around nervously to make sure there
were no more hands to shake and settled back comfortably with
a broad grin.
* President MacKenzie, scarlet
robes fluttering in the breeze, said
Ibudly:-vWe've just won. Our first
wfV In two years."
. "Yes, so 1 hear," said the prince
Straining for a glimpse of the 'Birds
galfoiplng back onto the tield for
their 10-mlnute exhibition game.
'■{if Jlis*. saw the scoreboard, too.
Wonderful introduction to the
gjahre." •"•
vChan*felior-elect Sherwood Lett,
sq«lrn»ing 'slightly, turned to the
smiling princess and explained.
"We, don't usually play in the
d^rk;*'
Eastern Oregon and UDC lined
up on the field.
There was a mlgihtly roar from
the 10,0000 spectators, then a dead
silence broken by Princess Elizabeth   who   asked   the   Chancellor
quietly: "What's Uhe difference between this and English rugby?"
"Well," said the chancellor. "They
wear pads In this game . . . and It
moves a bit more slowly."
The princess nodded and everybody strained to find out whether
she had anything more to say.
Mary Lett, feeling more comfortable with her presentation over,
chatted sortly with Mrs. MacKenzie.
Registrar C. B. Wood, Obviously
pleased to see the book signed
and his official duties over, grinned
at AMS President Vaughn Lyon
and both of them cheered as UBC
passed the ball down the field.
UDC was pushed far down the
field and the crowd was glum.
Even Prince Philip dropped his
smile.
Crowd  Screamed  In  Darkness
Then,somebody (it was too dark
to kndw who for sure) pulled a hld-
deft ball play aud the 'Birds raced
50 yards forward.
The' crowd stood up and screamed. .
-The princess grinned and the
prlncp let out a lusty cheer.
Slightly abashed by his own lus-
tilierfs he turned to the president
and i asked in a hushed voice: "I
guesk that was all right?"
. "Sure," said Dr. MacKenzie, join-
Ink in the about.
Time was running out and nobody had scored In tlio exhibition
period.
VOLUME XXXIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23,1951
5 CENTS
NO M
Last Call For
Grad Photos
Today and Wednesday Is poe-..
itlvely the laot opportunity for
grads to have their portrait
taken for the ISS? totem.
" The studio In the armories
will be dismantled after Wednesday. Oet. 24th.
No   appointment   Is   necessary. Hours are from 9 .to 4.
TWEEN CLASSES
Driving
Movie
The hig clock ticked slowly on.
"10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5 . . . "shouted the
crowd.
The  stadium   horn   honked   and
Is  was all over.
The royal party up.
[    The plain clothesmen relaxed.
I     The  motilities snapped to atten-
I tion   and   20-odd   dignitaries   who
| made up the royal party ran down
from the stands and Joined the pro-
, cession    down   the    flag-bedecked
stairs.
Prince  Philip  turned  to one of
them aud said:  "Fascinating . . .
but  it's a dashed peculiar game."
"I wish it hadn't been dark," said
! the princess sadly.
DANGERS of drunken driving will
be shown in the Film Society's
noon hour show, "Drunk Driving"
ln the Auditorium today. Significance of the Kltimat Aluminum
Project will also be featured In
' Nechako Survey." Admission ls
free.
* *       *
SCOTTISH   DANCE   Club   will
hold Its regular meeting at Wednesday noon in Hut 04.
SQUARE DANCE .demonstration
club will meet Wednesday at 6
p.m. In Hut 04.
* *       *
PROGRESSIVE        Conservative
Club will meet today at 12:30 ln
the Men's Club room, Brock Hall
Plans
mm
PROGRAM
Today, 12:30 Frosh-Soph Basketball game In Oym.
Oct. 2*1 8 p.m. U.N. Model Assembly in Brock Hall.
Oct. 2"» 12:30 Pep Met*t--Kicka-
poos in Armouries.
Oct. 26 8:30 p.m. LSE Special
Event—Recital of Tudor .Music by
the Renaissance' Ensemble ln
Brock Hail.
Oct.  20  8  n.rn
War Memorial
of Chancellor
Chancellor Er-
Oym. Installation
Sherwood Lett by
eritua Hon. Eric Hamber. Conferring of Honorary degrees on: The
Hon. Milton Oregg, V.C.- Sir Alexander- Clutterbuck. His Excellency
The Hon. Stanley Woodward. Conferring of degrees ln Course.
Convocation speakers: Sir Alexander Clutterbuck, Ills Excellency
The Hon. Stanley Woodward. Dedication of War Memorial Gymnasium. Address by Hon. Milton Oregg
V.C.
(Saturday program will be published in Thursday's edition).
fvenge
In Moon Basketball Garni
By KATHLEEN BYRNE
More than 500 graduates are expected to return to UI|C
during homecoming week. New building, many of which will
ibe seen for the first time will be open for inspection.
Special guides will be provided on Saturday morning \
from 10:30 to 1:30 p.m.
The big week will start with a bang today when the
Frosh and Sophs stage their annual basketball game*at
12:30 in the women's gym. *
It is rumored to be a grudge match with the Sophs
out for revenge after last year's loss. \ '\,
FUS President, Jim McDonald, is organizing the Frosh
team while Gordon Elliott is handling the Sophs.
To date there are five princessess—candidates competing for Homecoming honors. They are Lois Dunlop, Aggies,
Louise Morris, Commerce, Mavis Coleman, Engineering,
Flecher. Frosh Undergraduate Society and Lila McLennan,
candidate of the Women's Undergraduate Society. Other
faculties are expected to announced their candidates soon.
The Kickapoos will stage a big Pep Meet at 12': 30 of
Thursday in the Armouries. It will last for two hours and
Bill St. John, Kickapoo's president promises it will be a
gala affair.
MacFarlane  Gives  Football
The football teams lined up health* the royal car and Prince Philip
walked over and held out his hand.
•   "Good  show," he  said.
'Birds captain Dave MacFarlane
ran around the line brandishing an
autographed ball.
He held it out and Prince Philip
took it with one hand and shook
MncFurlane's hand with the other.:
"Thanks," he said, obviously,
pleased. ,
Pouncing tho ball up and down he
walked slowly back to the brightly-
llgihU'd plastic domed car.
The  crowd   went  wild.
The car circled nlowly around
the track and somebody started to
fiing AuId Lang Syne.
Prince Philip rolled down -the
window and lie and the princess
sang too.
Two Tickets
For Winner Of
Football Quiz
Here's your big chance th win
two tickets for Saturday's (oot-
ball game.
•Fans were a mite frustrated last
week when they read Ubyssey's
account of how to win tickets. All
the directions were there—but no
c-juestlonH.
Just leave your answers to
tho following questions in the
sports office before Wednesday
norni.
1. What, team scored the first number of points on thc score-board
—UBC—E. Oregon?
2. Do you feel that George Pull's
longest run of the game was
closest to—7 yards—15 yards—
20 y£.;*ds—or 40 yards?
'!. Did Cal Murphy complete the
first pass he*threw?
4. According to the official uta-
ti.Ulc.** of the game what team acquired the greatest number of
li"*' downs—UMO—K. Oregon?
KICKING OFF HOMECOMING in grand sty le are these twelve lovely U.BC cheer leaders
who'll display their obvious charms to the crowd at the Saturday football game. That's
when UBC Thurfdeilbi.rds.meet Central Washington. The lovely damsels from left to right
are: Diane Le (Blanc, Pat Perry, Pennv Constabaris, Sue Jlall, Babs Blake, Mary Mc-
Alphine, Marie Lloyd, Pat Davidson, Elaine Gustavson, Norma McDonald, Patti Burley and
Pat Spring. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 23,1951
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorised as second class mall by the Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions
11.00 per year (included ln AMS fees). Mall subscription 12.00 pr year. Single copies
five cent*, published throughout the University year by the Student Publications Board
of the Alma Mater Society, University ol British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, aud not ueceBs&rly those of the
Altna Mater Society or of the University.
Offices in Brook HaU. Phone Al4na 1624           For dla-play advertising, phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  ..... LES ARMOUR
S&SOUTIVp EDIT OB-ALLAN GOLDSMITH MANAGING EDITOB-DQUG HKAL
City Editor, Harold Berson; Copy Editor, Chuck Coon; Futures Editor. John'Napier-
tfemy; Fine Arts Editor, John Brocklngtpn; OUP Editor, Sheila Kearns; Women's
Editor, Florence McNeil; Senior Editors Sheila Kearns (Tuesday), Doug Upex
rsday). Bilstfi Gorbat (Friday). *
A Good Start
A. week ago today THe Ubyssey sug-
an Put-Weft scholtrship exchange
fj»f yc!sp>nse in the last week has sur-
The jQWtttown papers, the CBC and the
national wire services have all carried the
President MacKenzie has said he is in
# favor oi the plan "provided that the students
'km ftp P#$8 W»ee*t our academic stand-
, Ajgf Pw4d9»t V*W# Lyon has said he
thUjkji the ideal* good.
HI, oddly enough, has maintained stony
silence.
Perhaps they haven's had time to consider it yet. Pehaps they are worried abottt
Jthe effects of any new plan on their standing programs.
The scheme, in any, case, seems to have
attracted a great deal of attention.
We have written to the editors of the
Soviet journal "News" and We except a reply
within the next few weeks.     •
In the meantime, let's draft a concrete
scheme.    .        v ,       ,;
The support is there.
It is a matter of deciding who is to finance the scheme and finalizing the details.
From there on in it will up to the Soviet
Government.
i
Red, White and Blue Letter Day
7*
Tht
HE'S  SORRY
Editor, The Ubyssey
I wish to acknowledge my tois-
take ln criticising publicly Mr, Feltham for his English at last Thursday's AMS meeting. I am not changed In my stand for reputable English, however, especially at public
meetings. '
B.M.H.N.
October 20 will be remembered as the
reddest of ihe red-letter days that has ever
hit our campus. More happened on that day
in the space of three hours than has happened its history.
First, our football team fought as they
had never fought before. The team which has
never before even attempted to lift a finger
sit tht opposition somehow found some unknown source of spirit and played football
for the first time this year.
Second, the crowd for the first time in the
history of the university gave their team the
sUpport that spurred them on. Never before
had the students cheered so loudly and so
vrell.
"Third, almost as an anticlimax, was the
royal visit of Elizabeth and Philip. Although
the crowd had practically cheered itself out
they found a little left for the couple
who had a brought « distinct honor to the
university.
The statements of the press that there
was too many official introductions was made
obvious to all who attended the game on Saturday when the only way the royal couple
could he seen was behind a lighted glass cage.
The only way tihe royal pair could see the
foot ball game was though the eyes oi the
public address announcer.
Why or how pur team won the footlbaH
game is neither here nor ihfere.
They won a game attended by about
seven thousand people. Perhaps these people
will come and watcji a game once more.
And All That    By Les Armour
Well, the lion has tangled with the Sphinx
in Suez.
The same beast, we understand, was
nearly drowned in a pool of oil in Iran.
Students of foreign affairs (including our
own Prof, F. H. Soward) maintain that the
lion has justice on his side—though his chances of winning are regarded as slim.
Students of socialist theory, however, are
included to feel that the Egyptians ahd the
Iranians have a better than average case.
For the next three days, anyway, Britain
has a "socialist" government — and it was
the socialist government which got the lion
into the fight.
The confusion in the foreign office must,
therefore, have been more than entertaining.
We imagine the scene last week must
have been something like this:
FOREIGN SECRETARY: Gentlemen.
Something must be done. These dashed Egyptians have gone and rebelled.
SENIOR ADVISOR (grey haired and
balding, obviously Conservative): Yes, dash
them. Most awkward- pon't know quite what
we can do. I suppose we can send troops?
FOREIGN SECRETARY: Good heavens
no. Absolutely not. Create a beastly mess.
Of course . . . we're in the right. We should
send troops.
JUNIOR ADVISOR (youthful and
timid): But we have troops there already:
FOREIGN SECRETARY: I suppose we
must, withdraw them- M$ke us look like* awful
asses, though, don't you think?
SENIOR ADVISOR: I've got it. We'll
leave them there. Then as soon as somebody
gets nasty, they can say they've been attacked. Then we can send more troops in to
rescue them.
FOREIGN SECRETARY: By jove! A
capital'idea. First rate! Naturally, we aren't
making war to keep the Egyptians to our
treaty. We're just protecting our troops. No
breach of principle. But no withdrawal,
either. Of course ... if we touch off a war all
over the Middle East . . . But we'll face that
when we come to it.
JUNIOR ADVISOR: Tea's ready.
Xetter tc the Cd'tUf
CANADA OK, BUT —
Editor, The Ubyssey
It has been my pleasure, during
my brier period of fellowship with
the young people of Canada* to
ponder upon their ideals and motives. I think that I am justified
when generalize and say that we
of Cnada have, hy was of ideals,
high concepts of democracy and of
the necessity for the Individual to
play a part beneficial to society.
As for real motives, vve have
those that hr.ve been with ns since
Eve, with In addition, the relatively
modern   desire   **to  get.  on   in   the
world'   and   to   Impress   the   girl
friend.
All this is rather trite, not to say
-.vlndy, but it Is upon this basis
that a decision is to be made
namely; whether or not young Canada today ls primarily egotistic.
I think that we have, in this last
week, been given the basic data for
j such a decision. The most laudable
j of social benefit is the preservation
i of life, and this is the aim of bl-ioil
transfusion.
Less than one in four of the students    of    this    university    could j
trouble  themselves  to doimte.  The \
people who knew best what their
gift could mean g_ave 155 per cent
of their quota. Engineers gade 110
per cent of quota to tbe artsmen's
60 per cent. This can only be ax-
plained by the desire to prove that,
engineers are more virile than
artsmen.
On the basis of these facts. I
feel justified In stating' that young
Canada.* has not yet reached that.
stage of development at which lt
will have subordinated the personal
ad\antage to the group Ideal.
A. .Gilchrist,
2nd  Year Pre-Med.
Help Destitute Nations
Andrew Tells Students
By MYBA GREEN
"A combination of both religious and technical knowledge
i% necessary to help destitute countries," said Dr. Geoffrey Andrew, chairman of the panel discussion on "Christian and Technical Assistance Program," sponsored by United Nations and
Student Christian Movement yesterday noon.
Continuing the U.N. Week pro***' ~       ~~t~~";
gram, an open forum "Six Years of ed enough on Ideal leadership. '
%0§mw09nww^lf.
ROOM AND BOARD
TWO   ROOM,   NBWLY   PjBCOR-1
ated suite, oqe blftcg trom tjflltoo-
aid toils. 8T7| W». M*fc W WTW
CLEAN, C!»H!r#flTA»I4S H^M
-with or without br^aWait. Immediate possesion. Ph. KB &S42M
■VQtT *M9 9WH9
WIST PRdM MAMOOKS DURING,
the past year.
1. Several red bandied, red-sable
sho-card brushes. 2. Business end
of stapler, "Mwnooks" written on
one side. Please return any of
thes articles to the AMS office.
LOST — BROWN COAT IN CHEM-
latry Butldlag on Oct. 17. Paul Wong
WILL DOUG B1NHAM PLEASE
call at the AMS Lost and round
re. lost article.
LOST - TUB& .OCT.' 3 Between f||| »od PI*"** Bids* a grey
yiter^in's fountain pen. Phone
|tew a* al Q4l«t.
L,QgT - FRATERNITY PIN, IN-
mill A,p, Pi A,|. Plfise contact lost
and Found or phone KB G390Y. Reward.
FOUND — A WATERMAN'S BEN.
C$1 Fort Camp, Hut «, Room 36,
Stan Mozol.
LpST - WALLET CONTAINING
personal papers ln HG6 10. Ph. HA
G991L. Ask for Mike.
LOST   —   YBLLOW   HANDBAG,
Owner ls Eleanor Lafleche, 2565
York St. CH 6543.
NOTICES
150 DANCING GIRLS AT THE
Pre-Med nurses' mixer iu Brock
Hall, Oct. 19, 8:30. Tickets &t AMS
or door. All guys and gals welcome,
LIKE TO PLAY GOOD BRIDGE?
Come to 1st regular meeting ot
Bridge group in Brock Snack Bar,
Monday, Oct. 22, 7 to 9 p.m. Instruction and plenty of supervised
play, comments and criticism. Mr.
(HUbert, FA 4497R
DELEGATES TO U.N. MODEL
Assembly meet Monday U 12:30
in Men's Clubrooom, Brock Hall.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION UNDER-
grad meeting Tues. 12:309 ln New
Gymnasium.
VOTING FOR THE PHYSICAL
Education Queen on Monday 22ud
10:30 to 3:30 lu the Old Oym. '
COMMERCE WOMEN — THERE
will be a meeting of all commerce
women at 12:30 Friday In HG9.
THE UBC AERO CLUB WILL
hold a special meeting In the agricultural Engineering Building on
Thursday, Oct. $i at 12:30 p.m.
Members please u-tte-pd.
AN ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
of the Psychology Club will be
held today (Tuesday) in the Psych
lab (HM3). All those Interested
In Psych please attend.
FOR  SALE
SHORT, WHITE FUR EVENING
cape. Has not been worn. Very
reasonable. Ph. TA 2902. Mrs.
Warren.
1937 AUSTIN SALOON CAR.
Good body and tires. Motor re-
bored, u'ew piston rings, klngpliui
"and clutch. Cheap transportatioon
for four. M. D. MacDoonald, FA
4G59Y.
1929 CHEV COUPE. BODY AND
motor good. Price $75. Ph. AL 0542L
or 4543 W 13th after 5 p.m.
TYPINQ
WILL TYPE NOTES OF STU-
dents oL* Art's Department. Hand
writing must be legible. No short-
aaied. Terms to be arru-nged. Mrs
Moore, ,1345 12th Ave. CE 3382.
TYPING CAN BE DONE FOR
you accurately at reasonable rates.
For notes, essay, etc phone FR
T(i2T l.lanet Moorman).
TYPING, ESSAYS, THESE, MAN-
usiuipts, card work, letters of application. Notes as specialty and
mimeograph lug. liloise Street, Dal-
houslo Apis., 'University , Area,
.('aiupu-i rates. AL Ofi.'ijU.
U.N." will fye presented by the
Chinese aud u.N. consuls and Australian Trade Commissioner ln
Arts 100 at 12:30 today. Tomorrow
a flag raising ceremony will be
held. Also a full evening program
Including g Model Security Council.
Model General Assembly, International   Display   and   a   Informal
IXPLAINS NKCDS
D»'. Shemilt said technical aa-
sls*iai)ce had been going on for centuries but lt had been undertaken
With raaay ulterior motives. He
felt that those sent bad not depend-
BOOSTS CHURCH  GROUP
Dr. Wood replied thut missionaries had often been boosting their
own dhurch group Instead of Christian religion »s a whole. M$ epp-
eluded this had a disturbing etfeel
ou people of the foreign countries.
Both men agreed that human!-
tariantean was necessary *or technicians sent, but that they should
not try to throw their rellflon &
the poorer countries. Artd re ws concluded that this was a wonderful
challenge to Christians who wished
to help sipread the brotherhood of
man.
mmmmmmrm*
FORYQUK
Portrait
•TUDIO
4S38 W. *0th Ave.    *
(Opp. Safeways, 10th and Sasamat)
wam-mm*mmm>mm*iiim-~m'm9m^~'
ALma 2404
mmm
h step with
^ufagneeas...
New industries, new communities, new
sources of oil and iron and power...
Canada moves on with amazing strides.
And with this expansion come added calls
for every form of banking service. Your
chartered banks have moved ahead in step*
with these growing requirements. That is why
it now takes 45,000 men and women to do
the banking of Canadians — almost double
the number of ten years ago. That is
why there are now 3,700 branches to serve the
expanded needs.
Wherever initiative and growth demand it,
banking is there — claiming your
continued confidence.
One of a series
by your bank Tuesday, October 23,1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page Three
WOMEN'S
FLORENCE McNiH—Editor
mmmm
Scoter)
«)OCld
iy FHO MeNftJL
■i^vet* ir*m WtJMtftf'i ftlstlen-
•rjjt "t)tu4aat—a ItaiHww. mUte*
or* wH« OvdlM, an attentive and
ay||§$*ttft «|Mfi4|fV ?|it felle*-
ln| il • day la a stwMmt's tiut#
m
De^r|iM&ry:
Am sure glad to be getting. .
hu|a$ ea»ly {or a change. Had fun
t°ltiy*
fait: Bus arrived late this, morning.   Couldn't   make   It   to
Fi-each leetuje. Went to Cgl. Had
two  t-ups of coffee,  talked  to
thf girls. Saw cute Phi Delt who
looked very friendly, l^ary Leu
ha* darling new plaid purse.
1.0:30: Free houi*. Headed tor
Library.  Couldn't find empty
place, but met Joe. Wait to
Brock  for  coffee.  Joe  is  fullback on the football team* Joe
says  school  is  difficult  some*
TAUI TO« fAST
\l-M: Went to English lecture.
Could-a't ttke notes because Pro.
talk* too fast. Betty said she
beard that Mary was going out
with an Engineer in fourth year.
Vjtoa. aiwsirisea.
12:30: Lunch. Talked to the
girls. Saw PhU with his crowd.
Heard PhU has new Bulck. Smiled.
1:30: Mary
Lou and I went
for a drive with
Phil. New car
Is smooth. Phil
•aid be would
teach me to
du'lvf.
.trtl w»at to
c%f. Had two
ou#s Qf coffee.
SftW frewh pel- WottAer If he
knows I missed lecture. Gloria
asked me to, tea on 8&tiurd»y.
JlftTy Lou said Gloria-often en-
tertalns re*Uy important people.
otm Attiitwr
3:30: Went to lab. Lab assistant Is cute. Jean says he Is a
Big Block. Am glad Don has
same lab before me. Saw Ellen.
Her hak looks awfully blonde.
4.: 15 Went to Caf. Saw Betty'*
friend, Chris, Hear lie's a bit
weird. He writes.
500:  Had supper.
6:30: Weat to library. Saw
Gloria ln basement. Gloria told
me about how her mother met
the Princess.•
700: Started out tot home. Met
Bill. Bill was telllug me about
how ho felt after his Frat formal.
8:00: On way home. Diet gang.
Went for coffee. Made plans for
parly at Bill's bouse.
10:00: Home. Mother objects*
to me studying so late out at
Varsity.
'Nite, diary.
Biology
* t
\ ^^   	
WUS Pyjama Party
To Be Fun For All
The "bobl-jy-pm brigade" will assemble at Brock Hall on
November 1 lor a gala pyjama party from 7:30 to 9:30.
— : ®   All the women on the campus
are urged to attend. Kay etefward,
vice-president of WUS is la charge
of their gathering with a harvest-
time theme. The entertainment
chairman, Doreen Mitten, promises
everyone a wonderful time.
Andrew Talks Today
"Society aud the Individual" will
be tbe topic of Professor Geoff Andrew's address to the Frosh Undergraduate Society today at noon
In Physles 200.
JQAN FRASER
Energetic
Totem Ed
Hates TV
By MAUREEN WADQEN
The glamorous subject of today's column Is hard-working
Totem  Editor, Joan Fraser. *
The first woman editor in
over five years, Joan regards
' her position as a full-time job
In addition to her studies. Furthermore, she Is an executive
member of the Kappa Kappa
Gamma Women's Fraternity,
FUTURE   UNDECIDED
Like so mi'.ny fourth year
sludeuts, Joan's immediate
goal is graduation. After April,
her future Is undecided.
Reflecting her own vibrant
personality Is Joan's fondness
for bright colors and yellow
roses. Her taste In art trends
toward the modern school.
Like most women, her "millinery madness" shows her love
for hats.
HATES TV
On the other hand, she strongly dislikes pink carnations
and television. Her "pet hate",
though, Is a dripping faucet.
When  the  Totem     appears
next  spring,  lt  will  certainly
reflect the brilliance of its attractive  and  energetic  editor.
<i
Revived
•
The Biology Club, dormant for
some time, is being revived on t^e
Campus.
At the club meeting members
wlU be given a chance to exchange
ideas aad become better acquainted
with each other. A large membership of students in Biology and allied sciences is anticipated.
On Wednesday, October 24
John Kellsal, who has ajtent
several years in the Arctic will
speak to the club. He fill illustrate his talk with a colored motion
picture. All interested students are
welcome. Time 8 p.m. In Bl 100.
Blood Drive
Falls Short
ENTERTAINMENT
Feathered on the programme will
be games, community stating and
special entertainment In' the form
of an hilarious act by the executive
members ol WUS. Jean Hood, WAA
representative, is supervising . the
games for the party.
One of the highlights of last year
which ' is being repeated is the
square-dancing called by Miss
Miller.
All "Big Sisters" are asked to!
bring their "Little Sisters" with |
them to make sure that no one)
misses this important get-together,
TICKET  SALE
The tickets are thirty-five cents
and can be obtained from the faculty representltlves on WUS or from
the AMS office. Refreshments will
be served.
Here ls a grand opportunity to
have a fun-packed evening. We'll be
seeing you in full regalia ht the
WUS Pyjama Party.
Phrateres'
Meet Alums
Phrateres' old members were given a chance to meet again at the
Old Members banquet, held Monday night In Brock Hall.
Speaking to the large group, were
Shirley Merritt, past president of
Phrateres, and Enid Deartng, who
is new prexy. They spoke on their
lee'ent trip to the U.S. where they
attended  a* Phrateres   convention.
Despite tbe act that the UBC
blood drive fell 400 pints short of
quota. Red Cross officials Monday,
termed response to the drive
"splaadld"     *
"We are extremely pleased with
ths results of the drive," K. S.
Louoks, executive secretary of the
Vancouver Wood drive, told the
Ubyssey. "We noticed a much better spirit this year, a great many
more Interested people.".
Quota for the drive w*gs 1800
pints; a total of 1400 was received.
Five faculties-—Applied Science,
Nursing, Agriculture, Forestry and
Medicine — exceeded their quota
with Forestry leading gll other
faculties with 21 par cent of quota.
Quota percentage reached by
the various faculty are Arts 68 per
cent, H. Be. 40 per cent, Ph. Ed.
40 per cent, Comm. 80 per cent,
Grgd St. 40 per cent, App. Sc. 110
per cent, Nure. 13G per cent, Aggies 123. per cent, Forestry 917
per cent, Law 52 per cent, Pharm.
75 per cent andWed 187 per cent.
ALPHA OMIOA Society will
hold a general meeting at 112:30
in Arts  101  on Wednesday	
SS
SCIENCEMEN WILL BE MEN
New Fashion Features
Masculinity will be emphasi-
slzed in this season's science-
men, indicated Red Sweater
Day fashion show.
Sciencemen will be debon-
alre with a difference this
term. Tweed droopy-drawers
will feature threadbare knees
(from sharing bus seuls with
co-eds) and pant cuffs will be
worn down at heel.
Basic campus attire will be
the ever popular hand-me-down
scarlet sweater with plunging
neckline and striped sleeve.
Coats will pL',y lip the Inverted pyramid again this fall, with
pointed caps to (It.
Sciencemen will scintillate
in evening weai* of denim,cutaways with rliinestone fastners
ami red string tics. (Humor Is
i.chlevnl hy the new Aggle-
s'H'riul  hah'ctu, which features
greying   temples   and   centre
part. '
Engineers will be as elusive,
as ever this year. The you'll-
lase-me if I turn sideways silhouette Is popular, especially
■with final year and batching
students,
The hungry look will replace
the perennial thirsty look
which fled when speedier production lu lab stills made wood
alcohol available to the masses*.
Various science departments
will retain individuality through distinctive dress. Architects will choose brick red
accessories. Cleologs preferlng
slate grey. Aggies will be pretty ln horse hair coats with el
ectiicals daring in shock socks,
forestry students will be uni
i|iie   ill   dainty   wooden   clog's,
Climaxing this  fall's  fashion
show was the wedding scene.
The groom, dressed becomingly In traditional white lab coat
of sailcloth with complnlment-
ary slogan emblazoned on a*
swaying back, was conducted
to the alter by the bride's
father,
The hunting theme was emphasized by the groom's attendants, who wove gun-metal
mourning jackets and baby-
blue trousers caught up at the
hemline with satin ribbons to
show demurely brocaded red
flannel woolies. Attendants*
ci.rrled slide rules and six-place
log tables effectively covered
with n fringe of poison Ivy.
MUS president Donald G.
Verux-all concluded the show
with a word of thanks to models and guests, who were later
conducted to the lily-pond for
i (IVeshnient.
YIARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY QF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
' AND SORORITIES.
THExrs a mm
wist/
"So' /STATIOMIBY AH*
MNNTINQ CO. 1TB.
1086 Seymour ft. Vancouver, B.C.
**mmmimmmmmmmmmmimmm
SAY IT
WITH
FLOWERS!
FJJNCnON_0U,JN
UN Week Boon
To UBC Students
fly PIANNE UVJNGSTON
FuU Slate of United Nation* W*ek gctivHft* on t^e
campus ahould be a boon, to students who do r»ot |pw
-tti»-lHi)fftlqniio|Hievwepto'tiKPluiik- "    .'"'*
Amaslngly  little  is   konwn .■*»■    ,  \'\t ,1 \ .,.;*,  .    ,—-
about the activities of the Unit-       **** •? W w f m ifftKW•   '
The e*ecqtlye of *|a J^er-
national Club* on tiie wtmous
have put mu*b toj% ialefN :
Week. They ha# trjed "§ pffs- 4
ent otjly topics f||$ ym *P-
peal to imleiii and *MU i>e r
comprehensible to them. I
ed Nation Organisation. For instance, bow many know wbo
the Secretary-fleneral or the
head of UNESCO is?
The punwae of UN Week if
to reach students, tbe local UN
to promote understanding. Tbe
Club bgs arranged a full slats
of activities including a Model
Assembly, Model Security
Oounoll. lectures by various
.consuls and displays.
It would be well wortih while
for everyone to attend at least
one of the functions In view
of the* position of tbe United
Nations in relation to tbe rest
of tbe world.
* QqqJ attendance tends to
give speakers impetus necessary to deliver speeches.
Those tbo attend may eveif
obtain a broader, less mfl#.
!
Redshirts first s,ipo,ker o| the,
year wi|i be held, oa Wfflfsday
eveninf In the Howden ballroom af
* f>*W.
Regarded by "eeobe^y p^ded"
Buflaepr as the best bucks forth-
on ca«Ri»m. ««WM*!|ftt ?T|1 be
provided by B»» tofUe |hd Peoff
Pringle, honors students in C 8 359,
^ Nurses are feicome a*t their owni^
discretion. , '       \
N|«f ATTRAfTIOH
CYRANO
Jose' mmm
A-;«d#my Awfrd Winner ,
NEW| IPICIAL
varsity mum
klAlN TO »ANPI
mmm
mm
ft   fi^AYl!^
S Ueison. M.00-10 U«||90| |1|.0fl
mmM Sihoii
Alms Mall     U7t W. ■<*•«*•>
CI..M7I -       v IA t4M
A COMPLITI
COLLEGE PRINTERS LTD.
4430 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3253
Printers ef "The Ubyssey"
-mmmmf—-**
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leaf Note Books, Exercise toaki
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIQLOGV PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C.
mtrnt
Sav« Wisely TODAY.,
for TOMORROW
Consult any of tho following Sun Lif* Representatives who have W wide experience hi budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance ne-e-fc:
FRED McCOLL
JACK, PEARSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE OF-CANACM *w.-■*.'-''*, ™**   I" ■■
<m
Page Four
TOE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 23,1951
They Waited
Time, But It Was Worthwhile
BEARING DOWN GOAL POSTS wag a moment UBC student* had awaited for two
years. Thunderbirds defeated Eaatern Oregon 13-8 in a great victory at Varsity Stadium
Saturday afternoon. /Ubyssey photographer Wait Sussel quelled his own excitement
Photo by Walt Sussel
long enough tp snap this picture of enthusiastic students doing the traditional honors for ;
a victory. Princess Elizabeth and Prince 'Philip arrived after the game was finished and the
teams played a 10-minute exhibition for thsm. *
S P O R T S
ALEX MacGILLIVRAY, Sports Editor
Elizabeth Smiles
Birds Surprise
By iQUS NAPIER-HEMY
The Royal couple almost missed the boat Saturday, but
Jelly's hapless 'Birds came into port for the first time ih
history.
It was a spectacle tit for royality as Varsity romped to victory
over Eastern Oregon. but the royal eyes missed the epoch-making
touchdown.
*The score was 31-8 when the final whistle blew. The stadium
was packed, the crowd went wild-Nevah In the history . . ,
V *v ' *r
.!'   Somehere along the royal route their Highnesses-were unfortunately detained.
,   What a blow tor Princess Elizabeth!*
That gladiators  lay panting in the coliseum.  They  had  performed the Impossible for the glory of the Empire. But where was
m the mighty Caesar to turn thumbs down on the Americans?
'*   And where was the charming princess who was tP.Ueam condescension on Mr. Andersen?
'e. If Queen "Victoria had been alive the situation would have failed
to. amuse her.
i   The wind was cold, and the mob was groAVlng ugly. Would they
secede?
•**]-. 9p *■***<,
e I
Two hours later and ten degrees colder a plastic-topped auto
appeured. Then a spontaneous demonstration took place just as
plfchhed.
Zubiehoff muttered with disappointment, and loft the stands.
He had lost the bomb when he was fumbling with his popcorn
money.
The crowds were quieter now and the apontanlety had almost
died out.
*
*
The gladiators were out in the field again, committing mayhem
for   the   crown.   The   princess   .smiled;   and   a   dozen   columnists
, reached for their penolls.
Five minutes later.big Dave MacFarlane was confronted with
the prince.
Dave presented Philip with a football for the Bonnie Prince
Charlie.
"dee," said Dave, "I don't know what to say."
The oyal couple departed, the Empire was saved, and Jelly, of
course, was deliriously happy.
Hall UBC!
Long live the King!
EXPECTED TO WIN
UBC XV Fooled
At Connaught Park Saturday, a
confident . Varsity XI expected to
gain   their  third   straight  victory. '
But .sad to note, the underdog,
Mouth Burnaby squad refused to cooperate, soundly beating the Chiefs
The loss of Ualph Martenson,
first string forward out with a ligament in jury suffered the week be-
lort:, undoubtedly hurt them.
Varsity Braves evened things up
by edging Ex-Brit. 5-0 at Douglas
while  Tomahawks  and   "Meralomas
fought to* a 3-3 stalemate.
* *        *
VARSITY   BOUNCES   HILL
Although scored on in the first
halt minute, Uie Varsity soccer
team bounced back to win 4-2
over South Hill on goals by BUI
Popowich  (2) and Bud Doben  (2),
* *        *
The l*BC team played a much
improved game, but lost by a 4-1
score to Collingwood Legion. Vic
Edwards scored BBC's lone goal
to save them from a shutout.
Stops
Post Win
Goal  Posts
Come Down
After Big Win
By PETE LUZST1G
Crowds roared, bands played,,
cheerleaders worked overtime
and finally the goal posts cam >
down. UBC Thunderbirds gave
a royal perfomance at Varsity
Stadiitm Saturday afternoon,
beating Eastern Oregon 13-8.
Varsity's first triumph this 'season can be attributed to no single
player; because for once every man
on the (-quad hit a* little harder or
blocked more effectively or ran the
ball a little further*
About six thousand, fans saw a
determined gbal line stand by the
UBC defensive line'that held firm
with seconds left In the ball game.
8TUART,VPUIL OMfAT
On offense, Bill Stuart combined
with Oeorge Pull to give the Thun-
dei-blrds their two touchdowns.
It was these two men that gained most yardage for the locals on
the ground. Cal Murphy, and Roger
Kromiuish led our aerial offensive
with Al Eszy and B^b Hlndmarch
co-operating nicely on the receiving end., Dave' MacFarlane's punt
ing was once again a highlight of
the game, end his setemty yard boot
may well be a UBC record.
ADEQUATE PROTECTION
Leo Sweeney, John MacDonald,
Cece Taylor and Ross Johnson
starred in the line, and were responsible for breaking through and
catching Oregon ball carries behind
their own line of scrlmage, giving
UBC passers adequate protection,
and opening holes in the Oregon
line through which our back field
sicampered. As usual however team
captain Dave MacFarlane was the
stand out.
Author Elliot
Solves Redshirt
Drinking Riddle
Student Directory proofs have been
posted at the north entrance board
In Brock Hall. If there are an,v eer-
rors. students are asked to make
corrections by filling out the fonr
obtainable at the AMS office.
Proofs for those whose names
begin from A to' H will be up
up until 5:30 today.
Proofs of those whose numes are
from II to Z will be posted during the week and wiil remain a
few ilays,
STUDENTS MAY GET FREE ICE
DUCATS FOR BK PUCK OPENER
The opening games of the Vancouver Commercial Hockey
Leagiup will be played on Wednesday night at the Forum.
Two are scheduled and students may procure free tickets by
calling ait the AMS office, the New Gym and the sports department
of the UBYSSEY.
Thunderbird Crew
Whip Oregon State
By JIM  PATTERSON
In a performance that'will have
the 'coach, crew and fans of Oregon
Stlite" 'College talking for days,
'Bh'd-Oarsmen Saturday defeated
the Oregon Beavers at Corvallls,
Ore., by two lengths, Oregon was
actually considered as favourite
for the race, but there was certainly no question ln anyone's
mind after the meet as to which
crew had the most precision, aud
the smoothest style.
The race was held on the Willamette River at 10:30 a.m. Saturday. UBC wa*s racing In a borrowed shell with which they were
not familiar.
Then the excitement mounted for
the big event, the long awaited
grudge race between the UBC Varsity Eight and the Beaver Vu-rsitv
Wight was about to begin. TIir
crews carried their long, aleek
shells down to the water, adjusted
their slides, foot braces, and pul'ed
away from the docks to assume
their respective pbsitlons 2000 metres downstream.
Everything became quiet, the
glut sounded and the Beavers In
an amazingly powerful start pulled
a length ahead of the 'Birds. The
Beaver fans went wild. Then Jerry
Savory, Coxswain of the Birds
slowly began to pick up the stroke,
and the crew responded with a
smooth, powerful, but exhaustlpg
stroke of 3,") a minute. The Birds
shell began forging ahead. By the
halfway mark they were even. In
a* display of strength and co-ordination that left the fans murmer-
ing for the rest of the race. Birds
pulled out in front. For approximately 900 metres they gave everything they had, and crossed the
finish line two complete lengths
ahead of Oregon.
The UBC line was as follows:
Varsity Eight
Stroke Dick Kanla. No. 7 John
Drlninin (secretary). No. fi Hank
Matheson, No. 5 Harry Castllliou,
No. -I Dong Hollbrobk. No. '! Andy
Small,   No,   2   Hob   Falconer,   Bow
John Warren( Captain).
Varsity Four
Coxswain Jerry Rendell, stroke
Jim Byers, No. 3 Graham Watson,
No. 2 "Glen Smith, Bow Selwyn Fox.
ln the coaching boat which followed the shells down the race
course were Beaver Coach Carl
Dryllca. Bird coach Frank Reld and
Bird Manager Jim Patterson.
UBCs Cats
Still Alive
UBC's most publicized felines
haye not yet been executed.
An official of the Department of
Animal Husbandry told a Ubyssey
reporter that Sambo and her four
week-old kittens were alive and
well after they were removed from
a Fort Camp basement last Wednesday.
Sambo and kittens are believed
housed in one of the Agricultural
building. Ho-wever, officials refuse
to divulge their whereabouts.
EXPLANATION of the Worm*
tion will be shown in £ noon-hour
movie, Wednesday In Physis 200.
Education reveals life's
possibilities: systematic saving
helps bring them within
your reach.
*   - , :-:wJM-*'
C-31
•A-
Vancouver Branch Office — 402 W. Pender Street
ERIC V. CHOWN, LLB., Branch Manager

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