UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 16, 1919

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124079.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124079.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124079-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124079-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124079-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124079-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124079-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124079-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124079-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124079.ris

Full Text

 Issued Weekly  by  the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, OCTOBER 16, 1919
Number 2
Freshman Class
Guests at Reception
FIRST   SOCIAL   EVENT   OF   YEAR
IS WELL ATTENDED
"The main thing to keep in mind," said
our worthy editor, in delegating us to
report on the Freshman reception, "is to
get away from the conventional style
that describes every dance as 'the best
ever,' and so on. Forget that the president and vice-president of the A. M. S.
and Mrs. Klinck will be waiting at the
door to welcome the bold Freshies who
venture out; and, above all, don't go into
raptures over the decorations, the orchestra and the mode of serving refreshments." Repeating, solemnly, as many
of these directions as we could remember, we sallied forth to the reception,
and, by great good luck, arrived just as
the cakes and other edibles were being
unpacked. When we finally summoned
up courage to enter the Auditorium, we
received a nice little green ticket bearing
a most imposing arrangement of numerals. At first the impression prevailed
that these were lottery or raffle tickets,
and, feeling very virtuous and high-
minded, we nearly decided to depart.
However, it was explained that these
labels were merely identification disks
to aid in the painful process of "getting
acquainted." Accordingly we joined a
group supporting the wall beneath the
cabalistic sign "251-300," and waited. So
did everyone else. Finally, "in large and
compact masses," the freshmen came
into view, and scanned first their own
verdant tickets and then the young ladies nearby. We listened: "Are you
279?" "No, but 279 was here a minute
ago. Have you seen 252 anywhere?"
The password of the evening was, "Have
you found yours yet?" We understand
that the nervous strain of waiting for
the corresponding number to materialize
proved over much for several, who retired to the calm of the library to indulge
in a mild game of cards.
The various partners being assigned
finally, dancing proceeded merrily, to the
accompaniment of many apologies and
comparisons of the size of the room and
the number of dancers. For the early
part of the evening the halls offered a
change from the crowded main floor,
but, with the approach of supper, their
coolness was utilized as a supper-room.
The programme of fourteen dances
finished promptly at midnight, and, with
waltz tunes still ringing in our ears, we
betook ourselves homeward, to burn
much midnight oil  in  the concoction  of
Players'Club Will
Arrange Reception
"TRY-OUTS" COMPLETED —XMAS
PLAYS ANNOUNCED
The first regular meeting of the
Players' Club was held on Thursday,
October 9th, with the president, Miss
Dorothy Adams, in the chair. In opening the meeting Miss Adams welcomed
the new members of the club, and, after
routine business had been transacted,
two committees were appointed to arrange a reception to be given in the
Auditorium on October 24th for the
successful candidates at the recent try-
outs. These are as follows: Misses L.
Cowdell, B. Johnston, K. Knowlton and
N. Willis, of Arts '22; H. Clark, M.
Jackson, H. Leveson, M. Portsmouth
and P. J. McKay, of Arts '23; Messrs.
J. Berto, Arts '20; J. de Pencier, A.
Crawford, Upshall, Arts '21; R. Hunter, E. W. Jackson, C. H. Scott and C.
Y. Robson, Arts '23; B. Fraser, Arts '22;
A. Manual, Agriculture '22. The judges
at this try-out were Dr. Ashton, Dr.
Sedgewick and the honorary president,
Mr. F. G. C. Wood. The four one-act
plays to be given late in November, as
announced by Mr. Wood, are: "Abraham
and Isaac," a 15th century miracle play;
"Pierre Pateline," an old French farce;
"The Locked Chest," by John Masefield;
and "Playgoers," by Sir Arthur Pinero.
Try-outs for places in the casts of these
plays will be held in the near future.
The "Ubyssey" would like to call attention to the rules of the reading-room.
Conversation in the reading-room is
prohibited. We wish our Freshie
friends would bear this rule in mind.
Surely they are capable of showing a
little consideration for their fellow-students. That is all the rule requires. We
hope that, now it is pointed out to them
how disturbing their conversation is to
other—and older—students, they will
cease promoting disturbance in the
aforementioned fashion.
(Continued from Column 1)
this report. In fact, the only fault we
could find with the reception was the
fact that we had to write it up, and tried
frantically all evening to obtain inspirations. None, however, were forthcoming, as this report bears witness.
'Varsity Promises to
Have Strong Teams
OFFICERS ARE ELECTED IN THE
ATHLETIC  ASSOCIATIONS
The season 1919-20 promises to be one
of the most successful which .basketball
has ever enjoyed in the University of
British Columbia. The class of Arts '23
contains a large number of students,
both men and women, who have starred
in the High School leagues, and several
of these players will make strong bids
for places on the first teams. The women
are out to annex the Farrel Cup, which
they lost to the Crofton House last season. The men, strengthened by the
return from overseas of "Mickey" Mc-
Dougall and George Dixon, should
finish at, or near, the top of the City
League.
The men have already commenced to
practice, and at the first workout, held
in the King Edward gymnasium, twenty-
two players were on hand. Practices
will be held every Monday and Thursday afternoon at 5 o'clock.
The men will probably have three
teams in the various Vancouver leagues,
while steps will be taken immediately for
the formation of a class league in the
University, consisting of teams from
the different years in Arts and Science.
Whether or not the University will be
successful in obtaining the use of the
Normal School gymnasium is not yet
known. Several members of the board
of governors will visit Victoria in the
near future, and this will be one of
the matters which they will take up with
the Minister of Education.
ELECTIONS
At a meeting of the executive of the
Men's Athletic Association, held on Friday, the following officers were elected:
Hon. President—Mr. P. H. Elliott.
President—A. E. Lord.
Vice-President—J. R. Kingham.
Secretary—E. Solloway.
Treasurer—Mr. Clarke.
Curator—N. T. Grimmett.
The  following are  the  officers  of  the
Women's Athletic Association:
Hon. President—Mrs. Boving.
President—M. Kilpatrick.
Vice-President—D. Hopper.
Secretary-Treasurer—L.  Swencisky.
Curator—H. Draper.
(Continued on Page 3) THE   UBYSSEY
OCTOHER   1(5,   11)1!)
Arrow Shirts a„a Collars
Stanfield's Underwear
Hobberlin Clothing
THIS   IS   THE   STORE
that can always show you
something new, and where
you are always sure of a
smile.
"Our Prices Are Right"
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820  GRANVILLE  STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
itf asstjtnn - (ftraft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY    should   be    the    first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's  clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Trices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHIONCRAFT
®lt00. SiflBtrr & (Ho.
Sjttttitrii
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
FRIDAY NIGHT
The programme of a Senior who did
his duty. Giving his original system for
the discovery of freshette partners.
FRESHMAN  RECEPTION
Engagements
1—Very fresh. Infinitesimal. Black
and  gold.    Room  "Y."
2—Clinging vine. Looks slushy. Hair
coming down.    "X."
3—Looks lost. Green and white. Simple and childish.    "X."
4—Eyes.    "Z."
5—Red dress and powder. Looks as
though would rub off. To be found
anywhere.
6—Simplicity; dressed in pink. "Now-
be-a-good-little-girl" type.
7—W h i t e pumps, black stockings.
Dress, yellow; hair, red.    "Y."
8—Goggles. Very studious. Menacing
and awful.    "Z."
9—Languid   and   sleepy.    Beastly   bore
for her to dance.    Blue.    "Y."
10—Pink, pinker, pinkest.    "Y."
11—Carefully curled.    Serene  and  soporific.    "Z."
12—Chewing  gum.    Can't  stop   to   talk.
Supper.
13—-"Chewing gum"  again.    "Ye gods!"
14—Cute little dear.    White and creamy.
Bashful and sweet.
ARTS '20
Arts '20 is justly renowned for its
knack of hitting upon unique and novel
ideas, and its early proceedings during
the Fall session point to a no less
original programme for its last year in
U. B. C.
At a meeting held last week the
question of a class paper was definitely
settled, the form of the publication decided upon, and a staff appointed. Miss
Rena Grant and Mr. G. E. MacKinnon
were chosen as associate editors, with
Miss Agnes Darner and Mr. J. D. Sid-
dons as sub-editors. An early issue of
the paper is promised, and members of
the class are looking forward eagerly to
the appearance of the new publication--
for the perusal of Arts '20 only.
In order to ensure a good showing in
the inter-class debates during the year,
speakers have been elected early to represent the class in the annual contests
in both the Men's and Women's Lits.
Messrs. A. Peebles and Buck will represent the men of Arts '20, and Miss
Katherine Pillsbury and Miss Patricia
Smith the women, in the approaching
debates.
Steps are being taken by the executive to bring a little more academic
dignity into the University by procuring
gowns at once for the Seniors, and an
effort is being made to provide some
satisfactory "label" for the Freshman
class. A committee of Seniors has been
considering the matter, and its report
will be submitted to the undergraduate
societies.
The question of a distinctive class
song has also been taken up, and before
long the rest of the 'Varsity may be
treated to a variety of original Arts '20
songs and yells.
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers  and
Printers
Students'  Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational  Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing  Instruments  and   Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R.   Depot)
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital   $13,500,000    Reserve  $15,000,000
THRIFT   AND   SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Hank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and   deposits   made  by  mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District, including the following, which
are in the vicinity of the University:
Fairview—Corner    Sixth    Avenue    and
Granville.
Kitsilano—Corner  Fourth   Avenue   and
Yew' Street.
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and  Main Street.
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud   Printers
of
It
The  Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!    Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. October  1(5,  191!)
THE   UBYSSEY
License No. 10-26:16
HOT SUPPER
EVERY DAY
From 5.30 to 7.00
HOME-MADE   CAKES
TO ORDER
Ye Little
Brown Inn
745 Dunsmuir Street
Around the corner from Drysdale's
W. D. McLEAN     L. S. POWELL
McLean & Powell
Iron Works
358-398 Dufferin Street, W.
Phone, Fairmont 1546
GENERAL   FOUNDRY
AND  PATTERN - MAKING
We specialize in  Mill and  Marine
Boiler Grates
Satisfaction    Guaranteed
If you come once, you will
come again; for you will
appreciate our PROMPT
SERVICE.
ECONOMICS   DISCUSSION
CLUB
At the organization meeting of the
Economics Discussion Club held on
October 3rd the following officers were
elected:
Honorary President—Dr.  Boggs.
President—Mr. J. Denham.
First Vice-Pres.—Miss H  Matheson.
Second Vice-President—Mr.  Couper.
Secretary—Miss   Hazel   McConnell.
Treasurer—Mr. E. Boss.
Another' meeting was held October
10th, when it was agreed to invite honorary members to the club.
Dr. Boggs agreed to address the first
meeting on Tuesday, October 14th.
LECTURE BY DR.
EASTMAN
All thinking students of U. B. C. are
sure to find matter of interest in the
announcement that Dr. Eastman is to
speak on "Alsace-Lorraine" in the Auditorium on October 17th. Dr. Eastman
has had full opportunity, while in
France, to gain a close knowledge of
modern Alsatian history, and can speak
with authority not only on the past history, but on the current problems of the
newly-recovered provinces. An admission fee of fifty cents will be charged,
the proceeds to go to the Ann Wesbrook
Scholarship   Fund.
At a meeting of the Gymnasium Club
held recently Miss H. Draper was elected president, in place of Miss Hazel
Thompson, who has not returned to the
University.
A box has been placed in the Main
Hall for the convenience of contributors.
If you have any protests to register, or
hear some particularly amusing comments or jokes, write them out and give
the rest of the 'Varsity the benefit of
them.
The first meeting of the Y. W. C. A.
was held in the Auditorium on Wednesday, October 8th, at noon. Miss Leila
Coates presided. Miss D. Brenchley
gave a report on the convention at
Whytecliffe. Miss B. Gill outlined the
plans of the finance committee for the
year. Miss N. Willis rendered a pleasing pianoforte selection. The speaker
was the Rev. Mr. Kerr, of St. Andrew's
Church, New Westminster, who gave an
interesting address on "The Forward
Movement."
ELECTIONS
(Continued from Page 1)
The Men's Basketball Club have
elected the following officers for the
year:
Hon.  President—Dr.  Davidson.
President—C. D. Taylor.
Vice-President—R. G. Anderson.
Secretary—C.  Mathers.
Treasurer—L. J.  Fisher.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTT-SHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special   Evening   Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
SprottSbaw Stamp^Quality
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
"TUUM EST"
PATRONIZE YOUR ADVERTISERS
A Reliable Watch
at Little Cost
Probably the best watch made that
sells for a small price. It is made
by the well-known T a v a n n e s
Watch Company, and has a sturdy
movement featuring seven jewels,
three adjustments and brequet
hair-spring-. It is proof against
magnetism, and for all-round durability and time-keeping is most
remarkable. The case is nickel silver, fiat, smart in appearance, and
will satisfy the most fastidious city
man. Made in two sizes, fully
guaranteed.     Priced at
$8.50and $9.00
—Jewellery Dept., Main Floor
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED THE   UBYSSEY
October 16, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our Sock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE   OUR   WINDOWS   for
New Models
309    to    3 15
Hastings Street W.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
The
Young
Mens
Tailors
&
Semi-Ready Shop
655 Granville Street
Issued every  Thursday by the   Publications   Board
of  the   University   of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising- rates,  apply  Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL  STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
[ Lillian   Cowdell
Associate  Editors I H.  L.   Keenleyside
( D.  Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   H.   Imlah
Exchange   Editor T.   P.   Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
liusiness    Manager J.   Weld
Advertising   Manager L.   Fournier
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor  for  the   Week Miss   L.   Cowdell
THE TIME-TABLE
Probably the first thing the University
student is advised to do is to plan his
entire course at the beginning of the
second year. In good faith, the student
selects his subjects for the entire three
years. It comes as an unpleasant surprise to him to find that all his plans are
upset by that unobliging thing — the
time-table. He naturally expected that,
if he conformed to the calendar regulations (which are enough to try the patience of Job, especially in the matter of
history and economics), he would find
no difficulty in pursuing the course he
had chosen.
The first week of the term proves to
him the fallacy of this expectation. He
is forcibly reminded of the old saying:
"Man proposes, God disposes." His
proposed course is disposed of by the
time-table, till there is nothing left of it.
The student first finds himself deprived
of desired distinctions and forced to
take them in subjects of minor importance, and far less interest to him. If he
be a third- or fourth-year student, he is
compelled to drop one or two important
courses, say, in English, because they
clash with the rest of his time-table. To
make up the requisite number of units,
undesired sciences are "wished on him*'
by the time-table.
THE OLD ISSUE
The beginning of the session 1919-
1920 finds us still in the same temporary
quarters, in the same old buildings, and
cherishing the same old grievances.
Except for the aggravation of many of
last year's discomforts, owing to the
greatly increased enrollment, no change
can be seen. Lectures are crowded to
overflowing, and students in certain
courses still rove around uncertainly
seeking a lecture-room large enough to
accommodate all. The congestion of
the stairs and corridors is, we hope, a
passing evil; but the crowded condition
of the locker-room and reading-room
will only be intensified as the University
grows older. And to pass to a matter,
considered by some, perhaps, as too
frivolous for serious attention, there is
no suitable space for the various social
gatherings,  that are,  after  all,  of  great
importance in 'Varsity life. The Assembly Hall is hopelessly inadequate to accommodate all those who have a right
to  share in university merry-making.
Small troubles, perhaps you may say.
Aye; but they all play their part in preventing the growth of true college
spirit, and the formation of a proper
pride in our University. There is a profound influence exerted on the students
by the nature of the buildings which
house them; the serious work of study
is affected by the lack of proper space,
while the hundred and one little details
of student activities are hampered and
made meaningless by the absence of
proper facilities. When, oh, when, will
the second chapter of the history of U.
B. C—the real beginning of its life—
start with the opening of the necessary
buildings at Point  Grey?
INITIATIONS
A rather warm controversy has arisen
regarding the recent initiation of freshmen. It is well for the University that
such has occurred. As students, we
have been shaken from that conventional state of mind which considers
many customs, long ago classed as obsolete, as still necessary and desirable.
We have been aroused by public opinion to the point where we must consider
intelligently the merits of the annual
performance through which freshmen
must pass before they are recognized as
students of their Alma Mater.
There are certain facts which we
ought to keep in mind in order to arrive at a fair conclusion. The first is
that the initiation is becoming more
severe each year, and, before many sessions, if permitted to continue unchecked, might equal the historical and
often-times tragical occurrences which
marked the passing of such ceremonies
in many of the older universities. Another thing to remember is that a committee appointed by a body of students
may plan but cannot control that same
mass when their animal spirits predominate. The result is that very often the
foremost in the execution are fellows
who are not, at the time, students of the
'Varsity, but who returned to take a
prominent part in making the night a
student "success." And, with our ever-
increasing numbers, the possibility of
keeping men within reasonable bounds
is greatly lessened. Let us not forget
that our experiences are not unlike
those of hundreds of other institutions,
by whom we might very well be taught
a   lesson.
An initiation of some sort would seem
necessary. But let us not make the mistake of going the limit, of placing the
name of the University in disrepute, and
of having to desist completely in the
near future because of the demands of
the authorities. What ought to be done?
The initiation of the women does not
seem to be objectionable. It is simple,
but manifestly more effective than that
of the men. Some of its features might
be imitated. It has also been suggested
that all plans should be submitted to the
Students' Council for their approval or
rejection before the final arrangements
are made. This might be an improvement. Maybe you have a better scheme.
Tell us about it in the "Ubyssey."
A. A. W. October 16, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
CORRESPONDENCE
COLUMN
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only,
and may be signed by a pen-name, but
must be accompanied by name and class
of the writer.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—It has been customary for
the W. U. S. to hold a masquerade,
known as "High Jinks," about the end of
January in each session. So far High
Jinks has been a strictly feminine affair.
I think I am expressing the opinion of
the majority of the women of the University in saying that the masquerade
would be a far greater success if it were
open to the men.
High Jinks is principally a dance; and
what dance is a success when all its participants are women? It really isn't a
dance at all—> it is a mere shamble.
There is no one to lead properly, and
each awkward couple is continually
jostled and bumped by some other
equally awkward pair. The men, I am
sure, would welcome the opportunity of
attending so novel an affair as a masquerade would be in U. B. C.
This suggestion is advanced early, it
is true. However, the writer knows how
slowly changes are accomplished, and is
anxious that there should be plenty of
time for the W.U.S. to decide to change
High Jinks from a very tame and crude
affair to a really pleasurable masquerade.
M. E. S.
need, and minimizing the chances of
perhaps irremediable difficulty and distress caused by simple mistakes as to the
numbers of dances. „    .    m
C. A. T.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:^Might I suggest through
the "Ubyssey" columns that at the next
"sing-song" some attention be given "O
Canada"? We all know that "O Canada"
always "falls flat" on account of there
being so many sets of words written for
it; but let us in the U. B. C. stand by one
version of it, e.g., the version in our
University Song Book, and learn to sing
it, and not repeat the failure which took
place in the Auditorium last week.
I might suggest that it would be wise
for students to all procure song books
and keep them at the college — not at
home on some musty bookshelf, to be
looked at in years to come. Make them
"capital," increasing the output of our
sing-songs.
SOPH.
Editor "Ubyssey":
As the result of painful experience
acquired at the Freshman reception and
other college dances, I would like to
emphasize the necessity of some adequate set of numbers being provided for
the different dances, to be placed in a
conspicuous corner near the orchestra.
Surely one of the many organizations of
the University is willing to win immortal    fame   by    supplying   this    long-felt
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—As I understand the usual
privilege of airing grievances in the correspondence column of the "Ubyssey"
will be granted again this year,-may I
ask space to make a suggestion?
Anyone passing, as is often necessary,
along the wooden sidewalks leading
from the Arts building to the Science
lecture-rooms, must have noticed the
crowding of the sidewalk between lecture hours, especially when a freshman
class is travelling in one direction or
another.
Now, Mr. Editor, it is well known that
most long-established universities count:
among their traditions one which forces
freshmen to yield precedence to upper-
class men in many matters in which
such a privilege is desired. Is it not time
some such token of respect for Seniors
should be enforced in U. B. C, and is it
impossible to make some arrangement
whereby freshmen should allow Seniors
and Juniors free passage along the
walks?
IN  HASTE.
ECONOMICS   DISCUSSION   CLUB
The Economics Discussion Club cora-
cenced the term's activities on Tuesday
night, October 15th. Several matters of
business were dealt with; among these
being the fixing of the night of meeting
in future for Thursdays, and the amending of the clause in the constitution
dealing with membership. All students
who have taken one course in economics,
or are taking one or more courses, other
than Economics I., are now eligible for
membership. Mr. Sage, at this meeting,
was elected to honorary membership.
The speaker for the evening was Mr.
Angus, who took for his subject "Direct
Action." He outlined the history of the
illegality of various forms of strikes and
the suggested methods for dealing with
cases of direct action. The club benefited from his intimate knowledge of the
question in both Great Britain and
France. The discussion that followed
ranged from consideration of the specific cases themselves to the abstract
realms of what would happen in the
event of direct action and opposition in
various  cases.
"THE GIPSY'
Born in a gipsy tent in Cambridgeshire, England; converted at seventeen,
an officer in the Salvation Army for a
time, and evangelist of world-wide fame
is, in brief, the history of Gipsy Smith,
who is to speak to us next week. Many
men have used the name; but there is
only one original Gipsy Smith, and he
will speak in Wesley Church every evening and St. Andrew's every afternoon
for the next two weeks. He will address the students of the U. B. C. on
Friday, October 24th, at the noon hour.
An opportunity of this kind should not
be lost. Let us fill the Auditorium.
Make a note of the hour now.
He is coming under the auspices of
the U. B. C. Student Y. M. C. A.
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
THE "UBYSSEY"
Stylish and Serviceable Footwear
For the Young Folk who are Particular
FITTING   SERVICE:     THE   VERY BEST
<ihe INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
October  1(5, 191!)
Art   and   Style   Clothes   Shop   for
Snappy Styles
REMEMBER THIS !
When you buy your Clothes from
us you are getting the very best
of    material,    tailoring    and    style.
Prices:
$40.00 to $75.00
GLOVES
Our Glove Department offers an
assortment hard to beat — constantly being added to. We invite
you    to    come    in    and    see    them.
Prices:
$2.00 to $5.50
Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
Tmb Gut Tlowtrs.     Tunral Klerk a Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light  Refreshments
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
P.   PARIS
BOOT AND SHOE MFR.
Repairing Our Specialty
51 Hastings Street, West
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WHAT OTHER UNIVERSITIES ARE DOING
Physical training is this year to be
compulsory for all first- and second-year
men students, according to an announcement made recently by the athletic
director. If a student does not take the
required amount of physical training, he
will enter his next year starred in that
subject and will be compelled to take it
in that year.
The work prescribed by the physical
director for the undergraduates consists
of participation in any form of athletics
and gymnasium work. With first- and
second-year men, a minimum of two
periods a week in the gymnasium is
required.—-"The  'Varsity,"  Toronto.
In an editorial in the " 'Varsity," we
find the idea that has been seeking expression many, many times in different
phases of our University activities. Perhaps it is not new to you, but it can bear
quotation:
"From all over the world, the challenge comes for intellectual and professional leadership. By our presence in
this University, we profess to have
picked up the gauntlet. We are availing
ourselves of the highest educational
privilege which our country has to offer,
and our responsibility is proportionately
great. We have come here with ideals,
vague, perhaps, but none the less real,
and the spirit in which we strive to attain them will determine not only our
character, but our influence on our fellow-students. The close of the world
struggle has lifted the war clouds from
our horizon, and every member of the
undergraduate body, whether returned
from overseas or continuing an uninterrupted course of study, is entering upon
a new life—a life of greater opportunity,
a life of greater responsibility.''
FROM THE CORRIDORS
Why is it absolutely necessary to hold
animated discussions immediately in
front of the most important bulletin
boards in the main hall? Such unusual
interest in the notices is highly flattering, and frequently entirely unhoped for;
but, for the sake of students not provided with periscopes, we would suggest
that students leave approaches to the
bulletin boards as free as possible.
L.  PATTERSON
L.  PATTERSON
GROTTO
CIGAR STORE
622 Granville Street
L.  PATTERSON L.  PATTERSON
"FRESHIES,  YOU  ARE  VERY
LITTLE!"
YOUR ADVERTISERS
EXPECT RESULTS
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
MAKE    OUR    STORE    YOUR
HEADQUARTERS  FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouver Stationers Ctd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY  GOODS
MAIN  STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone,  Sey. 6410
BRANCH  STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey.  2313
932  Granville   St. Phone, Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St. Phone 4742 OCTOISER   l(i,
ill!)
THE   UBYSSEY
THE COLLEGE CAT ONCE
MORE
'Twas upon an evening dreary, when
my head was very weary, and the world
seemed far from cheery, in the stack-
room dim I sat. In the stack-room,
dimly lighted, there I sat like one benighted; all at once I spied, or sighted,
a ferocious-looking cat. Lean it was
and very lanky; once, no doubt, it was
quite swanky; now it looked exceeding
cranky, perched upon the bookcase
there. Fearsomely its whiskers curling,
there it sat with tail unfurling, with a
strange and gruesome twirling; in its
eye a yellow glare. "Hello, pussy," said
I, smiling, with an aim to reconciling
beast so terrible and thin. "Hello," then
the creature uttered, scarcely more than
hardly muttered, while its whiskers gently fluttered in a wide and awful grin.
"Cat or liend," 1 shrieked, upstarting,
all my soul within me smarting, "be that
word our sign of parting; leave me, .1
cpn bear no more. Leave no single sign
nor token, leave my loneliness unbroken;
cats that I have known have spoken, to
my knowledge, ne'er before. Who are
you with presence haunting, that my
terrors here are taunting, with an ugliness so flaunting; who are you, then, tell
me that?" For a moment paused and
stayed he, then this soft reply he made
me, gently, humbly said he. "Lady, 1 am
but the college cat!" Students that had
tales for telling, felt their griefs and
sorrows welling, and their hearts within
them swelling, held an interview with
me. I would hear their grievance bright-
lv, settled problems expeditely, and set
forth their tales politely in the weekly
'Ubyssey.' Though my crest is shorn
and shaven, yet I ne'er have been a craven: all I seek is some safe haven wherein I can, peaceful, die." Quickly then,
with much tail-slashin', he worked himself into a passion. "I am only out of
fashion," was his wild and boneless cry.
And the creature still is sitting, still
is sitting, never flitting, on a high and
dusty boo'-case just inside the stack-
room door. You can interview him
brefly. if you've not done so before.
Fashions come and go, and. after a
trance of two years, the college cat has
returned to his ancient haunts. Watch
this column for his views on life in general, and U. B. C. in particular.
THINK IT OVER
Do 'Varsity students, as a rule, really
think for themselves? "No." say some:
"Yes," say others, with equal faith in
their own judgment. Everywhere we
hear, with or without variations, some
phase of idea that the students of to-day
are the leaders of to-morrow. If so, the
habit of self-reliance must be acquired
somewhere before entering upon the
actual business of life. Ts it during the
four years of college that the student
learns to form his or her opinion inde-
oendently of surroundings or companions? Apply the question to yourself,
and (this is not an insult, far from it)
count up the number of times you have
decided some difficult problem entirely
alone, or how often you have "followed
the crowd." Do college students really
think for themselves? The answer is of
importance to us all.    Rut what is it?
Students' Loose*Leaf Supplies
RING BOOKS and RING BOOK SHEETS for ALL BOOKS
FOUNTAIN   PENS,   HIGH-GRADE   PENCILS   AND   PENS
WE   WILL   APPRECIATE  A   VISIT   TO   OUR  STORE
WESTERN  SPEemLTY   LTD.
PRINTERS and STATIONERS  -   572 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER
THE SAME OLD PLEA
As usual, the "Ubyssey" is in need of
assistance in the way of contributions
from the students; and, realizing the impossibility of appealing to each one individually, the Publications Board asks,
through the medium of print, for cooperation. The "Ubyssey" is essentially
a paper of the students, for the students
and by the students, and, in order to
produce any results at all worthy of U.
B. C, a certain amount of sympathy and
active interest must be evinced by the
main body of undergraduates. The paper
aims at representing student thought,
and, to do that successfully, must be
able to count among its contributors
members of every year and faculty.
Surely there is some department or column in the weekly to which you can add
something. We are very anxious to hear
from Arts '23, and are counting on receiving contributions from that year. To
the rest of the 'Varsity we say again,
"Tuum  Est."
THE INFLUENCE OF THE
UNIVERSITY
Just now we hear endless dissertations
on the inefficiency of present school
systems and the need of radical changes
in the curriculum. Did you ever stop to
consider how much this agitation affects
and is affected by the University courses
and calendar requirements? Mr. H. G.
Wells, in one of his latest works, "Joan
and Peter," probes into the heart of the
British school system, and arrives at the
conclusion that many of its abuses are
due to the entrance demands of the universities. Surely there is a modicum of
truth in this view; but, if so, where does
-he remedy lie? As University students,
we are likely to be affected closely by this
tendency towards a certain degree of
revolution in the educational system,
and ought to be able to think with a
T'air amount of coherency upon this
point. Who picks up the gauntlet on
behalf of the old order of education?
PATRONIZE YOUR
ADVERTISERS
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R.C.Purdy,Dl
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
"THE UBYSSEY"
%. 3Cott <L ©o.
©^elusive furriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
October 10, 15)19
.. The ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
Offers   in   its   Guaranteed  Security
Policies   one   of   the   best
investments for to-day
Every Student Should
Carry One
See the Manager, or one of their
many agents, for particulars
Head Office for B. C:
701 LONDON BLDG.
626  Pender  Street,  West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
C.  E.  MAHON,   Manager
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who  stay  young
THE REVIVAL OF ICE
HOCKEY
Interest is being revived among the
women of the University in the sport of
ice hockey, and an organization meeting
was held recently with the object of
placing this game once more on the list
of U. B. C. athletics. Dean Brock was
elected honorary president; Miss M. R.
Munro, president, and Miss Cordingly,
secretary-treasurer. Miss D. Hopper
will act as captain. Ice hockey had many-
ardent devotees in the early days of U.
B. C, but has been neglected recently.
However, the interest shown in the matter this term promises a more successful
foundation for the club.
Even hard-working college students
occasionally find time to indulge in the
luxury of reading. The next time you
find an odd hour hanging heavy on your
hands, get a copy of a recently-issued
anthology of poems, entitled "Songs of
Men." From the first poem in the book,
"Out There Somewhere," through the
long list of chants of the magic of the
out-of-doors, and descriptions of "the
road to Vagabondia that lies across the
earth," and the hushed beauty of "An
Island Song," and Masefield's lyrical
ecstasy, "Sea Fever," there is something
for all tastes. Even ardent geologists
may find their favorite many-syllabled
names in "Evolution."
From Geology 2 comes the solution
we have been seeking for seveial days.
It has been explained that the voice of
the lecturer exercises a profound hypnotic influence on the class, producing
a bland and unruffled expression even
in the face of a point-blank question.
Surely this is a sufficient answer to the
base insinuations of Mr. Wood!
A birdie, with a yellow head,
Cocked his eye at me and said:
"Are you  naturally impudent,
Or just a fresh young college student?'1
"Is our friend R a great orator?"
"A great orator?"  repeated  the  president  of  the     Club.     "Why,   he   can
convince you of something without taking the trouble to understand it himself."
Don't Forget
to Vote
on Friday
For or
Against
Initiation
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
"THE UBYSSEY"
CLOTHING
SERVICE
SOMETHING    NEW    EVERY
WEEK FOR MEN
Special display of Suits,
light and heavy Overcoats,
also combination Raincoats,
in our Hastings Street
windows
Every garment represents the very
latest in styles, the very best in
quality, and values unsurpassed at
$30, $35, $40, $45, $50
J. N. HARVEY LTD.
123, 125, 127 Hastings Street, West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the big Red Arrow Sign
INDEX   TO   ADVERTISERS
Page
Fashion-Craft     2
Rickson's     2
Canadian   Bank of  Commerce  2
Clarke  & Stuart  Co  2
Evans  &  Hastings  2
McLean & Powell Iron Works  3
Sprott-Shaw      3
David  Spencer  3
Ye   Little   Brown  Inn  3
Clubb  &  Stewart  4
Thomas  & McBain  4
Ingledew Shoe  Co  5
Grotto  Cigar  Store     6
Ben  Petch  6
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd  6
The  Bungalow  6
P.   Paris     6
U. Morimoto & Co  6
Vancouver Photo Co  6
The Vancouver Stationers,  Ltd  6
Western  Specialty  7
Cusick's   7
B. Holt & Co  7
R. C. Purdy  7
The Western  Life  Assurance  Co... 8
J. W.  Foster,  Ltd  8
J. N. Harvey, Ltd ,  8

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124079/manifest

Comment

Related Items