UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey May 20, 1953

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124077.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124077.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124077-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124077-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124077-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124077-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124077-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124077-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124077-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124077.ris

Full Text

 THE UBYSSEY
VOLUME XXXV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MAY 19 and WEDNESDAY, MAY 20
No.
Honorary
Degrees
Announced
Two outstanding scholars who
have served the University of
British Columbia with distinction will be awarded honorary
degrees at the annual Spring
Congregation of the University
this month.
William John Rose, B.A., Ph.
D., will receive the degree of
Doctor of Laws ((Honoris Causa), on May 19, and Frank Eben-
ezer Buck, emeritus professor,
Department of Horticulture, will
be awarded the degree of Doctor
cf Science (Honoris Causa) on
May 20.
Dr. Rose has served as special
lecturer in the Department of
Slavonic Studies since 1948. A
native of Manitoba he holds degrees from Manitoba, Oxford
and the University of Cracow.
He taught at Wesley College,
University of Manitoba; at Dartmouth College and at the University of London, where he was
director of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies,
before coming to British Columbia.
During the last war he was a
civilian member of the foreign
research and press service, of
the British Foreign Office from
1939 until 1943 and he conducted special lectures for Army
Education in Palestine and Sy-
*ia in 1944-45.
Professor Buck joined the
faculty of the University of British Columbia in 1920 after serv-'
ing with the Dominion Government Horticulture Service in
Ottawa.
In 1946 he became supervisor
of campus development and has
been largely responsible for the
development of the campus
since that time. J
During his time at the Uni-!
versity he has taken a keen interest in the city and for four
years served on the Board of
School Trustees.
Valedictory
Since the first students first
sat enraptured about the feet
of the first professor in a medieval pub, it has become a
tradition for graduating students to use this solemn mo-"
ment to point out to their
parents and professors that
they've left the world in a
bit of a mess.
It is then customary to soften the blow somewhat by
adding that whatever the limitations and failures of the
older generation, they have at
least in part redeemed themselves by bringing forth and
bringing up a generation such
as ours.
Finally, the graduating student will point out gently but
firmly that as of now, he ii
"taking over" and everything
will be alright in no time.
We do not intend to indulge
in the rites of self deification._
We are dazzled by no illusions of ourselves as knights
in shining armour. Two wars
and a depression within forty
years have robbed us of that
sense of invincibility which is
(Continued on Page 4)
900 Students Graduate
Diplomats Wilgress, Rive
To  Deliver  Addresses
Degrees and diplomas will be conferred on 900 students
at the University of British Columbia's 1952-53 graduation
exercises Tuesday and Wednesday in the university armouries.
On Tuesday, degrees and doc- • ■
torates will be granted in Arts,
and  Science,  Law and Pharm-1
Diplomat
To Receive
Degree
Dana   Wilgress,   Under-Secretary  of  State for  External
President N. A. M. MacKen-1Affairs' wiU be awarded the
zie will also award the Honor-1 Honorary Degree of Doctor of
ary Degree of Doctor of Laws j Laws at the annual Spring Con-
to Dr. W. J. Rose of the Slav-1 gregation Address, May 19.
onic Studies deparement at UBC.[
acy.
Dana Wilgress, Under-Secretary of State for External Affairs, will deliver the Congregation Address on Tuesday. A
former Canadian Ambassador
to Soviet Russia, Wilgress will
be awarded the Honorary Degree of Laws at the graduation
ceremonies.
TOP STUDENT among Home Economics graduates is Diane
Marie Dixon, of 4388 Pine Crescent. For graduating with the
highest marks in the faculty Miss Dixon has been awarded the
British Columbia Parent-Teachers Federation Prize of $100.
Classics Graduate
Leads 1953 Class
Winner of the 1953 Governor-General's Gold Medal at
UBC is Peter Lawson Smith, classics student, who has consistently topped his class.
Son   of   a   school   principal,^—	
Smith, 20, of 1764 Cedar Hill;
Crossroads, Victoria, is a dance'
instructor in his spare time.
Born   in  Victoria,  Peter  was
a star student at high school, matriculated    with     the     highest i
marks in the province four years      A graduate of the University
ago. i of   British   Columbia   in   1921,
It was the third year in sue- will return to the University in
cession that a Victoria student j May this year to be awarded the
headed the graduating class, j Honorary Degree of Doctor of
Katherine Sawyer. Laws and to deliver the annual
Peter completed his first two' Congregation Address on May
years of his arts course at Vic- \ 20th.
toria College where he first be- i     He is Dr. Alfred Rive, Cana-
came interested in the classics.! dian High Commissioner to New
While attending UBC he stay- Zealand, now serving hte second
ed at Union Theological College term as High Commissioner to
men's residence.    He scored an that  Commonwealth  nation,
average of 93.8 percent. i     Mr.   Rive   was   awarded   his
During the school term the 8.A. at British Columbia after
winner of the coveted award, serving during the first World
spent one night a week as a War with the Western Universi-
dance instructor at UBC's Dance ties Battalion. He joined the
Club. He describes himself as Department of External Affairs
an  'enthusiast." in 1930, as third secretary, after
Reading and music are his post graduate and teaching
chief hobbies and he hopes to work at California, Cambridge,
write a book sometime in the England and later at Yale. He
future. was promoted to first secretary
For the past three summers while serving on the staff of the
he  has   been  employed  by   the   Canadian   Permanent   Delegate
HONORARY   DEGREES
On   Wednesday   degrees
will
Mr. Wilgress is one of the few
Canadians with an outstanding
knowledge   of   the   USSR   and
be granted in Social oWrk, Edu- \ mucn of nis time ln tne Cana.
cation, Commerce, Home Economics, Physical Education, Applied Science, Nursing, Architecture, Agriculture and Forestry.
dian trade and diplomatic services has been spent in that
country.
He is a native of British Col-
Congregation speaker will be umbia  and    was    educated  at
Dr. Alfred Rive, Canadian High
Commissioner to New Zealand.
A graduate of this university
in 1921, Dr. Rive will be honored with the Honorary Degree
of Doctor of Laws.
An Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science will be conferred
Queens School, Vancouver aari
University School, Victoria, before attending McGill University.
In 1914, Mr. Wilgress entered
the Canadian Trade Commissioner service. In 1916, he wis
Trade  Commissioner  at  Omsk.
upon Dr. Frank Buck, former j Siberia and transferred to Vlad-
supervisor   of  campus  develop- j ivostock in 1918.
ment and Professor Emeritus of |
Horticulture.
After serving in a number of
posts in the Trade Commissioner
service including tours of duty
„ , ,     _ ,» . in   Europe,   Canada   and  South
Tuesday and by Gerry Mam on ^.^ Mf_ ^^ wag ^
Valedictory addresses will be
delivered   by   Tom   Franck   on
Wednesday.
UBC Graduate Returns
To Deliver Address
pointed   Canadian
Russia in 1942.
Minister   to
He served as a member of the
Canadian delegation to the Sah
Francisco Conference in 1945
and as Chairman of the Canadian delegation to the Preparatory Commission of the United
Nations in the same year.
Since leaving his post in Rua-
United   Kingdom   and   attended! sia   in   1947,   Mr.   Wilgress   has
„j  ■ „   4   tu   r-,„.^;..„ ^«i„   been Minister    to    Switzerland,
as advisor to the Canadian dele- . „■
Chairman   of   Committee   Five,
United Nations General Assembly  in Paris, Chairman  of the
In 1945, he was appointed official secretary to the High Commissioner for  Canada    in    the
gation   to
assembly.
the   United   Nations j
department of education in Victoria handling and marking examination papers for other students.
He   also   took   the   $300   B.C.
to the League of Nations in Geneva from 1935 to 1940
In July, 1940, he was recalled
to Canada to organize a special
section   of   the    department    to
He was first appointed High General Agreement on Tariffs
Commissioner to New Zealand and Trade and more recently
in 1946 and was reappointed to j Canadian Representative on the
that post when his tour of duty j North Atlantic Council Depu-
ended in 1949. ties until  1952.
Electric scholarship in classics deal with matters relating to j
and the Ahepa prize of $100 for prisoners of war and Canadian '
proficiency in Greek. interests in enemy countries.       |
AGGIE FACULTY, 4H CLUBS
TO HOLD FIELD DAY MAY23
The University of B.C. Faculty of Agriculture will hold
a field day Saturday, May 23, to mark the official opening
of the new University Greenhouses.
More than 450 members of the provincial 4-H clubs will
attend the demonstrations in cattle, poultry and swine
judging, and in such subjects as cooking, sewing, agricultural engineering and home nursing.
The new greenhouses will be opened by W. H. Robertson, deputy minister of Agriculture.
Demonstrations for the 4-H club members will start
at 10 a.m. and the official opening of the greenhouses will
take place at 2:30 p.m., followed by a guided tour. PAGE 4
4.	
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1953
THE UBYSSEY   victory
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa.
i Student subscriptions $1,20 pe/ year (included in AMS fees).
[Mail subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single Copies five cents.
•Published in Vancouver throughout the University year by
the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University.
Ltters to the Editor should not be more than 150 words. The
Ubyssey reserves the right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters received.
Offices in Brock Hall For Display Advertising
Phone ALma 1624 Phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AL. FOTHERINGHAM
Ex*cutiv* Editor, Ed Parker; Feature Editor, Elsie Gorbat;
City Editor, Myra Green; News Editor, Ron Sapera; Literary
Editor, Gait Elkington; CUP Editor, Patsy Byrne; Circulation
Manager,  Marion  Novak;  Staff Photographer,  Hux  Lovely.
Now is the Time
Graduation '53. Now. is the time for all success!ul candidates to look to the aid of their pockets. However, having
'io qualifications other than general BA, the prospective
employee will have trouble getting a job. Typing is not a
prerequisite for university education, and an English major
is not necessarily familiar with general office routine.
It is a great pity that in order to earn a living the university graduate must attend a business college or else have
.ipecialized to such a degree that he defeats the purpose of a
general education. The business world looks with jaundiced
eye upon the value of a general BA. It cannot run a bookkeeping machine nor can it take a letter.
It seems that the old concept of the well-rounded personality has been discarded in favour of the more narrow specialist. Nevertheless, we are not fully convinced that four years
of general education are wholly wasted. By fourth year the
most important lesson should have been learned: a general
)3A is jusl a broad introduction to further fields of knowledge;
il is not the key to the ills of the world. There is still much
lo learn even if we can croon Spenserian stanzas to the hum
of our Gestelner.
Wisp of Memories
It is spring of '53 and the past four years have gone up in
unoke leaving only the wisp of memories and two extra letters
ip your name. The twenty-five odd hours of written exams,
tiie essay deadlines, the good books found, the conversation,
the parties and games, and the people met during those four
y:ears at UBC have left their mark on the '53 graduates.
Time and again the sweetest and the most bitter memories
will return, but the years are done, their work completed.
They were the closing door of adolescence and the entrance to
maturity. Now the press of an occupation, a family, the social
t ^sponsibility of the individual to his society replaces the
1 jghter duties of school life.
As freshmen, life was one great wonder—but a lot of
fun. During sophomore and junior years the work' grew larger in amount and more confusing in degree. By the beginning
.,}( fourth year the goal was too close to foresake; and, besides,
•fjfee disappointments were being forgotten in favour of the
more pleasant memories.
Now graduation is here and with it the awareness that
this is the last obligatory trip to the old campus, the last walk
to the Brock, the last opportunity to ignore the "Keep off the
Grass" sign. Today, the graduate receives his certificate:
Baccalaureate: a bachelor, the last step in a general education,
first step towards specialization. This is the time! of parting,
the final goodbye, and now, tho need for decision in a world
certain only of its motion.
University life can bo of benefit to each person. It may
not prepare an individual for the business of industry but it
ran make the business of life more meaningful. It imparts a
zest to living: an appreciation of, and a sensitivity towards the
'.deas exlant in a world of action. That quality of acuteness is
sufiicient achievement for the general BA candidate. Being
nware of ideas and contemporary trends of thought and activity, their sources and contemporary suitability is, in itself, the
mark of an adult. The power to evaluate, to adopt or discard,
concepts and ideologies, whether in literature, politics or the
general attitude toward life signifies the maturity of mind
found in a well-rounded personality. That completeness of
person is the goal of a general education and the key to satisfaction. If the years spent at UBC have in any way begun or
completed that movement towards maturity, they were not
.vaster! seal's.
the heritage of youth.
We are accused of being a
cynical generation.
We are.
But if by this we mean that
we know something of the
shortcoming of man—not only
of his shortcomings—then the
knowledge is our asset.
No generation has «vtr an-
joy ad tha opportunity that is
our* because no generation has
ever been shown so clearly
that self-confidence in our
own ability to change the order of things crumbles inevitably in the wake of discarded
visions and exploded dreams.
If, then, we have been stripped of faith in the self, if we
realize that we have no magic
wand, no open sesame that
generations before us did not
also have, we shall be free to
gather to ourselves a new
faith. Knowing the frailties
of man, we shall have taken
the first halting steps in overcoming them. Eut a deaf man
cannot alone teach himself to
speak. Neither can we by
ourselves overcome the weaknesses which we acknowledge.
These can be overcome—if
they are to be overcome at all
—-by service born of faith;
faith in our creed and faith in
our community.
We say that we have been
taught  to think.
But thought disembodied of
action ii a mere sophistry. If
we have learned to think, it
is to serve.
If we have truly rejected
tiie invincib.Tty of thr self,
we shall have acquired a capacity for service which is the
mark of the missionary. We
shall be able to do that which
we do not feel we should have
to do, work with those we
would rather avoid, surrender
that to which we feel entitled.
Herein would lie victory.
Can we do il? Is our faith in
ourselves sufficiently shaken
that, unlike previous generations we will not leave this
hall guided solely by our intellect?
il think we shall. I think
ttljs cynical generation gives
nuin jhis greatest cause for
hope.'
For we are not cynical
about the future of man, but
only of his ability to realise
his destiny by an unlimited
faith in himself alone.
We shall leav«# this hall realizing that only by a faith in
(forces more powerful than
those at ou:- own disposal will
we be able to utilize the potential* which our university
has invested in us. We must,
in other words, harness ourselves to the twin dynamos of
God and the Community of
Man.
Less than one in tw-thous-
and of the world's young
people will have an experience such as we are concluding today. We do not, we
cannot think that it has been
ours simply on our own incomparable   merits.
On the contrary, we can
leel only a great sense ol' duty
—duty to work toward the
solutions ol' problems which
have stumped one generation
after  another.
Knowing our limitations,
we shall not work alone.
—TOM FRANCK.
' ii: I-'
TIT
Tfit New Management of...
UNIVERSITY GROCERY
B. HEUSER
wish the class of '53 every success and thank you to the
Student body for it's patronage this past term. We hope
to see the familiar faces back again in the fall.
S732 University Boulevard ALma 0800
Sat W'uka
AND YEARS OF SUCCESS
*
BELL & MITCHELL
LIMITED
INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE
Ml RICHARDS ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
MArine 6441
Collins and Collins
Chartered Accountants
470 Granville St.
MArine 0564
BEST WISHES
to the
University Students
CROSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 BEACH AVEw VANCOUVER, B.C. TUESDAY, MAY 19,4983
GRADUATION ISSJ^E UBYSSEY
PAGE 3
I Portobk I
I hrytvl  ■
vv
SMITH • CORONA
FEATURING
PAGE GAGE!
New! Saves time, saves work,
saves stationery! Eliminates
re-typing hundreds of pages a
month!
Just set PAGE GAGE and begin typing. When you are 2
Inches from the end of the
page . . . Presto! Red Signal
pops up to warn you! Red
scale tells, and keeps telling,
how much space is left as you
type to the end of the page!
Page Gag* lets you   Priced
type right down to
the last line with-     ,rom
out  fear  of   over- Mg* _ ^
typing! Only Smith- A ft 5(7
Corona has itl
Phone for Demonstration
in your own home
STUDENT RENTALS
AVAILABLE
SPECIAL LOW RATES
The Consolidated
Typewriters Ltd.
416 Richards
MA. 8047
B.C. Distributors for Smith-
Corona office and portable
typewriters.
GRADUATION 1953
Do You Remember - - - ?
A dozen, dozen lecture moons ago,
That dimly-dawning day when you arrived,
High-schooled scrubbed and waiting . . .
When first you packed your dreams into a bulging briefcase,
And watched with wildly wistful hopes
The million other ants who swarmed the hill .    .
Do you^recall?
Remember what you dreamed . . .
When through the classroom window you could see,
There beyond the campus lawns blinking in the sleepy sun,
The mountain-peaks lean misty arms upon the ledge of sea?
But soon the weathered world of wisdom turned;
Your first lecture ...
the quick crumbs of knowledge tossed at your molten mind
by some small god who chatted chalk in hand . .
A life of learning to be won—you thought
Remember . . . ?
The constant cups of coffee served with steaming conversation,
You cheered       Stirring the talk with eager hands
you sipped it fresh and warm.
In labs you boiled and cooked, dissected life
and found you could not piece it back again,
You cheered at games, and flirted furtively.
And said—someday I'll settle down;
Now all the world is mine . . .
A traveller, or engineer,
a millionaire, a journalist ... so much to do . . .
And in your eyes like sprinkled bits ofsunshine
shone a dream . . .
Now as the grey mist-mantle of twilight covers the cowering
campus
And wraps itself around our dwindling college days,
We remember . . .
Somewhere in all the haste of these young yearning years
The dream has dulled.
Our high heaped hopes which schemed enchanted things
Have melted to the urgent practical.
We face a future that is instant ours.
Now, as the shadows, moon-mingled, close upon our day,
upon this which is the end of the beginning—
We pause one moment to recall
"the glory and the dream."
Florence McNeil.
Congratulatiohs to the GradS df '53
Mrs. AA. Takeuchi
DRESSMAKER
4337 West 10th Avenue
AL. 3710
SUCCESS TO THE GRADUATES OF '53
PAT  OLIVER
Authorized Shell Dealer
10th Avenue and Discovery
AL1702
QL  SfLsriaL  HainL I
Inquire about our special rates for graduation portraits
and make an appointment today! Your graduation portrait
is something you'll treasure always! Telephone CEdar 1314
and take advantage of this special offer now!
f
Mfl
MAKER   OF   FINE   PHOTOGRAPHS
»
Photographer in 1953 to the Law Undergraduate Society,
Phi Delta Theta, Zeta Psi, Phi Gamma Delta Fraternities.
2932 Granville Street
WHEREVER YOU GO
WHATEVER YOU DO
WE WISH  YOU WELL
Parsons Brown Ltd
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
535 Homer Street MA. 9211
MOVING
Arrange your long
distance move to any part
of North America
through ...
PAJ264^ PAGE 6
Graduation Awards
(NOTE: This list includes awards for graduate study and
awards in the final undergraduate year only'. Other awards will
be announced later).
THE PHODES SCHOLARSHIP
JAMES  FREDERICK  McWILLlAMS
AWARDS FOR HEADS OF THE GRADUATING CLASSES
Th* Governor-General Gold Medal (ht»d of th* Graduating Class
for th* B.A. d*g»**):
PETER    LAWSON    SMITH,     1764   Cedar  Hill   Crossroad,
Victoria, B.C.
Th* Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Modal (head of th* Graduating
Clatt for th* B.S.A. d*gr**):
HUGH   ALEXANDER    DAUBENY,    1103    Glenora    Place,
Victoria, B.C.
Th* Association of Prof •••ional Engin**rs Gold Modal (head of
th* Graduating Claw for th* B.A.Sc. d*gr*e):
HUGH JACK GOLDIE, 3309 East 25th Ave., Vancouver.
Th* Kiwanis Club Gold Modal and Pris*, $50 (head of th* Graduating Class for thr B. Com. degree):
CHARLES ARNOLD SIGVARDSEN, 2828 McGill St.
The University M*dal for Arts and Science (head of th* Science
group in the Graduating Class for th* B.A. degree):
GEORGE BRIERLEY CHADWICK, 918 West 19th Ave.
The Law Society Gold Medal and Pris*, Call and Tuition Fee
(head of th* Graduating Class for th* LL.B. degree):
THEODORE GEORGE PEARCE, 4175 Balaclava.
The Horner Gold Modal for Pharmacy (head of the Graduating
Class for the B.S.P. degr**):
RAYMOND ERNEST COUNSELL, 4042 Dunbar.
Th* British Columbia Parent-Teacher Federation Prise, $100 (head
of the Graduating Class for the B.H.E. degree):
DIANE MARIE DIXON, 4388 Pine Crescent.
. Th* University Nurses' Club Pris*. $50 (head of the Graduating
Class for the B.S.N, degree):
MARION ELIZABETH BROWN, Cloverdale. B.C.
Th* Canadian Association for Health, Physical Education,  and
Recreation Medal and Pris*, $50 (head of the Graduating Class
for the B.P.E. degree):
DANIEL SAMUEL ZAHARKO, 732 6th St., New Westminster.
Th* Canadian Institute of Forestry (British Columbia Sections)
Modal (best all-round record in Forestry or Forest Engineering):
JAMES FREDERICK McWILLlAMS. Victoria.
The H. R. MacMillan Prize in Forestry, $100 (head of the Graduating n*M for the B.S.F. deoreel:
HENRY AUGUSTUS OLSON, Port Coquitlam.
The. Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron Memorial  Medal  and  Prize, $50
(leading student in the Teacher Training Course):
FREDERICK WILLIAM ROBINSON, 2104 West 37th.
SPECIAL AWARDS
The Savage  Shoe Company Fellowship,  $1500  (for  research  in
Paediatrics)— !
DR. L. YING CHOU.
University Fellowship Fund, $1500 each— .
GUV G. S. DUTTON.
ROY GRIFFITHS.
NINA H. MORLEY.
AWARDS  FOR GRADUATE  STUDY
The' Alan Boag Scholarship, $250—
NO AWARD.
Th* Ann* Westbrook Scholarship, $200  (for graduate study)—
ISABELLE FANNY DAVIS. Ladysmith. B.C.
The Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited Scholarship, $250 (awarded in December,  1952, for graduate study in
Mineralography)—
BRIAN JOHN BURLEY, Fort Camp, UBC.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited Fellowship in Agriculture, $800—
ELMER LYLE MENZIE.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited Graduate
Scholarship in Engineering, $500—
WILLIAM KEITH RAE PARK, Radium Hot Springs, B.C.
Th* British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited Graduate
Scholarships:
RICHARD   HAROLD   DOWNEY   (Psychology),   $200,   White
Rock.
Pr/TER LAWSON SMITH (Classics). $300, Victoria Road.
ROBERT HAMPDEN TENER (English), $250.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Company Limited Scholarships 'or graduate study and research)—
LORNE ARTHUR CAMPBELL, $400, 4703 W. 7th Ave., Van.
HUGH ALEXANDER DAUBENY, $400, 1103 Glenora Place,
Victoria.
JACOB DUERKSEN, $400, Langley.
DONALD KEITH EDWARDS, $200, Kelowna.
SVATOPLUK FRED FLORIN, $400, Ontario.
EZIO MERLER, $150, 2245 Ottawa St., West Vancouver.
ERIC PATERSON SWAN, $150. 1731  Dunbar. Vancouver.
DONALD WILLIAM S. WESTLAKE, $400, 3106 W. 10th. Van.
The British Columbia Telephone Company Scholarship in Community and Regional Planning, $600—
Award to be made in the fall.
The    British    Columbia    Telephone    Company    Scholarships    in
Engineering and Physics—
DAVID KENDALL ADAMS, $600, Longvicw, Wash.
ROY ANDREW NODWELL, $600.
ROBERT LeROY WILLIAMS, $700, St. Thomas. Out.
The California Standard Company Graduate Fellowship, $750 (for
graduate study and research in Geology)—
PHILIP ROY WATSON, 1133 Comox St., Vancouver.
The Canadian Industries Limited Fellowship, $900 (for graduate
study in Chemistry)—
MELVILLE  ERNEST  DOUGLAS  HILLMAN,   2406  W.   5th.
Vancouver.
(Continued on Page 7)
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
f
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1953
Sincere Best Wishes To The
Graduating Class Of 19S3
From The Following Professional And
Business Men And Firms
Chancellor Sherwood Xett
C. W. Umber Ctit.(j. /Xfc.
W. g. titurrin
Junk M Sroun CSX.
H. /£ titctilillan CSX.
frank Ut. Gou
Cric faneyani
Senator J. W. %rrU
tfichol'j Chemical Co. ltd.
(jeorae W. Kloraan
H. J. Sird And Compani) limited
(Investment Securities)
hai (jrauer
W. #. titalkin
S, J. Klein
A C. Juke*
Jcurex SakerieA
John A. Wicfaon
tilackenpe. White & faun*wir ltd.
Vancouver tilachineru hepct ltd.
Vancouver Jtron Work* ltd.
tfeUonA laundered
and fortf Cleaner*
i TUESDAY, MAY 19, 19B3
GRADUATION ISSUE. UBYSSEY
PAGE 7
Sincere Best Wishes To The
Graduating Class Of 1953
From The Following Professional And
Business Men And Firms
(jorden WUmer
(jordtn Jarrell
titr. & titrJ.?. Ronald (fraham
(jeorae iZerfet
J. A. Campbell Q.C
(jeorae % Cunningham
7 £ fa'xon
C. (j. Same*
lech J. ladner Q.C
fi?o** It Herr
(CUSTOM BROKERS)
W. titark he Celt
Jack fiatUson
Senator £. £. titcHeen CSX.
kvn Cromie
C S. H. Van Klorman
Pacific titeat Co. ltd*
7ou>nleu &> titatheJon
Robert Jidde*
C H. C William* Co. ltd.
(jartiin jfce & Juel Co. ltd.
Canadian Exploration ltd.
S. C bUtrict Tetearaph Co. ltd
Graduation Awards
(Continued from Page 6)
The Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, Western Division,
Fellowships, $500 each (for graduate study in Forestry and r*.
lated fields)—
ARTHUR KNEELAND PARKER, 409 Federal Bldg., Victoria.
DAVID BRIDGES TURNER, Nanaimo, B.C.
Th* Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company Limited Scholarship,
$100—
NO AWARD.
Th* Comlnco Fellowship, $1000 (for graduate study and research
in the field of metallurgy)—
ERNEST PETERS.
Th* Community Planning Association of Canada (B.C. Division)
Fellowship, $300 (awarded in December, 1952)—
SIEPKO HENRIK LOK, Acadia Camp.
Th* Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarships, $500 *ach (for graduate
study)—
1. For Chemistry—
CAROLE ANNE WALLICK, Winnipeg, Man.
2. For Geology—
RALPH ALBERT KRETZ, 4270 Maywood St., Burnaby.
The Edith Ashton Memorial Scholarship, $250 (for graduat* study
and research in Biology and Botany)—
ROBERT ERNEST HARRIS, 5509 Fairview Ave., Vancouver.
The Gault Brothers Limited Graduate Scholarship in Commerce.
$700 (for graduate study)—
GREG MERRILL Fe de MONTREVE, 1591 Larch St., Van.
Th* G*n*ral Construction Company Limited Scholarship, $300
(for graduate study in Civil Engineering)—
NORMAN BESTWICK, Lethbridge, Alta.
The Graduate Scholarship! in Slavonic Studies. $300 *ach (given
by Mr. Walter C. Ko*rner. Esq.. in honor of Dr. William Ros*. for
graduate study and research)—
1. EDMUND HEIER, Regina, Sask.
2. To.be awarded later.
Th*  Imperial  Order  Daughters of  the  Empire Scott  Memorial
Scholarship, $100 (proficiency in Biology 330)—
CATHERINE HEATHER McKAY, Brentwood, V.I.
Th* John and Annie Southcott Memorial Scholarship, $100 (for
investigation in the field of B.C. History)—
GORDON RAYMOND ELLIOTT, 4624 W. 10th Ave., Van.
The Lefcvre Gold Medal and Scholarship, $150 (for proficiency
in Chemistry)—
CHRISTINA JANET CAMERON, Ladysmith.
The Leon Koerner Graduate Scholarships, $250 each (for research
in Forest Ecology)—
THOMAS CHRISTOPHER BRAYSHAW, Hope, B.C. T
ROBERT TOWNLEY OGILVIE, 4487 W. 13th Ave., Van.
The Leon Koerner Graduate Scholarships,  $250 each  (awarded
in December, 1952)—
ROBERT GORDON McMINN, 4078 W. 17th Ave., Van. 8.
The Morris Belkin Prise, $100 (best report on assigned subject
in Psychology)—
ARCHIBALD B. LEVEY.
The Native Daughters of British Columbia Scholarship, $100 (for
research in the early history of British Columbia)—
PETER ROBERT HUNT, 2358 Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C.
The  Pacific  Pine  Co.  Ltd.  Scholarship  in  Forestry,  $300  (for
graduate study)—
ROBERT W. KENNEDY.
The Powell River Company Limited Scholarship, $500 each (for
research in wood chemistry)—
WILMA ETHEL ELIAS, Saskatoon.
SHIRLEY ANN MARGUERITE SUTHERLAND, 4311 Angus
Drive, Vancouver.
The Powell River Company Limited Service Awards in Architecture (for special project study at Powell River)—
JAMES BARRY CHASTER, 2031 Westbrook Place, Van.
ROBERT MARTIN OPIE, 1531 Davie St., Vancouver.
The Shell Oil Fellowship for Research, $900 and tuition fees (for
graduate study and research in Chemistry)—
STANLEY JAMES PRICE, 1836 Vine St., Vancouver.
Special Forestry Scholarship, $300 (for graduate study)—
JACKQUAITE.
The Standard Oil Company of British Columbia Fellowship, $950
(for graduate study and research in Chemistry)—
PAUL KEBARLE, 5910 Highbury St., Vancouver.
University Graduate Scholarshio, $200 (for graduate study)—
THOMAS ROBERT LOOSMORE, 2610 Pearkes Road, Van.
The Vancouver B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Scholarships (for
graduate study) $125 each—
1. For  Agriculture—
HUGH   ALEXANDER   DAUBENY,   1103   Glenora   Place,
Victoria.
2. For Arts and Science—
DONALD GRANT IRVINE, 2237 Torquay Dr., R.R.5, Victoria
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship  (for  Canadian History). $100— ,
JOHN HERBERT MORGAN, Ladysmith.
FOR HOME ECONOMICS
The B.  C.  Electric  Service Award  in  Home  Economics  (special
training course for graduates)—
j VERNA   MARION   GERALDINE   ACORN—4th   Ave.   West,
Calgary.
SOCIAL WORK
; The British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited Graduate Scholarship, $250  (for further study and  research  in  Social
! Work)—
! (MRS.)  MARJORIE   NORINE  AVESON,   3272   W.   1st   Ave,
Vancouver 8.
; The Laura  Holland Scholarship,  $200  (general  proficiency—for
further study)—
j SHIRLEY JEAN WALDMAN, 102—1055 Harwood. Van.
(Continued on Page 8) PAGE 8
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1953
Graduation Awards
(Continued from Page 7)
TEACHER TRAINING
The Players' Club Alumni Scholarship, f SO (forthe Summer School
"of the Theatre Course)—
DONALD WILLIAM WITHROW.
AWARDS FOR THE FINAL
UNDERGRADUATE YEAR
GENERAL
The United Nations Prise, $50 (proficiency in the field of United
Nations studies)—
THOMAS FRANCK, 4088 Arbutus, Vancouver.
IN ARCHITECTURE
The  Architectural  Institute  of  British  Columbia  Prise  (proficiency in architectural design), books of value approx. 166—
ROBERT MARTIN OPIL, 1831 Davie St., Vancouver.
B.C. Coast Woods Prise in Architecture (proficiency in design
project involving use of wood). 650—
FRANCIS MURRAY JOHNSTON, 2296 W. 8th Ave., Van.
Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Medal—
NO AWARD ,
IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
The Ahepa Prise, 6100 (proficiency in Greek)—
PETER LAWSON SMITH, 1764 Cedar Hill Crossroad, Vic,
The David Bolocan Memorial Prise. 625 (outstanding student in
Philosophy and Psychology)—
LOIS ELLEN BENNETT, Enderby. B.C.
Department of Mathematics Book Prise (proficiency in mathematics)—
ROBIN BROOKS LECKIE, 5432 Vine St., Vancouver.
The francos WflUard Prises (best essays on assigned study)—
ELLEN CHRISTINE STEPHENS, $50,  1165 Haro St., Van.
MALCOLM ANGUS MATHESON, $25, 2611 Kitchener St.,
Vancouver.
The German Government Book Prises (proficiency in German
studies)—
YUSUF OULSOY, 3263 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver.
BETTY LOUISE V.OG1L, New Westminster.
The Llewellyn Jones frise in Zoology. 550—
NO AWARD
Prise of the tyfcister oi Switserland, books (proficiency ia French
Language and Literature)—
MOYRA DIANE LIGGINS, 4051 Pine Crescent, Vancouver.
The Slavonic Studies Graduation Prise $100 (for proficiency in
Slavonic Studies, given by Welter C. Koerner, Esq., in honor of
Dr. William Rose)—
EDMUND HEIFR, Regina. Sask.
The University  Essay  Ptise,  $25  Ibest  essay in undergraduate
English courses)—
JACQUELINE SAWYER, 4483 W.  12th Ave., Vancouver.
IN ENGINEERING
The American Society oi Mechanical Engineers (UBC Branch)
Prise. $25 (best design in course M.E. 463)—
ERIC EDWARD ANDERSON, No 5 Road, R.R. 4, Abbotsford.
The Canadian Forest Products Limited Prises, $100 each (proficiency in the final two yoars of Forest Engineering)—
1. ALVIN OSCAR NORMAN, 2071 Linden Ave., S. Burnaby.
2. RICHARD BURKE, 6187 Wiltshire St., Vancouver.
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver Branch) Walter Mober-
ly Memorial Prise, books. $25 (best engineering thesis)—
GILBERT FRANK JACOBS, Summerland, B.C.
The H. R. MacMillan Prise in Forest Engineering, $100 (highest
standing in B.A.Sc. course in Forest Engineering)—
ALVIN OSCAR NORMAN
The Ingledow Prise. $50 (general proficiency in Engineering)—
EDMUND DAVID IJJEALE, Box 299, Little Mountain.
The Northern Electric Company Limited Prise, $100 (proficiency
in final two years of Electrical Engineering)—
WILLIAM KEITH RAE  PARK
The Road Builders and Heavy Construction Association Graduation
Prises, $25 each (highest standing in CE. 470. highway engineering)
JOSEPH DUDRA, Cloverdale, B.C.
GILBERT FRANK JACOBS, Summerland, B.C.
Special University Prise. $50 (general proficiency)—
WILLIAM EUGENE BORESKY, 7243 Sherbrooke St., Van.
The Timber Preservers Limited Prises (best plans and specifications of a structure of treated timber)—
First Prise $65—
ALAN JAMES HODGSON, 5226 Aberdeen St., Van.
Second Prise $25—
BJORNULV GJERVAN
Third Prise $25—
G. DIMI COUROUBAKALIS, Union College, UBC.
Merit Awards, $15 each—
NORMAN BESTWICK, Lethbridge, Alta.
HARRY EDGAR THIESSEN, 4783 Fleming St., Van.
JOHN DENISON WOOD, Calgary, Alta.
IN FORESTRY
Special University Prise, $25 (proficiency in Forestry)—
KENNETH GEORGE BOYD, 4444 4th Ave., Vancouver.
IN LAW
The Canadian Law Book Company Prize, books (highest standing
in subject of Conflict of Laws)—
THEODORE GEORGE PEARCE, 4175 Balaclava, Vancouver.
The Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation Prize, $25 each
(highest standing in subjects of Mortgages)—
HOWARD ALEXANDER CALLAGHAN, Ottawa, Ont.
THEODORE GEORGE PEARCE. 4175 Balaclava, Vancouver.
The Carswell Company Limited Prize, books (highest standing
in the Final Year)—
THEODORE GEORGE PEARCE. 4175 Balaclava, Vancouver.
The Norgan Essay Prize, $50 each (best essay on an approved
topic)—
(Continued on Page 9)
Easy Burden
on Insurance
WHEN SOCIAL CUE-
DIT TOOK OFFICE ADMINISTRATION O F
HOSPITAL INSUR-
ANCE WASAT A LOW
EBB.
PEOPLE WERE BEING
DEPRIVED OF HOSPITAL CARE BECAUSE
OF ARREARS IN PREMIUMS.
YOUR SOCIAL CREDIT
GOVERNMENT HAS
NOW SUSPENDED ALL
ARREARS IN ORDER
THAT CITIZENS CAN
BE REINSTATED BY
PAYING THE CURRENT PREMIUM. AN
IMPORTANT CONCES-
SION FOR THE
PEOPLE.
DON'T BE MISLED.
MARK YOUR BALLOT
FIRST CHOICE.
•   t   •
EVERY SUCCESS
■ ■,).■'■'.
Scientific Supplies
CO. LTD.
LABORATORY APPARATUS
Industrial, Assay, Clinical
University and School Laboratories
736 Granville Street TAtlow 3529
SOCIAL CREDIT 1
This advertisement ie issued by
the    British    Columbia    Social
Credit Campaign -Committee
MARSHALL-WELLS (B.C.) LTD.
Wishes the Graduating Class
Of 1953 Every Success
la Their
Individual Fields of Choice
549-573 CARRALL STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
PA. 8211
Vale Atque Ave.!
A friend of ours, a Science man, tells us that
•the above phrase in a foreign language can be
tortured into meaning "Goodbye and Hello!"
. . . and wc hasten to explain that what we
mean by it is goodbye and good luck to all
UBC graduates and hello and good luck to the
same grduates as they join the rest of us in
what is somewhat grinjjy called the workaday
world. Anyway, our sentiments are sincere, no
matter what they say about our Latin.
Norris!
Len Norris, The Sun's
cartoonist, has lately
been awarded about
all the honors that a
Canadian cartoonist
can accumulate. Look
for his matchless
spoofs almost every
day in The Sun!
®tt %ncouuer Sun
Vancouver s   Home - Owned   Newspaper TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1993
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
PAGE »
i
\
BEST WISHES
to the
CLASS OF '53
University
Hardware
& Appliance
4S36 W. 10th
AL 1789
Congratulations
.   to the
Graduating Class
Whether  for  Home  or
Business
Our Office Stationery and
Printing Departments
Will Serve  You
In Many Ways
GEHRKI
Stationery & Printing
Co. Ltd.
1035 SEYMOUR STJ
.       PAc%:017i.:t^    ^j
£hciAJUL
COMPANY LTD.
Industrial and
Commercial
Contractors
TAHow
2241 - 2 - 3
1319 SEYMOUR ST.
Vancouver, B.C.
A Complete Hectical
Service
Graduation Awards
(Continued from Page 8)
ANNA FRANCES WOOTTON, 128S Victoria Ave., Victoria.
GORDON WESLEY YOU^G, 835 Northcott Ave., Victoria.
Th*  Toronto  Q*n*ral   Trusts   Corporation   Prise,   $30   (highest
standing in th* subjects oi Trusts)—
GEORGE GODFREY TURNER, New Westminster, B.C.
IN  NURSING
Th* Provincial D*partm*nt of Health and W*lfar* (H*alth Branch)
Prises, ISO each—
D*gr** Course-—
MARNEY JEAN McLELLAN, Hedley, B.C.
Certificate Course—
BETTY MARIE DRONSFIELD, 7851 Montcalm St., Van.
Th* Vancouver Registered Nurses' Award. $280—
THELMA ETHEL LUDLOW, Balcarres, Sask.
IN PHARMACY
The Cunningham Pris* in Pharmacy, $80 (g*n*ral proficiency)—
DONNELENE MAY STEVEN, 3388 Salsbury Way, Victoria.
Th* D*an E» L. Woods Memorial Pris* (Pharmaceutical Association of th* Provinc* of British Columbia). $80 (g*n*ral proficiency)—
VERNON THEODORE FRYKLIND, 4194 Inverness St., Van.
Th* Msllinckrodt Chemical Works Limited Pris*. $28 (proficiency in Pharmaceutical Chemistry) shared squally by—
RAYMOND  ERNEST  COUNSELL,  4042  Dunbar  St.,  Van.
DONNELENE MAY STEVEN, 3388 Salsbury Way, Victoria.
Th* M*rck Awards, books (highest standing in Pharmaceutical
Chemistry)—
DONNELENE MAY STEVEN, 3386 Salsbury Way, Victoria,
RAYMOND ERNEST COUNSELL, 4042 Dunbar St., Van.
Pharmacy Alumni Book Prise (general proficiency)—
LLOYD HAROLD NORDLUND, Kimberley.
AWARDS MADE BY OTHER
INSTITUTIONS TO GRADUATE OR
GRADUATING STUDENTS
Th* Athlon* Fellowships (Overseas, Engineering)—
JOHN RICHARD ARNOLD, Hotel Georgia.
RICHARD MOW AT SHIER, 4620 Langara. Vancouver.
JOHN DEN1SON WOOD. Cal«ary, Alta.
The Exhibition of  1881  Scholarship.  £480 per annum for two
yeari (Overseas, Science)—
MARGARET MARION MOODIE. 1315 W. 59th Ave., Van.
International Nickel Company of Canada Limited Graduate Research Fellowship, $1800—
DOUGLAS H. POLONIS.
International Student Service Exchange Scholarships (Germany)—
BRUCE CAMPBELL GIFFORD, New Westminster.
MURIEL GRACE TRIMBLE, 756 Falkland. Victoria.
BETTY LOUISE VOGEL, New Westminster, B.C.
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire War Memorial I Scholarship, $2000—
JAMES MacLEOD SANDISON, 3235 W. 12th Ave, Van.
National Research Council Awards:
(a) Post'poctorat* Fellowship, $2800 and Rutherford Memorial
Scholarship, $800:
GEORGE MOTLEY GRIFFITHS, Thorold, Ont.
(b) Special Scholarship. $1800—
ALEXANDER DZUBIN, Natal, B.C.
(c) Fellowship!, $1200 each—
FOREST GENE HESS, Physios Dept., UBC.
MARY FAIRFIELD JACKSON, Toronto, Ont.
(d) Studentships, $900 each—
RONALD ERNEST BEDFORD, Brandon, Man.
HARVEY ALLEN BUCKMASTER.
PAUL  ALEXANDER  DESMOND  de   MAINE,   4359  W.
Ilth Ave., Vancouver.
PETER FRED FILLIPOFF, Shoreacres, B.C.
CHARLOTTE FROESE, Sardis, B.C.
MILES HUGH A. KEENLEYSIDE.
JOHN ERWIN LOKKEN, Mayview, Sask.
FRANK DEREK MANCHESTER, 5510 TennfS St., Van.
DAVID BOYD McLAY, Hamilton, Ont.
MARGARET MARION MOODIE, 1315 W. 59th Ave., Van.
GEORGE CROYDON NEILSON, Ladner, B.C.
ALAN LINDSAY ORR-EWING, 1032 Victoria Ave., Vic.
JOSEPH A. R. GREY PAQUETTE, Montreal.
ABE MARTIN UNRAU, 4508 W. 13th Ave., Vancouver.
(e) Bursaries, $600 each—
THOMAS  KENNEDY  ALEXANDER,   1218  W.   21st St.,
North Vancouver.
GENO BISARO, 202 Ealing St., Trail, B.C.
CHRISTINA JANET CAMERON, Ladysmith.
GEORGE BRIERLEY CHADWICK, 918 W. 19th Ave., Van.
COLIN WHITCOMB CLARK, 3414 W. 26th Ave, Van.
HENRY ESKO ENGMAN, 4422 W. 13th Ave., Vancouver.
DONALD GRANT   IRVINE,   2237  Torquay   Dr.,   R.R.   5.
Victoria.
GARTH JONES, 1497 Lang St., Victoria.
THOMAS HARRY LEGG, Kamloops.
JAMES  FREDERICK   PALMER,   5744  Dunbar  St..   Van.
ROBERT WEBB. 3357 W. 7th Ave., Vancouver.
Ne\cton Wesley Rowell Fellowships for International Studies—
THOMAS  FRANCK,  S800,  4988 Arbutus.  Vancouver.
THEODORE GEORGE PEARCE, $1200, 4175 Balaclavas
Schlich Memorial Fund Book Prize, awarded through the Canadian Institute of Forestry)—
KENNETH GEORGE BOYD, 4444 W. 4th Ave.. Vancouver. ;
Woodrow Wilson Foundation Fellowship, $1200—
PETER FRANCIS HARTNETTY, Montreal, P.Q. '
. . The Welding Industries are also making a significant
contribution to the industrial progress of industry in
British Columbia.
SCOTT - FOSTER LTD.
"Your Wilding Supply Houst"
539 E. Hastings Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
HA. 6257
GRADUATION GIFTS
FROM  THE
CASTLE JEWELLERS
0$j8$C*
Watches by Elgin. Bulova, Gruen
Blu* Ribbon Diamonds
Rings, Broach**, Bracelets
Ronson Lighters, Parker 81  Peru
EXPERT REPAIRS WORK GUARANTEED
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
4560 West 10th Ave. ALma 2009
EVERY GOOD WISH
FOR
SUCCESS, PROSPERITY ond HAPPINESS
from
PETERSON
ELEafttOL CONSTiHJCTlON
CO. LTD,
1255 Napier St. HAstings 3860
VANCOUVER, B.C.
During Your Vacation
ConuL iiv . . .
and listen to your
favorite selections
in our
WlodsWL   foatuL  Shofu
THOMSON  &  PAGE  LTD.
2914 Granvilc South Park Royal
CHcrry 5144 a West 2302
Expert or Novice — Everything for
TENNIS
Racquets By
Slazengers, Spalding, Dunlop
Shoes,  Socks,  'T"  Shirts,  Sweat  Shirts,  etc.
Shorts in Washable Gabardine
BEV. RHODES SPORTING GOODS
588 Richards Street
MA. 1590
Compliments Of
HARRY BARRATT
ARCHITECT
709 West Georgia St. PAGE  10
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1958
PROPHEC Y
This is station U.B.C., official
organ of the University Television Society.
As another service of this up
to the minute station, we bring
you today to the twenty-fifth
annual banquet of the 1953
Alumni to Discuss the Possibility and Plausibility of Raising
Funds for a Men's Dorm or an
International House. We ask
you to join our renowed citizens
who are here in ancient Brock
Hall to ponder the problems of
their old alma mater.
Ward &
Phillips Ltd,
PRINTERS AND
LITHOGRAPHERS
382 W. Broadway
FAir. 7605
Vancouver, B.C.
Best Wishes
to the Graduating
Class
•
NATIONAL
Machinery Co. Ltd.
Granville Island
VANCOUVER
Honorary chairman -of this
fund-raising banquet are Art
(Phillips, director of the UBC
School of Fine Arts, and Miss
Ann Choma, the first woman
chancellor of our university.
After twenty-five years the committee is still at a stalemate.
Miss Choma continues to advocate the erection of a new gym
instead of a student house, while
Phillips favors a grant to the
Historical Society, his pet phil-
;anthropy.
Many emminent graduates
are here today. Seated at the
head table: Mr. Pat Thomas,
leader of the CCF opposition for
the past twenty years, is accompanied by "Pat Junior" who
will step into his father's shoes
next month. Other notables at
this table include: UBC Athletic
Director Bill Boulding, Warden
of the Women's Dorms, Kay
Stewart; Rhodes Scholar Jim
McWilliams who has been demanding higher wages for his
I.W.A.; Doug Steinson, chief returning officer of Canada. Mr.
Steinson appears to be arguing
witli writer Geoff Pringle who
has devised a system of balloting
whereby only ballots with the
right answer are counted.
Among the more sterling citizens present are: Vancouver
Brewery Baron Mike Ryan v/ho
stated that he is willing to contribute to the "Ryan Men's
Dorms"'; Pharmacist Bob Alexander who has finally popularized odourless perfume; Sally
Herd, hostess-owner of Ye Olde i
Georgian Cocktail Lounge on
campus.
From the field ot sports come
proud parents, Mr. and Mrs.
George Puil, accompanied by
their son, who was recently
signed as centre by the Minneapolis Lakers Basketball Club.
Also on hand is bai.ker John
Southcott. Mr. Southcoil just
gleefully announced his five
thousandth mortgage foreclosure.
i Several of the guest* havt
mad* headlines recently. Former Slipstick editor Bill Inglis
who fought for freedom of the
press so valiantly, is on probation to allow him to accept the
position of Dean of UBC School
of Journalism.
Sitting in an obscure corner
of the room is noted cinemactress Louise DeVick, Who faced
City Prosecutor Joe Nold, when
she presented a dramatization
of "Goldilocks and the Three
Bears." According to Nold, the
performance affected the "baser
instincts" of many of the better
citizens of the city.
Two city employees attending this gala affair are also under suspicion. Ray Christopherson, engineer in charge of
the erection of the new Marpole
Bridge, was accused of "dirty
play" by city papers following
the cave-in of the bridge last
week. He is comparing notes
with city traffic co-ordinator
Denny Silvestrini. It seems that
)he clover-leaf outlets Silvestrini planned for the Granville
Bridge, merely go around in
circles instead of speeding up
traffic.
(Continued on Page 20)
See   "PROPHESY"
WHITE DOVE
CLEANERS
Ask for 3-day Regular or 1-day Special Service
FAST PICK UP AND DELIVERY
• COMPLETE DELUXE LAUNDRY SERVICE
4567 West 10th ALrtio 1<
Congratulations to the 1953 Graduates
from the
Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.
Of Canada, Limited
The World's Leading Manufacturers Of
BOWLING and BILLIARD
EQUIPMENT
H. M. Traccy, Manager
947 Granville Street
EVERY GOOD WISH
To The Graduating Class
for
SUCCESS,  PROSPERITY
AND HAPPINESS
from
Burrard Drydock
Company Limited
and
Pacific Drydock
Company Limited TUESDAY, MAY 19, 10S3
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
PAGE 11
Every Success to The
GRADUATES OF 1953
Varsity Launderite
Chenille Articles A Specialty
4388 W. 10th Avenue
AL 2210
Congratulations !
DO-NUTS and COFFEE
After Class . . . After the Dance
ANYTIME
O-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Avenue . . . Just West of Sasamat
Phone ALma 3580
DO-NUTS FOR SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
>!•
—*>>■ ■* ' •"••?•&'
COMPLIMENTS
of
UNIVERSITY
TRANSFER
LTD.
4217 W. 13th Ave.
ALma 1005
Every Success to the Graduates of '53
And My Sincere  Thanks for Their Patronage
During the Past Year
Var*itn Jeweller*
4479 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3104
Austin A40 Somerset
FOR
Details - Demonstration - Delivery
CALL
GORDON BROS.
CEdar 8105
10th and ALMA
CONGRATULATIONS
- TO THE
CLASS OF '53
from
Hewer Hardware
4459 W. 10th Ave. AL 1552
BEST WISHES AND SUCESS TO THE GRADS OF 53
J Jul fonnjoUA&WL Shop*
GIFTS and CHINA
4433 West 10th Ave. AL. 1520-R
BEST WISHES
Chattel Hif4e
PLUMBING & HEATING LTD.
4526 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3606 • 1866
Compliments
and
Best Wishes
Sporting Goods
4451 West 10th Ave.
ALma 1414
Congratulations to the Graduates of '53
Vancouver Heating Centre
Oil Heating Equipment
SERVICE AND INSTALLATIONS  BY  CONTRACT
4393 West 10th Avenue ALma 0813
VERY BEST WISHES
to the
GRADUATES OF 53
SASAMAT TAXI
4395 W. 10th
AL. 2400
CONGRATULATIONS and BEST WISHES
from
(b&ari&u
FINE FOODS
DEANS CHOCOLATES & PECAN OPERA ROLL
4489 W. 10th Ave. AL. 2596
Congratulations to the Graduates of '53
EILEEN  A.  SHARNELL.  DESIGNER
fiaAALCUL <£jCudlSLbu®hSLSA.$h0)^
Dress Designing & Tailoring to Your Requirements
WE CARRY A STOCK OF SEPARATES
4562 West 10th Avenue ALma 1098
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE NEW GRADS
OF '53
DONALD  LYLE
B. COMM. '42
REAL ESTATE
AND INSURANCE
4570 W. 10th
AL 1124
CONGRATULATIONS
To the Graduates of 1953
Thunderbird Service
DON and JOHN
10th Avenue and Tolmie Street
ALma 0771
PETER'S
ICE CREAM CO.
THE QUALITY ICE CREAM
OF  THE  PACIFIC  COAST
CEdar9181
3204 W. BROADWAY VANCOUVER, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS
TO THE
GRADS  OF   53
TRIMBLE
SERVICE
GARAGE
4494 W. 10th Ave. — AL 1551
Groceries, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Cooked and Fresh Meats
Rose I and Market
FREE DELIVERY
4329 West 10th Avenue
ALma 1918
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
GRADUATES OF  53
Trimbleten Bakery
4425 W. 10th AVENUE
ALma 0444
Congratulations to the Graduating Class
Thanks  for  Your  Cooperation  —
A Welcome to Next Year's Grads —
£valhvbL fi&cuih^ <Bcuul
HAIRSTYLISTS TO THE UNIVERSITY
4554 West 10th Ave. AL. 0811 PAGE 12
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1953
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE
GRADUATES OF '53
from
Colleae Printer* ltd.
PRINTERS OF THE
"UBYSSEY"
4430 W. 10th Ave.
ALma 3253
I liUi; LIMITED
PLUMBING and HEATING
SUPPLIES
Wish You Every
SUCCESS
540 Beatty Street
MArine0511
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS
LIMITED
592 Seymour St.
PAc. 7942
ROYAL    TYPEWRITERS
The only Typewriter with Magic Margin. Right k Left—TripU
Spacing. Non-Glare. Plastic K»y-Board
Deluxe Model with Tabulator       $109.50
Arrow Model with Non-Tabulator   $99.50
Commander Model with Special Students Keyboard $77.59
STANDARD AND PORTABLE MODELS
THE IDEAL GRADUATION GUT
TOP  PRICES  PAID
FOR
Good Used Furniture
CALL
ROYAL
Furniture Store
2607 Main     —     FA. 9323
OLyoJLMsLSl..
Milk  and  Milk
Products (Milk, Cream,
Butter, Buttermilk,
and Ice Cream)
are among the most
essential of foods . . .
SERVE MILK
IN   ALL   FORMS
CREAMLAND
City  Wide  Delivery
13.15 HOWE ST.
MAr. 7371
Congratulations
to the
Class of '53
and
Felicitations to the Faculty
Members   for   their .Work,
Patience   and   Many   Long
Hours.
CilO
WER]
MA.KK5
153 EAST &ND£R
YOUR TOTEM
WILL BE AAAILED
TO  YOU
YOUR TOTEM
WILL BE MAILED
TO YOU
Best Wishes
to the
Grads of '53
Mrs. Monro's
Confectionery
4601 W. 10th
AL0080
Congrwtohthns
Wm Scott & Co.
EGGS and POULTRY
Produce Wholesale
1426 COTTRELL ST.
MA. 5530
L
CONGRATULATIONS
to the graduates of '53
Russell Food Quest Metal
Equipment Ltd. Works Ltd.
871 HOMER STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MA 6241-2
MA. 9388-9
Here ot HYGRADE in RADIO CENTRE
you'll find the largest assortment of
WIRE AND TAPE RECORDERS
in the West.
Choose from the BIG SIX:
Magnecord, Webster, Bell, Eicor, Wilcox-Gray, Tapemaster
SERVICEMEN AND EXPERIMENTERS
always find the quality and assortment of
Radio Components
Hy grade Radio Ltd.
Phone TAHow 1421
971 Richards St.
EVERY   SUCCESS
N YOUR FUTURE  ENDEAVORS
MAYOR
F. J. HUME 1    TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1993
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
PAGE 13
i
Our Very Best to the Grads
from
James G. Anderson
President
Pied Piper Company Ltd.
COMPLETE PEST CONTROL SERVICE
DExter 4343 3129 Kingsway
Every Success to the Class of '53
FOSTER'S FINE FURS
•   Designing
•   Manufacturing
•    Remodelling
825 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
MArint 6729
,4
Congratulations and Best Wishes to'The
Graduation Class of '53
ARMCO DRAINAGE
nnd
METAL PRODUCTS OF CANADA LTD.
\\
8811 Laurel Street
Vancouver, B.C.
[very mass...
Studio of Creation for Exclusive
Garden Furniture
Pion Ornamental Iron Works
CH. 6110
2306 Burrard at 7th Ave.
EATON'S
EATON'S salutes you 1953 graduates.
Our sincere congratulated and
Best Wishes for success in all
your future endeavours.
<T. EATON C°
■ ■        CANADA >*LtMITIO
•it
History
Purile Pennywaite thought,
fully licked his hand and with
it slicked down the fountain of
hair at the back of his head.
This was a big day for Purile.
He stood there in the hallway
of his spacious Fort Camp bach-
elor suite listening to the in«
spiring roar of a dozen students
breathing behind paper walls.
Tonight, he thought, the world
was his. Tonight destiny pointed at Purile's head.
And Purile's head pointed
right back,
He thought of the struggle it
had all been, taking the best«
eleven years of a young man's
life. But tonight, when his hot
little hand reached out for that
precious scroll, he would know
that it had been worth it.
There were moments, Purile
rccaled, when he thought he'd
have to buy a ranch to get a
sheepshin. He smirked as he
thought of how he'd adjusted
tbe Library fountain so that
when it was turned on at the
dedication ceremony, it had
soaked all the honored guests.
He thought how, even before
that, he had swiped the plans
for the fountain and substituted
the blueprint for a doggiewash,
and how no one had caught on
yet, except the dogs.
And thinking about artistic
fountains made Purile think of
the LSE and he wondered whether Anne Choma and Johann
Stroyva were in the newspaper
publishing business to stay. He
had heard that they had gotten
a job wfth the air force turning
out flyers.
Thinking of the LSE reminded him of the Ostrum Plan, and
he looked in the mirror again.
He had a barrel chest, alright—
like a sten-gun barrel.
The Ostrum Plan made him
think of the new gym, and the
mortgage, and A.M.S. President
Basi's stirring words, "Never
have so many owed so much . . ."
And thinking of AMS matters
reminded Purile of the Russian
Exchange Scholarship, and he
smirked as he thought of some
of the people he'd like to nominate for it. All of which brought
his mind around to the traditionally Pravda-like Ubyssey
and how, infiltrated by those
counter - revolutionaries Schlesinger, Parker and Green, it had
starteled everyone by adopting
a journalistic standard comparable only to a cross between the
Now York Times and the Wall
Stret Journal. It got to the
stage where, when the Goon
edition tried to do a take-off on
a typical Hearst paper, nobody
noticed the difference.
The thought of Politics reminded him of the visit to the
campus of the Tory leader, and
how he out-Drew even the
packed house that had heard
Coldwell the day before. And
from there his mind moved on
to such graduating campus po-
liticos as fearless Ron Cheffins,
and Jeff Turner, the deaf colonel from Duncan, not to mention such Council stalwarts as
Ann Willis whose campaign posters prompted the suggestion:
"You take a slow boat to China.
I'd rather go with Willis Overland."
All this reminiscing about
Canadian, statesmen present
and future, brought back memories of the success of the first
Canadian Book Week on the
Campus, which made him a
little sad. Sometimes Purile
almost wished Elementary
(Continued on Page 15)
See "HISTORY'' PAGE 14
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19. 19S3
Congratulations
and Best Wishes
For Your Future
Success
from
NICK'S
GRILL
5700 University Blvd.
AL. 1679
Congratulations
to the
Graduating Class
Of 1953
Gordon & Belyea
LIMITED
101 Powell St.        PA. 4244
Vancouver, B.C.
A. I. M.
Steel Products
DIVISION LIMITED
EDMONTON — WINNIPEG — TORONTO
VANCOUVER, CANADA
The Law Society of British Columbia
offers its congratulations to the
Graduating Class of the University
of British Columbia and in particular, those of the Faculty of Law.
BEST  WISHES
TO THE GRADUATING CLASS
OF  1953
COMMODORE CABARET
Margaret Moodie
Wins first
Science Prize
The iirst Exhibition *of 1851
Scholarship in Science ever to be
given a-University of British Columbia student has been awarded to Margaret Marian Moodie,
The scholarship is for two years
at an English university and is
for 450 pounds per annum.
Miss Moodie, who graduated
with first class honors in Chemistry at UBC in 1951, will receive her Master of Science this
Spring and will attend Cambridge University for advanced
work in radioactive chemistry.
Miss Moodie entered UBC from
Magee High School and was
winner of a University Entrance
Scholarship in her final year
at high school. At the end of
her first year at the University
she won a University Great War
scholarship and in her third
year won an Alaska Pine Scholarship and a Chemical Institute
of Canada book prize. She won
a University Medal in Arts and
Sciences and a Lefevre Gold Medal in Chemistry in her graduating year.
The Exhibition of 1851 Schol- ,
arships are awarded by the com- j
missioners of a fund set up after '
that exhibition in England.
1870  WEST  TENTH AVENUE
VANCOUVER, B.C. ALma 0432
m4f)
$Aapkic 9nduAi/uAL <£td.
PHOTOGRAPHERS — ARTISTS
Manufacturers of "Scan-a-graver" Plastic
HALF-TONE CUTS
193 E. Hastings Phone TA. 6929
VANCOUVER, B.C.
YOUR TOTEM
WILL BE MAILED
TO  YOU
Best Wishes fo the U.B.C.
from
J. R. WILLIAMS & SON
Assaying ond Ore Testing
METALLURGICAL WORK EXCLUSIVELY
580 Nelson St.
MArine 5821
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
extends
Two Hands
to
the
1953   GRADUATES  OF  UBC
one in
CONGRATULATION
on the attainment of one
of the most important
steps in life, the completion of a formal education
designed to equip you for
the important role you are
to play in this complex
and fascinating drama of
modern civilization.
the other in
WELCOME
to the world of opportunity
which awaits you in your own
Province of British Columbia,
where a highly-organized and
energetically progressive machinery of industrial and professional services to civilization
has a constant need and a real
reward for the talents and abilities which you possess. Industry
the Professions, the Services of
the fastest-growing Province in
Canada offer the graduating
student innumerable opportunities to fulfill the career destiny
for which his or her University
training has b(j,en the preparation.
DEPARTMEHT of TRADE and IHDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G.   ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy .Minister
HON. RALPH CHETWYND
Minister TUESDAY, MAY lft, 1M3
GRADUATION ISSUE UBY1SEY
PAGE IS
f   YOUR  TOTEM
' WILL   BE
^MAILED TO YOU
s
4
STUDEBAKER
The Conodion Car with the European Look
J. M. BROWN
MOTOR CO. LTD.
1128 W. Georgia MA. 3341
VANCOUVER, B.C.
See Complete Lint of Westinghouse
Applioncts
at
Radio Rental & Repair
4453 W 10th Avenue ALma 2244
YOU CAN BE SURE IF ITS WESTINGHOUSE
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
Complete Automotive Servicing
WE CATER TO UBC STUDENTS
ROY HAND, PROPRIETOR
2180 Allison Road ALma 0524
(Just off University Boulevard)
Best Wishes to the Class of '53
Best Wishes to UBC's
Graduating Class of 1953
from
Jantzen Knitting Mills
OF CANADA LIMITED
•     |    10th Ave. at Kingsway
Vancouver, B.C.
HISTORY
(Continued from Page 13)
Reading hadn't been an option.
Bet there was absolutely nothing wrong with his eyes,
though he could hardly believe
them as he watched the opening
chorus number of Mardi Gras
in Cuba, and even Di Cox, with
her shapely face outdid herself.
Purile's heart thumped as he
thought of Queen Solveig and he
grinned as he recalled how MC
and publicity-mad genius Dewis
had turned a slow ticket sale
into a sold-out show by writing
a phony letter to the Ubyssey
complaining that the chorus-line
was "disgraceful, indecent and
immoral."
All of which reminded him
of Dorothy Davies lively appearance on the campus, and the
motto: "Koni Soit Qui Maly
Pense" (If You Think Dirty
Thoughts It's Your Own Fault).
Thinking of the "theatah"
brought to Purile's mind the
memory of Miss Somerset's experimental plays: "Agamemnon"
and the other one. He remembered how the audience had
been split betwen those who
said they understood it and
those who told the truth. He
smirked as he thought of the
sorority that had turned out en
masse because it had heard that
this was a play about life among
the Greeks.
He thought too of the other
campus productions — of Phil
Keatley's unseemly bedroom
scene with one Miss Low-Botch,
and of Players Club president
Louise deVick's brief but meteoric rise to fame playing opposite Magistrate Maclnnes in a
court-room melodrama.
And he thought of Mussoc's
Firebug, and of Milla Andrew
marching about the campus with
her donkey to symbolize the
Donkey seranade; but it wasn't
a Donkey, it was a mule, and
while that may not mean much
to Milla, it matters to a Donkey.
Unfortunately the Mule walking around the campus didn't
cause much of a stir because
elections were underway, and
everyone thought it was an election stunt. And thinking of
elections made Purile think of
Ragbhir Basi who brought fame
to UBC and glory to himself by-
being elected president of NFCUS and how success hadn't
affected him at all; he was jurft
as pleased with himself as ever.
And   that   reminded   him   of
how   Basi   had  outsmarted   the
Jokers Club at the Spring Che-
ral Meeting (You were formed'.
to promote these meetings, not
to  break  them  up.")  and  how!
ex-Prof.   Dal   Grauer   had   out-,
smarted Basi at the conference ]
to ask for lower bus fares (Get!
a bike). j
And thinking of things students can't have reminded him i
of the Arts Undergraduate Society, and he smirked again, his
wooly red .sweater itchy but reassuring under his starched
I white shirt.    And just as Purile
was about to wonder whether
Brighitta was going to get her
International House built, he
heard the opening strains of the
processional march echoing
across the parking lot. "Hark,"
he said, glancing into the mirror
which, like Purile's, was slightly
cracked, "They're playing our
song."
The excitement caused Purile
to flush (which was hard to do
because someone had stolen all
the seats again) and he rushed
for the door. Coming to it, he
halted instinctively, and instead
of opening it, lifted it expertly
off its hinges and disappeared
in the direction of the armouries.
For Purile was no ordinary
graduate. He was an engineer.
—TOM FRANCH
Success To The
Graduates Of
1953
BELKIN
PAPER
BOX
CO. LTD.
1030 Kingsway
BEST WISHES
TO THE GRADUATES OF 1953
British Ropes (Canadian Factory) Ltd.
Granville Island Vancouver, B.C.
BRITISH  PLATE MIRRORS
THERMOPANE WINDOWS
PILKINGTON GLASS LTD.
102 Powell Street
PAcific 0145
mmmmmmm
Compliment*
from
City Construction
Company Limited
and
Capilano Crushing
Com pony Limited
FAir. 3202      —       107 E. 1st Ave.       —      FAir. 4662
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Distress
fcFFOWLESS
NO  TIRESOME   WINDING— •
Ju*t pin curl a\ uiual and apply .
Bobbi.   No ^rong-wav wave* .
or wrong.p!a:» curl,.   No new •
clumiy criers to fiddle with I •
NO N8UTRAUHR—Juit rin<«
wilh dean water 45 minutti
after applying lotion. No fear
of friuy, kinky curU from left-
on lotion I
NO RESETTING — Juit bruih
pin curl, when dry. Bobbi p«r.
mewe/iti your most flattering
hair ityle—'.eh, itylei, wavet
all at one timet
Success/
.w
/
fatti
PIN CURL PERMANENT
Sets, Stylet, Wavei—AIL AT ONE TIME
So fast, so familiar a method—a Bobbi
takes just a few minutes more than put-
ting your hair up in pin curls—yet your
hair \sbernntuently waved in the style you
want for weeks and weeks! Bobbi gives
you a soft, casual, carefree curl that sets
at a fingertip's touch.
SO EASY-NO
HELP NEEDED!
MS
INCU0C0 PAGE 16
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1933
CLASS WILL
Class of '53
We, tthe undersigned Class of
'53, being more or less of sound
mind, revoking all former wills,
codicils and testamentary dispositions by us heretofore made,
declare this only to be and contain our last Will and Testament.
We give, devise and bequeath:
1. To the Foresters, a tank-
car full of blood.
2. To the Players' Club, a
cash register and a copy of "Tobacco Road,"
3. To Artsmen, a course in
"Effective Living" to be given
by an Engineer.
4. To the frosh, more members and a bigger lily pond.
5. To Faculty members, more
pay or part-time jobs.
6. To all political clubs,
good public relations.
7. To the unsung researchers
on our campus, satisfaction from
the success of their efforts.
8. To the Thunderbird hoop-
sters, membership in the "Exhibition Game" league.
9. To the World Cup Rugger
Champions, a fan club and a
world exhibition tour.
10. To the "Russian Exchange" students, lodgings in
the Kremlin and an open door.
11. To the Publications
Board,   more    'freedom   of   the
press."
12. To the lawyers, favorable judgments; to the medics,
wealthy neurotics; to Commercemen, briefcases full of
samples; To Engineers, forty
beers and an audience; to the
Social Workers, a happy time;
to the teachers, a book of instructions; to the Nurses, positions on the Thunderbird football team; to the Pharmacists,
decipherable   prescriptions,
13. To the Aggies, homesteads
and a plough.
14. To Students' Council, a
secluded retreat where they may
lick their wounds in peace.
15. To Raghbir Basi, the Order of Merit and the Premiership of India.
16. To the University, a sigh
of relief on the exodus of the incomparable Class of '53.
(Signed) THE CLASS OF '53
Per George Campbell
Compliments
of
HICK'S
TICKET
BUREAU
(i10 DUNSMUIR
PAcific 6427
Valedictory
For the past week we have
' been saying gbodbye, with
varying degrees of sentiment
—or sentimentality — to university classmates and campus,
professors and classrooms, and
now comes the moment of
public farewell to the whole
situation of university life.
Because the tradition and
ceremony of graduation define the amount so sharply,
we are swept by a solemn
sense of being poised between
our irrevocable past and our
unknown future. Yet we
know we are not so poised or
unmoving; there is a continuity; we carry the past we
have experienced into the future we anticipate. And so
this is the moment to realize
what we carry on, to speak
with affection and gratitude,
of what classmates and campus, professors and classrooms, represent, of what
value they have given to the
last four or five years of our
lives.
Obviously, they mean
friendships and light-hearted
days; they mean new knowledge and skills, the acquiring
of which, for utilitarian ends.
was probably what most of us
came here for. If the professors have had their way with
ui, wt have learned a broader
skill, which is the thinking behind the skills, the theory, the
way of attack.
And if the life here has had
its way with us, we have been
exploring, consciously or unconsciously, more than the
courses whose credits will be
marked on our official transcripts. We have had access
to the University's equipment
—for research—as well as to
its gymnasium and track —
association with a wide circle
of students, with opportunity
for interchange of questions
and opinions, and contact with
trained minds. Surely, then,
we have known intellectual
disciplines, and learned something—or something more
than we had known before—
of the art of living together.
Surely we have acquired—or
added to—an appreciation of
values, realized some ideals
or purposes in life. If not,
then we have still the "savage
mind." And the more we advance in technical skills, the
more terrible will be the physical powers controlled by a
mind still savage.
Our society subsidizes our
universities in the expectation
that their education will serve
social purposes. It wants the
skills and it wants the vision.
Education should equip men
to improve the conditions
which affect their lives,
should make them competent
to develop policies and controls, should establish principles of personal worth and
freedom and assumption of
personal responsibility. The
student moves towards these
goals indirectly, through the
self-imposed disciplines of
work, the freedom of thought
that exists at a university, and
the association with teachers
and students.
If, then, the life of the university has had its way with
him, he has learned from his
associations to agree with
others upon a common course
of action, and in that action
to assume responsibility for
tedious and inconspicuous
work no less than for leader-
(Continued on Page 17)
(SEE VALEDICTORY)
CAMPBELL & GRILL LTD.
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL
CONTRACTORS
Extends Congratulations To The
GRADUATES OF '53
122-124 West 6th Avenue
FAir. 2020
CONGRATULATIONS
^ from
G. W. Ribchester & Son Ltd.
COMMERCIAL TRUCK BODIES and REPAIRS
1253 Howe Street MArine 0827
Campus capers call for Coke
Commencement's a big day
... so get off to the right start.
Pause for a frosty bottle of delicious Coca-Cola
DRINK
f:(««6c&
MMh-ftrrnMsritf tr*wi+m>*k
oo
COCA-COLA LTD.
Every Success
* to the
University of British Columbia
SHARP and THOMPSON
BERWICK,  PRATT
Architects TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1953
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
PAGE 17
WARMEST
Good Wishes to The
Graduating Class
OF 1953
from
*
Vancouver's oldest and largest company,
specialising in oil-fired heating for homes.
rtuHte, O. jCtd.
GEORGIA
FREE   CUSTOMER   PARKING   NE^T   DOOR
i
Se*t Wi*he*
from
ALASKA
PINE & CELLULOSE
LIMITED
602 VV. HASTINGS STREET
Se*t Wi*he*
For A Successful Future
CANADIAN
FOREST PRODUCTS
LIMITED
999 W. PENDER ST.
MArine 7341
VANCOUVER, B.C.
BEST WISHES
AND  EVERY SUCCESS
CAVE & COMPANY
LIMITED
\
•
ASSAY, INDUSTRIAL AND EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES    —   CHEMICALS
567 Hornby Street Vancouver, B.C.
Valedictory
Continued from page 16
ship. If he has trained his
thinking, he has looked at the
troubled world, and, with
honest unprejudiced observation and reasoning, chosen his
loyalties. The university has
provided opportunities for
self expression, so loudly demanded today, but more important still, opportunities for
development of selves worth
expressing.
Each of us, on his own
plane, and in whatever degree he has felt the stimulous
of the university, looks back
upon it now with gratitude.
That period of our lives is
,'ovcr, past and irrevocable,
yet it lives in what we are.
We know we have more skills;
it now becomes us to use them
with constant and independent effort. We hope we are
more reasonable beings for
our years here, more unprejudiced, more critical, clearer in
purpose. May we, with God's
help, make good use of our
training.
—GERRY MAIN
VENTILATCO
ALUMINUM
AWNINGS
GIVE A
LIFETIME
y
&wyl/a
For Homes
Offices
Stores
Patios
Factories
Apartments
/OH INfOMNION
PHONtOkHWt
25% Less Than Other Per-
manent Type Awnings.
An Awning Everyone
Can Afford
COOL-SHADE
4458 West 10th       AL 3005
YOUR TOTEM
WILL BE MAILED
TO YOU
CONGRATULATIONS ... GRADS
It has been our pleasure' to serve many of the students during
the semester now closing. We extend our hearty thanks for
your patronage.
Ru*kant
PHOTOGRAPHER AND CAMERA SALES
(Formerly McCaffery Studio)
4538 West Tenth Avenue ALma 2404
(Opposite Safeway)
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE
CLASS OF '53'
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C.
COMPLETE LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING SERVICES
IXL
LAUNDRY  AND   DRY  CLEANERS
FAir. 1228
Every Success   .   .   .   Graduates of 1953
GENERAL EQUIPMENT
LIMITED
POWER PLANT HEATING AND
VENTILATING EQUIPMENT
CEILING AIR DB? FUCERS
1230 Granville St.
PAciftc 5932 PACE 1«
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1053
BEST WtSHES GRADUATES!
... *very success in your future endeavors
Campu* Jinn
4423 WEST 10th ALma 2481
Between Trimble and Sasamat
Fhwers Wired Anywhere
FLOWERS & GIFTS
For All Occasions
4429 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0660
FIX YOUR OWN CAR
We will loan you the tools and supply you
with parts at special discounts
ALL WORK DONE UNDER
EXPERT SUPERVISION
See Us First and You Won't Be Sorry
U-Fix It Yourself Garage
CHerry 4818 1823 W. 4th Ave.
SUCCESS TO THE 1953 GRADUATES
f
Summer   School
Bursaries Offered
Four bursaries, covering fees,
are available through the University of British Columbia Department of Extension, for the
Summer School of the Theatre to be held this summer at
UBC.
The School of the Theatre is
held in' conjunction with the
Summer School of Fine Arts and
is conducted by the Department
of Extension.
Purpose of the bursaries is to
assist actors and directors who
ere keenly interested in the
theatre; preferably those who
have had some previous experience in school or community
theatre or who are in charge of
drama programs.
Letters of application, addressed to the Department of University Extension, should give details of any previous experience
and be accompanied by letters oil
recommendation.
Applications must be receivec.
by May 31.
On the fishing grounds, in our
canneries, in our offices • • •
Hit  mtn  ond  women  of the
NELSON
BROS. FISHERIES LTD.
SHARE  YOUR PRIDE  IN
YOUR  GRADUATION
ITS   FROM   BIRKS
&B
W WATCHES
for the Graduate
A Rideau Watch is one of the most appropriate and
acceptable gifts for graduation. This famous watch is
noted for accuracy and long service; the 17-jewel
movement   is  made  in  Switzerland  especially  for
Birks.
Lady's  Watch,  yellow  case 29.75
Gentleman's Watch, yellow case 47.50
IM R KS
JEWELLERS
GRANVILLE AT GEORGIA — MA 6211
DIETHERS
LIMITED
COAL
e SAND and GRAVEL
BUILDERS SUPPLIES
TRUE MIX CONCRETE
Granville Island
Vancouver, B.C.
TAtlow 4 2 8 1
PAcific 5321
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
JOHN TENER JACK PEARSON
LARRY WRIGHT J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
SUN LIFE OPCANADA TUESDAY, MAY 18, 1958
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
PAGE 19
Georgis
1148 WI
LEADERS
In Their Classes
NASH - The Economy Big Car
HILLMAN - More Car Miles
Per Dollar
Your Nash and Hillman Dealer
WCLEODRAE
MOTORS LTD.
Your Future Is
Yours To Plan...
. . . and the time to make your plans is
now! Choosing a career marks a big step
forward in the life of every young man
or woman.
The Dominion Bank "offers a sound,
opportunity-filled future to those interested in banking. Limitations are few, and
the rewards ample. Above all, The Dominion Bank offers a secure future—the type
of career opportunity which opens up
lifetime possibilities,
If you are interested in planning your
future wisely, with The Dominion Bank,
contact the manager of your local branch.
He'll be glad to help.
THE DOMINION BANK
82 Years of Service to the Canadian People
Col. The Honorable E. W. Hamber, C.M.G., LL.D.,
Vancouver Director
R. F. J. Ford, Manager, Vancouver
i.
To the Girl
thinking about
a Career. . .
Girls today want to know two things about
the jobs tbey are looking for—
1. Is it Interesting?
2. What does it pay?
TELEPHONE OPERATING has these
answers.
1   The work offers a fascinating career in
communications, and
2. The pay is good, starting at $125.00 and
rising to $195.00 monthly.
Other advantages include adequate time off
for sports, hobbies, shopping, etc.—eight full
days in each four-week working period including one period of four consecutive days.
For other interesting news about the life of a
telephone operator call and have a friendly
chat at the Employment Office—555 Seymour
Street We'll be glad to see you.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
And Associated Companies
Arts Student
Wins Press
Scholarship
Fay Evelyn Fingarson, of 4617
Kingsway, South Buranaby, has
been awarded the Vancouver
Women's Press Club Scholarship
of $500. The Scholarship is
awarded annually by the Vancouver Women's Press Club to
a woman student at the University of British Columbia preparing for a career in newspaper, magazine or radio work.
Miss Fingarson has just completed her 2nd year in the Faculty of Arts at UBC and is studying honors Eunglish and Sociology. She is particularly interested in a career in the newspaper
field.
Miss Fingarson was born in
Saskatchewan and Received her
early education in Calgary. Graduated from John Oliver High
School in 1951, she is a member
of the Reserve University Squadron RCAF and one year- ago
served as flight cadent doing administrative work at RCAF stations at London, Ontario, and
Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.
This summer she will continue
with the RCAF at Rivers, Manitoba.
I    During her time at John Oliver, Miss Fingarson edited the j
school newspaper and she has al- i
so been employed by the Colling- i
i wood Dispatch. She was a mom-
j ber  of  the student's council  in
| high   school   and   took   part   in j
four  operettas.   Miss  Fingarson
has continued these interests at
the University by taking part in
the activities of the Musical Society and the Dance Club. She
has appeared in both the "Student Prince" and "Firefly.'' She
is also a member of the St. Thorn
as Anglican Young People's Association.
YOUR TOTEM
WILL BE MAILED
TO YOU
Suoo?
ARE MILDER
Canada's Mildest Cigarette
MEET THE
F.V.M.P.A. FAMILY
The Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association comprises
80 per cent of the milk producers in the Fraser Valley of
British Columbia. It serves the Lower Mainland of B.C.,
with a population of over half a million persons.
Products are marketed under the following brand names:
DAIRY LAND
MW
serving more customers than
any other daily in Western
Canada.
ARCTIC
ICE  CREAM
specializing in frozen
dairy products
PRODUCER   DIVISION
SARDIS
producers   of:   First   Grade
Butter    -    Powdered Milk,
Cottage Cheese - Whey Powder and Casein.
PACIFIC  MILK
producing about 75'7 of the
canned milk sold in B.C.
FRASER VALLEY MILK PRODUCERS
ASSOCIATION
VANCOUVER, B.C.
YELLOW*- STAR*- CHECKER
TAXI
PACIFIC  3311     MArine  2121
Covering U.B.C. ot All Times PAGE 20
GRADUATION ISSUE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1833
Prophecy
(Continued from Page 10)
Raghbir Basi, recently named
president of the BCE has just
returned from a press conference. "Bus fares on the university transit system will have to
be increased," Basi told newsmen.
Several globe-trotters have
returned for this special dinner.
Pulitzer Prize winner Flo McNeil has come back from Capri
to write an epic poem on "Coeds, Coffee and the Caf or "The
Disintegration of a University."
We notice that L.P.P. leader
Tom Franck has abandoned his
usual morning coat and striped
trousers. It seems that UBC
students greeted him with dead
cats and tomatoes when Franck
returned from Europe to address
them.
Al "Hiccups" Hicks and John
"Junior" Tennant, noted TV
wretlers, will perform for guests
at the end of the meeting. Doug
Little and Bill Ewing who have
perfected a new variety of leeches to aid in future blood drives
will give a demonstration, while
Mary Fran Munro will discuss'
'How to Organize a Sorority in(
Outer Mongolia."
FLASH—We are sorry to cur-'
tail our broadcast but banquet i
guests are all rushing wildly to-1
wards the new gymnasium.    It!
seems that UBC football squad
has finally won a trophy which
is now being placed in the trophy case presented by the Grad
Class of '53.
—MYRA GREEN
Student
Tops Crad Chss
The University of B.C. board
of governors has announced that
more than 130 medals and awards
j have been won by members of
| the 1953 graduating class. Grad-
i uates in all faculties will share
i
'; thousands of dollars in scholarship and bursary money,
j For the top 15 awards, men
j students outdid co-eds seven to
j one. Only two coeds reached
I the highest bracket this year.
I Last year four of the girls made
| it and one of them won the
I gold medal.
I     Hugh   Jack   Goldie,   23-year-
j old top winner, lives at 3309 E.
29th, Vancouver.
He went to school in Vander-
' hoof, then Renfrew elementary.
He spent four years at Vancou-
' ver Technical School before entering UBC for the five-year
bachelor of applied science
course.
A member of the University I
Air Training Squadron for three |
years,  Mr.  Goldie  received  his
navigator's wings and commission in England last summer
after two years of air training.
He plans to accept employment with Northern Electric in
testing and development, at the
same time completing his mas
ter of arts in engineering night
school at McGill University in
Montreal, #
Hugh Ddubeny of Victoria
won the Wilfred Sadler Memorial Gold Medal for highest marks
in agriculture.
Leading the ladies were Diane
Marie Dixon, 4388 Pine Crescent, who won the $100 B.C.
Parent-Teacher Federation prize;
and Marion Elizabeth Brown,
who led the class for the nursing degree.
m
I   IIJON     I 114      Im'S|!
BARR
TYPEWRITER CO.
615 W. Hastings
MA. 5445
All Makes of
TYPEWRITERS
SOLD
RENTED
REPAIRED
SPECIAL RATES TO
STUDENTS
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
Set Squares
T-Squares,  Protractors
From $10.00
Mechanical   Engineers
and
Polyphase Slide  Rules
Ames Lettering
Instruments
Zipper Ring Books
Complete  with  Sheets
and   Index
FROM S2.69
Fountain Pens
Clark & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
Stationers   and   Printers
550 Seymour St.
Vancouver, B.C.
We're advertising in these publications to
SELL B. C.   ROUND THE WORLD!
Since 1944 B.C. Electric advertisements have featured
the slogan "Business Is Moving to B.C." This year a
special series in influential Canadian and American publications will continue to beat the drums for this province
—for, although business IS moving to B. C, it is vital
to her economic future to Keep It Coming.
Keep it coming!
Bringing the fabulous potential of this province to the
attention of the economic world has been a big factor in
encouraging a swelling stream of investments and of population. Every citizen shares in the resulting prosperity and
everybody can help Keep It Coming. In all of your
contacts elsewhere on this continent and abroad you can
help spread the word—can help Keep It Coming.
ABUNDANT CHEAP HYDRO POWER ON PACIFIC TI DEW ATE*

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124077/manifest

Comment

Related Items