UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 23, 1937

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124069.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124069.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124069-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124069-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124069-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124069-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124069-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124069-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124069-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124069.ris

Full Text

 Vol.  XIV
Published  Twice Weekly  by   the     Publications   Board  of   theUniversi ly  of   British   Columbia
VANCOUVER,  P   C, 1 U1 SDAY,  ITBUUARY "'■!..! ^"57
No.
Job Seekers
Given A Few
TimelyJTmts
"What do you look for
in a young p e r s o 11 who
comes to you for a job?"
"1 look for confidence. Initiative, personality, anil cheerfulness. Tile real sales-people al'°
those who succeed in selling
themselves. There in little hope
for RppllcimtH who begin: 'I don't
suppose there's any ehanee for a
job?' They nre inviting a negative reply, so tlie easiest thins
is to agree with them — anil
they're   none."
So spoke Mr. Walter Carson
In a "Ubyssey" interview last
week, ns a preliminary to his discussion on "A picture of the
jewellery business, and a comparison between the work as it
was when I started, and as it is
now," whieh he will present as
the Vocational Guidance topic for
next  Wednesday.
"Those of us who have been
through the mill should prepare
the young people for tho shock
they'll set when they venture out
—the shock of netting to work.
I have heen asking some of my
contemporaries, those In important positions, how they got their
start. One of these, connected
with one of tlie biggest concerns
In Canada, began by taking the
first Job that was offered to him
after two years of high school.
In those days people went to
university only if they wished to
enter the professions." Mr. Carson remarked.
MANAGER  AT   BIRKS
The B. C. Manager of Henry
I3irks and Sons continued: "What
applies in one retail store may-
apply more tn another. The jewellery business is built up In
contldence. Dealing with pearls,
for instance: here the customer
must take our word for it that
the gems are genuine. Then, the
jeweller ls brought into tho inner family as most other merchants are not: coming-of-age
gifts, wedding presents, the maintenance of 'Family Silver' registered under your own name, the
choosing of all these help the
jeweller to know his customer in
an intimate way, giving his business a little  more character."
This month Mr. Carson marks
his thirty-fourth year with Birks.
Getting his start in Montreal, he
later moved to Winnipeg, and
thence to Vancouver, where he
has been for the last 23 years.
Besides his position as Manager
of the B. C. branch for his company, Mr. Carson is president of
the   Board  of  Trade.
Beer and Pretzels
Perhaps; But Not
Beer and Co-eds
"Beer parlours are not accepted
socially for college students much
less co-eds," stated Miss M. L.
Bollert, Dean of Women, In her
short talk to the W.U.S. in Arts
100, Monday noon.
"In view of several things said
after the last Co-ed and a few
things said lately," continued
Dean Bollert. "I would like to
remind you that the Co-ed is n
University function. This is a
type of function that is not accepted thoroughly as yet."
"Therefore If you wish to be
loyal to your own University, sex
and position which women are
fulfilling do what is creditable
from the standpoint of the University."
In concluslonMlsti Bollert urged
the women students to place the
"University crest before your
own practise."
Evelyn Wants Her
Dolls Returned
There are about the compus,
people in possession of dolls. The
dollH do not belong to them. They
were lifted from the Nurses' table
on the night of the Science Ball,
when   gaiety  was  at  it  height.
Evelyn Magulre, president of the
Nurses' Society, and responsible
for the return of the dolls ln their
original unsullied state, requests
most earnestly that the parties ln
possession of them will return
them to her, or to Council office.
There  are  two  missing.
JEWELLER
Waller Carson, B. C. manager
of Birks, who said on interview
th.it a jeweller gains a little
more character by knowing his
customer in an intimate way.
Mr Carson is the Vocational
Guidance speaker on Wednesday,
CAREY NOMINATED
FOR PRESIDENT
First nomination in the forthcoming Alma Mater Society
fight for president was filed in
the Society's office this morning by sponsors of Dave Carey,
at present Men's Athletics President.
French Societies
Sponsor Two
Comedies Feb. 25
Next Thursday, February 25th,
at noon in the Auditorium, Le
Comite France-Canada and ..'Alliance Francaise will present two
French comedies entitled "L'An-
glais tel qu'on le parle" and "Les
Doctresses."
"Les Doctresses" is tho story of
a bewildered client, two sisters, one
a doctor of medicine, the other a
doctor of law, and an impudent
maid. The client wishes to consult
the lawyer and in the process of
finding the right person she tells
her story to the medical doctor, and
the maid. The maid realizes that
the client has mistaken her for her
mistress, the lawyer, and being the
type of person she ia, she pretends
to be the lawyer. The humour of
the plot is well portrayed by the
cast nnder the able direction of
Madam P. Auge, wife of the French
consul.
There will be no admission
charge.
"Shame Of a Nation"
To Be Shown Here
By Film Society
Thn Film Society announces a
special bargain membership of
twenty-five cents for three showings, including the presentation
Friday noon of "Shame of a Nation." This film has aroused great
Interest as illustrating the viewpoint of Germany in relation to
peace.
Also included on the same bill
will be assorted short subjects,
while future programmes include
"Don Quixote" with the famous
Russian Basso, Fedor Chaliapin.
George Robey, the well-known
English comedian, and Sidney
Fox.
American Students
To Tour Britain
WASHINGTON, D.C. (NFCUS)—
Two undergraduates of American
University in Washington, D. C,
will represent the United States in
a debating tour of England, Wales
and Scotland which gets under way
next April. They expect to be absent for two months; the tour ia
by way of reciprocation of American invitations to British teams
which have visited the United
States.
Employment In
Fishing Equals
1929 - - Payne
"There were ;is many men
employed in fishing in I'.ril-
ish Columbia wahTsjii I '.)'A\
as there were in 1!»2!>," said
Air. It. It. Payne, as ho addressed the Vancouver Insti-
tulo, Saturday evening, on
"Tlie Fishing Industry of li.
C." In ii lecture1 interspersed
with interesting stories of
early life in Hritsh Columbia,
Mr. Payne outlined to his
audience the history of the
fishing, i n d ustry, described
tlie life histories and methods
of catching the various kinds
of flsh, and gave a picture of
the future of the  industry.
Concerning the first commercial
fishing in Hrltlsh Columbia waters,
Mr. Payne told of tho purchase of
land at Nootka in 17SS hy Captain
Men res. and the explorer's interest
In the halibut fishing and sealing
possibilities of the coast. Following Menros' visit, the Hulling continued under the natives for 100
years, their annual catch being
about   .'!.000,000   pounds.
ATTEMPT   IN   1888
In 1SSS there was the llrst attempt to commercialize the industry when a ship out of Port Town-
shend viKlted Vancouver Inland
waters to take tlsh. Tlie venture
failed because It was impossible to
keep the flsh in good condition till
they reached the market. Then the
C.P.R. built six refrigerator cars
and from that time the fishing industry began to grow, as the fish
could be shipped to reach tin? eastern markets in good condition. The
Grand Trunk Pacific Hallway was
completed to Prince Rupert, and
being a railway terminus the. northern port became a second llshliig
centre.
It was soon fount) that there
was a surplus of tlsh during the
.summer months. To solve this
difficulty cold storage facilities
were installed at New Westminster and later, as tho need developed, all along the coast. Fish are
now shipped to Europe so successfully that upon arrival they have
all the freshness the would have
if consumed locally in B.  C.
LARGE   WAR   DEMAND
Due to the large demand during
war years the fishing banks were
almost depleted ot flsh and the Industry seemed ruined. The annual catch dropped from 60,000,000
pounds In 1910, to only 20,000,00 in
1922. It became necessary to limit
times for Ashing and as a result
of this conservation work the industry began to revive. The 1938
catch showed an increase of 46,-
000,000   pounds.
Mr. Payne described the methods
of catching halibut, herring and
salmon and told of the work of the
Inspection Board. He discussed the
question of cooperation between
labor and capital, and showed
how lt had been achieved in the
fishing industry by means of working  on   shares.
Speaking of the future of the industry, Mr. Payne expressed the
belief that If fishermen from other
countries can be kept from the British Columbia fishing banks, the
present supply can be maintained,
and a successful industry can be
passed  on  to  the  next generation.
Dr. MacLean-Fraser thanked Mr.
Payne for his address. Mr. Ridington occupied  the chair.
Break from Empire
Logical Course For
Canada-Prof. Owen
ANGUS ADVOCATES
FRANCHISE FOR
B. C. ORIENTALS
Prof H. F. Angus, of the Economics Department, addressed aome
forty members and frienda of the
Chinese Students' Club last Thursday evening.
Discussing the question of enfranchisement of second generation
Orientals, he stressed the fact that
they have In proven incidents become more Canadianized than Occidental Canadians. He outlined the
ultimate necessity of such enfranchisement ,and advocated that it be
given now while the number of
eligibles is small, and before bitter
feeling is engenedered.
Beamish and Allen
Lose Debate To
Manitoba Team
Dictatorship and
Parliamentary System
Les Allen and Ludlow Beamish of the Parliamentary
Forum, bowed down to defeat before a team from the
University of Manitoba in a
radio debate over the C.U.C.
Friday evening. The arguments centred around the
relative merits of dictatorship
and the parliamentary system.
DEMOCRACY   CRACKS    UP
Ludlow Beamish, supporting dictatorship, noted that freedom of
thought antl co-operation in the solution of national problems did not
go well together. "The fetters of
the. parliamentary system of government cause democracy to crack
under the strains of great emergencies," he Haiti.
Leslie Allen of U. B. C, termed
political parties doctors who fought
among themselves while their patient, the country, was dying. Modern emergencies call for modern
treatment, he said, antl a sensible
dictatorship Is that treatment. "It
is the genius of our race to meet
situations in the right way, antl I
feel that we could evolve our own
type   of   dictator."
The Manitoba leader, in his case
for democracy, denounced the sacrifice of the Individual under a dictator. Tlie parliamentary system
makes the individual supreme, I.a-
vutlle said, antl as such is worth
while. Ills partner, Richard Boles,
said that dictators help to bring
on war, even though the common
people  may  want  peace.
Japanese Students
Win From U. of W.
Debaters of the U. B. C. Japanese Students' Club successfully upheld the negative of the resolution
that "The infusion of Japanese
culture among, the second generation Japanese in America should
be encouraged," against a team
from the Japanese Students' Club
of the University of Washington.
Catholic Hall, the scene of the debate, was well filled with an enthusiastic  and   youthful  audience.
U.B.C. debaters were: Miss Cana
Okamura, Mr. Peter Htgashl and
Mr. Thomas Shoyama. * Washington was represented by Walter
Hlrazura, Giro Kubo and William
Takashawi. Judges were Prof. J.
Friend Day, Dr. Topping and the
Rev. K. Shlmizu. The Japanese
Consul in Vancouver, the Hon. K.
Neniichl, delivered an address of
welcome to the visitors, and presented the cup donated in 1925 by
the Seattle Japanese Chamber of
Commerce.
The main point of the affirmative
was that second-generation Japanese are ln difficulties at present
because they have no understanding of their cultural backgrolnd,
and therefore should adopt the culture of old Japan. The negative,
taken by U.B.C, stressed the fact
that the first generation had many
difficulties to contend with on their
arrival here, because they had different traditions and culture from
the majority in their new home.
Therefore, any return to the old
culture would be a step in the
wrong direction, and should be
avoided.
The Seattle party was entertained at dinners and parties during their short stay here, and
much credit is due to Roger Obata,
the president of the U.M.C. club,
for his untiring efforts to make
their visit  enjoyable.
Not   Probable Thaugh,
Says Alberta
Speaker
lAXIVKKSITY OK ALBKR-
TA, Edmonton, Feb. 18 (Wi
PC) Two alternatives face
Canada in the matter of foreign policy, Professor Francis
Owen of the Department of
Modern Eanguages, told over
a bundled students assembled at an inaugural meeting
of t h e Canadian Student
Peace movement o n this
campus. "We may stay in
the Empire, as we are now,
In which case we may be expected to take part In any
conflict in which Britain is involved. We may break away
from the Empire and join a
pan-American alliance.
This latter course is the logical
one for Canada to follow, but It
is probably not the one this country will take, said Professor Owen
in tlie course of his talk. The
speaker said he was opposed to
conscription ns it ls at present
understood. He had served in the
last war for four years, he said,
antl no one had ever made up to
him the four years he had lost in
this way. While he was serving at
the front the people who stayed at
home had in many cases been able
to make large profits or secure
rapid advancement. The only kind
of conscription he would support,
Professor Owen said, was a system
under which not only the manpower but all the available wealth
antl resources of the country would
be   conscripted.
It would probably take moral
courage to refuse to light than it
would take simply to fall in with
the marching troops behind the
brass band in the event of war,
lie continued. Asked if he thought
people refusing to enlist might not
simply be taken out and placed before a firing squad, the speaker
remarked, "If 20,000 Canadian university students refuse, lt is unlikely they would all be stood
against a wall and shot."
*       *       *
Alberta Asked to
Give Course In
Gas Treatment
UNIVERSITY OP ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Feb. 8. (WIPU) — A
requaat from the Canadian Department ef Mllltla that the Unlveralty of Albarta Medloal Sohool
offer madloal atudanta a eourae
In the treatment ef vletlma of
polaon gaa effeeta, waa received
here thla weak, acoordlng to re-
porta In the dally papera. Tha
dean of the Faoulty of Medicine
confirmed receipt of the letter
from the Mllltla Department. A
almllar requeat la aald to have
been made to all unlveraltlea In
Canada having a achool of medicine.
Tha auggeated eourae would
probably be eonoerned chiefly
with familiarizing atudenta with
effeeta of varioua typea of poleon
gaa and the appropriate treatment. No action haa yet been
taken by the unlveralty on the
requeat, It waa learned today. In
view of the faot that It aeema
unlikely Canada oould be attacked by the uae of polaon gaa,
considerable apeoulatlon haa been
arouaed aa to the departments
motive  In  making  the requeat.
Conscription Issue
Not Backed By NFCUS
The Ubyaaey haa reeelved a
letter from the aeeretary of the
National Federation of Canadian
Unlveralty Studenta, pointing out
that that organisation haa not In
any way aponaored the recent
propaganda on the laaue of oon-
aorlptlon. The aeeretary of the
N.F.C.U.S. takea exeeptlon to a
Ubyaaey editorial, "Mugwump!
and  Thlnga."
Musical Show
Success Last
Two Mights
Principals Show
Improvement On
Last Nights
A sudden fall of snow Saturday
did not. prevent a large crowd from
attending the final performance of
"Robin Hood" that evening, antl
Musical Society officials are looking forward to a small surplus as
they commence the work of preparing the financial report of the
show.
LOSS   LAST   YEAR
Tills fact does a great deal to
prove tlie success of "Robin Hood"
as compared with other productions. Last year, with a much
smaller budget and slightly more
suitable weather, "Pirates of Penzance" lost the Alma Mater Society
a large sum. The 1937 effort was
considered a greater risk, with high
royalties and greater costume cost
Involved. The operetta was presented an additional evening this
year, bringing the receipts up to a
more satisfactory amount.
A  decided   Improvement  in  the
production   waa   noted   following
the   opening   night.     Critic*   who
attended    Thuraday    evening
praiaed     the     work     of     Callum
Thompson,   as   Robin   Hood,   and
Willa   Elliott, aa  Maid   Marian.   It
waa pointed out by one  reviewer
that the choice of "Robin  Hood"
aa againat a Gilbert and Sullivan
work   waa   unwise,   the   acope   of
the de  Kohven operetta being too
great for student voices.    On the
other hand, another writer praiaed    the    choice    and    the    reaults
gained.
A   great  deal   of  comment   on   the
performance    of    Tatsuo     Sanmiya
was  heard as members  of  the  audiences   chatted   between   acts.     As
Sir  Guy,   the   Japanese   boy   played
his    semi-comic    part    with    ability
and   showed   a   good   voice   In   his
songs.    Improved work on the part
of  Kay  Patterson,  Lewis  Freeman,
and   Marjorie   Thompson   was   also
noticeable.
IMPROVED  WITH  TIME
With an amateur production, it
tt possibly better to judge the
work on the second night, when
the players have found their stage
legs. For students, an opening
night, particularly one before a
student audience, is a thing to be
feared. Certainly, "Robin Hood"
proved Itself a definite success after Wednesday was over.
The production will be remembered for a long time, of course,
for the lovely music and the performance of Oordon Heron and Bill
Cameron, with the principals slipping Into a good enough second
place.
When the time comes, however,
for the selection of a show for next
year, serious consideration should
be given to a return to Gilbert
and Sullivan. There are few opportunities for the hearing of the
works of these artists. If the Musical Society decides against such
a move, the next best thing will
be the selection of a piece as tuneful and pleasant as "Robin Hood."
Texas Co-eds Demand
Right to Disagree
DENTON, Texas (NFCUS) —
Students' rights were given a brief
airing at a recent meeting of Council at Texas State College for Women; the women of the Panhandle
State have very definite ideas on
what rights they deem essential on
the campus. They unanimously
went on record as believing students should have the right to organize, the right to petition, that
students should be represented on
Faculty Committees when discussions concerning a student or student problems are under consideration, that the student press should
be "free," that there should be
complete freedom to "discuss" all
subjects, and, finally, they affirmed
the right of a student to disagree
with a professor as to conclusions
to be drawn from material he presents, "without penalty." Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 23, 1937
THE   UBYSSEY
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY:
Dorwin Baird
SPORTS EDITOR
Dick El son
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Ken Grant        Dorothy Cummings
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITORS
Frank Perry    Frank Turner
Peggy Higgs
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Student rate, $1.00 per year. Rate for non-studants, $1.50 per year,
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone:   TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:   Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited
«H IM HMIMI >• IMIII HI 11 IH II III' • >
OUTMODED SYSTEM
Another debate defeat, the one administered to U. B. C.
by the University of Manitoba over the radio Friday night,
should be taken by those with vision as the final death
knell of old-fashioned debating. The important factor is not
the defeat itself, but the fact that winning and losing have
become so important ln our debating.
Debating, like all other activities, grows up with time.
There are modern methods in this field as well as in all
others, and when an organization such as the Parliamentary
Forum has a long run of adversity, it is time to investigate
some of these methods. Of course, we at U. B. C. cannot
change the attitude of other Canadian universities in this
regard, and we are forced to meet them in encounters based
on the old system.
Someone, however, must start every forward movement. It would be a good idea if U. B. C. came out in a
definite manner again win and lose debating. Some system
of discussion possibly the panel group method, could be substituted with better results. We do not profess to be experts
ln this field, but it takes no expert to see the need of a
change.
It ls not that we are ashamed of losses, though half a
dozen years of them have had their effect, it is rather that
losing, or winning, is no longer fashionable in the realm of
college debating.
S.M.U.S.
Smutterings
The following column ia the contribution of the new assistant
SMUS editor. Here it ia and one
will follow every second week. Hla
name, by the way, ia Ed. Tooley.
Oh to be an Artaman, now that the
exams are near,
Oh to be able to go out nights without that consarned fear,
Oh to get rid of this feeling that
makes things seem so queer,
For   in   only   six   weeks   more   the
exams will be here.
* *     *     *
I  paid my  lady a  visit one  night,
this sin I cannot hide;
She gave me the cold shoulder, and
at her homo I couldn't abide.
She  bounced  me   a  half   hour  for
homeward my tram to ride,
And the sloppy, sleaty snow soaked
me thru to my hide.
* *    •    *
I am a man of experience, aa doubtless you can aee,
For it's unsclencemanisb to let
maidena go free
When they pull auch tricks on the
aclence faculty.
* *    *    *
So here  is  my  suggestion  and  to
motto it's just
Forget your women and forget your
luat,
Be a man, pass your exams or bust.
Long live Science, Ood save SMUS.
* *    *    »
Honourable mention goes to the
U.E.S,   They  did  a neat  piece of
Extensive Canadian
Debate Program
(By N.r-.C.U.S. Service)
Included ln the debating tours
program juat announced tor next
November by the office of the Secretary-treasurer of the N. F. C. TJ.
S., are tbe following projected vis-
Its: (1) A two-man team drawn
from the Western Universities will
tour the universities of the Dakota's, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois and Iowa. (2) A two-man team
drawn from the Marltimes will
tour Ontario and Quebec. (3) A
two-man team drawn from Ontario
and Quebec will tour the Marl-
times. (4) A two-man team drawn
from Ontario and Quebec will tour
Western Canada, as far west as
Vancouver. In no case will the
guarantee exacted be more than
$65, which was the amount set on
the last inter-Canadian series in
1935, when, out of a total of approximately 50 debates, tbe total
net profit, when all profits and
losses were absorbed, amounted to
less than 98.00.
work in bringing Mr. C. E. Carver,
of Carver Patent Office, to apeak to
ua on "Patents in Scientific Work."
Thoae who heard Mr. Carver have
no regret for they heard, in my
opinion, one of the moat clear-cut
speakers to addreaa a U.E.S. meeting.
* •    *    *
• Science '40 ia juat about topa in
the intramurals. Keep in touch
with Jim Usher, you athletes, he
is looking for men for the relay.
• *    •    •
Every Skyrocket ends in Science.
SHOPPING
Tn
We hear that at least one Theta in town has taken to pin planting.
Or how can you explain the Theta pin worn by one of Mr. Aber's male
employees.
■*■*■*.■¥.
Now it is Co-ed time you'd be wise to think of ways and means to
brighten up your sport clothes for the dance. Even if you are paying
the bill you can still look your smart best. THE LINGERIE SHOP on
South Granville has the perfect antidotes for tired dresses In their new
organdie and pigue neckwear.
■¥■¥*■¥
Delicately fragile are the snow-white organdie collars, they can turn
the most serviceable of campus dress into something just right for
informal  parties.
Notice also the pigue and crushed lace collars which come in white
only.
■¥■        •*•        M        ■¥
There is a Beta who came to grief last week. He has the best
looking shiner we have seen for a long time. He claims it all came from
walking   into a door  by  mistake.
GRIT.
If you tried singing recently
when you were Buffering from the
'flu you will know what it is to
have to'warble with a sore throat.
Fortunately, few of us have to sing
as an absolute necessity, so we
weathered the epidemic and kept
our mouths closed.
All of which is by way of introduction to a tribute I'd like to pay
to a member o fthe "Robin Hood"
cast. You see, some people have
got to sing, and a little thing like
a sore throat for them ls just too
bad. Willa Elliott, who played the
feminine lead in tbe operetta, suffered from a throat affliction that
nearly put her out of the play Friday  and  Saturday.
Nearly, but not quite.
Although her understudy stood
by, probably reminding Willa of a
waiting undertaker, the plucky
singer took another does of medicine every time she made an exit,
bit her lips, and prepared to go
back for more. Most people might
call such action plain foolishness,
and they would be right—ln a way.
I prefer to call lt courage; lt
sounds better, though it often
means   the  same.
Let's hope Willa's voice doesn't
desert her for long. In the Wln-
chell manner, I might suggest orchids.
*•        •        •
CAF scene.
About six o'clock the caf
things, are always running through
the minds ot those who write a
lot. Little bits of notions that
never grow up, but usually stay in
the back of the mind, waiting for
a chance to show themselves in
print. O. O. Mclntyre. unashamed,
often lets himself go and pours
these brain babies out onto the
paper with no rhyme nor reason
. . . Just a mixed up paragraph of
odds and ends.
Let's try it. Jim Beverldge of
the Totem ls probably the best conversationalist of the campus. He
can make you fairly flash your
ears ln applause as he tells you of
some of the new ideas for this
year's annual. The "Robin Hood"
chorus wns well trained, when
backstage they slipped into a corner and didn't cause stage-hands
headaches. I was back there for
a moment Saturday evening and
noticed them huddled In a pile
watching the action out front. Seen
at "Wlnterset" Friday night: Dr.
G. O. Sedgewick and "Doc" Brown
of Union College. Uoth looked as
if they liked it. English !>, prepare
to have the Great American Hamlet
torn   to  pieces  before  you.
The Musical Society certainly
knows how to pick usbers. Being
shown to your seat by a smiling
young thing is half the thrill of going to an ameatur show, the professionals lose the personal touch.
Under the leadership of Marjorie
Flndlay, the co-ed crew was ln
perfect  form  for "Robin   Hood."
Appropriate nickname for a girl
in a green dress and red hair —
Ginger. Why do ex-varsity folk,
those who never finished, always
shed a tear when you tell them of
the most recent campus function?
While those who graduated hear
your tales with a hard, oynlcal attitude. Given tbe right breaks,
Peter Lorre will out-Karloff Chancy, If you get the idea. See "Crack-
Up."
The Student Prince has kept his
real name under the hat for a record time for campus writers. Some
day I'll get dirty and break the
news. Down at CRCV Friday night
to watch the debate I took a minute to admire the new studios, done
in green, brown and cream. Very
modern, efficient and smart. Dick
Clarrlngbull has a oopy of the Ubyssey with the Jack Scott article ln
it. Professor Day suffered more
than both tbe d eb a t e r s. He
watched the clock, captioned the
speakers ln their speed, and smoked chain fashion. Showing a real
love of the work he does voluntarily.
A mural at one end of CRCV's
studio A ls not half as food as the
Pub DePoe product. A copy of
"Look" that is going the rounds
proves that all good things have
cheap imitations. "Look" is a very
cheap and useless copy of the new
"Life.* Another word about tbe
Totem. A peek at some advanoe
proofs sponsors tbe bit of advice—
if you've not ordered yours, do so
now. You never oan tell about rising prices these days. So in an
idle wandering way we near tho
end of Column No. 80, a bit ot an
anniversary, eh what?
•        *        *
IDLE thoughts.
Ideas, words, phrases, small
takes on a new air, one far removed
from the noon hour hustle and
shouting. Scattered groups of students slowly pick at food and talk
about essays . . . the waitresses
take their time in fulfilling orders
Correspondence
Editor, Ubyssey.
Dear Madam:
We smile over the thought of
five milk-fed Fraser Valley Soph-
ties taking it into their heads to
flirt with your good Judgment.
We view with a satisfaction
equal to their chagrin, the decision just reached by the Vancouver Presbytery of the United
Church, wherein was formed a
pacifist resolution, submitted to
the Canadian Parliament, which
urges: "that a halt should be
called In the program of world
rearmament." Also being deft ln
deciphering newstype, we quote
further for their enlightenment:
"To this end we believe that
Canada should show an example
by not embarking upon such a
program for this Dominion without a world appeal for a halt.
We appeal to both the Government and the Opposition to this
effect."
Now we could go on further,
but they, (the Chillies) being
"small-town boys" (or are they
milkmaids?) we fear that it
would pass right through their
straw hats, or not even bring a
glimmer of comprehension to
their apple-cheeked faces. So we
rest content in the knowledge
that lt Is really too big a matter
tor them to expound, and we believe that slight attention will be
paid to thetr meandering homespun philosophies. We sincerely
hope, too, that the echoes of the
barnyard will cease.
Signed,
Five  Disgusted  Vancouver
Sophomores,
Editor, Ubyssey.
Madam:
The Frosh, at the start of last
term, were Impressed with the
library law, "Absolute Quiet,"
with a view no doubt to effective
study. Now, I stroll in dally to
Just that thing, finding as usual
that lt ls  impossible  to  do so.
One day's experience ln the
Library enables you to classify
some library nuisances. Let me
me Introduce you to one type of
pest. Just as you are plodding
serenely up to the dizzy heights
of integral calculus, static such
as this, Interferes with your
thoughts:
". . . and he said he was a
fourth year mechanical engineer-
man, some break for me, eh? . . .
so I Just kidded him along, but
I'll bet he dates Jean up anyway,
although I don't for the life of
me see .  .  . etc."    Or,
"Yes, they had a sale of them
on in Hudson's Bay, Isn't it a
darling? Oh, I've Just gotta get
one   .   .   .   etc'   '
Then there Is type 2 pest . . .
The Sorority Girl. These chatter
gaily on about their pin-collecting accomplishments; will discuss the possibilities of another
dance, or date, or jag, and . . .
"do you think he'll get his father's  car?"
Type 3 is the more common, or
garden, variety ... a boy this
time. 'Tls he who expounds loudly and painstakingly his last
week's drunk, or a chem. experiment, or what he thinks ot such
and such a prof, (or perhaps
some new blonde, more likely).
We are blessed, too, with the 4th
type; the Frankenstein who just
wanders around and around, like
a poodle on parade,-finally espies
you, and slaps you on the back
with a "How're you doing, boy?
Say, oould you let me have your
math, notes for awhile?"
Why can this not be ended?
Students who earnestly go there
to do some work have to give
up ln despair. Often I've been
told, "A fellow can't do any work
ln the library any more." In some
of the American Universities attendants are at hand who will
come up to you with a tap on tbe
shoulder, asking you to leave If
you whisper above a gargle.
Something like that would be
very welcome here—although lt
would hardly be necessary it
such pests could be made aware
ot their thoughtlessness for others.
One ot Those Disgusted
Chilliwack  Sophs.
LOST
A key folder, between Arts lockers and Auditorium stage.   Finder
pleaae  notify   Gordon  Gray,   Arta
Letter Rack.
and nobody seems to mind. . . Jean
sits by her cash register and tries
to square her cash with what she
should have . . . the executive ot
a club has supper in a corner and
seriously talks about club policy
. . . two professors light their pipes
and argue over defense estimates
. . . and so on . . . after six half
the lights go out and so do most
ot the people . . . soon, in pairs and
groups they drift over to the Library to settle down to a dreary
night of reading . . . and the girls
in the caf sweep the ashes from
the  floor.   .  .
"Let em* itrva year car, and   year ear wtll terv yea."
"FRANK" FICKK
A.B.C. 8ERVI0E 8TATI0N
24-Hour Emergency Service — Complete Repair Facility*
SOUTH END OF McGlLL ROAD PT. GREY 53
"I'm looking forward te a wonderful weok-end—M
'You'll have It — I've brought plenty of Sweet Captl"
SWEET CAPORAL  CIGARETTES
'The puratt form in which tobacco can be *moked."—/\inc*t
♦
Educational Stationery Loose-Leaf Binders
FOUNTAIN PENS
Drawing Instruments Slide Rules
Social Printing and Engraving
The
CLARKE & STUART
Company Limited
STATIONERS PRINTERS ENGRAVERS
550 Seymour Street Phona Trinity 1341 Vancouvar. B. C.
The Bdltor ot the Ubyssey.
Madam:
We thank you kindly "Ubyssey,"
and we ask no apology. We are
very pleased tbat we have been at
least on the academically useless
plane  with  the Artsmen.
We cannot take credit from the
machine shops for supplying the
ploughs, harrows, picks, shovels,
etc., nor for the miners and engineers, whose noble art belped to
keep the Boulevards and sewers
open   in   dire   need.     It   was   only
when there was danger ot the tender feet of Artsmen getting wetted, that the Aggies came down
trom their exalted plane to their
assistance.
We would ask you to rise, but
not even the Sciencemen would lay
the blame of Rosalind's twins upon
the Aggies, so we now turn a cold
shoulder and fervently hope that
the metaphorical knees remain
bent and  well  bruised.
Signed,
AMUSED  AGGIES.
JM
The Sun a liberal paper
Jtf OT in the sense of being a political party organ,
for the Vancouver Sun has about as good an Idea
as the next man of the weaknesses political parties
are heir to. And we have been told, from time to time,
that some of our own ideas are not any too advanced;
that they are old-fashioned, in fact. But the Sun is
most distinctly a newspaper of liberal outlook. Its
columns have been for years and are now open to the
examination and ventilation of advanced thought. Our
regular contributors are, significantly, writers who by
no means fall Into the mold of orthodoxy, and they
write as they feel and think. If we do not push into
the unexplored as fast as the bold spirits of the vanguard the Sun is no comfort to the apostles of reaction. Probably "liberal" describes the Sun policy
about as well as any word could, and people of liberal
intentions feel comfortable when they read it. To
read the Sun regularly it is only necessary to phone
Trinity 4111. Tuesday, February 23, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
The VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
SOCIETY
Announces
The Sixth and Final Concert
of the Season at the
STRAND
THEATRE
Sunday
March 7th, at 3.00 p.m.
ALLARD da RIDDER, Conductor
Soloist,
I wan Phlllppewtky, Pianist
Tickets on Sale at
M. A. KELLY MUSIC  HOUSI
659 Oranvllle Street
A Modern Romance
Information,   speculation;   fluctuation ;   rumination.
Dissipation,  degradation;   reformation, or atarvation.
Application,  situation;   occupation,
restoration.
Ooncentration,    enervation,    nerve
prostration.    A vacation.
Deatlnatlon, country station.    Nioe
location, recreation.
Ebcploratlon,   observation,   fascination,—a flirtation.
Trepidation,   hesitation,   converaa-
tion, atlmulatlon;
Invitation,  acclamation,  sequestration,  cold  libation,
Stimulation, animation; inspiration
new potation,
Demonstration,   agitation,   circulation, exclamation 1
Declaration,     acceptation,     osculation, sweet sensation;
Exultation,    preparation,    combination, new relation.
—Dalhousle Oasette.
PSYCHOLOGY OF
HAMBURGERS
This is not an article about how
to cook hamburgers, or how to sell
hamburgers, or even how to eat
hamburgers. I know nothing about
humburger statistics and care less.
My friend Nicodemums Q. Smalley
could probably write an article beginning thus: "X pounds ot meat
went into the manufacture ot this
popular dish in the year x. — per
cent of the population of the North
American continent consumed R plus
hamburgers on an average day in
the year   A.D."    Statistics are
a false and unreal interpretation
of a very real situation and aa such
should be suppressed as being opposed to the publio good.
Here I am concerned with tbe
psychological effect of hamburger
consumption on the average man.
As tbe average man Is non-existent
tor all practical purposes, I will
postulate myself as a representative
case.
A year ago I was normal. I lived
in a modern Eden, oomplete with
forbidden fruit, thorns and slushy
winters. I survived the usual run
of trials and tribulations and was
the  better for them.
Came a snake in the grass. This
traitor, this city hypocrite, this
damned and damnable belly-crawler
found the chink in my tig leaf and
wormed his way into my good
graces. All was lost. Unknown
to me I was doomed to an eternity
ot negligibility, surrounded and upheld by the unborn living. "We
are such stuff" as dough is made
of, and our little life is rounded in
an abattoir.
On a cold bitter night my Judas
enticed me by foul pretences and
entreaties into a future grave, warm
safe and replete with detectable
odors aa It then seemed. Sitting
at a high counter I looked at the
delightful faces around, inhaled
savory exhalations dreaming, fool,
that I had found heaven. Falling
into a swoon of luscious sensibility,
pain, cold, weariness fell from me
as immortality rose in an all-devouring tide.
Day and night I lived for the
hours spent in my hamburger-opium
orgies. Somewhere, lost and by
the wind tossed, my pitiful ghost
wailed through the world while I
revelled in a sensual paradise. I
never knew what I had forsaken. I
still  don't.
"TO HIOH SCHOOL?    NAY, TO COLLEGE SIRE!"
SMI LINO, THE BOY FELL DEAD.
(Headline: "Business Men Dislike College Graduate*.")
The Banker, the Aristocrat,
The Cowhand with his lariat
Bourgeois and Proletariat
All heartily agree
That, while they have strength to totter,
They'll stand hell fire and high water
Ere they Bend a son or daughter
To a university.
Chorus:
Then sing heigh! sing ho! for college boys,
The track and basketball age boys,
The thirsting-after-knowledge-boys,
Whom only Ood could love!
Co-eds are cold and haughty,
Sophomores are lewd and naughty,
Upperclassmen all have dotty
Doctrines radical and bitter.
The only thing to celebrate
About the average graduate
Is that, if any, one point eight
WlU represent his litter.
The sing heigh! sing ho! for college boys,
The track and basketball age boys,
The thirsting-after-knowledge boys,
Whom only Ood could love!
In Italy or Russia,
War-torn Spain or Nazi Prussia
The trend ls not to trust you
If you mention a degree.
Political bombasticism
Is driving our scholasticism
Back into monastlcism
Anyone can see.
Then sing heigh! sing ho! for college boys,
The coonskin, flask, football age boys,
The thirsting-after-knowledge boys,
Whom Ood alone could love!
CLASSIFI
UNIVERSITY
BUSINESS
DIRECTORY
Listed balow are leading Vancouver Professional, Business and
Manufacturing Concerns, compiled for easy reference. By referring
to the Plrms and Individuals raprasantod, your every need can be
easily and completely satisfied. You will find It Convenient and
Profitable to do so.
Retain This Directory for Immediate and Future Use.
RUSS IN LOSS AT
MOSCOW!
Ruaa Keillor, former Varaity student, lost a close decision to Forrest Ober, University of Idaho
heavyweight, in a recent tournament held at Moscow, Idaho,
Russ, you will remember, chalked
up a win in Seattle several weeks
ago, and as a result earned a trip
to Idaho with seven other Vancouver sluggers. Six ot the eight
battlers were stopped by tbe States
College men, three by knockouts.
Alma Service Station
124-HOUR GARAGE SERVICE
Broadway at Alma
Bayviaw 74
Alberta Hockey Co-eds
Lose Close Series
UNIVERSITY O F ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Feb. 18 (WIPU)—University of Alberta women's hockey
team lost to the Calgary Grills in
a close-fought series for the Alberta championship at the Banff winter carnival last week-end. The
Varsity team lost the first game
1-0 and the second game was tied
at 0-0. Calgary drew numerous
penalties and at one time had only
three players on the Ice, but the
Varsity girls lacked sufficient finish
around the net to score. Varsity
also lost to the Calgary outfit 1-0
in an exhibition game played ln
Calgary the day previous to the
Banff carnival.
Alberta Basketers
Move Step Nearer to
Prov. Championship
UNIVERSITY O F ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Feb. 18 (WIPU)—The
University of Alberta senior men's
basketball team moved another
step nearer the Northern Alberta
basketball championship last night
when they defeated the Edmonton
Y.M.C.A. Redskins, 39-33. This was
the fourth game in a four-out-of-
seven game series tor the northern division title. So far, Varsity
has won three games and the Redskins have taken one. One more
win will give Varsity the championship and the rlgbt to meet the
southern Alberta winners tor the
provincial title.
GLOVES LOST
Lost, Saturday morning, a pair
of black kid gloves. Finder please
return to the Lost and Found, Mr.
Home's office.
BRIEF ABSCONDED
Will party who accidentally absconded with black brief-case from
Caf coat-rack on Wednesday night,
pleaae return same to Mr. Horn's
office?   Important.   P. H. Blanchet.
MATHEMATICS CLUB
A regular meeting was held Friday, February 12th, at the residence of Miss A. Hamilton. Mr. J.
Kadzellawa presented "Galois' Theory of Groups," in an interesting
paper. The next meeting of tho
club will be held on  February 26.
IF THE TRUTH
WERE TOLD . ..
"Good evening, folks, this ts your
old friend, Eddy Rubens, again
with another rollicking, romping,
rhythmic riot of gags and gals tor
your evening's entertainment. Tonight the guest of honor of our
Laughing Gag Cigarette Show is
none other than that maestro of
song writers, the man wbo wrote
this wee k's Number One hit,
"Sweetheart ot Swing"! PRESENTING . . . Ivan Jones!"
"Thank you, Eddy. Thank you,
ladies and gentlemen . . ."
"And now, Ivan, tell us what inspired you to write "Sweetheart ot
Swing"?"
"Well, I didn't really write it at
all, Eddy. I swiped the tune from
Irving Berlin's "Moment ot Magic,"
and rehashed lt ln ope or two
places ..."
"But who was the girl you had
In mind, Ivan? There must have
been someone—your charming wife,
a childhood sweetheart of long
ago, or . . ."
"My wife and I ain't met ln
weeks, and even If we did we don't
spenk. No, I Just swiped the tune
from Berlin because I was running
short of dough."
"To what do you attribute your
success as a musician, Ivan? Was
lt all hard work, or did Lady Luck
give you a hand?"
"My father is a leading shareholder ln the Laughing Jag Cigarette Company."
"Speaking of Laughing Jags,
Ivan, don't you agree they're really
the 'cigarette with a heart,' the
most delicious tasting .  .  ."
"Sorry, but I don't smoke, Eddy.
All brands ot cigarettes are bad
for the throat, nerves, and even the
heart. My friends tried that complimentary package you Bent over,
and they said the tobacco was stale
and dry, and left their mouths and
throats feeling like Hamburger
steak, . ."
"Laughing Jags are the oholce
of America. Plain, cork, or filter
tipped, oval or round. Laughing
Jags are the high-class smoke with
the low-class price, Ask tor the
cigarette in the bright blue carton,
or write today to . . ."
"Bddy."
"Uhh . . . yes?"
"Let me see your script a moment. . . . Thanks. Now, lets hear
you talk about Laughing Jags on
your own. Come on, Eddy. No,
stop grabbing! You can't bave tbe
script!"
"Please, Ivan!"
"No!     Now go ahead!"
"But I gotta have it, Ivan. I'm
don't speaking so good English
without I have mine scrip for reading. Please, Ivan! Ach, Himmel!
Play Benny . . ."
Churches
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
CHURCHES
Branches of The Mother Church,
The  First  Church  of  Christ,
Scientist,    In    Boston,    Mass.
Sunday Services, ll a.m. and 7.30 p.m.
Wed.   Evening  Meetings  at  8   o'clook,
Include  testimonials of
Christian  Science  Healing
Sunday  Sohool,  9.80 a.m.  and  11 a.m.
First Church of Christ, Scientist
1160 W. aeorgla Street
Reading  Room,   Birk*   Bldg.
Second Church of Christ, Scientist
Twelfth Ava. and Oypraaa St.
Reading   Room,   Dick   Bldg.
1488 W. Broadway, at Oranvllle St.
Third Church of Christ, Scientist
Thurlow and Burnaby Streata
Reading Room, Church Edifice
Christian Science Socloty
■alvadara Hall, Tenth Ave. and Main
Reading Room, Church Hdlfloe.
The publio la. cordially Invited to
attend the services and visit tihe
FREE reading rooms where The Bible
and authorised Christian Science literature may be read, borrowed or purchased.
CANADIAN MEMORIAL
CHURCH       Cor. 15th and Cedar
Minister,
Rev. G. Harrison Villett, B.A.
One  of  Canada's  Most   Beautiful
Churches.   Services Every Sunday.
Week-day Activities include
Physical Education Classes,
Badminton and Swimming
Ours is the Friendly Church
ST. JAMES' CHURCH (Anglican)
Gora and Cordova
Designing
MADAM L. WELLINGTON
Expert Designer and Stylist
Gowns, Suits and Dresses made to
suit  every  individual   requirement
Specializing in Hand-Woven
Materials
2666 Alma Road Bay. 7227
Vancouvar, B. C.
Electric
CANADIAN GENERAL
ELECTRIC CO. LTD.
1065 West Pander
Soy. 3211
Hardware
MARK DUMOND
Hardware
Paints, Farm Implements
Harness Made and Repaired
832 Main St. Say. 30
Paper
COLUMBIA PAPER COMPANY
LTD.
Wholesale   Paper   Merchants
and Manufacturing Stationers
986 Homar Street Vancouver
TUDIO
Organised for SflBolont Servloe
aaa <u_A_rvsw-i stman
DANCIN
Every Wednesday and Saturday
ALMA ACADEMY
*        Stan Patton's Orchestra
Sanitation
Rev. W. Cooper
Rev. H. R. Whitehead
Rev. Eric G. Munn
Sundays
7.30, 8.30, 9.30—Holy Communion
11.00—High Mass
7.30—Solemn Even Song
Barbecue
Compliments of . . .
WHITE SPOT BARBECUE
67th Ave. and Granville St.
Bicycle Rentery
VARSITY BICYCLE RENTERY
R. J. Routledge
4607 10th Ave. W. P.G. 811
Bicycles for Rent
CLOSEST TO VARSITY
Sales         Repairs
Brewing
Compliments of . . .
CAPILANO BREWING CO.
Cafes
You'll enjoy . . .
The INTIMACY
The COMFORT
The GENUINE HOSPITALITY
of OUR RESTAURANT
SCOTT'S CAFE
722 Granville St. Sey. 2621
Decorators
A. V. LEWIS, LTD.
General Decorators
Wallpaper Paints
Established 1909
2756  Granville Bay.  2684
CLEANS   AS   NOTHING
ELSE DOES
0HAD
emulsifies   the
Greases
For .he Kitchen, Clothes,
Silverware,
Bath, Washing
At your Grocer, 15e    Va\r\t.
DUSTBANE   PRODUCTS   LTD.
1285 Pender St. W.       Soy. 4641
Photographers
0E0. T. WADD8
Portraits
Ground Floor Studio
1318 Granville St. Sey. 1002
PHOTO ARTS LIMITED
S. C. Thompson, Mgr.
Specialist in
Photographic Enlargements and
Reproductions
Kodak Developing and Printing
573 Hornby Street Soy. 9077
Tailors
A. STUART
Civil and Military Tailor
Breeches Maker
Ladies' Riding Habits and
Breeches a Specialty
413 Granville St. Sey. 6838
For quickest and best Dry Cleaning
Service in Point Grey
PHONE ELLIOTT 1540
F. L. ANSCOMBE, Custom Tailor
4433 West Tenth Ave.
Dry Cleaning, Pressing,
Remodelling, Repairs
Suits Pressed While You Wait
Schools
STENOTYPY
The Modern Machine Way of
Shorthand
Get  complete  information  as  to
what this means to you
STENOTYPE SCHOOL
Soy. 5406 522 West Ponder
H.   FAULKNER  SMITH
SCHOOL OF APPLIED
AND FINE ART
Recognized, by  B.C.   Dept.  of  Education
Day and Evening Classes In
COMMERCIAL, APPLIED AND
ANO PIN! ART
Prospectus on Application
MARINE   BUILDING SEYMOUR  «31
Stationers
C. P. FOSTER & CO. LTD.
Commercial and Educational
Stationers
Engineering, Optical and
Mathematical Instruments
592 Seymour St. Soy. 5070
SMITH, DAVIDSON 6- WRIGHT
LIMITED
Wholesale Stationers and
Paper Dealers
Homer and Davie Sts., Vancouver
The CLARKE & STUART Co. Ltd.
Stationers, Printers, Bookbinders
Social Printing and Engraving
Educational Supplies
Architects' and Surveyors'
Instruments
550 Seymour St. Trin. 1341
Vancouver, B.C.
ALBERT J. KYME
Exclusive Ladies' Tailor
Suits or Coats $35.00 and up
2320 Alma Road Bay. 54
Transfer
ROYAL TRANSFER LTD.
E. C. Davison, Manager
Baggage to and from All Trains
and Boats
Office at 314 Granvilla St.
Near C. P. R. Depot
Phono Soy. 6
Tobacco
BERT HENRY STORES
Retail Tobacconists
Stores located at:
601 Granville St. Soy.   434
898 Granville St. Sey. 7358
510 West Hastings Soy. 6627
74 West Hastings 160 E. Hastings
Office: 1037 West 15th Ave.
Phone Bay. 8496
Featuring "COMOY"
Featherweight Pipes
Teas
Compliments of
BLUE RIBBON LIMITED
E. Yuill, Manager
Pacific Coast Division
Vancouver
Welfi
are
FIRST UNITED CHURCH
WELFARE DEPARTMENT
Superintendent,
Rev. Andrew Roddan
HELP  US TO  HELP OTHERS!
We need shoes, clothing, beds and
furniture   for   the   less   fortunate
members of the community.
Phone Trinity 3807 or Sey. 6266 RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN V.A.C.
GYM. THIS SATURDAY FOR
FIRST GAME OF HOOP FINALS
CLASSIC ARTS '30 ROAD RACE
TO BE RUN TODAY
TIME:  12:30 SHARP
Pour
THE       U   B Y S S E Y
Tuesday, February
] 937
LOCAL U. SKIERS DEFEAT WASHINGTON OYER WEEK-END
VARSITY CO.T.C. RIFLEMEN
CANADIAN COLLEGE CHAMPS
Daunt and Olsen of U.B.C. Team Tie Blair
Range Record; Score 104 Out of 105
The results of the Inter-University Canadian Rifle Competition
have just been tabulated, and reveal
that the eight ritembers of the U.
B.  C. team wero victorious.
The event, although scheduled for
last fall, was so arranged that
every University was given the opportunity to run it off whenever
they wanted, and because of the
laxity of some of the eastern
Varsities in getting their results in,
the final scores are only now definite and complete.
The local sharp-shooters, who
held thetr trials at the Blair
range on the North Shore, are
the first University to win this
competition west of Winnipeg. In
scoring this triumph, the U.B.C.
men scored a total of 803 points
out of a possible 840.
DAUNT AND OLSON
TIE RECORD
In accomplishing this feat, Corporal A. Daunt and 2nd-Lieut. R.
Olson tied the record of 104 out of
a possible 106. A co-holder of this
record is Colonel Letson, a member
of the Canadian Paisley team, and
by equalling it the boys havo
pushed themselves Into the front
ranks of Canadian riflemen.
Other   members   of   the  team,
however,  must not  be  forgotten
when it comes time to give out
the  orchids.    Although  they   did
not aet any records, they all performed very capably, and went to
make  up   one   of   the   best  rifle
teams   that   any    University   in
Canada has produced in the last
few  years.
Following is a list of the names
of the team members, showing their
scores:
Corporal A. Daunt 104
2nd   Lieut.   R.   Olson 104
2nd-Lieut. P. Layrd 100
2nd-Lieut. A. P. Fawley 100
Corporal  H.  Mann 100
Lieut. H. P. Godard  »»
2nd-Lieut. A. D. Greenwood.... »9
2nd-Lieut. A. G. Dickey  07
—H. A. SHIRREFF.
Arts '39 Leading
Intramurals
Arte *39 are on top of the
Intramural heap closely followed
by Science '89, who are in the
seml-flnals of both the volleyball
and basketball, not having dropped a game.
Arte '37 is scheduled to play
Science '38 and Science *3» to
play Arts '40 in volleyball tomorrow. On Friday Education
will take on Science '39 and Aggies will tussle with Arts '37.
•OARF  LOST
Lost, ln Arts 106, a blue and red
(MacBeth Tartan) scarf. Would
finder please Inform to R. Atkinson,
Arts  Letter Rack.
■     a   9151
STAR CABS *
Manager: Bob Strain, '33
Juat about all you could atk fer . . .
Aristocratic Hamburgers
Limited
Kingsway at Prater    —    Tenth at Alma
Vancouver, I. C.
Fairmont 106 Bayviaw 4448
"Take Some Home"
Dr. C. M. Whitworth
Dentist
Telephone Illlot 17M
Hours: 9 to 6
Saturday: 9 to 1
Cor.  10th and Sasamat St.
I  GET  MY CLOTHES and
FURNISHINGS
CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
ARTS' 30  RACE
TO BE  RUN
TODAY  NOON
The long-awaited Arts '30 bunion
derby will get. under way at 12.30
today. After a week-end of hectic
praying to tlie Clods of Weather by
Joe Rita that they might relent
enough to at least clear off a space
on the Mall where he could start
the race, Joe emerged from his
trance yesterday, stating that tho
classic would he run, regardless of
weather  conditions.
It is, however, understood, that
Rita will sacrifice one or two Junior managers on tlie altar of Jupiter Pluvius that the coarse might
be  clear.
All  contestants  muat   report  In
atrip at  12.15 oppoaite the eairn.
Conventional    attire    will    be    a
bathing  suit,  but  any  runner attempting to negotiate tha oourae
by  means  of an  outboard  motor
will  be disqualified.
Points won in  this historic event
will go  toward the class aggregate
as   credit   for   the   Governor's   Cup.
The   winner   will   count   40   points,
second   38   points,  and   so  on  down
to   the   twentieth   man   to   finish.—
A.  O. JONES.
Co-Eds   Defeat
Farmers 47-10
McEwan, Campbell and
Wilson Star for U.B.C.
Shuffling cautiously on a dance
floor masquerading as a basketball
hall for the evening, the Senior A
girls played, or rather slid around,
with a quintet at Cloverdale Saturday to whitewash thorn 47-0.
Cheered on and serenaded by the
Varsity rooting section of six, the
co-eds completely overwhelmed the
bewildered local team. Time after
time our girls ran down the floor
to the three-quarter mark, debating
meanwhile whose turn it was . to
shoot, slide to under the basket and
score.
With very little effort, McEwen,
Campbell and Wilson were top
scorers with ten points each, and
Trapp accounted for nine. Neil
Trapp, a newcomer this year, is
rapidly becoming; one of the beat
basketball players in the city. She
is always in every play, though she
seldom tries  to shoot herself.
Highlights of the evening—the
perfect unison of Ena Clarke and
her check as they slid basketwards
—the two "heroes" who accompanied the girls, dashing Into a Burnaby house to inf rm the owners It
was on Are, then helping to put it
out—the snow-flght after the game
with Nell Trapp acclaimed champion—the number of dogs that attended the game and barked applause.
—MYRNE NEVISON.
Sr. B's  Triumph   In
Cloverdale
Through slush and rain Saturday
night the senior B men slid to
Cloverdale, then slid around a
dance floor there to the tune of
a 31 26 defeat from the local quintet.
Fast breaks and quick passing
plays just weren't. Till the closing
minutes of the game the players
were more concerned with keeping
on their feet than really trying to
win. As the end drew near the
Varsity team staged their usual
rally, but it failed as the farmers
too  put  on  extra  steam.
High scorer for this exhibition
was Oeorge Pringle in person, who
graciously condescended to play as
a substitute (of course he took hts
strip with him Just for something
to carry). He collected the whole
of eight points, while Lafon, Jones
and Wright accounted for four
markers  each.
U. B* C.   OUTDOOR   CL UBBERS
FAVORED FOR COAST  TITLE
Mickey P.ogue,   Tom Church Finish One-Two
In Cross- Country ; Killam First In Downhill
By   VAN    PERRY
University of H. C. skiers paved the way to ti win in tlie Intercollegiate Ski C'lumipiosliip, when they trounced Washington Huskies
30O-252.-I7 on' Grouse Mountain over tlie week-end. Saturday, the crosscountry race from the Outdoors Club Cabin to Thunderbird Kidge anil
back was held under excellent weather conditions, and Sunday, in a
penetrating  Scotch   mist,   the  downhill  and   slalom   events   were   run  off.
POGUE,  CHURCH   FINISH   ONE-TWO
Varsity got off to an auspicious start by taking the crosscountry event 100-56.98; with Mickey Pogue flrat, Tom Church aecond, and three other U.B.C. men in the next three places. Don
Clarke  waa  unable  to  finish   becauae  of cramp.
Sunday morning, with a cold win swirling millions of drops of
water through the toughest clothes, the downhill race over the Nosee-
ums' Kandahar course was run. This Kandahar ls a tough course at
any time, but under the tricky snow conditions caused by the usual
Vancouver humidity, it's a wonder that there weren't several casualties.
Dave Killam of U.B.C., took this event, with Hill of Washington, second;
score:   100-08.43.
U. W.'a  HILL WINS SLALOM
In the afternoon, about twenty enthusiastic skiers laid out a brand
new slalom track on the Big Hill, and then stood around disconsolate
and damp while Washington fought to tie up the score. Hill of Washington, skimmed the flags to win, but Bob Taylor of Varsity, took second, and two other Varsity men filled up the other two places. Scoring here was 100-97.06.
Miokey Pogue'a time for the crosa-country run waa 67 mlnutea,
47 aeoonda, with Tom Church a cloae aecond In 58 mlnutea, 40
aeconda. Killam'a time down the Kandahar waa 2 mlnutea, 18,
followed by Hill of Waahington In 2 mlnutea, 32. Thia aame Hill
took the two runa of the alalom event In a total of 74.0 aeconda,
and Bob Taylor, U.B.C, came cloae to him with a time of 70.9
aeoonda.
The snow was very peculiar, and If a man got off the track at all,
ho was certain to end up In a heap, but the tracks themselves were
fairly good, showing only a slight drag on the  turns .
HOT   FIRES   ANP   FOOD
In spite of these uninspiring conditions, all events were hotly contested, with every evidence of the best in sportsmanship and good
humor, and bedraggled devotees of the greasy-plank returned to the
warmth and comfort ot hot Ores and food kept ready for them by the
untiring efforts of Betty Street, vice-president of the Outdoors Club,
and her three assistants, Polly Brand, Audrey Chowne and Agnes
Gwynn.     (And waa that chocolate  cake good I)
Orchitis are in order also for the men who braved wind and rain
to  mark the  courses,  start,  and   time  tlie  various  events.
The next tournament will be with the College of Puget Sound, on
the slopes of  Mount Rulnler,  March   4th,  5th  and   6th.
START PRACTISIN' BOYS! - - - -
 START PRACTISIN'
Below you aee the hlghwaya and bywaya over whieh all aaplranta
for fame In the annual Arta '20 road race will trek. All man who wlah to
daaart the good eld olnder paths for the aaphalt are advlaad te look thla
map over and then to arouaa themeelvaa In time In the morning to gat
In a little praotlce. The raee, whieh will be held In a week or ao, oen-
alata of eight laps. Applleatlona will be gladly received by Track
Managar "Joe" Rita.
OT«aT
ROUTL
OF
ARTS  '20   RE.LAY
!______ M.
jjjMjiut vr
HK&l    UP
PlXt   6T.
ikiflHAvc.     OtCONO   IAP
UUCH   4T
<5
WAIMUo    ST.
l<.otUrH_yo«P'"
«,.*... THIRD   UP
«^4lh Avenue.
_.I*IH    LAP
Fmi-M
L
n__f
StVtNTH   WAP
I«rtirat__«'N
I Aul»V0tluH
 EIGHTH
(|<I»I      MM l
\.r\y
— SHOWS
S1AR1 »nd nmsii
 p*   IAP	
British Consols
Province Team Throw
Hoop Scare Into Varsity
Chuck Jones' Province hoopers
gave plenty of warning of what's
to come in Lower Mainland flnala with Varaity, when they outplayed the visiting whisker-merchants and won by a 39-35 win
on   Saturday   night.
Maury Van Vllet'a melon-tose-
ers aren't taking any chances on
the Newslea copping the annual
claaslc and the coveted entry Into
the Dominion Playdowna. Practices have been called for every
day thla week, and the Blue and
Qold baaketera will be knotting
every muacle getting Into ahape
for the flrat of the three out of
five aerlea alated for this coming
Saturday   in   the   V.A.C.   gym.
COME ON OVER TO
THE HEN RANCH!
The campus gym on Thursday
afternoons more antl more resembles a chicken ranch the day after
Thanksgiving as leathers from
the shuttles litter up the floor. Miss
Moore's mixed tourney Is proving
very popular, but as there are
more boys entered .than girls, the
ladies have a choice of partners
(lucky girls).
Each person playing ls now asked
to pay the small, sum of 10 cents
to defray the cost of shuttles. As
all'you economists can see, this is
a very small price for an afternoon's enjoyment. So all you badminton fans who cannot play at.
any other time, turn iu your names
to Miss Moore ad come out and
Join In the fun.—J. B. & A.  J.
WESTERN
MUSIC
COMPANY
LTD.
Specialists In
SH-ET MUSIC and
MUSIC  LITERATURt
Supplies for  all
FESTIVALS   and   MU
EXAMINATIONS
SIC
570
Seymour Street
Vancouver,
B.C.
M*
CRITICAL MOMENTS
W-H-EN YOU
•ARRIVE
•sm\ LIT!
LAT€ -FOR
YOUR DATE
—AND YOU -FIND  *SOM€ ON€*
■HAS GOT T+1ERE JUST A -FEW
MINUTES Afi€AD 0¥ YOU	
YOUR  WORRIES WILL Q.UICKLY
DISAPPEAR    IE   YOU	
AWO  e»*joy
TH*
_ES1
Your Photographer
'The Latest in Portraiture"
3708 West Tenth Avenue Phone: Bayview 1398
For Your Next Class Party, Dance, or Social Occasion . . ,
See ANDERSON for the Printing
Phone Seymour 3400 455 Hamilton Street

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124069/manifest

Comment

Related Items