UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 19, 1920

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124064.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124064.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124064-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124064-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124064-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124064-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124064-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124064-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124064-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124064.ris

Full Text

 Issued Weekly by  the  Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 19, 1920
Number 17
Arts '23 Wins
Relay Race
TIME*  37  MIN.  30  SEC —SENIORS
FINISH SECOND
Anyone who may have wished to enter the Publications' retreat, "The Better
'Ole," on Saturday afternoon, before 3
o'clock, would have had a hard task.
Staunch supporters of the various relay
teams filled the room, both with their
bodies and their voices, which continued
high until the telephone rang. "Hello!"
answered the chief reporter. "Yes, end
of the third leg, with Arts '20 in the
lead, followed by Arts '23." "Hurrah!"
yelled the Seniors gathered there, and
then they passed the news to the crowd
outside. The rest of the message passed
unheard.
The relay started, with the signal
from Mr. Elliott, shortly after 2 o'clock.
Rear, of Arts '23, set the pace for the
first lap, which was practicaly all down
grade, and he was followed by J. Schell
and MacKinnon, close together. Within
a hundred yards of the post Schell was
seized with an acute stitch in his side,
and, although he gallantly attempted to
go on, he was forced to drop. This left
Arts '20 second, with Rear over fifty feet
in advance, but a hard and rather spectacular spurt brought MacKinnon almost
abreast of his man at the post. Weld
soon removed this lead and established
a more substantial one for his year, leaving Arts '23 second, with Agriculture and
Science third and fourth. At the third
post Mr. Elliott re-started Arts '21 even
with the last man.
It was on the fourth lap that "Chubb"
Arnott placed Arts '23 in the lead, and
Arts '20 in second place. It was on this
lao, too, that Mathers for Science and
Milley for '21 outran Agriculture and
ga:ned third and fourth places respectively. For three more laps of hard
running these positions remained unchanged, until, in the last sprint, Russell
beat Rae, of Science, to the door of Arts
building, after H. Arkley and H. L.
Keenleyside had preceded him. Agriculture finished fifth.
The race was characterized throughout by good running. The whole course
of 7.5 miles of hilly country was made
in thirty-seven and a-half minutes. If
it could be said that any of the runners
excelled, perhaps they were MacKinnon,
Weld, Siddons, Coates, Arnott, Russell
and Mathers.
The two first teams were:
Arts '23—Rear, Cameron, Walker, Ar-
Science Men Hold
First Annual Dance
LESTER COURT SCENE OF GAY
GATHERING
The first ball of the Science Undergraduate Society was held last Wednesday night, and so great was the success
of the initial enterprise that there is no
doubt that from now on this function
will be staged annually. The patronesses
for the evening were Mrs. L. S. Klinck,
Mrs. R. W. Brock, Mrs. J. M. Turnbull,
Mrs. P. H. Elliott and Mrs. E. G. Mathe-
son.
Nine o'clock found Lester Court
crowded with happy, sparkling young
life, intent on enjoying five hours of gay
and carefree pleasure. The general
aspect of the hall was brilliant, in spite
of the fact that the room itself was not
decorated. There were a few signs upon
the walls in the shape of a design announcing the name of the affair and various cards scattered around bearing
some letter of the alphabet. These placards were supposed to designate certain
rendezvous so that the dancers could
divide themselves into various groups.
This excellent scheme, intended to facilitate the finding of partners by the
men, was, unhappily, used by very few
people.
The orchestra, led by Miss Marjorie
Stevens, provided superb music, and
certainly was a great factor in making
the success of the evening. With two
saxaphones and a zylophone to give a
swing to the music, a smooth floor and
a merry, laughing throng, what more
could be desired? The supper seemed
to satisfy everybody. Certainly it was
dainty enough for the most fastidious
taste, and plentiful enough for the most
voracious  appetite.
Great credit is due the executive of
the Science Undergraduate Society, and
most especially to the hard-working
president, Mr. Kingham, for making
such  complete  arrangements.
nott,   Wilson,    Cassidy,    Saunders    and
Arkley.
Arts '20—McKinnon, Weld, Siddons,
Berto, Nelson, Coates, Morrison and
Keenleyside.
The Arts '20 relay team wish to
take this opportunity to congratulate publicly the winners of the
race from Point Grev.
Arts '20 Wins
Inter-class Debate
SENIORS    AND   JUNIORS   ARGUE
FOR W.L.S. SHIELD
On Wednesday afternoon the Women's
Literary Society held the second of the
series of inter-class debates. Miss E. P.
H. Smith and Miss K. Pillsbury, of Arts
'20, upheld the affirmative of the resolution, "Resolved that, for equal work,
women should receive equal pay with
men," against Miss J. Lett and Miss D.
Blakey, of Arts '21.
Miss Smith, for the affirmative, after
commenting on the essential justice of
the principle embodied in the resolution,
argued that its adoption would not cause
an undercutting of men's wages, or be
derogatory to their interests in any way.
Its adoption would, on the other hand,
make for increased productivity, since
the women's resources would be utilized
to their fullest extent and valued at
their proper worth. Her colleague, Miss
Pillsbury, declared that the employer
would be compensated for the extra cost
in the wages of his female employees by
the increased efficiency of their work,
due to the better living conditions they
would enjoy. Miss Pillsbury dealt also
with the argument that men should receive greater wages because they have a
family to support, declaring that the
wages of many women go to the support of a family and that in numerous
cases their wages are absolutely essential to the family income.
Miss D. Blakey, for the negative,
claimed that if the principle of equal pay
for equal work were adopted there
would be two positions open to the employer: First, he may regard women as
economically inferior to men. Then, as
far as possible, men will replace women
in industry. The result would be that
women's choice of occupations would be
still further restricted. In those occupations which would remain open to
women there would be an over-supply of
labor, which would result in the lowering of both men's and women's wages.
Moreover, the general standard of work
would be lowered, for the male workers
would not exert themselves as much as
formerly. In the second place, the employer may regard women as economically equal to man. Then the adoption
of the principle would bring about the
breakdown of man's sense of responsibility for the support of the home. It
would make woman an equal sharer with
man    in    his    economic    responsibility,
(Continued on Page 7) THE   UBYSSEY
February 19, 1920
SUPER
BREAD
Mere asking for bread will
not always get you that
SUPER BREAD —the
bread with the crisp, golden
crust—always uniform. To
get the best in bread, you
must ask for
SHELLY'S
4X BREAD
AT ALL GROCER'S
 OR	
PHONE FAIRMONT 44
CHARACTER
GET THAT BETTER
DRESSED LOOK
Wear Fashion-Craft
Quality Clothes
Youz Satisfaction Guazanteed
JUST ARRIVED
LATEST STYLES
in SPRING SAMPLES
Uimttru
514 GRANVILLE STREET
NEXT TO MERCHANTS' BANK
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Tho«. H. Foiler G. N. Jarman Fred Foster
Dr. E. A. Henry delivered a very interesting and inspiring address to the
Y.M.C.A. on Thursday at noon. The
fairly large attendance indicated the respect which the college has for Dr.
Henry. Speaking of student problems,
he referred to the programme of the "Y"
in regard to the three C's—clean living,
clean speaking, and clean athletics, and
said that the clean life is the basis of all
accomplishment. He spoke of the difference between reputation and character, stating that your reputation is really
only what others think of you, while
character is what you actually are. It
is based on self-reverence, sincerity, self-
effacement and holiness. In an effective
manner he applied this to speech and to
athletics, and then said that the Christian character was built up in the same
way and patterned after the life of Jesus.
The picture we have of Him is such that
all men can point to His character and
say, "That is worth being." It is not a
creed, but a life. He is our supreme
teacher, our living example and our
Saviour from sin. If any man will save
his life, he must lose it in service. This
is the social gospel of to-day.
ALUMNI LUNCHEON
The regular monthly luncheon of the
Alumni Society was held last Saturday
in the Hotel Vancouver at 1 p.m. The
speaker was Mr. E. H. S. Winn, chairman of the B. C. Workmen's Compensation Board. He dealt with workmen's
compensation and state health insurance,
outlining both and showing how each
benefitted the workman. For instance,
while under the company plan the insurance company takes two-thirds of the
premiums paid in, under the state plan
the workers get back all the money
turned in as compensation.
State insurance is not an experiment;
it has been tried in Europe, and everywhere tried it has been a success, particularly in England.
Students should show more interest in
these luncheons. The Alumni are securing as speakers men who are well able
to speak authoritatively on their subjects, and the addresses are well worth
hearing.
ANY OLD JUNK?
When the laborious days of this session have passed into the Great Beyond,
and you find that you wish to rid yourself of much of your college equipment,
don't hesitate to join the auction crowd.
On the last day of lectures, under the
direction of the Students' Council, a
public auction sale of "old junk" will be
held. If you have any second-hand
books, notes, pencils, sweaters, boots, or
bottles, bring them in, and trust to the
persuasive powers of the auctioneer to
sell your goods. But let us-whisper on
the side—keep it a purely University
secret, and thus we shall escape the license fee.    So, hush!
A  man  may  be  a  success  with  hens
and a failure with chickens.—Ex.
Men's Gunmetal
or Velour Calf
Boots
Special $8.95
These Velour or Gunmetal Calf
Boots, made in Blucher or plain
lace style, on the newest full round
or medium recede toe last, and
every pair has oak-tanned Goodyear welted sole's with hand-finished bottoms, which gives longer
wear to the sole. Sizes 6 to 10.
Special, per pair,
$8.95
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
EVANS    &
HASTINGS
PRINTERS
 of	
" The  Ubyssey "
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
Phone, Seymour 189 February 19, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouwr Stationers Ctl
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
.. Cbe ..
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C
COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,    Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, GLENCOE LODGE
Phone, Seymour 0022
New Arrivals in
Neckwear
qp
CHENEY SILKS
Direct from New York.
ENGLISH KNITS
Direct from Old London.
Prices, $ 1.00 and up
Our display is sure to please you
in other lines as well.
Orpbtum
fiabtrdasbtrs
Orpheum Theatre Building
759   GRANVILLE   STREET
GREEN STOCKINGS
Tickets for the performances of
March 4th and 5th are obtainable now
from any member of the Players' Club.
In spite of the increase in theatre rental,
printing, and other essentials, the club
has determined to keep prices below
$1.00. First fifteen rows, ground floor,
and first three rows, balcony, $1.00; all
remaining seats 75 cents, with the exception of the gallery, which is 50 cents.
The aim of the club is to equal at
least the proceeds of last year. At that
time $1,250 was cleared, of which eight
hundred was put aside as a nucleus to
a Student Memorial Fund. The remaining $450 went to the Women's Auxiliary,
General Hospital.
This year it is the intention of the
club to devote a considerable part of the
proceeds to the enlargement of the fund,
and, in addition, to form the basis of a
trust fund for special stage equipment
when established at Point Grey. The
third night is entirely in the hands of
the W.A.G.H.
Performances are on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday, March 4th, 5th and 6th, at
the Avenue. Buy your tickets early, and
buy more than one.
RETURNED SOLDIERS
Are you in sympathy with the aims of
the  "Returned  Soldier  Students'  Club"?
If so, what about that $1.00 membership fee?
Do you want someone else to pay it
for you, or are you willing to do your
share?
Tuum Est.
INTER-COLLEGIATE
DEBATE
Universities of Idaho, Oregon, and
British Columbia
IDAHO AT B.C.
W. J. Couper '20 and Denham
'21 on the negative of "Resolved
that the application of the principle of the Closed Shop will best
serve the cause of Industrial
Peace." Admission,  25c.
Auditorium,  February 27th.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
SprottSbaw Stamp*=Quality
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods"
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE   STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
10% off to Returned Men
Students' Loose Leaf Supplies
Ring Books and Ring Book
Sheets for all Books. Fountain
Pens, High-Grade Pencils and
Pens.
WE WILL APPRECIATE
A VISIT TO OUR STORE
Western Specialty Limited
PRINTERS and STATIONERS
572 Granville St. VancouTar, B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
February 19, 1930
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
The Young Man's Store
20th Century Brand
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
for Young Men are the best
obtainable.
See our Windows and investigate
for yourselves.
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 Hastings Street West
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who stay young
Issued every Thursday by the  Publications  Board
of the  University of British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
(Lillian Cowdell
A.   H.   Imlah
C. D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   Evan   Boss
Exchange   Editor G.   G.   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business  Manager J.   N.   Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
.    . f D. A. Wallace      W. R. Smith
Assistants -'     ,   ,, v
y W.  McKee
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for the Week A.  H.  Imlah
AN URGENT REFORM
At present it is customary to close the
reading-room sharply at nine-thirty
every evening. The result is that a great
deal of annoyance is caused those who
desire to continue their studies until a
later hour; and many who find it necessary to use reference works, but who
live at some distance from the University, are continually inconvenienced. As
the rule stands now, it is impossible to
get a book out before nine-thirty, so that
those desiring to use the reserved volumes can do so only by coming up to
the library in the evening. While many,
would take advantage of this privilege
if the time of closing were extended,
they do not consider that two and a-half
hours in the reading-room is sufficient
to repay them for the time lost in travelling to and from the University; and,
even although it is permissible to take
books after nine-thirty, few students
avail themselves of the opportunity, as
they have little inclination to study after
their return journey to the different
parts of the city. The difficulty could be
overcome quite easily if the reading-
room were left open until ten-thirty or
eleven o'clock in the evening. Such a
change would be appreciated by many,
and would inconvenience no one.
There are some library regulations,
however, which are not being adhered
to by the student body. Probably the
most important of these is the one requiring reserved books to be returned by
nine o'clock in the morning. Some have
cultivated the habit of returning the
borrowed volumes at any hour during
the day, to the annoyance of the other
students who have, in the meantime,
required them. This is purely selfish
conduct—conduct which among University people should not exist. The regulation, although it restricts to a certain
extent the individual, nevertheless benefits the larger group and should accordingly be observed scrupulously by an
intelligent and democratic student body.
COLLEGE EVENTS
Although  the four principal events of
the year are to be held within the next
four weeks, students should not neglect
one of them. To fail to attend the international debates with Idaho or Washington would be to withdraw your support from the policy of inter-collegiate
relations and to stand in favor of isolation. To miss the Spring play or the
musical concert would be to lose an opportunity, not only for enjoyment, but
also of seeing your talented fellow students perform. So keep your Friday
nights free.
But this is not the whole issue. We
are members of a young' University
which is handicapped by inadequate
buildings because the public does not
realize the value of the institution. It
remains for us to influence every citizen
possible by bringing him to the debates,
to the play, or to the concert.
EX CATHEDRA
No,   the   "Buzzer"   is   not   among  our
exchange papers.
College elections are less than a
month away. Now is the time to begin
sifting the possible candidates.
The Players' Club say that they will
not be responsible if green stockings are
fashionable  this  spring.
Mr. Foerster, Miss Healey and Mr.
Coope have been asked to begin work
on a new and larger college song book.
Two hundred U.B.C. pennants will arrive in about three weeks. The sale will
be in charge of the Y.W.C.A.
It will be a physical impossibility to
continue in these buildings next session.
The B. C. Government have an opportunity of showing what stuff they are
made of in dealing with this question.
But all the while we go on smiling—
ever hopeful that some day we may
watch the sunset from our dormitory
windows at the Point.
Last week we received a valentine
card from "Dere Mertel." Don't be
jealous, Joe.
The Chemistry Society are planning
for a dance in a few weeks. These chaps
ought to be able to concoct "punch" that
would make one feel joyful forever.
Boracic, remember, is a good sugar substitute.
Congratulations, Science. The glowing write-up which our reporter brought
back will be accepted by all who were
able to secure tickets.
F.-H. Buck, one of our inter-collegiate
debaters this year, was editor-in-chief of
the McGill Annual in 1912.
The recipients of the beautiful valentines placed in the letter-rack would be
very glad to know what "S.S.S." represents. Many suggestions, such as "Society of the Silly Sisters" and "Sunday
School Scholars," have been advanced
by those who were not fortunate enough
to receive one of these works of art; and
the real solution of this baffling mystery
is desired by all, Mr. F. G. C. Wood included. February 19, 1920
THE   U-BYSSEY
Cnrrpapnttbpttrp
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer. Letters must not exceed 400 words,
in length.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—It greatly surprises me that the.
men of the University have been content to
allow their common-room' to exist in the
condition it has this year. To a passer-by
it would appear rather the habitation of pigs
than that of gentlemen! There is no logical
excuse for this disreputable condition of affairs; There is a rack for the holding of
magazines. Why, in the name of all common sense, isn't this used? There is also a
receptacle for the lunch papers, etc., which
is never made use of by the students. It is
sheer laziness, sheer slovenliness, and absolutely disgraceful! Such carelessness would
never be tolerated an instant in our homes.
What reason is there for its existence in the
University.
Apart from all other considerations, the
present state of affairs is quite unfair to
the janitor. It is an absolute shame for him
to be forced to clean out daily the mass of
dirty, filthy paper, mingled with the remains
of lunches, matches and cigarette stubs
which litters the floor of the common-room.
Now that chairs have been provided, I think
that enough pride should be taken by the
men in the common-room to keep it in at
least some semblance of respectability.
Yours,  etc.,
SPERANS.
EXCHANGES
The salaries of Harvard Faculty have
been raised 20 per cent, recently. They
will still have to be raised another 55
per cent, to catch up with those of the
day laborers. The U.B.C. Faculty stil!
have the entire 75 per cent, to go yet, I
believe.
Query: Do the editors of a college
paper ever envy their reporters?
Mr. Wm. Butler Yeats, the renowned
Irish poet, was the guest of the University of Toronto last week. He met a
small party of professors and the college reporter, afterwards giving an address to the student body.
ATHLETICS
Periodicals from Alberta, Manitoba,
Queen's, Toronto, and McGill universities have been received during the week.
Anyone may secure the loan of these by
applying to the Exchange  Editor.
How long is the Vancouver "World"
going to list the University write-ups
under the general heading of "Current
Events of the City Schools"? If we get
to Point Grey, and if we get real buildings, perhaps	
An event of interest to many of the
University students took place on the
evening of Thursday, February 12th,
when Miss Norah Kathleen Nowlan was
united in marriage to Capt. John E.
Purslow,  M.C.
The bride spent three years at the
University as a member of Arts '20, taking, while here, an active part in the
affairs of the Red Cross Society, on
which executive she acted for two years.
Capt. Purslow has but recently returned,
after serving five and a-half years with
the Canadian Forces.
Her many friends join in wishing
Mrs. Purslow every happiness for the
future.
TOWERS TAKE CLOSE GAME
FROM 'VARSITY
University dropped into second place
in the intermediate hockey race on Friday night when they lost to the Towers
by a 2-1 score. All three goals were
scored in the first half of the opening
period.
In the first five minutes- of play the
Towers had slipped the puck past Lambert twice and a heavy defeat seemed in
store for 'Varsity. Jack Wilson scored
the only U.B.C. goal a few minutes later.
Though 'Varsity outplayed the Towers
in the last two sessions, they could not
score. After the first period Lambert
settled down and pulled off a number of
sensational saves.
'Varsity presented a patched-up team,
and the players did not keep their positions. Many promising rushes were
spoiled by the two wing men crowding
into centre ice and getting in the way of
Wilson, who put up a fine game for
'Varsity.
The University players were: Goal,
Lambert; defence, Manuel and J. Grimmett; rover, McDiarmid; centre, Wilson;
right wing, N. Grimmett; left wing,
Plummer.    Substitute, McCutcheon.
TRACK CLUB
IN ECONOMICS 6
Mr. Angus—What of the position of a
foreign citizen, say an American, doing
business in this country?
V. Anders (waking from dreams of
the "Yellow Peril")—They got far more
privileges than a white man has.
Take life as you find it, but don't leave
it that way.—Ex.
Now that the relay race is over, the
Track Club proposes getting down to
business in preparation for the track
meet on March 10th. In addition to the
running, training for the broad jump,
the high jump, the pole vault and the
shot put will begin next Wednesday at
Brockton Point.
In addition to the list in the "Ubyssey" of January 29th, there will be a
half-mile relay, four men to a team, and
a five-mile relay, five men to a team.
Entries to all events must be handed to
the secretary, H. W. McLean, Arts '21,
before  Friday,  February 27th.
The New Spring Models in Footwear
For Young Men and Young Women
are a gathering of the best Shoe Values and the choicest Shoe Styles to be
found anywhere.
We will take the greatest pleasure in showing you the handsome new
creations for the Spring season.
ihe INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666  GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
February 19, 1920
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A.. Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Br id g man's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Insist on ■your Dealer supplying
you with
KEYSTONE
Loose Leaf
COVERS and SHEETS
No. 2736 Open End size 5% x 8^
No. 2768 Open Side size 9^ x 7%
No. 2769 Open Side size lO1^ x 8
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  & Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C.
R.e.Purdy,D<L
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
U.B.C. MOURNS LOSS OF
PROMINENT STUDENTS
In the death of R. L. Fraser on Monday, February 16th, not only Agriculture
'22, of which he was a member, but the
whole University sustained an irreparable loss. Mr. Fraser was born in Pembroke, Ontario, and during the war
served as a signaller in the 55th Battalion, F.F.A. He saw much service in
France at Lens, Hill 70, and Vimy, and
was gassed badly in the big drive of
March, 1918. On coming to U.B.C, he
entered into the full spirit of college
life, both in debating and in sport, while
under the penname of "Observer" Mr.
Fraser was a frequent contributor to the
"Ubyssey." It was while training for
last week's relay race that he caught the
chill which later developed into pneumonia.
The sympathy of the students and
Faculty alike is extended to Mr. and
Mrs. Wright in the loss of their daughter Evelyn. Although she had been sick
since last spring, her death came as a
shock to her many friends in the University. Her cheerful manner and good
nature won for her the genuine love and
respect of all with whom she came in
contact. Her keen interest in her studies
is shown by the high standard she always held in examinations, while her
popularity among the students is proved
by the number of offices she so ably
filled. In her first year she was Literary
representative for Arts '21 and a member of the inter-class debating team. In
the second year she very capably filled
the position of vice-president of the
class; and at the same time, as convener
of the Bible Study Committee of the Y.
W. C. A., awakened great interest in
those classes. This year she was elected
vice-president of the Women's Literary
Society. Evelyn has been greatly missed
this term, and her loss will be felt more
and more, not only by Arts '21, but by
the University as a whole.
HAL.F-HOLIDAY
Wednesday, February 25th, will be a
half-holiday, as usual, but in the evening
the waiters in the lower dining-room at
the Vancouver Hotel will be working
overtime. Almost every returned sol,
dier, student or graduate, university man
residing in or near Vancouver will be
there to celebrate the first big social
gathering of the Universities Service
Club. This will be the occasion of its
get-together dinner and smoker, and
shall be such as would be expected of
university men.
There is a limited number of tickets
left, and any who have not yet obtained
their ticket had better get busy.
The executive consists of President
Mack Eastman, Vice-President Harry
Letson, Secretary T. Larsen, Treasurer
C. C. Fenie, together with G. R. Nelson,
Alex. Monroe and Harry Logan, the
convenors of the social, membership and
war records committees, respectively.
If women got all the "credit" they ask,
men would not be so prominent in affairs
—most of them would be in the poor-
house.—Ex.
Art and Style Clothes Shop
Are Your Shirts
Laundered at
Home ?
If so, you should wear W. G. &
R. Shirts — the only shirts with
Double Wear Cuffs.
These new cuffs make it possible to wear the shirt twice as long.
Every man knows that the cuffs of
a shirt get soiled first. And when
one side of the Double Wear Cuff
gets soiled ( you just have to turn
it over.
Ask to see the new shirts with
Double Wear Cuffs.
Ben  Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
Trtsb Cut Tlcwer*.     funeral mort » Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and  Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone, Sey. 6«io
BRANCH  STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone, Sey. 2313
932 Granville   St. Phone, Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government  St. Phone 4742 February 19, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
DEER MERTEL-^JOE
Deer Mertel:
They is a bunch of fellos in this University witch do not think they are quite
so big as they did last wk. and they are
the Seniors what challenged the rest of
the University to do a relay race witch
was run last Sat. and witch was one by
the Freshmen. Well, Mertel, 1 gess I
am fixed for life now, becus I bet $15 on
this grate event and one. I didnt bet
that much money but had a bunch of
gentlemans bets witch we call them
when they is no money put up but onley
promises.
I will have to tell you why I bet all
that money witch I was sure to win.
Last wk. I past 2 fellos witch was Seniors and ast them where they were going in there new dresses, meening the
gowns witch they were weareing. They
started to chase me, Mertel, and we ran
neerly a mile but they didnt catch me
and the next day I found that trey were
on the 4th. yr. relay team, which was
supposed to win the race. I wasnt fast
enuf to get on the 1st. yr. team, and I
was better than them so I figgered the
4th. yr. teem wasnt any good. I gess I
have more than bone in my hed, Mertel.
The Freshmen were in better shape
than the Seniors witch is not to suppris-
ing becus the Seniors are always on time
for lektures wile the Freshman is neerly
always late and has to run for street cars
etc., which keeps him in fine condition.
I am going to buy you a present with
sum of the money I one, Mertel. I have
gone down town twice allready to buy
it but they was too many peeple in
Woolworth's each time and I did all the
waiting instead of the clerks. (This is
a joke,  Mertel.)
They is going to be another relay race
in March and with this and 2 rugby
games I shood be a rich man through
betting. I hate to take other people's
money, but if they are foolish they
shouldnt have money and they are foolish if they bet against me. I gess I am
pretty good this wk., eh Mertel? I always was clever, though. You no what
I am, Mertel. JOE.
ILLUSTRATED LECTURE BY
COL. SHARP
Next Tuesday evening, at 8.15, in the
Auditorium, Colonel Sharp, M.C., who
was head aerial intelligence officer for
the Canadian Corps overseas, will give
an illustrated lecture on "Canadian Battle Areas as Seen by Aeroplane." Just
what and how much could the observers
ascertain of the movements, positions,
etc., of the enemy? Come and see the
answer thrown on the screen. Colonel
Sharp is lecturing under the auspices of
the Alumni Society.
(Continued from Page 1)
while not diminishing her racial responsibility, thus giving most unfairly a double burden to women.
Miss Lett, for the negative, argued
that female employees cost the employer more in the way of rest-rooms and
lunch-rooms. The fact that they required more sick leave and were not as
apt to stay as long on the one job as
the male employees also detracted from
their value to the employer.
The judges, Dr. Boggs, Mr. Henderson, and Mr. Robertson decided in favor
of the affirmative.
M. PERRIN, Manager —■ 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT   PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,  it  may  be  the  dance  floor—or  the  atmosphere  that  pervades—or  the
character of the people.
PERHAPS   it  is  all  three—for  the  BARRON  is  different,  and  that  is  why   this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee Luncheon, 11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH  DINNER   Every Day,  including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
WHAT LAST YEAR'S  GRADUATES
ARE DOING
Kosaburo Shimizu—Lostr A reward
for his recovery will be offered by the
treasurer of Arts '19.
Bill Sutcliffe—Digging hard and deep
into Economic problems in search of a
Ph.D. at  Harvard.    Good-luck,  Doc!
Roy Vollum—When not disturbing
classes with his "grin" (Mr. Davidson
threatens to make a phonographic record of this "grin"), he can be found
talking to the "Bacteria in Milk" in the
Bacteriology  lab.
Joe Smeeton—Uncle Joe, family and
all, have left recently for California,
where his headquarters will be, as travelling secretary for the Y.M.C.A.
Annie Archibald is teaching at Sapper-
ton.
Bernice Bain is training as a nurse in
the  Vancouver General Hospital.
Muriel Contley has found her vocation
in educating the youth of Kamloops.
Evelyn MacKay is continuing her
studies of Economics at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania.
Laura Ketcheson and Norah Wallace
have wandered to the northern region of
B. C, and are teaching at Hazelton and
New Hazelton, respectively.
Marjorie Peck, Alice Gross, Catherine
Maynard, Dylora Swencisky, Lillian
Boyd and Mollie Wolfe are attending
Normal.
Gertrude Reid is at present a much-
envied lady of leisure.
Constance Highmoor and Margaret
Cameron are both teaching in the city,
the former at Crofton House and the
latter at night school.
Isabel Thomas is attending lectures at
Toronto, by which university she was
sent as delegate to Des  Moines.
MEN'S MISSION STUDY
On Sunday afternoon, at 4 o'clock, the
first meeting of the College Men's Mission Study Group will be held in the
Auditorium. Principal Shortt, of St.
Mark's Hall, has consented to give a
series of addresses to the students at
this time each week until the end of the
term. These informal talks will be of a
most interesting nature, and of such
duration that there will be ample time
left for general   discussion   at   the   end.
Remember the  time  and the  place, and
come to the first meeting.
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about tomorrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New and  Second-Hand
Book Shop
Specialists in University Books
MISS ANDERSON
Teaches   the
latest    Ballroom
Dances at hei
home.   Small classes
arranged for.
1299 Seventh Avenue, West
Phone,
Bay view 3104R
THEATRE NIGHT
A meeting to discuss arrangements
for the annual theatre party to be held
at the Orpheum Theatre on Thursday
evening, February 26th, was held on
Tuesday noon. The part which the students will contribute to the programme
will be a song or two by the male quartette, and a burlesque on some one of
Shakespeare's plays. The details of this
act are in the hands of a committee, of
which  Mike  McLennan is convenor.
■It was decided that the men should
dress as hoboes; that we should enter
quietly and wait until after the first act
before making any demonstration, when
we will give a yell appropriate to our
custom. After the show there will be a
parade. Watch the notice boards for
announcements  of sale  of tickets. THE   UBYSSEY
February 19, 1920
REPORT OF THE DES MOINES
CONVENTION
Thursday, January 2, 1920
Morning Session
Mr. David Porter, Senior Student Secretary, spoke of the Student Volunteer
Convention at Mount Hermon 33 year9
ago. He said that the slogan of every
delegation was to be "Jesu est Rex."
George E. Hayes, of the Negro Student Movement, made a plea for the
recognition of the negro people in America. He said: "These dark people have
deep capacities for contribution to other
nations. When the sunlight of Christianity is refracted through the minds of
different races, it shows in glorious
aspect. The negro people will have their
share in this contribution if they are
given a chance for the re-enforcement
and development of their possibilities
for economic freedom, education and religion, and if they are given courage and
the opportunity for truthful utterance.
They crave civic and community participation in all spheres of life. Their greatest form,of self-expression is in religious
organization."
Mr. McDonald, the Scottish secretary
of the British Christian Student Movement, spoke of the sacrifices made by
the able-bodied men in the universities,
and of the wealth of opportunities which
now confront us if we are to fulfil the
responsibilities of a new world order.
"There is only one foundation — Jesus
Christ. We can only become this foundation by burying ourselves from all
that the world counts as success. We
have an impossible task given us by God.
We shall fail utterly in this world evangelization unless we, in the spirit of
Christ, go to them as one of them. We
may go to them bringing our Western
culture, civilization and education; but
what they want is Christ. K. T. Paul
said: "We want Christ, not Christianity
which is the religion of the rulers."
Charles W. Bishop spoke of the latent
possibilities for world evangelization.
He pointed out our capacity for intensive, earnest study into fundamentals,
and for consecration of this to the great
social tasks of the day. "The national
spirit of Canada is a sense of national
mission relating itself to the field of the
world."
Evening Session
Dean Brown, of Yale, was the first
speaker in that great evening meeting.
He spoke on the "Christianizing of National and International Life," pointing
out the heirlooms that are ours because
of this war, and then the problems of
reconstruction which confront us.
"There are assets as well as liabilities,"
he said, "and what we need is an instinct
of justice, a lessening of race prejudice
and religious bigotry; we need a capacity of giving and self-sacrifice, and a
new moral seriousness in the life of the
world. The war showed us the devil—
the power of evil organized. The evil
of the world has been put away with
blood, and a spiritual sensitiveness has
been awakened. The Christianizing of
nations offers1 us a great challenge." In
answer to the question, "Why did not
Christianity prevent the war?" he said
it was because we hadn't enough Christianity in 1914, and the kind we had
wasn't  the  right  sort.    In  the  war  we
had brawn enough, brains enough,
wealth enough, but not character
enough. We haven't enough of the sense
of social justice. Our spiritual forces
must be linked up with the various problems, and a finer quality of national
soul must be developed. When we used
to sing our war song, we promised that
we wouldn't come back until it was over
over there. Well, it isn't over over
there, and it isn't over over here. There
are certain aspects of the great struggle
which are just now approaching their
most critical  stage.
Bishop McConnel spoke of Mexico as
the concrete example of an application
of the "rights of small nations" idea.
"Shall the United States now, after
the fine things we have said of the rights
of small nations and making the world
safe for democracy, seeing human beings
not human to the number of 15,000,000,
but merely copper and oil, and the possibility of rubber plantations-
"It may be that in the name of humanity, it may be that in the name of
stopping disorder, some kind of police
protection may ultimately be necessary.
But if that ever comes, let us insist that
the holders of great resources, the oil
holders, the mine holders, and the land
grabbers, shall pass off to some place by
themselves while it is going on, and be
silent."
The possibility of the need of a new
economic order was forecasted by the
Bishop, who asserted that competition
might be well enough in the realm of
sport or daily knowledge, but "competition for daily bread is another thing."
"Now take the holders of the good
things of this world, the land holders,
the possessors of the great natural resources, and stand, them off there in a,
great multitude. Write over them and
see how appropriate it seems, 'Blessed
are the meek for they shall inherit the
earth,'" he said. "What is come over
us in this last year? Is it not a pity
that, having stood shoulder to shoulder
fighting in a great cause, we should now
have fallen back again into the old suspicions, that we should so soon have forgotten the old comradeship? That we
should say, 'What does this nation mean
—what does that diplomat have up his
sleeve?'" the Bishop asked. He also
said, "Will there, after the next world
war, be enough of civilization left worth
picking up, if these frictions now between nations grow i-.ito something
larger and more significant?" Also, "The
misunderstanding between nations is responsible for many of the international
wrongs. These nations have no ill-will
against us."
Miss Isobel Thomas, of Arts '19, was
a member of the Toronto delegation to
Des Moines.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Thursday, 8 p.m.—Chemistry Society:
H. T. Andrews will speak on "The Sulphite Process in Paper Making," in
Chemistry building. Senior Economics
Discussion Club: Dr. T. P. Hall will
speak on "Social Evolution." All members of Junior Club invited.
(golft Seal
Cbocolates
Unequalled Flavor
Unexcelled Quality
Gold Seal Candy Store
999 Granville St., cor. Nelson
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The  " Combination "
^ A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over inslep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
fl This insures that perfect glove fit
around the inslep and ankle. The
maximum of comfort and sttyle.
Cluff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite  Bank   of  Commerce

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124064/manifest

Comment

Related Items