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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1951

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 UN Club
Forum
Today
The Ubyssey
Don't Miss
Our Sports Page
Today
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1951
NO. 33
President
Suggests
Fee Hike
Road Conditions
BC Problem, Too
Free increase to students to
provide for grounds improvements was suggested as tht
only alternative to the provincial government p r o v iding
more funds for paying and
lighting at UBC by Dr. N. A.
M. MacKenzie, president of the
university in a letter to the
Ubyssey today.
Dr. MacKenzie was replying to
an editorial in The Ubyssey on
January 5, which criticized the
buildings and grounds department
lor the condition of the east mall.
"1 agree with you wholeheartedly
that the East Mall is and has been
for many years desperately in need
of paving,' President MacKenzie
said in the letter.
He said that work of this nature has not been carried out because of a lack ot funds. "The
Board of Governors had estimates
made some years ago and the figures quoted us then were about
1100,000," the president said.
Dr. MacKenzie expressed hope
that it will be possible ln the future to have all roads on the campus property paved and lighted. He
said that this can be done only
when the Provincial Government
or some other body does this work
or makes funds available for the
project.
"The only alternative to this la
to increase the fees of the students to take care of items of this
kind," the president said.
He emphasized that the responsibility for matters*of this kind
rested with the university administration and not with the department of buildings and grounds.
Ubyssey Photo by Bob Steiner
DOING THEIR DARNDEST to catch a man for the annual
WUS Sadie Hawkin's Day Co-Ed are Doris Becker, first year
arts (left), and Pat Grindlay, a second year arts student. They're
in for a disappointment, though, cause Geoff Dewis, second
year commerce, has already arranged to attend the affair. He's
emceeing!
WUS DANCE SATURDAY
'Turnabout
At Annual
Time
Co-Ed
Annual WUS Sadie Hawkin's Day Co-ed is scheduled for
Saturday night and large-scale plans include a skit by Men's Big
Block Club and crowning of the 1951 Totem queen.
Judges of the queen contest are
not yet officially released, hut their
names will be run with the pictures
of the queen candidates in Thursday's Ubyisey.
Theme of the  Men's Big Block
FIRST CLUE ANNOUNCED
IN NEW LEGION CONTEST
UBC students have a chance to earn extra-curricular
money this term in Legion sponsored "Operation Big Jim"
contest which begins today.
Clues will appear in each issue of the Ubyssey, and the
first person to identify "Big Jim" receives a prize.
MF is the first clue.
Operation Big Jim'
Gets Underway Today
A Legion contest designed to boost War Memorial Gym
funds will get underway today with the appearance of the first
clue to Operation Big Jim in today's Ubyssey.
Patterned on last year's Opera
tion Pigskin, Operation Big Jim is
a guessing contest for which one
person on the campus has been
chosen to act as Big Jim. Clues
about his identity will be published
regularly in the Ubyssey. The first
person to walk up to Big Jim with
a ticket and identify him will receive $25.
Tickets for the contest priced at
2." cents each, are on sale now in
the Legion office the Quad and
the AMS office in Brock Hall.
During last year's Operation Pig-
Bkln $125 was taken in which was
used to bring disabled veterans to
football games.
Only persons who know the
Identity of Big Jim are T.eglon
president Al Westcott and business
manager Mrs. T. Ogilvie. Operation
Big Jim Is not open to executives
of the  Legion,'
Visual Arts
Hold Exhibit
Visual Arts Club will hold Us
annual exhibition of student work
in  the   Art   Gallery   In   Iho  library
Entries may be painting, seupl-
tore, weaving, models, photography,
designs, etc. and should he bronchi
to the Arl Gallery nol hi I cr llian
January 25,
Legion-Sponsored
'Bus to Nowhere'
Again Saturday
"If you dress for a date, you're
sure to rate." This is the only
olue Legion officials will give to
the destination of their "bus to
nowhere," which will leave on its
second trip at 8 p.m. Saturday.
Tickets and reservations for the
mystery trip may be obtained at
the A.MS office in Brock Hall: It
is important that students pick up
their tickets as early as possible,
says Legion president Al Westcott. ho that officials will know
how many busses to charier. Price
of  the   trip  is  Ifl.!)."'.
The II passenger buses will begin their mystery trip from the
Pacific Stage Lines depot at Oeorgla  and   Cambie,
On llie first "bus to nowhere,*'
whicli lell Vancouver November 11.
students were treated to an evening of  dancing ai   I'ollinghnin,  for
!f I.UU.
All   proceeds   from   the   mystery
bus  trip   will   go  le   the   War   Mem
orieil C.ym fund.
Club skit will remain a secret till
the night of the dance, but they
promise an "eye-opener."
Fred Massey's quartet will supply the music for the co-ed which
begins at 9 a.m. Before the dance
there is a Thunderbird basketball
game In the gym.
MC for the evening Is Geoff
Davis, a member of UBC's Kickapoo Club. The Brock snack bar
wil he open for refreshments.
Tickets are $1.25 per couple (girl
buying) and will bo on sale today
and Wednesday at 12:JiO p.m. in the
Quad and at tho door Saturday
night.
Field Day
For Thieves
Thieves had a field day ln the
women's cloakroom ln the north
basement of Brock HaU Friday.
Five members of the Musical
money and wallets from their
Society reported the theft of
coats while the society was banqueting in Brock Lounge. The losses occurred between 7 and 9 p.m.
Friday.
One student lost $10 of her fee
money.
RCMP officials report that
it is the first report of theft from
the   washroom   for   some   time.
Discipline Group
Labelled 'Farce'
Member Queries Usefulness
of USC Disciplinary Committee
LSE Reps
Accuse
Ubyssey
By JOHN NAPIER-HEMY
"The Ubyssey jumped the
gun in publishing the LSE
brief," Mike Hind-Smith, United Nations Club president,
stated yesterday.
Hind-Smith's statement echoed
the violent criticism by LSE officials of the article on the LSE
brief appearing in the Friday Ubyssey.
"The Ubyssey snatched a copy
of the brief from the waste-basket," said Vaughn Lyon president
of the Liberal Club.
BRIEF TABLED
The brief which calls for a fee
increase of $1.00 to meet rising
club costs and possible budget
cuts, was drawn up by LSE president Ed Pedersen, and four major
club executives. It was presented to
25 clubs executives on November
30, and tabled for further consideration.
Hind-Smith claimed that the
news of the brief was prematurely
released, as copies had only just
been distributed to the clubs, and
executives had not had sufficient
timo to discuss its content.
For the proposals contained in
the brief to go into effect it must
first be approved by the clubs mak
ing up lhe LSE ind then submitted
to a student referendum.
STATEMENTS
Following are statements by club
executives on the LSE brief:
Ron Alltree, Radio Society: "So
far we haven't dipped into our budget, therefore a cut would not hurt
us. We are neither for or against
the proposal at the present time.
Barry Baldwin, Mamooks: What
the LSE does doesn't affect us. If
we bad no budget we would have
to charge clubs for posters.
Lawrence Lyndt, Civil Liberties
Union; We can't make a definite
statement of policy until we know
where we stand financially. The
LSE has the best Interest of the
students at heart.
SMALL CLUBS  HIT
Roy Haapala, Social Problems
Club. There should be a fee increase of one dollar. Clubs are now
on a  virtual austerity program.
Dorothy Fox, Student Peace
Movement, SCM: 1 helped draw up
the brief but my opinions on it
have since been modified ln several respects.
CONFIDENCE
Vaughn Lyon, Liberal Club:
When LSE adopts a brief it will
be a good one.
An LSE meeting will be held In
the near future in order to discuss
the brief more fully.
USC's Disciplinary Committee was labelled "the biggest
farce on the campus" by a member of the committee in a heated discussion at the regular Undergraduate Societies meeting
yesterday.
Murray Martindale, Commerce
representative on UBC and two-
year member of the Disciplinary
Committee, hotly aired his views
on the work and nature of this
committee when action was sought
to try enforcing Brock Hall regulations.
"As far as I'm concerned, the
Discipline Committee is the biggest farce on the campus and might
Just as well fold up right now,"
Martindale said.
DONE NOTHING
"We haven't done a thing all
year and everything is running
a'long just fine," he said.
He said that conditions in the
Brpck are taken care of favorably
by the maintenance men in charge
and they wield much more authority in the eyes of the students than
a fellow classmate "with a little
card like a police badge."
"What would the average stu
dent think of a fellow or a co-ed
for that matter, coming up to him
in the Brock and saying, 'Hey.
lake away your AMS card?' " Mar-
Mac. Take off your coat or I'll
tindale queried.
STUDENTS CAOEY
The whole Incident was brought
onto the floor when a USC member noted how cagey the students
were in regard to Brock rules.
Students are not supposed to sleep
on the chairs with their shoes on,
"so they take them off and then
sleep."
COMMITTEE  IMPROVING?
Martindale said that during his
two years on the committee he has
seen it perform nothing concrete.
His first job on the committee
was to "spy'' on a campus club
which   was   suspected   of   having
(Continued on Page 3)
Two Speakers
On Campus
Two prominent speakers are
scheduled to appear ln public addresses at the University this
week.
Dr. George F. Davidson, Deputy
Minister of National Welfare, will
deliver the Hewitt Bostock Memorial Lecture in the auditorium at
12:30 p.m., January 11. His subject will be "Social Welfare in
Modern Society."
Vancouver Institute speaker at
8:15 p.m. January 13 will be Professor F. H. Soward, Director of
International  Studies at UBC.
His topic, "World Report," will
deal with conditions as he saw
and interpreted them during his
recent trip to Europe, the Middle
East, and India.
'Tween Classes
Korean Problem
UN Club Topic
At Forum Today
An open forum on the Korean question will be the subject of the first United Nations
Club meeting today at noon in
Arts 100.
* *      *
UBC SYMPHONY orchestra will
hold Us first rehearsal of the new
year in the auditorium at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. Members of the or*
chestra are requested to bring
their music stands, and a request
far additional instrumentalists
has been issued by officials.
* *       *
UBC FILM SOCIETY will present "Songs of My Heart" featuring the music of Tchaikovsky today at three showings in the auditorium. Admission to the show is
25 cents. Performances are at 3:45,
G and 8:16 p.m.
* * *
SPRING MEETING of. all members of the UBC Phrateres will be
held Wednesday at 12:30 p.m, In
Physics 200. Memfiers'oT'lB? caili-
pus branch have been urged to attend by the executive.
* * *
CONDUCTED TOUR by Professor Frederick Lassere, head of the
UBC School of Architecture will be
staged today of the architectural
exhibit, currently on display ln the
art gallery ln the UBC library.
* *       *
RAY THOMAS, Social Credit
member of parliament for Wetask-
win, Alberta will be the featured
speaker at a meeting of the UBC
Social Credit Club Wednesday at
noon in Arts 101.
Mr. Thomas will speak on some
aspect of Social Credit activity
in Canada today.
* * *
FORMER MAYORALTY CANDIDATE Tom Alsbury will be the
speaker at a meeting sponsored by
the CCF club in Arts 100 at noon
Wednesday. "As Labour Sees It
in 1960", will be his topic.
* *       *
SCOTTI8H   DANCE  CLUB  will
hold   their  first   meeting   of   the
year ln Hut G4 today at noon.
* *       *
UBC MUSICAL SOCIETY GLEE
CLUB will hold their first rehearsal of the spring term today at
12:30 p.m. in HM1.
All new members are particularly asked to turn out.
MUSSOC REPEATS THE GONDOLIERS'
Best Spring
Offered By
Program
Campus
In Many Years
Culture Clubs
The most varied and Interesting
spring program that UBC has seen
in many years will be offered by
campus  Culture  Clubs.
Mussoc will again offer (illbert
and Sullivan's "The (iondollers."
As usual C. Haydn Williams will
direct the musical proceedings and
leads will be played by Milla Andrews, Rii a Loiselle, Kelvin Service  and John  Yeotuans.
"Tbe   Mule   Animal,"   a   popular
Broadway success of a few seasons
l hy    .lames    Thnrbcr    will    he    the
i Player's   Club   annual   spring   pro-
\ duel ion. Tills  play  will  he particularly typical as il   involves the purine ol   a   college  professor. The cast
i bus  yet  lu  be elioeecll.
One of the outstanding musical
events will be the Canadian Premiere of Uela Bartoks Sonata for
Two Pianos and Eleven Percussion
Instruments. UBC musical authority Barbara Pentland terms lt
"one of the most, significant works
that has been composed In the
20th century." Featured at the mid-
March concert will be duo-pianists
Colin Slim and John Brockington,
Campus musicians under the direction of Classics depart ment instructor John Reeves will present
a program of sixteenth and seventeenth Century music in March.
The program will consist of solos,
choruses ami instrumental ensembles.
The UBC Symphony Orchestra
under the direction of Colin Slim
will present the third musical feature March 22. Pianist John Urnck-
ington will play the Grieg Piano
Concerto and the rest of the program will Include a Beethoven Overture, the second Brandenburg
Concerto by Bach, and Love the
Magician  by  De  Fulla.
Of other productions on the campus the most important will he the
performance of Ben Jonson's "The
Alchemist'* presented in January
by the English department tindei'
the direction of Dorothy Somerset.
I'BC art gallery is opening its
spring schedule willi a mammoth
architectural  show   including   work
from all Canadian schools and eight
American schools of the Pacific
Northwest, as well as sculpture
ami models from UBC.
This show will be on till Saturday, Jan. 111. Following that from
Jan. Ill to 27 will he Painting In
B.C. a small, select exhibit of the
best work being done in this region, and the Canadian Water-
color Society
Following these will he an outstanding American show "TRIO''
including paintings of Morris Oraves, Mark Toliey and Kenneth Callahan,' and the annual exhibit of the
CIIC Visual Aits Club. (Jan. 23-
Feb.  10.) Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,1951
The Ubyssey
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRES9
Authorised as Second CIbsb Mail Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student Subscription! 11 per
yenr (included in AMS Fees). Mail Subscriptions—$2.00 per year. Published throughout
the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of tho editorial itaff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offlces In Hrock Hall. Phone ALma 1021 For display advertising phone ALma 82M
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF     RAY  FROST
Tuesday Editor—ANN LANGBEIN
Associate Editor—JOHN NAPIE.R-HEMY
Letters To The Editor
GENERAL STAFF:
8enlor Editors: ANN LANGBEIN,
MARY STAINSBY
Copy Editor: JIM BANHAM
CUP Editor: JOAN CHURCHILL
Women/Editor: JOAN FRASER
Fine Arts Editor:  JOHN BROCKINGTON
Editorial Assistants: LES ARMOUR,
HAL TENNANT
WRITERS THIS ISBUE:
JOHN  NAPIER-HIMY
IRIS SANDERSON
ELSIE GORBAT
HERM FRYDENLUND
MARI  STAINSBY
JOAN CHURCHILL
JOHN   BROCKINGTON
Let's All Chip In
We had some nasty things to say last
week in these columns about the LSE brief,
which has declared that the Ostrom Plan for
athletic aid has put campus culture in great
jeopardy.
But there was one important point in
the brief, which, if taken out of its despicable
context, is worthy of the support of us all.
The poiht is a fee raise of $1, to help bolster
Alma Mater Society coffers.
\ Only the Don Quixotes among us will
cry (with ignorant dismay) that such a move
Would be contributory to inflation. Fpr only
ia Don Quixote would be naive enough to
believe that he could, all alone, tackle the
giant windmill of inflation.
It's like fearing that the vast Pacific will
flood us out if we indulge in a poker game
called "Spit in The Ocean."
It's a grim truth that costs have been
spiralling, upward ever since 1939. Yet the
AMS has imposed no fee raise whatever for
itt? own benefit since those pre-war days.
It's true that fees have jumped twice in
the last 10 years, making a total hike of $3.
But the $2 raise went directly into the War
Washed Up ?
In the news columns of today's papers i
member ef the USC discipline committee has
commented that his committee is little more
than a farce.
Mr. Martindale, who has served on the
committee for two years, should know. One
might, of course, be pardoned for asking why
he has done nothing to make the committee
something more than a farce, but this is
hardly the point.
It seems likely that thc committee is a
farce because it has no power to be anything
more than a farce and because, anyway, the
whole concept of "discipline committees" in
a university is ridiculous.
Memorial Gymnasium drive, and the other
dollar was tacked on to help bring foreign
students here under the "Education in Democracy" plan.
It's also true that some AMS executives
of the recent past have said that fees are
high enough already. But their epoch is over.
It will long be remembered as the Pink Cloud
Era of UBC finance.
We believe that AMS Treasurer John
McKinnon and his colleagues have their feet
on the ground.
It they're honest enough to admit it,
they'll say that it's time students began to
share the financial burden that budget-juggling treasurers have been carrying far too
long.
We can't go along with Pedersen's cheap
political shystering when he obviously wants
more money at the expense of the Ostrom
Plan.
But a fact is a fact. The Alma Mater
Society is cutting some things a little too fine
for all of us.
For our own good, let's all chip in another dollar apiece.
About all the committee can do is to take
away the student's AMS pass—and a lot of
students never bother to pick up their passes
to begin with. What's more, those who do get
them seldom use them. The loss is not very
great.
The real point, though, is that the few
rules which are necessary to preserve student
equipment really don't need a discipline committee to enforce them. Proctors should be
able to inject a quiet word here and there
and that should be all a university would
ever need.
We can only conclude that Mr. Martin-
dale's committee should have been washed
out long ago.
Sifting the Cinema    by Stanley fox
The temptation among critics, at this
time of the year, to make lists of "The Best
.... of 1950" is irresistable. Here, for what
it is worth, is my list of films most enjoyed
last year—approximately in order o*f merit.
"The Bicycle Thief"—This Italian film
is one of the most significant works of art
of our time. Its humanity and profound moral
sense are conveyed to the spectator with
great dramatic force. It seems rather silly
to call it "The Best Film of 1950", or any
other year for that matter. It would more
correct to term it simply "The Best Film."
"Sunset Boulevard" although tainted
with commercialism — remember the pointless, atmosphere destroying commentary —
contained enough excitement, imagination
and insight into the Hollywood mentality together with the stunning performances nf
Gloria Swanson and Erich von Stroheim, to
easily qualify for second place.
"Wagonmaster", the great John Ford's
poetic western in praise of the pioneering
spirit, was a splendid, even noble, account
of a wagon trek by a band of Mormons.
Ford's favorite theme, the beauty of a life of
creation and enterprise, was presented in a
manner which recalled his other triumphs,
"Stagecoach" and "My Darling Clementine."
"The Asphalt Jungle" turned out to be
John Huston's most successful study of
the criminal mind since "The Maltese Falcon." The film wa.s really a documentary view
of the undcrworcl, presenting it not as a
naive affair of gangs and personal loyalties
but rather as a reflection of the world of
commerce, differing only in being on the
wrong side of the law. The picture suffered
somewhat from a sentimental ending as the
moronic "Dix" fulfilled a long ambition of returning to his "Old Kentucky Home" and
died in- a field of alfalfa.
"The Third Man" was brimful of virtuosity on both sides of the camera. Its final
significance is debatable, but the performances of Orson Welles, Joseph Cotton, and
Trevor Howard together with the amazing
photography of Robert Krasker gave the film
considerable distinction. Carol Reed directed.
"The Set-Up" was a remarkably honest
study of the fight racket. Besides its integrity,
the film showed an admirable sense of proportion, while for sheer excitement it had few
equals—again due to splendid photography.
"All About Eve" had enough clever lines
and enough good acting to provide an entertainment piece par excellence and it was ■•*»
pleasure to see Bette Davis in a decent part
for a change. At the moment however, the
picture is undergoing a strange fate—that
of becoming the most overpraised production
since "All the King's Men."
Other fine productions of 1950 were:
'The Village Teacher', 'They Live by Night,'
'Moonrise,' 'Caught,' 'Kind Hearts and Coronets,' 'The Lawless,' 'Picture in Your Mind,'
'Force of Evil,' 'The Men.'
Looking them all over in retrospect,
there would seem to be a glimmer of truth
in Hollywood's latest slogan, "Movies are
Better than Ever."
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I have just read your Editorial
of November 30, 1950, the first
paragraph of which Is as follows:
"You have nothing to lose. Join
one of your University contingents
now. This le the time to join—not
after tbe bombs have started to
fall."
This remarkable paragraph Is
said in your Editorial to be a
quotation    .
" ., Taken from a letter directed
to UBC students by the campus
armed forces contingents last
week."
This assertion Is a complete untruth. No single sentence of the
paragraph Itself appears In the
purported quotation much less the
letter presently being mailed by
myself and the Commanding Officers UNTD and RUP to the men
of the university.
I suggest that you acknowledge
its proper author.
. Since the effect of his remarks
might mislead the mind of anyone
not In receipt of the letter referred to above, I would appreciate
your reproducing In full the enclosed copy of the letter under
discussion together with this letter
Yours sincerely,
R. W. Bonner, Lt. Col
Commanding officer
CO. UBC COTC.
The following .letter sent jointly
by the UNTD, COTC, and the Rur
at UBC to male students of the
university, justifies the Intent of
our editorial of Nov. 30, 1050 to
which R. W. Bonner refers. What
Bonner Is attacking is the form
of the editorial not its message.
His whole criticism was brought
about by tho neglect of the editor
to bracket in square parenthesis
the remarks reportedly to have
come from the letter below. The
brackets would have noted that
the editorial was merely paraphrasing the words and ideas contained In the letter below. We
note, though, that Bonner has not
criticised the intent of the editorial, where we attempted not to
"mislead" the students but to point
out to them the grave Issues which
we felt the letter took too lightly.
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Undoubtedly you have kept In
close touch with International Affairs during the past months.
There is a keen and growing
realization amongst Canadians that
the threat of a third World War Is
very near. The only way In whicli
we can guard against such disaster
is to realize our responsibilities and
strengthen our * defences. The ef
fort must be not only collective,
but individual.
As a result, our Government has
entered upon a vast programme of
expansion tor both our Regular
and our Reserve Armed Forces.
It is elementary common sense
to appreciate that it is better to
have a trained and well-equipped
"fire brigade" prepared lor emergency than it is to accept,
through lack of preparedness, the
loss from a sudden conflagration
raging unchecked.
Technical aud other developments of the past few years have
made it necessary to seek our
leaders from men In the higher
educational brackets. The source
of officers is, therefore, in "the
Universities. The COTC (Army),
the UNTD (Navy) and the RUP
(RCAF) have been organized on
this campus to give you the opportunity to prepare as nn individual and qualify yourself as an officer against emergency. You have
nothing to lose In polnlng one of
these organizations, you and your
country have everything to gain
Another Horld War may well mean
total mobilization of manpower
and other resources In Canada. You
are needed now to train as an officer: not after It becomes too late.
Some vacancies remain in certain
selected Corps. It is anticipated
that the Department of National
Defence may well grant more. Men
in first or second year Applied
Science are particularly needed.
If you are now in your final
year and regret not having affiliated yourself for training with one
of the Armed Forces on tlve campus, it is not yet too late. The
Canadian Government has adopted
a plan whereby a final yenr male
student In any faculty may be
commissioned directly Into the
Regular Forces and paid dining
Ills academic year at the rate of
$153.00  per  month   together   with
$65.00 to $96.00 per month from
the date of his application. No
previous military experience is required. You must however, be a
British subject or a Canadian citizen and, if not a veteran, be under
the age of 26 as at 1st June 1961.
We cannot over-emphasize the
value to you yourself of taking advantage of one of these schemes.
Canada is your country. Our system of government has allowed
you your opportunity for higher
education. Will you not, for your
own sake and for your country,
prepare   yourself   for   leadership?
Will you come to the University
Armoury and ask for particulars
from one of the three Armed Forces representatives located there?
(R.W. Bonner) Lt. Col.
CO. UBC-COTC
(Frank J.E. Turner)
Lieut. Cdr.
CO. UNTD-UBC
(A.R. Raines) DFC Sqn. Ldr.
CO.  RCAF-RUF-UBC
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I have 'read with Interest the
editorial In The Ubyssey for Friday, Jan. 6th, in which you criticise Mr. Lee and the members of
his staff because of the condition
of the Bast Mull. I agree with you
wholeheartedly that the East Mall
is and has been for many years desperately in need of paving. That lt
has not been paved is not the fault
of Mr. Lee and he and his staff
should not be blamed for it. The
facts are that it is an expensive
business providing permanent paving for a boulevard of this kind.
The Board of Governors had estimates made some years ago and
the figures quoted us then were
about $100,000.00. Because no
money was available for this purpose and because too it was felt
that it would be well to defer the
paving until most of the heavy
trucking due to the construction
of buildings on or adjacent to that
Mali had ended, no action was
taken.
I hope that it will be possible in
due course to have all the roads
on the campus, including the East
Mull, properly paved and the campus itself properly lighted, but this
can only be done as and when the
Provincial Government or- some
other body does this work or makes
funds available to us to do it. The
only alternative to this ls to in*
crease the fees of the students to
take care of items of this kind.
However, the point I was really
anxious to make is that the res*
ponsibility for matters of this
kind lies with the University administration and the Board of
Governors and not with Mr. Lee.
Yours sincerely,
N. A. M. MacKenzie.
IHIKTJ Md CUANINC
1-DAY SERVICE
'/////
Iw. ink Ave.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-SQUARES, PHOTBACTORS,
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AND
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ZIPPER RING BOOKS
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Complete with Sheets nnd index
From $2.00      ~
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stmt
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS and PRINTERS
560 Seymour St.  Vancouver, B.C.
CHEMISTRY .100
Coaching Group
Commtncing January 19.
Shurpass Pacific College
Cedar 3131.
Defence Research Board
REQUIRES
Applicants for both summer and full-time employment in the
following fields: —
Hydrodynamics
Mathematics
Maths and Physics
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgy
Meteorology
Physics
Physiology
Aeronautical Engineering
Aerophysics
Bacteriology
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Climatology
Economics and Political Science   -Haychoiosy
Rlectrical Engineering Radio 1 hysics
Electronics Servo-Mechanisms
Engineering Physics Slavonic Languages
Qeography (Particularly Russian)
Geology Statistics
These positions are distributed throughout the various establishments of the Defence Research Board, which aro located at
Halifax, N.S.; Valcartler, P.Q.; Ottawa and Kingston, Ont.; Fort
Churchill, Man.; Suffield, Alberta;  Esquimau. B.C.
All applicants should be registered in Honour Courses and
havo First or High Second Class standing.
Summer (1 M«y—30 Sept.)
Applications v. ill be accepted Fu" Time
until   18th  January,   1951   frora     Applications will be accepted
undergraduates  in  their junior miti,   15th   February>   1951   for
and     final    years    and    from       . .......
graduates. employment starting In May.
Application forms may he obtained from the Registrar, or
from  the  University  Placement Officer.
Apply to:  Director   of   Research   Personnel,
Defence Research Board,
Department of National  Defence,
Ottawa, Ontario.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leof Note Books, Exercise Books
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C. Tuesday, January 9, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
WHICH  IS BEST  INDIAN,
CAMERON OR GRAHAM?
John Graham, co-chairman of this year's "Totemland"
Mardi Gras has challenged Totem editor Hugh Cameron to
a totem-pole sitting contest Wednesday at 11:30 a.m.
Contest will be to determine which one can hold out
longest seated upon one of the wings of the Totem pole outside Brock Hall.
Youth Trainees'
Take Over Campus
Annual  Invasion Of Students
Doesn't Worry Authorities
By   IRIS  SANDERSON
UBC was invaded this morning, but nobody is worrying
much about civil defense.
It was just the annual 8-week occupation of the Youth
Training School and a small army of new students have already
taken over their own campus.
UN
On
Club
Limb'
In Brief
The executive of the university
United Nations club are putting
themselves out on a limb today.
Mike Hind-Smith will present for
the UN executive a suggested restatement of UN policy in the far
eastern crisis to an open meeting
in Arts 100 at 12:80 p.m. today.
The brief that Hind-Smith will
present to the open forum takes a
stand quite different from the
present United Nations policy.
The campus UN executive feels
that there is much thought around
the eampus which differs from the
way in which the United Nations
and particularly the United States
is handling the far eastern problem, ft
Briefly, the report Is this:
(1) Communist China should be
admitted to the United Nations.
(2) The proposal of the Communist China Pekin government
that the whole far eastern question must be considered, not just
the Korea problem, shall be adopted.
(3) The main duty of the U.N.
in tbe tar east is the setting up of
an economic program, not a military or political program.
(4) The association of U.N. policy with US policy would be discontinued and that the responsibility of Oeneral MacArthur to
the UN and not tte United States
should  be  restated.
"Canadian policy in this matter
might well be guided by British
postwar policy in India," Hind-
Smith said.
The executive of the UN club
campus might have views similar
felt that many students on this
to those being presented in the
brief but they would have no way
of making those views heard, Hind-
Smith said.
If the brief is accepted by the
open forum, it will be presented to
the Vancouver UN organization
where it will be reviewed.
If the brief proceeds no farther
through the Vancouver group, then
the university group will send lt
direct to the United Nations in
Lake Success as the voice of opinion at UBC.
"We realize that we may be causing a furor on the campus when
we actually go against the principles of the United Nations, but if
adverse thought la there In volume. It should be brought out,''
Hind-Smith said.
From Poqe \
Disciplinary
Committee
Communist sympathies, Martindale told The Ubyssey.
He was to find out when and
where this club had their "secret"
meetings and he was given the job
of tapping their meeting with <i
wire recorder so that the Disciplinary Committee could keep close
check on this club.
"This year, though, the committee Is much better since it has
done nothing quite so underhand-
edly, In fact, it. has clone nothing
nt  all.''  Martindale said.
Martlndnlo moved at the meet-
Ins that the question of the Disciplinary Committee's worth he
studied and that If necessary It be
reorganized or abolished completely.
Sixty-one men and women from
way points throughout B.C. make
up this years flock of Youth Training students who range from 16 to
30 years.
It is the seventh annual vocational term made possible by Provincial Government grants.
These enable students to spend
two months at school with no fee
other than a $10 transportation
cost and $20 for two months room
und board.
EARN THEIR  KEEP
But the first dozen students that
arrived at Acadia Camp Sunday
earned their board' and room as
soon as they hit the training centre.
One thing the grant does not provide is janitors and kitchen help,
so from kitchen sink to carrot garden they became official caretakers for their 8 week stay.
Heading this year's educational
venture ls Mr. Allan Des Champs
of the agriculture department ot
University Extension.
Dr. Gordon Shrum, nead of
UBC's Department of Physics, is
official director of the temporary
school.
Work began Monday but school
was delayed until today when men
stepped into courses in welding,
handicrafts, blacksmlthing, home
planning and agriculture; while
girls tackled home economics,
cooking, sewing, home manage
mont and  weaving.
UNDER SUPERVISION
Each minute of the entire stay
is under supervision. A pass is required before five minutes leave
Is granted from the camp.
Week nights will bo club nights,
to be spread between radio, admln>
istration, publications, dramatics
and music.
The small campus within a campus will have its own weekly pub-
icatlon as well as a student's conn-
ell and president.
U. pf Toronto
Hard at Work
On Aid Program
TORONTO — (CUP) — The
University of Toronto has gone
ahead with its All-Varsity Aid
plan a scheme which was generated by Communist activity witnessed at the IUS conference at
Prague last summer
At the IUS conference, students
from the Western World realized
the pressing need for active and
immediate help for Asiatic universities to offset the work clone by
Communist-hacked universities in
this field. U of T students have
set themselves a goal of $10,000
for aid to the universities of
Janimln Mlllla nnd Sindh In India
and   Pakistan.
An editorial nppearlng in a recent issue or U of T's Varsity
tlons of all hut the most optimistic,
stated, "The support foi' this campaign has exceeded the expecta-
Toronto students, even those bur
dened by heavy time tables and
responsibilities, are proving thai
they do not think in an Isolationist groove.
"The Idea of All-Varsity Aid is
to help students In Asia who need
materials with which to build up
themselves. This Ih not charity;
this is co-operation."
CLASSIFIED
FOUND
SOKOKiTY PIN may bo identified by phoning Pat at HA 2081V.
SCARF, may be identified at Lost
& Found,
WATCH in case may be identified
at Lost & Found.
LOST
GEOLOGY MAGNIFYING glass,
combination 20&30 power lens.
Please phone KE 2753R.
WILL PERSON TAKING grey gaberdine overcoat from Eng. 200,
Thurs, at noon, kindly contact Leo
Schofield at AL 0393Y.
WILL PERSON who took my loose
leaf from outside chem 205 Lab.
Thursday around 4:30 p.m. please
phone Bill at CH 0250.
ROOM A BOARD, ETC.
ROOM & BOARD for girl student.
$45 per month. 4164 W 12th. AL
1054Y.
DOUBLE ROOM with breakfast,
suitable for 2 male students, $20
each per month. Also single room
with breakfast. $20 per month. 4000
W 10th, AL 1697R.
HOUSEKEEPING or sleeping room
near bus. 4322 Locarno Cres. AL
1307.
ROOM for rent near UBC gates.
Warm, upstairs room, reasonable
rent, with breakfast and packed
if desired. AL 0549L.
UNFURNISHED SUITE, 2 rooms,
electric stove, private entrance,
shower and lavatory, suit quiet
couple. AL 2290R.
TWO ROOMS FURNISHED SUITK
housekeeping If desired, suitable
for 2 male students. Reasonable
rent, AL 2006.
ACCOMMODATION (or single stu
dents available Immediately at Ac
adia and Fort Camps. Also MARRIED ACCOMMODATION available at University Camp, Little
Mountain Camp. Apply Housing
Administrator, Room 205 A. Physics.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED from Kingsway &
Rupert,   Mon.,   Wed.,   and   Friday
for  9:30's.   Phone   Bonnie  at  DE
4789R
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO on Sat,
for 8:30 lecturer;, from North Vancouver. Phone North "1189R.
RIDERS WANTED, vicinity of 33
and MacKenzie. Phone Henry at
KE 6330R after 6 p.m.
RIDERS WANTED. Route from
2000 E. Broadway to Varsity. 8:30,
Mon., Wed. and Fri Phone HA
4763Y
WANTED
PHOTOGRAPHS OF* CIL explosive works at James Island, needed
for an essay, please phone KE
2753R.
DO YOU NEED MONEY? Call us
if you have a bicycle. Free appraisal. Phone 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. Lloyd
at FA 7786R or Norm at FA 8162R.
FOR  8ALE
1931 PONTIAC two-door sedan, 6
wheels, cigarette lighter,
heater, good rubber, body, excellent motor. Must sell for fees. $138.
This car is in excellent shape. Ph.
Ken,  MA 5968
FOR RENT OR SALE. Fully Insulated trailer. Phone Roger Fry
at AL 0062. , ■
NOTICES & MEETINGS, ETC.
ALL MEMBERS OF THE UBC film
society are invited to Join the gang
at a bowling party this Sat. night.
Come to Hut A-2 and sign up. Everybody out.
THE NEW WEAR-EVER HEALTH
METHOD OF COOKING is now being presented in the University
Area. Morris Dauncey, B.Ed. (UBC)
TYPING. French essays and thes-
CE   4644.
es Typed accents.Mrs. M. Jenkins, MA. (French) 4510 W 4th.
AL 0476L.
TYPING. English and foreign languages, essays, theses, manuscripts, card work, letters of application. Campus rates. Miss Eloise
Street, Dalhousie Apts. University
Area.  AL 06.15R.
TYPING, Essays, thesis at home
for 12 cents per page by experienced typist. 2575 E. 5th. HA 1520R
TAILORING, DRESSMAKING, ALTERATIONS. Phone Dorothy Curtis, AL 1608M any time.
mmmm
mm
you canY help
RELAXING.
, t_^....:..vv.i'->- '
.with famous PALL MALL
PLAIN ENDS—With "Wetproof" paper which does not stick to your lips.
*  CORK TIPS—With Satin-Smooth Genuine Imported Cork.
EATON'SCampus Favourite of the Week
. . . Copy by JOAN  ... modollod by MARY LOUISE GRANT
FOR 1951 - the beautifully tailored, beautifully fitted suit. Here, '
a classic grey flannel, whose
smooth lines make it easy to slip
under a coat for colder months,
smart when worn later by itself.
Add to it with bright 1951 colours
- yellow, burnt orange - from
EATON'S accessory collection.
EATON'S   grey   flannel   suit   with
aluejiily rolled collar. 69.60
Suits, Second Floor
Orange  chenille  hat   with  a  gold-
colored thread through it.      7.98
Millinery, Second Floor
Harrel-sliaped  black  calf  handbag.
13.80
Handbags, Main Floor
The answer to that white glove
problem— easily washed gloves of
last-drying  nylon.   "Shortie" style.
3.30
Gloves, Main Floor
Opera   pumps   in   a   good   quality
black suede. 13.98
Shoes, Second  Floor
**T EATON C°
PHOTO BV SKIPSEY STUDIOS Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1951
Same Old Story
A very famous writer once penned these
immortal words—"The time has come, the
walrus said, to speak of many things ..."
Well, the time has come, and it would
be rash and foolish of Ubyssey editors to
deny its arrival.
It would be almost impossible for us to
hide our heads in ostrich fashion, and pretend we did not know of the state of today's
sports page.
Ergo, an explanation!
The Ubyssey and its editors regret to
inform the reading public of the ill-timed demise of its talented and useful sport editor,
the editor was forced to resign his position
in order to devote more time to his classes ,
and grades.
As our editions this year have plainly
shown, we are working under the difficulty
of having a very small staff.
In former years, when Christmas exams
have taken their toll, there has always been
some willing, if perhaps not too able, replacement.
This year-^-not so! When Ubyssey editors
found themselves without a Sports editor
Monday, they also found themselves without
a sport page.
Since the regular Friday senior editor
on the Ubyssey has followed the same course
as the Sport editor, and for the same reasons,
readers of other than the sport page of tho
Ubyssey, may also find a blank page confronting them Friday morning.
To our sport readers, we offer our sympathies, and to the general student body, our
apologies.
Watch this page for improvements in the
present situation!
Stop Prtti!
'Bird Icemen
Eke Out Third
Period Win
By   HERM   FRYDENLUND
Showing the effects of «
long lay-off, UBC's lee hookey
team caught fire In the final
period to beat the Vancouver
Commercial League All-Start
5-4 at Kerrladale Arena Monday night.
Five-week layoff was evident as the students floundered for two and a half periods,
Just managing to stay even
with the All-Stars.
In the latter part of the final
canto, the winnera finally
showed their true form to
subdue the Commercial Stars.
Scoring was 1-1 in the first
period. 3-3 at the close of the
second, and finally ended with
the students one tally up.
Veteran Haas Young led the
winners with two goals while
Ken Hole, Bob Coupland and
Pete Scott each garnered one.
Play was rough throughout
the contest with each team
drawing about five penalties
apiece, but no fights marred
the game's progress.
SPORT
1951 Thunderbird
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
January 12   Central'Washington
January 13   Pacific Lutheran
February 2  College of Puget Sound
February 3  St. Martin's
February 10   Clover Leafs
February 17   Western Washington
February 23 Eastern Washington
February 24 Whitworth
34
YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA/
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A MASON
°pV/Se /statiorirv aro
printing co. ltd.
• no* i    i>Ai 11 i.  o i ; I
J66 SIYMOUR if.   VANCOUVIR. S. C.
MAKE
MUNGER
A
MUST
15th
to
19th
AUD.-12:30
VCF
TOPS
IN SPORT COVERAGE
TOTEM
ACTION SHOTS
• TEAM STANDINGS
•  INTRAMURALS
• TEAM PICTURES
•  BIG BLOCK AWARDS
51
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
HARVEY STRANG
PETER MATHEWSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5:J21
SUN LIFE ©F-CANADA

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