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The Daily Ubyssey May 13, 1948

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  PAGE 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
Streamlined Ceremonies
For Bumper Grad Class
UBC's largest class of graduating students were whisked
through streamlined congregation ceremonies today as 1400
bachelor's and master's degrees were awarded.
To  the massed graduating class  in^ '
thc university armory, Chancellor
Erie W. Hamber proclaimed: "I admit
you and all whose names have at
this time  been  presente."
In previous years, before tlie university's mushroom growth, the Mr.
Hamber had tapped each graduate
with his hood and repeated "I admit
you." In succession, graduates received hoods individually from the
President.
But because this year's class topped
all others in the university's history,
graduates received hoods in advance
and rose in a body to be "admitted,"
Following the congregational address by His Excellency the .Governor-General, the class trooped across
the armory stage, ■ bowed to Chancellor Hamber and President Norman MacKenzie, then took their blue
bound diplomas from Registrar
Charles B. Wood.
Highlight of the colorful pageant
of graduation was the presentation
to His Excellency Viscount Alexander of an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.
A massed choir of students, faculty
members gowned in variegated robes
and the packed audience of graduates
and parents heard Canada's soldier
Governor-General lauded by President   MacKenzie.
Two UBC Students
Win Scholarships
Two top honors students in the
Department of Physics at University
of British Columbia have won scholarships which will help them to
proceed with graduate study in the
field of physical research.
Morton Mitchener, 1412 Devonshire
Crescent, Vancouver, has been awarded a $400 scholarship by Harvard
University and will travel to the east
late this summer to take up his
studies   there.
A Teaching Fellowship valued at
$1100 has been awarded to T. H.
Edwards, R.R. No. 1 Chilliwack, by
the University of Michigan. Edwards,
a married veteran of World War
II, obtained the outstanding mark of
98% on his graduate examination.
His ultimate goal is work in electronics.
Education Costs Blamed
For Boosts In UBC Fee
The rising cost of education was blamed for the $25 increase
in sessional fees that UBC students will face when they return
in September to face the 1948-49 session.
The added fees mean that arts, science, commerce and
agriculture students will pay $205 and law and applied science
students will have a $255 fee levied on them.
The announcement! of the fee boost •	
I
Double Award Goes
To Ex-Student
Former   UBC  student  and   lecturer
Lister Sinclair, now of Toronto, took
was made by UBC president, Dr.
Norman A. M. MacKenzie after a
meeting of the Board of Governors on Monday, April 2C.
STATEMENT ISSUED
She statement said the reason i.s
to offset in some measure the rising
cost of education without passing on
more to the student's than could be , a double awal'd at the 12th American
j Exhibition of Education Programs at
[ Columbus, Ohio, it was announced
UBC, in common with many other last week at CBC headquarters.
Canadian universities, is faced with] Sinclair took the double award for
the alternative of increasing revenue his original script, The Case Against
or of restricting its facilities and Cancer, and for his adaptation of tlie
doing without necessary equipment.    ' piayi  Murder  In  Tne  Cathedral,   by
_     IT ,       ..            ..    _, .,   „ T. S. Eliot,
The University, president MacKenzie   stated,   is   unwilling   to   provide He is remembered  in  this part of
less   than   is   necessary   to   maintain the country for his appearances with
its educational standards,  particular- the UBC Players Club in Pride and
avoided.
The handsome, quier Irishman, a
wartime Field Marshal who led Canadian troops in the Mediterranean
address and with other members of
the vice-regal party, presided at a
aet in Brock Memorial Hall.
//
Everything in Art"
Drawing Materials
Artists' Supplies
[•NHF.R WEST PA *448
621 PENDER WEST
ly in the midst of the veterans program,
INCREASE FUNDS
He added that the university intends to increase in some measure the
funds available for financial assistance with the fees of promising students.
Prejudice and Candida on its annual
Spring tour.
I His adaptation of Murder In The
Cathedral was acclaimed by adjudicators as a "superb adaptation of a
great literary work dealing with a
theme of noble proportions."
Judges   gave   his   cancer   script   a
first place award "for an adult, scien-
The increase will take the form of tific   approach   to   a   serious  human
$10 in the first term and $15 in the; problem,    effectively    escaping    the
post-Christmas session.
cliche of fear as an appeal."
SINCERE BEST WISHES
TO THE CLASS OF '48
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YOUR SAVINGS
AFTER   GRADUATION
...SAFEGUARD
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on circumstances beyond your control.
But if you save part of what you earn, you can shape
your future as easily as you shape your present.
A Savings Account in this Bank will help you to
save regularly. You can watch your future taking
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in itself contribute to the building of character and
independence.
THE
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BEST WISHES
TO THE GRADUATES OF '48
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Best Wishes to the Class of '48
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BEST WISHES FOR SUCCESS
AND 'GOOD LUCK1
nl
To the Men and Women of the
1948 Graduating Class
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Vancouver, B. C.
vVHEREVER YOU GO,
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MArine 9211 Thursday, May 13, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGE 3
Many Unique Courses Offered
At UBC 1948 Summer School
Many Noted Instructors Here
To Teach Six Varied Courses
Spanish House
For the benefit of students registered
in regular Spanish courses offered at
UBC's summer school, a Casa Espanola, or Spanish House will be operated at Acadia Camp in converted
army huts.
It will provide opportunity for
teachers and students of Spanish to
improve their skill in the language
and widen their knowledge of Hispanic vulture.
The language of the Casa will be
Spanish and special attention will be
given to beginners in courses given
during the summer session.
The Casa will operate from July 6
The Casa will operate from July 5
to August 20 and charge for board
and lodging will be $70.
The courses will be under (he direction of Aurelio M Espinosa, visiting professor of Spanish and noted
Hispanist; George E. McSpadden, associate professor of Spanish, and J.
A. McDonald, assistant professor of
Spanish.
Philip Freund, M.A., novelist, playwright and film script writer will
lecture in creative writing from July
12 to August 7. The course will consist of lectures, as much experience
as possible in actual writing, class
criticism and individual consultation
with the instructor.
lt will be divided into two sections,
narrative writing and dramatic writing.
Mr. Freund is a well-known young
American writer. He has published 7
novels, three volumes of short stories
and  is a contributor to such maga-
Creative Writing
zines as the Saturday Evening Post
and the New York Times magazine.
In addition he has done a great
deal of script writing for the motion
picture industry. During the war he
assisted in the preparation of army
films,
Fees for the course are $30, payable
with application addressed to the
Director, Department of University
Extension, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
Accommodation in one of the university camps will be available for
students who register early.
Summer Theatre
The Summer School of the Theatre
will operate from July 5 to August
14.
It will be under the direction of
Theodore Viehman, who has taught
and directed at Hart House and the
University of Michigan; Dorothy
Somerset, who has taught at the
Vancouver School of Art and the
University   of   Saskatchewan;   Sidney
Risk, 6 years supervisor at thc University of Alberta and founder and
director of the Everyman Theatre;
Robert F. Corrigan, assistant professor of speech arts at San Diego State
College; Jessie Richardson, president
of the Vancouver Little Theatre and
Joy  Coghill, director
Club at UBC, 1947-48
of  the  Players
Instruction will be given to students in acting, speech, directing,
stagecrafts and production of a play.
University undergraduates seeking
academic credit should consult the
university summer session calendar
and must register through the office
of the Registrar. A final examination
will be required for those seeking
credit. #
The Department of University Extension will be able to secure living
accommodation in one of the University camps for those who register-
early.
Painting. Weaving, Photography
Three   other   courses   in   painting, , 2 weeks only.  Materials for  samples
photography   and   weaving   are   also
offered during the session.
Painting for pleasure will be under
the direction of Mr. B. C. Binning
of the Vancouver School of Art.
The course will cover a period from
July 7 t'o August 9 and if registration
permits a second course will be formed and students divided into two
sections.
Weaving for Beginners will operate
from July 12 to July 30. The course
is for beginners and those who have
a  slight knowledge of the subject.
The course will be held at the
Youth Training Centre, Acadia Camp.
Classes will meet daily, Monday to
Friday, from 9 a.m.  to 5 p.m.
Candidates who find it impossible
to attend the three weeks' course
may   make   application   for   the   first
will be supplied free of charge.
The course will be under he direction of Mrs. W. S. Ellis and Miss
Jessie Stewart.
From July 8 to August 10 a series
of lectures entitled The Art of Photography will be under the direction
of Mr. A. George Bulhak.
The course will deal with the arts
of pictorial and commercial photography. It will cover such aspects as
camera techniques, handling the subject, composition. exhibition and
judging.
There will !:• a beginners course
dealing with camera techniques and
early forms of informal pictorial
composition. The advanced course will
emphasize pictorial and illustrative
photography.
Registration fee for the course is
$10.
STAR CABS LTD
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21 UBC Students Get
11,700 In Awards
UBC Second on Lists as Council
Gives Awards at 17 Universities
Awards totalling $11,700 have been granted to 21 UBC
students and a UBC graduate at the University of Toronto by
the National Research Council.
The awards were made to students at 17 universities across
Canada, with McGill first and UBC second.
Prizes at UBC were granted in thef-
departments  oi   metallurgy,   zoology,
chemistry, geology and physics with
six veterans included among the lists.
Twenty-three awards granted to
student at other universities will enable them to study in Vancouver.
AWARDS LISTED
UBC student winning awards were;
R, E. Carter, 2430 East Georgia, and
D. M. Morgan, 3686 Blenheim, who
both received $450 metallurgy awards.
A $450 prize in zoology went to
Harold Godfrey, 5658 Dalhousie Rd.
50 UNTD Members
Here for Assembly
Fifty University Naval Training
Division members, fresh from their
training base at Esquimalt at Victoria, paraded before Canada's Governor General at Convocation assembly this afternoon.
The cadets sailed from Vancouver
on May 3 and joined the RCN Pacific
squadron for cruises to Ucluelet,
Nanoose Bay, Prince Rupert, and
northern waters aboard HMCS Ontario, HMCS Antigonish, and HMCS
Kyoga.
Upon completion of the cruises they
received training in navigation, gunnery and supply at the naval training
base, HMCS Naden, Esquimalt.
A $450 bursary goes to D. A. Munro,
UBC graduate in zoology, now studying at the University of Toronto and
a $750 award in physics was gained
by J. C. F, MacDonald, 2665 Topp
Ave., Victoria at the University of
Toronto.
The following persons were granted $450 physics bursaries:
P. E. Argyle, 2222 Balaclava; R. H.
Chow, 192 East Pender; N. J. Harrick,
Lang Bay, B.C.; J. K. Kinnear, 2867
West Nineteenth; R. D. Lawson, 2804
West Twelfth; S. R. Morrison, 1524
Kitchener; J. E. Piercy, Denman Island; J. T. Sample, 1917 Gilley Ave.,
New Westminster; H. E. D. Scovil,
1053 Douglas Crescent; Miss Lorna
M. Silver, Port Alberni, and Miss
Helen Urquhart, Port Moody.
M. C. Robinson, 221 Fiftieth Avenue,
New Westminster, was awarded a
$450 award  in  geology.
STUDENTSHIPS GRANTED
Studentships valued at $750 were
awarded to A. E. Worthington, 2744
West Thirty-fifth, graduate student
in Chemistry.
Studentships of the same value in
physics went to Harry Brown, 1819
Acadia Road; T. L. Collins, Acadia
Camp; P. N. Daykin 2836 West Forty-
second, and T. M. Dauphinee, Acadia
Camp.
ALEXANDER GETS DEGREE
AT CONVOCATION TO-DAY
His Excellency the Governor-General of Canada received
an honorary Doctor of Laws degree at the Spring Convocation
Ceremony in the Armory this afternoon.
 $■   Viscount and Lady  Alexander ar-
|mVAM||   I llff   Rj|n rived here this morning on a three
WlCl|y   kill J   I/O 11 day   visit.   They   arrived  by   steam
ship   from   Victoria   at   7   a.m.   this
Lifts Ban
On Vets Earnings
Almost 1000 veterans at UBC will
be affected by the announcement of
the lifting of restrictions on outside
earnings at the beginning of the next
university term in the Autumn.
The announcement was made in the
House of Commons by Veterans Minister Gregg,
At present, limitations of $75 a
month for a single man and $75 for
the wife of a married veteran are
enforced.
In making the announcement Gregg
said that he did so before the term
ended so that any' veterans who
feared they might not be able to return to college would be able to reconsider.
At present there are 4300 veterans at
UBC and in the main the lifting of
restriction will affect veterans without children whose wives are working.
morning and were met at 9 a.m. by
acting-mayor George Miller, heads
of the armed forces, and honorary
aides, Major-Gen. B. M. Hoffmeister,
Air Vice-Marshal K. G. Nairn and
Cmdr. K. C. McRae
At noon their excellencies were received by the Bishop of New Westminster the Rt. Rev. Sir Francis
Heathecote at Christ Church Cathedral.
DELIVERS ADDRESS
At 2 p.m. this afternoon the Governor-General accepted the degree of
Doctor of Laws (Honoris Causa) and
delivered the convocation address. It
was broadcast.
There will be approximately 20
guests this evening at 7:40 p.m. when
their Excellencies dine with Hon. and
Mrs. Eric W. Hamber. After this at
10:15 p.m. they will appear at the
convocation ball at the Commodore.
@04tqnafalcwtiLty&
from
ODEON
THEATRES
of Canada
Limited
"Sacce44 it* yaal frdoAe. GHrdeavaotU
rr PAGE 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa
Mail Subscribers—$2.50 per year
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of
Daily  Ubyssey  and  not  necessarily  those of the  Alma  Mater  Society
of the University.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF - DONALD FERGUSON
EIDTOR THIS ISSUE:  JIM BANHAM
The
nor
"I ADMIT YOU..
n
With the oracularly pronounced "I admit you" 1400 new
graduates of the University of B.C. saw the end of their
undergraduate days and the beginning of the careers which,
lie in their futures.
The act of graduating amid the splendor of the variegated
faculty robes, the sober-faced choir, the throng of dewy-eyed
parents and the rustle of 1400 graduate gowns and hoods is
a little stunning to most of the customers.
It represents the last and final chapter of college days,
with the suggestions of studies and exams, of cooked labs
and copied essays, of over-due library books and raided carrels, of parties and love-affairs, of bus queues and caf queues;
all of which will be mentally filed away and labelled "the best
years of my life."
Perhaps the most stunning aspect of the ceremony is the
stark realization that student days are over and the time has
come to look after yourself. Carefully planned careers go
amiss, hoped-for jobs fail to measure up to expectations and
all-pervading is a feeling of finality — that what you are
about to do will make a huge difference to the course of your
life and that a decision must now stand a very long time.
In the unsure times of the present day graduates are
indeed to be congratulated for their tenacity in winning the
old academic fight.
On behalf of the undergraduates, and on our own behalf,
The Daily Ubyssey is proud to extend these congratulations
and to toss in a sincere hope for good fortune in the alumni
years of the class of 1948.
CLASS PROPHECY
By PAUL WRIGHT
1968: Here we are again after twenty years of buffeting on
the stormy seas of life. Some have weathered the storms and
the calms, very well, while others are coming apart at the seams.
However the class of '48 was well known for its stamina; there
is really nothing the matter with us today that a few weeks in
drydock won't remedy. It is my purpose as class prophet,
however, to refer to our present state of repair or disrepair;
my purpose today is to review the phophecy that was made
on that truly memorable day twenty years ago, to test its
validity, and to discard those sections which time has proven
to be incorrect.
You will recall the prophecy as it was read twenty years
ago today. While you, the class of '48 settled yourself back
comfortably in cafeteria type chairs supplied from Frank
Underbill's large stock pile, and soothed yourself with popsicles
purchased from profits enjoyed by the council of that year, I
mounted to the dias and read the following:
"The omens have been duly examined, the stars have been
searched, the entrails have been sifted, and the cards have been
scanned ... I do now state irrevocably and beyond retraction
that Fortune will serve certain of our classmates in strange and
devious ways. The fates have decreed that Nora Clarke will,
in 1952, lead a new suffragette movement successfully campaigning for no votes for men. Don Ferguson are newsman, will
turn up in China as the editor-in-chief of the biggest inflation
dollar plant in the Orient. Joan and Patricia Christian, our fair
haired twins, will have been the cause of thirty-seven minor
automobile accidents, and one hundred and nineteen cases of
mild delirium tremens suffered by unfortunates who thought
they were seeing double. Gwynn Griffiths will be given a social
case work assignment with the African Ubangis and will make
a fortune selling lipstick as a sideline.
Alan McGili oA the basis of his activities on behalf of international relations on this campus will be given the task of
designing a United Nations flag. He will then have a nervous
breakdown trying to arrange a bulldog, a hammer and sickle,
and an eagle in an interesting design. Taddy Knapp will blossom into a criminologist and will write seventeen books on the
habits of juvenile delinquent boys. Maxine McClung and Teena
Howard will open rival model agencies and fashion salons. They
will both go out of business when the Sunbathing Association
persuades the Canadian people that the bathing suit is unhealthily confiining.
Don Stainsby and John Wardroper will co-edit the first
picture magazine with harmonizing perfume. Their best selling
edition will be one featuring North American wild flowers, but
(Continued on Page 7)
President's Message
Perhaps the most interesting message that I can write for
the graduation number of "The Ubyssey" is one about some of
our current plans and problems,   The first of these is financial.
While the Provincial and Dominion Governments and private
citizens as well have been generous in their treatment of the
University, the facts are that we have grown so fast and the
costs of labour, materials, equipment, etc. have risen so greatly
that we are finding it extremely difficult to meet the legitimate
needs of the various faculties and departments.   Despite the increases in  the Provincial  Grant,  the  per capita  contribution
of each  student  and  even  on
behalf of each civilian student
is considerably less than it was
in  the  1920s.  The  per capita
contributions made by the citizens of British Columbia to the
costs of higher education in the
province   are   less   than   they
were in the 1920's and the percentage of the provincial revenue, which is paid to the university by way of grant, is also
less, Fees, on the other hand,
have   increaed   botsh   actually
and proportionately. Compared
with other institutions in Canada, we are better off in these
respects than Manitoba but not
as well off as Alberta, Toronto,
McGill and Western. It is, of
course, difficult to make accurate comparisons between Institutions, as different in their organization and set-up as these vari
cost $811, 455.68 plus a special award of 8125,000.00 made to the
contractors by Mr. Justice Sidney Smith, acting as a special
commissioner. (This award has been paid by the Government
out of the five million dollar appropriation). The Power House
is approaching completion at a cost of $331,673.18 - an increase
of $31^673.18 over the original estimate. A wing to the Library
is nearing completion and is expected to cost $763,174.80; the
Applied Science Building is being proceeded with at a revised
estimate of $744,820.54; and the buildings and land clearing
for Agriculture have cost to date $159,636.20. In addition"
$600,000.00 has been allocated to the Biological Sciences and
Pharmacy; $750,000.00 for Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine; $50,000.00 promised to the Memorial Gymnasium Fund
in lieu of an extension to present gymnasium; a balance of
$40,000.00 is earmarked for Agriculture; $250,000.00 for services
to buildings in the Biological and Medical area of the campus;
$250,000.00 toward the provision of facilities for the medicai
sciences and a small balance of about $124,000.00 for other
services connected with, the Medical Faculty, This leaves a.s
urgent needs residences for men and women, a first-class dining
room or cafeteria to replace the 'Caf and emergency eating
places on the campus; a building for Home Economics; and
an Arts Building. Then there are other items like a Museum,
a building for the Fine Arts, the reconversion of certain of the
existing permanent buildings to more modern needs and, finally,
the additional amounts that will be necessary before the Faculty
of Medicine is properly housed and equipped.
It should also be noted that the amount allocated at present
building costs will not complete the Applied Science Building,
the Biological Sciences Building or the building for Bacteriology
and Preventive Medicine and, while all of the space in these,
buildings and in the new wing of the Library will be used and
used to advantage, they will all need to be finished and properly
ous universities are, but my own conclusion is that the Province I equipped in due course. No doubt other interesting needs will
of British Columbia has been getting better university education \ occur to others as the university grows and develops. These
for less money contributed by the province or by any of the  needs, too, will have to be met. The programme which I have
GREETINGS
TO THE GRADS OF'48
• Wc have served you dining your Varsity years
• May wc continue to serve you In your Business and Professional
vcars that will follow your graduation.
"Printing for Every Purpose'
Anderson Printing Co.
LIMITED
PA. 5838
HAMILTON  ST.
VANCOUVER, BC
citizens of the province, (except the students themselves), than
any other Canadian province.
The costs of higher education are particularly heavy in the
faculties and departments which seem to be of greatest practical
and direct material benefit to the province and to the people
of it, e.g., Agriculture, Engineering and all its branches, Forestry, Fisheries and the Sciences.
Substantial private endowments would be a great benefit
to the University of British Columbia, not only because of the
income which would be derived from these endowments, but
because in my opinion diverse sources of revenue make fpr
the maximum freedom in operation and teaching. Apart from
endowment, my hope is that we will be able to get at least
$300.00 from the Provincial Government and Legislature each
year for every duly qualified student that enrolls with us. The
alternatives to this are to limit the number of opportunities for
education which we offer, thus limiting the number of students
who can enroll, or provide a second rate standard of education
for those in attendance.
Our second major problem is that of providing buildings
and equipment that are reasonably fireproof and permanent
for our expanding student body. Most of the accommodation
at the university is semi-permanent frame and stucco construction. These buildings are not fireproof and will have to be replaced after they have served another twenty or thirty years.
These, together with the existing permanent buildings, were
dsigned to accommodate from 2,000 to 2,500 students. While
we will lose all of, our veteran students in due course, our normal enrollment after they leave will probably level off at between 4,000 and 5,000, and will continue to grow from that total.
We planned in 1944 and 1945 to add the following buildings
at the estimated cost indicated:
A new building for the Department of Physics $500,000.00
A new wing to the Library   600,000.00
A new building for Arts   500,000,00
Residences   450,000.00
The Biological Sciences     500,000.00
The Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine 500,000.00
An extension to the present Gymnasium   50,000.00
Additions to buildings for Applied Science   300,000.00
Additions and land clearing in Agriculture 200,000.00
Home Economics   100,000.00
Extension to Power Plant 300,000.00
If it were decided to form a Faculty of Medicine, it was
estimated that we would need in addition to the $500,000.00 for
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine, $500,000.00 for the
medical sciences on the campus and another $500,000.00 for
various purposes connected with that faculty. These amounts
made no provision for the necessary services, such as roads,
sewers, water, heat, light, power ,etc, which had to be brought
into these buildings as they were constructed.
The Provincial Government very generously in the Spring
of 1945 arranged that five million dollars should be made
available for this permanent building programme. At 1944 building costs the construction engineers that we employed to draw
block plans estimated that we could provide most of the buildings at the prices indicated. In the interval three things have
happened: the costs of construction have nearly doubled, a
great deal of emergency accommodation in huts has been made
available and the pattern of our student enrollment has changed.
These necessitated certain changes in our building programme
and the Board of Governors acting on recommendations from
a large committee of some 60 members, consisting of Deans,
Heads of Departments, representatives of the Alumni and
Alumnae, the student body, the Senate, and the Board of
Governors, authorized the' construction, first, of the Physics
Building; second, the Power House; third, the new Library
wing; fourth, the Applied Science Building; fifth, various buildings and a land clearing programme for the Faculty of Agriculture. The Physics Building is now completed and has actually
indicated above will give some idea of how much remains to be
done at the present time to equip this University properly for
the work that the public expects it to do.
Finally, a word about the proposed Medical Faculty: there
te unanimous agreement that both the capital and operating
costs of this faculty will be high. There is equal unanimity that
unless the Province can afford a first-class Medical School it
would be better off without one. The Government and Legislature in the session which has just ended stated that they
would be prepared to contribute $350,000.00 annually toward
the operating costs of the Medical School and indicated too,
that this contribution would be in addition to the amounts
necessary for other departments and faculties at the University
and would not in any way interfere with their legitimate claims
for adequate funds for growth and expansion. This annual grant,
together with the fees of the 250 students in Medicine that may
be enrolled, should provide us with enough money annually to
make a good beginning' At least another million and a half
capital, however, will be needed for buildings on the campus
for this faculty and in addition someone will have to provide
and maintain suitable teaching facilities in connection with a
hospital. The University, in agreement with the opinions of
a number of distinguished authorities, who came to Vancouver
at our request and advised us about these matters, would like
to have the teaching hospital on the University campus. Some
others in the province seem to prefer that these facilities should
be established in connection with the Vancouver General
Hospital and other Vancouver Hospitals. This, while not as
satisfactory from our point of view, will in my opinion, enable
us to start a Medical School and to maintain a reasonably good
one, provided these facilities are adequate and the costs of
establishing and maintaining them are taken care of.
These, then, are some of the problems and plans which the
University administration and teaching staff are concerned with
and which I thought might be of special interest to those who
may read your graduation number.
Your Community Green Grocer
wishes
SUCCESS TO THE GRADUATES OF '48
Fresh fr
nit and vegetables brought in for you daily
FREE DELIVERY
VARSITY PRODUCE
10th Ave
. and Sasamat                                   ALma 1141
Congratulations . .
trom
Serving 10th & Sasamat
at
4440 WEST 10th AVE, Thursday, May 13, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY     .
PAGE 5
CoHgw7a6z7wti-   CLASS OF 1948  *~
M# 10th AVE. GmmttmG
Congratulations
from
RADIO
ENTAL
EPAI R
4453 West 10th Ave.
Alma 2244
Congratulations Grads!
Have Your
GRADUATION PORTRAIT
taken   while  you   still   have  your
Cap and Gown
McCaffrey Photos
4538 W. 10th Ave. AL 2404
(Sasamat   Opposite   Saieway's)
Compliments
and
Best Wishes
Qeotope   tSayce
Sporting Goods
4451 West 10th Ave.
Alma 1414
CONGRATULATIONS
GRADUATES!
Paulette Shoppe
LADIES SUITS - COATS
SPORTSWEAR
4365 W. 10th Ave.
AL 3101
CONGRATULATIONS
SUamnock  Stouty Salon.
4403 W. 10th AVE.
ALma 0201
Mr. & Mrs. A. S. Johnson
Graduates: Hollywood Institute of Hair Design
Hollywood, Calif.
Featuring:
The Radio Wave
The precision permanent Controlled by Electronics
(Now Reduced  in  Price)
To the Class of '48 . . .
Best Wishes for a Successful Future
MARTY LLOYD
4409 W. 10th Ave. Vancouver, B.C.
Congratulations and Best Wishes from
mORflV HOSIERY & LlnGERIE
"University District's Largest
Hosiery and Lingerie Store"
4573 W. 10th Ave.
Alma 2807
BEST WISHES
to the
GRADS OF '48
VERN'S   TOGS
4571 W. 10th Ave.
ALma 1863
CONGRATULATIONS  GRADUATES
TOMORROW..*
%^
todcuf
^%:e„
J
V
at
"«*■;:
Follow the lead of more than a million Canadians who
save for tomorrow.. .open your BofM account today.
Bank of Montreal
working with Canadians in tvtry walk oj lift sinci 1817
WEST POINT" GREY BRANCH: Sasamat & Tenth
A. E. WALTERS, Manager
WE HAVE FOLLOWED YOUR GROWTH
from babyhood
WAY BACK WHEN
... to those
FIRST SCHOOL DAYS
exams ... ~  —.      \w
WEREN'T SO TOUGH
. . . then
in spring . . .
A Young Man's Fancy
. . . turned to baseball
remember? ...
THAT FIRST DATE
. . . a high school prom
AND NOW
GRADUATION!
BEST WISHES GRADUATES!
. . . every success in your future endeavors
GOULD'S GRILL
4423 WEST 10th - ALma 3137
Between Trimble and Sasamat
GRADUATION CLASS '48
Congratulations and Best Wishes For
Your Future Success
"NOW IS  THE  HOUR"
to order that
CONVOCATION
BALL"
CORSAGE
Selection of
Roses,   Gardenias^   Carnations,
Etc.
(Orchids   by   order)
POINT GREY FLOWER SHOP
(Harold H, Graham, Proprietor)
We specialize in Wedding Bouquets and all types of
Floral Arrangements
4429 W. 10th Ave.
AL. 0660
•;•»<>«
WE WISH YOU EVERY SUCCESS
THE THUNDERBIRD
Wishes to Congratulate the
CLASS OF '48
and thanks the student body for its patronage this
spring.
We hope to see the familiar faces back again in the fall
1450 West 10th Ave.
ALma 0045
Good Luck To
The Class of '48
from
KAY'S MEAT MARKET
4460 West 10th Ave.
ALma 1794
CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES
from
etm4
FINE FOODS
MELLOW WHIP ICE CREAM
4489 W. 10th Ave.
AL. 2596
NGRATULATIONS TO THE '48
GRADUATING CLASS
Felicitations to the Faculty
.Members for their Work, Patience
and  many  long hours
OWL DRUG CO. LTD.
Your Friendly  Rexall  Druggists
4421 W. 10th Ave. ALma 1002
HEARTY CONGRATULATIONS
Successful Students and Graduates
WHEREVER YOU SPEND THE SUMMER
AND WHEN  YOU  RETURN
WHEREVER YOU TAKE UP YOUR
BUSINESS OR PROFESSIONAL CAREER
MAKE
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
YOUR BANK
66 BRANCHES IN B.C. AND THE YUKON
Over 500 Branches in Canada and Abroad
University District, Vancouver Branch
H. M. CORNWALL — MANAGER PAGE 6
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
MAKE DINING OUT AN ADVENTURE
 ^ ~s
at ^Jlte Alkamkfta
Cool - Comfortable - Clean
Cosmopolitan Cuisine
Comer of Cypress and Cornwall BAy. 6420
Open Daily — 11:30 A.M. to 1:00 A.M.
Available also for Fraternity Functions and Club Banquets.
Acconuoodation for 140.
GREETINGS TO THE
CLASS OF '48
Class Prophecy
Continued from Page 4
i p-^--
VICTOR SPENCER
THE NEW FAMILY HOME
After the wedding the natural place for the reception
is a large and attractive home to accommodate your
friends.   We provide everything:
FOOD, FLOWERS, MUSIC FOR RECEPTIONS,
SHOWERS, ETC.
Jftamlwfcr pfebbtitg ^ttvftvm ^onte
2011 W. 48th Ave.
they will suffer a serious financial setback in a series of pictorial
articles on polecat ranching. Cal Whitehead and Beverley
Wilson will develop a baby sitting agency to a high peak of
perfection. Cal will design a new type of diaper called the
eternal triangle, and Beverly will specialize in teaching new
born infants Hamet's soliloquy before they can say 'Mama.'
Bill McKay will take a croquet team to the 1957 Olympics
held in Timbuctoo, and will coach this team to victory over all
comers.   Chester Taylor will be called the fair-haired boy on
Broadway. He will stage all the best musicals for the next fifteen
years, and taper off gradually in his old age till he is head
window trimmer at Kresge's. Ron Grantham and Fred Lipsett
will discover a way to remove Ripple Rock from the shipping
I lane, and will work for twenty years afterwards to discover a
way to fill in the hole they make in the process.   Cut Cunningham will make a fortune as a «riminal lawyer, and will discover
that he can make twice as much modeling Cunningham crew
cuts in New York.   Perry Millar and Jean White will both
compete for position as head of the supreme court.    Perry
will concede the victory because of old fashioned courtesy, and
will instead take a post as justice-of-the-peace at Niagara Falls,
where he will gain the world's record for mass marriages by
uniting, with the help of a loudspeaker, seven hundred and
sixty-five betrothed couples at a single ceremony.
Bill Smith will invent the Smithsonian Calendar, providing
for a nine day week and a thirty-six hour day, to permit executive types on twice as many committees, and attend three times
as many Board of Trade luncheons, He will have much trouble
with indigestion in his latter days.
These are the prophecies, indisputable, unchangeable, and
true beyond all shadow of doubt. In general it may safely be
said that all members of the Class of '48 will be either "famous
or notorious."
Looking around us today, fellow classmates, in the year
1968, we cannot help but be struck with the uncanny accuracy
of this prophecy. Regard the classmate on your left—famous,
unmistakeably famous. Glance swiftly at the classmate on your
right. It is whispered that he is indeed notorious. Twenty
year ago the oracle spoke. We can question the words of the
oracle. Great terrible things were prophesied. They have all,
without exception, "come to pass.
Last Will and Testament
Of the Class of 1947 -1948
TESTAMENT
We hereby revoke all prior wills and Testamentary depositions heretofore made by us.
We give, devise, grant and bequeath:
1. To Comrades MacKenzie, Birney, and Lewis, Fellow
Traveler Pamphlet 569 containing evasive answer for questioning clergymen.
2. To Dave Brousson, a big job.
3. To the War Memorial Committee, a divot-replaccr.
4. To Frank Underhill, who has waged a lifelong and
losing fight against the forces of undergraduate dissolution in
his endeavour to run a respectable place, one green baize table,
one green eyeshade.
5. To Grant B. Livingstone who has consistently fled a
six-pointed star, a black umbrella to ward off its rays.
the English Department, a semi-colon,
the Premeds, a colon,
o the Biology department, a contract for all future
es of political belligerence. ^
9.   To the Library staff, a mounted,^oldplated model of a
ivet gun, militant.
(signed)  The Class of '48
per Ned Larsen.
wpek/ect
^GRADUATION GIFT!
Big Plans Bog Down
Totem Production
Production of The Totem. UBC's
permanent yearly record, has met
with difficulties and the editor has
announced that it will not be available  until late  in June.
Editor Don Stainsby told the Daily
Ubyssey that many new innovations
in the book this year have held up
production. These same changes, he
added, would make the book something worth  waiting for.
Copies will be mailed as soon as
possible to all members of the graduating classes. Cost of this procedure, however, prevents ii's being applied! universally. Undergrads can
pick up their books during the summer or in the fall at the AMS office,
To Agrologisf
Council
Dr. J. E'. Munro, Deputy minister of
agriculture for thc B.C. government,
an John C. Berry, senior member of
the University of British Columbia,
have been appointed by the provincial government to the council of
the B.C. Institute of Agrologists.
BEST WISHES
from ,   .Dte*ce
\X
Canadian Dress Designer
308 Arts & Crafts Building
576 SEYMOUR STREET
Congratulations, Graduates
fAMCUJ
CLOAK & SUIT CO.
ti)''-f~n When Your Spring
Fever's Chronic...
And your fancy lightly turns to thoughts a little less
than 100% platonic ...
And you cut your favorite classes and take sulphur
and molasses . . .
You obviously need an Arrow Spring Tonic!
Take your ailment to your favorite Arrow store.
A new Arrow tie or two will make a new man
of you (almost)!
ARROW SHIRTS
^lES • HANDKERCHIEFS *
FOK   AS  LITTLE   AS *l-50
Perfect  from a hoy friend . . . perfect from a
best  friend . . . perfect from a favorite relative . . .
Lutien Lrlong perfumes to make every occasion as
gala   as   graduation  day!   Indiscrete, Tailspin   and
-n     Sirocco in working - your - way - through - college  to
V§   rich- uncle  sizes.
^~ $0 ">0
Indiscrete  Perfume from   ''_&*'
... ia      •       n      i       #9 <M>
Indiscrete  Dusting I owner     *u*
Indiscrete Cologne ironi     ±,
Tic Tac Toe (Lipstick Trio)  *1.50
CLERGYMEN
WIN DEGREES
In the spring convocation of the
Anglican College of Divinity in Brock
Hall, Wednesday, April 28, Rev. Douglas A. Ford, B.A., Lth., was only
graduate to receive » Bachelor of
Divinity   Degree.
e
Honorary Doctorates of Divinity
were conferred on Rt. Rev. F. P.
Clark, Bishop of the Kootenays, and
Rev. Prof. D. P, Watney, M.A., B.D.
Licentiate of Theology diploma was
awarded to Norman Edgar Tanner
and Certificates of Standing to Kenneth Maxwell Collison, Capel Stand-
ish Lutener and Angus Ewen Hamilton Cameron.
Party refreshment
COCACOIA LTD., VAN
Ask for it either way .. . both
trade-marks mean tbe same thing. Thursday, May 13, 1948
DR DANIEL  BUCHANAN
. .  ,  Retiring Dean
UK. ISABEL. h.  iviaiim>ua
. . . Retiring German Head
DR. G. G. ShDGEWICK
.  .  .  Retiring English  Head
....^.^\^ «^\^nu9Cw/*&{ -.ywfc  __$_sjfgi
l)R. S. N. F. CHANT
. . . New Dean of Arts
Four Faculty Members
Retire from UBC Service
April 1948 saw the disappearance of some of the campus's
most familiar faces among the faculty.
Four senior faculty members and the university's bursar
retired after many years devoted to lecturing and student
administration.
Gage,  prof,  of mathematics,  will as- I
sume in addition the duties of Dean
of   Administrative  and   Inter-Faculty
Affairs,
Dr, J. Roy Daniells, professor of
nEglish, has been appointed new
head of the Department of English.
Dr. Daniells, who came to UBC in
September 1946, graduated from this
university.   He   took   his   Ph.D.   at
Dr. Daniel Buchanan, Dean of the
Faculty of Arts and Science and head
of the Department of Mathematics,
concludes 28 years of association with
UBC.
He has been professor, dean, and
on occasion, acting president. He was
head of the Department of Mathematics for 22 years and dean of Arts
for nearly 20 years.
He is a member of the American
Mathematical Association and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, retiring head
of the Department of English, first
joined the university staff in 191,
three years after the iniUtiltion
opened.
He later studied for a time at Harvard where he obtained the degree
Aggie, Geography
Students Jump
From Pan to Fire
Have you ever leaned back
after a job was done and then,
that very same instant, have
someone come up and hand
you another?
Well, fifteen UBC students
and graduates just through
with their examinations had
that same experience last
week.
The students were from the fac-
ultes of Agriculture and Geography,
and their classes are in a special
course on land utilization, administered by the university in co-operation with the Department of Lands.
On   completion   of   a   two
course,   the   students
a
in
of Doctor of Philosophy in English.
He taught in the U.S. before returning to the UBC.
Recently he has published a number of radio broadcasts which he
had been called upon to participate
in from time to time during his long
teaching career. Since October 1942
he has been chairman of the university committee on honorary degrees.
Dr. Sedgewick is said to be pne of
the great authorities on the Elizabethan period of English literature
on this continent.
Dr. Isabel Maclnnes head of the
Department of German, first associated
with UBC as an instructor in the
days when it was still McBill University College, was appointed professor
of German in 1943. She became head
of the Department of German when
it was created from the old Department of Modern Languages in 1946.
Dr. Robert H. Clark, after a brilliant academic career in Canada and
at Leipzig, taught in American universities from 1909 to 1916. He came
to UBC as an assistant professor in
the latter year. During World War
II he directed research on a number
of problems suggested by the armed
forces.
Angus MacLucas, retiring bursar,
who came to the university in 1916
as a member of the book-keeping
staff, succeeded to the post of bursar
in 1934, on the retirement of the late
Fred Dallas.
A. B. Recknagel, who has been
serving as acting head of the Department of Forestry, is leaving to join
the staff of St. Regis Paper Co,, New
York, as technical director of forestry,
Succeeding Dr. Buchanan as Dean
of Arts is Prof. S. N. F. Chant, OBE,
professor of psychology and head of
the Department of Philosophy and
Psychology.
Ontario-born Prof. Chant, director
o fpersonnel   selection  and  research
is
Toronto and was head of the Department of English at University of
Manitoba before coming here>
New   hefid   of   the   Department   of
Mathematics,  Dr.  R.  D.  James,  who
graduated from UBC in 1928. He is a
Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada
and author of a number of important
books on mathematical problems.
DIET1WU (0LLIMS4
'f'K.^t^P MACHINE   TOOtS  •  CONSTRUCTION   •
J V.V5^**^ LOGGING  •   SAWMILL  jnd   MINING  EQll
(HdTcol^
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Phone  KE. 4311
weeks
crews   will! for  the RCAF from 1941 to 1945
survey   Crown   Lands  in   the  Peace  author of "Mental Training, a Prac
River,   Prince   George,
and Kootenay areas
Similkameen, (tical sychology."
l   Dynamic,  popular Prof,  Walter H.
EVERY GOOD WISH
TO THE GRADUATING CLASS
for
SUCCESS, PROSPERITY
AND HAPPINESS
FROM
CLARENCE WALLACE
BURRARD DRY DOCK
COMPANY LIMITED
df&i£(4%48
The Graduation Ball... a night to remember . . . you,
lovelier than he's ever seen you, dancing like a
dream ... and looking like one ... in a Ricky formal,
beautifully styled, economically priced, from The BAY.
Romantic White . . . nylon eyelet embroidery, bare on one
shoulder, with a crisp nylon
net frill caught up at the back
... a wide, wide flounced
skirt
Dramatic Black . . . nylon marquisette with a diaphanous
skirt to waltz in ... a mist of
white lace on the shoulder
straps ... at the demure
bodice.
College Shop, Third Floor
l^tutfony l?8£ dompang.
INCOK^ORATHO   *fm   MAY  IfTO THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
Livingstone Flies
To Arizona Parley
Three smiling UBC student-veterans waved families goodbye at Vancouver Airport. Tuesday afternoon,
and buzzed off by light plane to a
university conference 1500 miles
away, s
They were headed for Tempe, Arizona, and the Conference of Pacific
Student Presidents at Arizona State
College.
"See you on the 12th!" called pilot
Jim Harty, DFC, former RCAF
bomber pilot, to his young wife and
five-year-old   daughter   Judy.
His companions were Dave Brousson, UBC Alma Mater Society president, and Grant Livingstone, last
year's campus president.
Sixty universities will be represented at the conference, with UBC
1he only Canadian "varsity" to attend.
After the conference, which lasts
from May 7 to 9, the fliers hope to
go to Forth Worth to attend the
Inter-Collegiate Air Meeting at Texas
Christian University . . . "if our
money holds out," grinned Jim
Harty.
Their plane, a Piper super cruiser,
was provided and equipped by the
UBC Flying Club.
Math Out
In Changes
Next Session
Two New Profs
Added to Teach
Announcement that Mathematics 100 is no longer compulsory for all Artsmen marked
the highlight of this year's
regulation and course changes.
The course will remain compulsory for students enrolling in Chemistry, Physics, Geography and allied
subjects but an extra language
course may be substituted by other
students. A new course, Mathematics
90, has been added since Math VI is
no longer compulsory in high school.
CHARGE LATECOMERS
Late registration fee will now be
$10.00 inst'ead of $2.00 and a fee of
$2.00 will be charged for course
changes whereas no fee was previously charged.
Two new lecturers, Mr. Ping-Ti
Ho of the Chinese National Tsing
Hua University and Mr. Geoffrey
Davies of Canterbury, have been
added to the Department of International Studies making possible new
courses in Chinese external policy
British   Commonwealth   relations.
A new course for Home Economics
students is announced by the Department of  Bacteriology  and  Preventi-
tive Medicine.
NUMBER CHANGE
New courses in advanced Physiology and Cytology are offered by
the Department of Biology. The department also announces several
changes in course numbers in the
field of Genetics. Botany courses in
Forest Pathology have been eliminated and new courses in Economic
Flora and Taxonomy added.
Graduate courses in Electrochemistry and Organic relations will be
offered in 1948-49. Off the schedule
are courses in Chemistry for teachers
and Chem. 310, a course in quantitative analysis.
Commerce students will be offered
a Vk unit course in airline traffic.
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
CIGARETTE
//
Who Gives a Damn
a
Students Wax Bitter;
Resent Fee Increases
By DOUG MURRAY-ALLAN
Feelings of resentment, indifference and sarcasm, were expressed by students concerning the
recent fee' increase, when interviewed by a Daily Ubyssey Reporter last week.
The majority of students felt
that the increase was necessary
from the point of view of the
rising cost of living, however all
of them had comments and suggestions to make as an alternate
to the increase.
CUT STAFF
One grad student suggested
sweeping cuts in staff, pointing
out the prevailing conditions in
the Physics department. Some instructors he stated have virtually
been unemployed during the past
month, although they have been
receiving their full salary.
Grant Livingstone, retiring AMS
president stated that "this is just
another feature of inflation, and
I don't think the university can
help it. However I do believe that
it is getting away from the idea
of free tuition which was originally
the basis of this Provincial University."
DIFFICULT FOR WORKER
Jim Sanderson, a graduating
commerce student said that it
would be very difficult for some
students who have to depend on
summer work to get through next
year.
A second year Arts student commented that "if the increase in
fees is paralleled by a decrease
in the size of lectures, its all right
with me."
Laura Haahti, third year Arts,
stated   that,   "I   don't   think   any
student is so destitute that twenty-
five dollars would stop him from
enrolling. At the most about a
quarter of an average month's
salary for a summer job."
CHARGE OUTSIDERS
One student was of the opinion
that out of province students
should be charged higher fees.
"These students," he stated, "are
being supported by our taxpayers,
and since they do not reside within our province I do not believe
that they should be given the
benefit of our educational institutions on the same basis as those
students who are B.C. residents.
One grad student quipped "I
don't give a damn if they raise the
fees a hundred dollars, I'm not
coming back here next year any
how."
OUTDOOR UIUTIIMH
Antfudteto
in Canada
• HOWARD CLEVELAND '33
• NORRIE    FINLAYSON    '35
• ERNIE     CLEVELAND     '42
SEABOARD ADVERTISING CO.
LIMITED
301 WEST 5th AVE.
FA. 0066
#-_*m&-.  •-   *"-"'
flow jet propulsion
creates employment
for Canadians
The principle of the
gas turbine has long
been known but its
most recent application to
the jet engine is one of the sensational
developments of our time.    One of the
main problems in thes ■ engines, is to get
metals to stand up under the intense heat
and stresses involved.
Development work on the gas turbine
is now world-wide.   Much progress in
design   and   development   has   already
been carried out in Canada.
new engines, and placing all their
technical knowledge regarding Nickel
alloys at their disposal.
px<i<Xm
To stand up under the terrific stresses
at   high   temperatures,   the   important
parts of turbines, blowers and combustion chambers in the gas  turbine are
being made of Inconel, Stainless Steel
and other Nickel alloys.    Without such
heat-resisting  metals,   these   new  type
engines would not be possible.
The International Nickel Company is
co-operating to the fulles^extent with the
technicians who are developing these
When  these  new engines are brought into
'''i'v/V .'"■ I It''      inliime   production
e, ei f }. ■ y .    j i *
1 O "-' -J t ijusancls    ot    Cana
dians will be employed in making this
entirely  new  source of motive power
available to industry and transportation.
This and  numerous other present-day
developments will provide new markets
for Canadian Nickel, and so provide jobs
for the thousands of men employed in
the  Canadian   Nickel   industry.    Thus
does research develop better products,
create more employment.
ji
A
a-^v^.Q*
'?',,   a|
•<m(t of
>Nietel"a 611- page
boot fully illuh
trattd, will hi sent
frte an rrqntst lo
anyone interrstid.
TNE  INTERNATIONAL  NICKEL   COMPANY  OF CANADA, LIMITED, 25  KING  STREET WEST, TORONTO Thursday, May 13, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGE 9
The Sun Life Of Canada
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Provincial Government Report of 1947
of British Columbia Business
Total Assurance in force December 31, 1947 $114,544,077.00
New Business effected during 1B47:
Ordinary 12,205,049.00
Group     1,776,570.01)
TOTAL  13,981,619.00
Cash Disbursements in British Columbia during 1947
to Policyholders and Beneficiaries 1,977,674.00
An average for each working day of 7,083.00
British Columbia Investments
Bonda  and   other   securities $31,193,147.00
On  Mortgages     5,682,338.00
TOTAL  36,875,485.00
BRITISH COLUMBIA BRANCH OFFICE
6th Floor, Royal Bank Building
A. L. WRIGHT, C.L.U., Branch Manager — PA. 5321
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GRADUATES
WMHEUJ
YOUR FASHION FLORIST
Specializing in
WEDDING BOUQUETS — CORSAGES
Phone: BAyview 5656
3691   West  Broadway
U(en J\l(ayktW,   <Ptofi. Vancouver, B.C.
UBC SERVICE STATION
Complete Automobile Servicing
We Cater to UBC Students
ROY HAND - PROPRIETOR
2180 Allison Rd.
(Just off University Boulevard)
Aim* 0524
Best Wislies to the Clots of '48
X... .A^'fe^^^A-.'^.;'a.<
BEST WISHES TO THE
GRADUATING CLASS OF '48
DICKSON IMPORTING CO. LTD.
Backers of
BttMiftm
TEA and COFFEE
1S7 West Cordova Vancouver, B. C.
BEST WISHES
TO THE
1948 GRADUATING CLASS
•
A FRIEND
Expansion Marks Efforts
Of UBC Alumni Group
In the interests of those students who are graduating this
year and will therefore become alumni, the editors of the Daily
Ubyssey felt that a message from the Alumni Association would
be fitting for the graduation issue. Accordingly, their message
is printed below.
Realizing that the best guarantee for the future welfare
and progress of UBC lies in the continued and active support
of her well-informed Alumni, the students of yesterday and
today can be found working together toward this great goal
as members of the UBC Alumni Association. "Alumni are
trying to keep faith with tomorrow's students," exclaimed
President Dick Bibbs the other day," by keeping in touch with
UBC's problems and needs today."
In his welcome to Alumni of the '48 Class, President Bibb
said that "it was a pleasure to see so many new names being
added to the roster in the Alumni office, and to know that
these Alumni would enjoy the direct benefits resulting from
almost two and a half year's operation of Alumni activities
on a full-time basis."
The former AMS President, and present Players' Club
Alumni President recalled that organized Alumni effort had
come a long way since "its spontaneous start in '19, under
First President Brigadier Sherwood Lett." Brig. Lett, who
was a member of the first graduating class in UBC's history
in '16 and a Rhodes Scholar, lead the organization on his
return from Overseas. Since that time, he has been a member
of both the UBC Senate and Board of Governors for a
number of terms and he is the only Alumnus who has been
honored with an Honorary Life Membership in the Association.
Approximately three decades later, in the first full fiscal
year ('45-'46) following World War II, the Association again
elected a Rhodes Scholar as its President—Lt.-Col. W. Tom
Brown (B.A. '32). The same year saw the appointment of the
first and present permanent Secretary-Manager, Frank J. £.
Turner (B.A., B.Com. '39), and the establishment of a permanent office and record system in the Brock Hall.
In the same year, Alumni joined the students in a concerted
drive to raise funds for a Provincial War Memorial Gymnasium at UBC.
There can be no doubt that the Association's magazine,
the "Graduate Chronicle", which was ffublished spasmodically
during the first two decades of its existence, is the most
important contact with Alumni all over the world. Under the
editorship of the Association's Immediate Past-President Darrell
fT. Braidwood (B.A. '40, M.A. '41), the magazine began to
publish quarterly and regularly, and became recognized as a
liso^J^ Caittsila^ ^x»m»t' pu^Mcation. The praeent Editor,
Ormonde J. (Ormy) Hall (B.Com. '42), has continued the
Chronicle's development and has increased its reader-interest
appeal.
Also important in the Association's expansion during the
past few years has been the establishment of enterprising
Branch groups in verious Communities in the Province, and
elsewhere. Active B.C. branches include Victoria, Summerland,
South Okanagan (Penticton), Kelowna, Kamloops, Vernon,
Kimberley, West Kootenay (Trail-Rossland), Creston Valley
and Wells, while others have been established in Southern
California, Northern California, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal,
and London, England. Presidents ol all Branches, or their
delegates are automatically members of the central Alumni
Executive.
The Summerland Branch is possibly the most outstanding
example of how successful an enthusiastic group of Alumni
can be. Over two years ago, Summerland Alumni started
a Community Scholarship drive and, as a result of Community
support, one Summerland high school student each year
reecives a $250 first-year scholarship to UBC. Recently, an
anonymous donor in the Ottawa Branch sent in $500 to
the University to be used to help students.
These are but a few instances mentioned to illustrate the
fact that graduation is really only the first stage of a student's
life-time association with his Alma Mater. This becomes even
more apparent when it is realized that, in the final analysis,
an institution of higher learning is judged by its "products",
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As Contractors for the new Physics Building, we are proud of the part we have
taken In the University Expansion plan.
AMR WELL COnSTRUCTIOn COIIIPfllW, LlflllTCD
GENERAL CONTRACTORS PAGE 10
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
COMPLETE MINING PLANTS
International Tractors and Power Units
Manclia Storage Battery Locomotives
Elmco Loaders
Holman Mining Equipment
Petter Diesel Engines
Wheat Electric Minors Lamps
Bertram Machine Tools
Pratt and Whitney Tools
Continental Do-All Machines
B. C. Equipment Co. Ltd.
HEAD OFFICE
551   Howe  Street
Vancouver, B. C.
WAREHOUSES
306 Industrial Street
Granville Island
SUCCESS TO THE CLASS OF '48
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1909 FRANKLIN ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DIETHERS
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Contractors
Extend  Congratulations  to the
Graduates of 1948
122-124 West 6th Ave.
FAir. 2920
Valedictory
ByJOANBAYNE
For 1400 young men and women, May 13, 1948, will signify
the end of undergraduate years and the beginning of more
earnest careers as UBC graduates and Canadian citizens. In
speaking for the 1400, I realize that the year of graduation is
one of the few dates we have in common; for those who registered
in 1943 and '44 were only interested spectators of the transformation which accommodated those who registered in '45 and '46.
But although our interests have been greatly.varied during our
college years, still we take pride as a whole in the accomplishments of UBC and of our fellow-students .
Since it is a young university, UBC's yearly growht
in almost every field is only natural, but the impact of the war
and post-war era created extraordinary demands on the Point
Grey campus as on every campus throughout the world. However, the Montreal Standard's lengthy article is evidence
that the remarkable and memorable achievements of President
MacKenzie and his faculty and administration command the
admiration not only of the province but of the whole of Canada.
In 1944 the curriculum still included compulsory military
training and Red Cross service; but with the influx of returning
service men and women, courses were accelerated, classrooms
were overcrowded and the now-familiar huts appeared on the
campus. Further consideration was given to the increased
enrollment by continuous attempts to furnish new courses and
new faculties so that this year witnesses the second graduating
class of the Home Economics department and the first valid
graduating class of Dean Curtis' Law faculty.
Despite the swollen registration causing the spotlight to
rest on academic pursuits, UBC's traditional student endeavors—
athletic, social, cultural and administrative — have not been
ignored. Rather ,student activity has reached an all-time high,
paralleling the growth of the student body and participated in
equally as well by the veterans as by the average-aged university student.
Sports have prospered and gained in importance since
the war's end to the extent that the athletic directorates now
have exclusive control of their own finances. "Bigger and
better" symphony and jazz concerts, guest artists' programs,
plays, operettas, and speeches, have been the entertainment fare
of the UBC student. The opening of the Radio Society's ultramodern studios, the establishment of the university branch of
the Canadian Legion, of Acadia, Fort, Wesbrook and
Little Mountain Camps, the launching of the War Memorial
Gymnasium Drive, and the increased leadership which UBC
student government officials have given in Canadian and American college associations — all these are factors in student extracurricular life.
(Continued on Page 11)
Thursday, May 13,1948
GOOD GOING!
Electric Power &  Equipment Ltd.
1285 HOMER ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE GRADUATES OF 1948
Bloedel, Stewart and Welch Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Bowell McDonald Motor
Co. Ltd.
Dealers for
CADILLAC        BUICK        PONTIAC
615 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Show Goes On
Wavy rMop of Hair'
Worn By Players
Garbage collectors know their
business but UBC Players' Club
cast of "School for Scandal" claim
they don't know real art when they
see it.'
It was all very disasterous. The
garbagemen made off with all the
huge elaborate Elizabethan wigs,
mistaking them for waste, and
burned them in the incinerator.
Fouy hours before the players
were due to board the train fcr
their tour of interior B.C. the loss
was  discovered.
Rather than have Sir Peter and
Benjamin Backbite et al appear
balding on the stage, the harried
players canvassed the local department stores for mops and spent
the first night on the train to
Vernon, their first stop, tying the
not so flaxen locks into wigs.
With a few licks of poster paint
and some aluminum dust the
converted mops became convincing
coiffures and saw thc travelling
troup through their week-long
schedule.
Opportunity
MADE IN B. C.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1948 GRADUATES
n
u
LIMITED
ENGINEERS AND GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
1449 HORNBY ST.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The development of British Columbia's
natural resources brings industries here . . .
with accompanying payrolls to provide
opportunities for our young people.
Through its Industrial Development Department and its advertising campaign "Business
is Moving to B. C." the B. C. Electric is
helping to establish industries here. Through
projects such as Bridge River Hydro, the
B. C. Electric is ensuring an ample supply of
low-cost power . . . one good reason why
"Business is Moving to B. C." Thursday, May 13, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGE 11
Congratulations
... to the Graduating Class
Whether for Home or Business Office Our Stationery and Printing
Departments will serve you In many ways
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566 Seymour St.
PA. 0171
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Grads Of Today Marched With UBC
In Transition From War To Peace
(Continued from Page 10)
Curiously enough, when most of us donned the traditional
green finery of First Year in 1944, President MacKenzie was
also entering UBC as a virtual Freshman; now as we wear our
graduating robes so proudly, we find that our honorary President and Vice-president are also leaving the cloistered halls of
higher learning for the "Cold, hard world." We salute our most
distinguished fellow-graduates, Dean Bucanan and Dr. Sedgewick, and wish them all success and happiness.
Since 1916, UBC has fostered every activity worthy of
undergraduate or graduate upport. Its history is short, but it
is such that each of us is proud today, and will in the future
count it an honor to hold degrees from the University of British
Columbia. The Class of '48 has been fortunate in being a part
of the university's transition from war to peace with its consequent rebirth of ideas and efforts. As heirs of a vigorous, |
growing, human institution, we hope that we have added to that
growth. And now we leave our Alma Mater, confident that her
influence will never be weakened by any lack of love or loyalty
on the part of the student body, certain that she will grow with
every passing year, and hopeful that the contributions of the
'48 graduates will not soon be forgotten.
Q*ui<huMan
Patfoaitl
at Special Rati!
Inquire about our special rates for
graduation portraits and make an
appointment early! Your graduation
portrait is something you'll treasure
always! Telephone CEdar 1314 and
take advantage of this special offer
now!
CLASS POEM
Four years In changing seasons blending,
Green to gold, and summer Into snows;
Autumn leaves confetti's scuffling rows
Assaulting counsellor and clerk, unending,
Thousand-footed student centipede.
Winter: Recall the mentor's monotone
Feeding facto with soporlphlc drone,
Balancing a diet for our mental needs.
Remember and remember face and fading form;
Let no past delight be lost to view;
Engrave, for keeping, days of calm and storm;
Let each year of purpose be renewed.
Memories serve our future with swift wings
Carrying past days through coming springs.
00W
I
Maker of Fine Photographs
2715 GRANVILLE STREET
(at 11th Ave.)
Cedar 1314
By Ernest G. Perrault
"Scandalized" Audiences
Applaud Touring Players
When the curtain rang down on last night's performance
of UBC Players' Club "School for Scandal" at the International
Cinema in Vancouver, it marked the finale in one of the most
enthusiastic programs yet undertaken by the student players.
This   year's   annual   spring   play,
Sheridan's
raftou:
Congratulations
1948 GRADUATES OF
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAMOUS  PLAYERS
CAN. Corp.
Operating
CAPITAL - ORPHEUM . STRAND
CINEMA • DOMINION THEATRES
famous social comedy,
which won the acclaim of UBC students when it ran on the campus for
a week shortly before exams, took 24
members of the Players' Club on a
nearly 1000-mile tour oi interior B.C.
covering the week from May 3 to
May 10.
The players then mounted the
boards of the International Cinema
Tuesda yand Wednesday of this week
when the Alma Mater Society sponsored the production for Vancouver
citizens.
At press time Jerry Macdonald,
production manager, expected capacity
houses for the two-day stand.
The week-long Interior tour took
the cast to Vernon flrat for a one-
night stand Tuesday, to Kelowna,
Wednesday night, Summerland on
Thursday and a matinee and night
performance at Penticton Friday. The
junket wound up with a night performance at Oliver Saturday and saw
the cast tired but confldnet, back in
Vancouver Monday morning.
Kinsmen, Rotarians, Stagettes, and
other drama and service organizations
sponsored the production at the interior points,
It is estimated that full houses for
all shows allowed more than 5M0
people to, see the production.
The travelling cast was largely identical with the original show at UBC
with the exceptions of Peter Main-
waring who replaced Peter Massey
as Sir Peter; Joy Coghill, director of
the play who stepped in as Mrs. Candour for Isobel Gould; and Art Alexander who took Careless for Ned
Larsen.
NO POP, NO SNAP
DURING TALK BY
GOV.-GENERAL
Today's audience at UBC graduation exercises was protected
against the annoyance of popping
flash bulbs by signed pledges
given to i'he university by press
cameramen.
At the request of the Governor-
General, the photographers promised not to siiap pictures while
His Excellency was reading his
speech.
Before the ceremonies began,
photographers were carefully
briefed by university authorities
on picture-taking etiquetre expected of them.
The university carefully excluded enterprising amateur shutter-
bugs by limiting the number of
photographers to four, each of
whom  ha  to be  accredited  by   a '
Sincere Best Wishes . * *
To The Graduating Class of UBC
From the following Professional and Business Men
and Firms
Campbell, Meredith & Beckett    M. Koenigsberg
Campbell, Murray & Co.      Sharp and Thompson, Berwick
McKenzie, White & Dunsmuir   '   Pratt
B. L. Johnson, Walton Co., Ltd.   Clayton B. Delbridge
Vancouver Engineering Works   Gordon Wismer, K.C.
John R. Kerr
Eric Donegani
George Reifel
E. E. Buckerfield
A. E. Jukes
Senator J. W. deB. Farris
Alfred Hyams
Nelson Laundry Ltd.
W. G. Murrin
W. H. Malkin
T. S. Dixon
Col. Hon. E. W. Hamber
Alberta Lumber Co. Ltd.
Senator Stanley S. McKeen
I. J. Klein
Chris Spencer
Pacific Meat Co.
H. R. MacMillan, C.B.E.
George W. Norgan
E. G. Baynes
Dal Grauer
Ralph S. Plant
Frank M. Ross PAGE 12
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
UBC Wins Canuck Hoop Crown
Defeat Mustangs, Montreal YMHA
To Gain Olympic Representation
UBC Thunderbirds won top Canadian basketball honors at
Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens with two straight wins Monday
and Tuesday nights in the Dominion Olympic trials.
The Blue and Gold quintet completed a successful season
with a climatic 48-34 victory over Montreal YMHA which gave
them the mythical national title. Down 19-17 at the half, the
'Birds snapped back with a 31 to 15 scoring spree in the second
half.
The Thunderbirds actually won the
right to represent Canada at the 1948
Olympics Monday night when they
defeated the University of Western
Ontario Mustangs by a 48-40 count to
take the Dominion Inter-Collegiate
hoop crown.
SCARR HIGH
Paced by Bobby "Hopper" Scarr
who garnered 10 points, and their
high-scorer of the season, Pat McGeer  with  eight,  the  'Birds jumped
PREXIES NAME
GRAD MANAGER
LATER IN MAY
top
into an  early  lead and  were  on
of a 29-22 count at the half.
Although Johnny Metras' Mustangs
crept within three points of the Western Canadian University Champions
at one point during the third quarter,
UBC was actually drawing away from
Western Ontario' in the final stages of
the game.
|    Coach Bob Osborne stated that the
I Canadian   Olympic   basketball   squad
1 will fly to London in August to compete in the international casaba tournament at Wembley Stadium.
BEAT ALBERTA
Previous to their successful invasion
of Maple Leaf Garden in Toronto,
the British Columbia student aggregation overcame Maury Van Vliet's
The Men's Athletic Directorate is' University of Alberta Golden Bears
still receiving applications for the 'in a best-of-three series.
office of Graduate Manager of Ath- The Thunderbird cagers scored an
letics. Seven applicants have offered easy 62-46 victory at Edmonton in
their services to date. j the first game, Monday, May 3, then
According to the new contract to be lost out by a 51-46 count in the
put into effect, the position will be second on Tuesday. However, a 56-42
a full time Job and will offer a salary' decision in the third game on Thurs-
of $2000 per year plus a bonus ac-jday, May 6, gave the Western Inter-
cording to ticket sales, although such Collegiate title to the Pacific Coast
bonus will  not  exceed $1000 in  the' college five.
first year. Although the other Vancouver bas-
Applicants to date are Luke Moyls, ketball team, Clover Leafs, were
present holder of the position, Herb' eliminated from Olympic representa-
Capozzi, Ole Bakken, Pat McGeer, I tion by the Montreal Y.M.H.A. on
Paul Stockstad, Maury Physick and Monday night, it is rumored that
Russ Baggen. They will be inter- Coach Osborne has asked Ole Bakken
viewed on May 19 and the appoint- j and Jack Pomfret to join the Cana-
ment will be announced shortly after dian Olympic team which will travel
that date. to England later this summer.
Rugby Boys Show Form
In Taking Four Cups
By  DAVE  BARKER &
Always a popular sport on
the campus, English Rugby
was again acclaimed, this year,
by the fans who turned out in
large numbers to see the
Thunderbirds take the Millar
Cup, the Tisdal Cup, the McKechnie Cup and the World
Cup. This latter trophy was
won in part, here in Vancouver,
and in part down in California,
at Berkeley.
Before Christmas, there were two
University teams entered in the Millar Cup series. The Varsity team is
the first fifteen otherwise known as
the Thunderbirds. A total of six teams
were in competition for this cup and
the Thunderbirds went right through
the round-robin series without a
single loss, to end up in top position
and win the Millar Cup.
After Christmas, the Thunderbirds
and UBC were also entered in the
Tisdale Cup series, but the first team,
due to the pressure of a very heavy
outside playing schedule were forced
to drop out of the race and leave
UBC to defend the possession of this
cup.
UBC WINS
UBC   came
through   nobly
the
North Shore "All Blacks" were only
one point behind them in season play,
was just an added incentive to fight
a little harder.
The first games of the World Cup
series were played here in Vancouver
against the University of California
Golden Bears, on February 19 and 21.
The Thunderbirds outplayed and out-
scored the Californians in the first
game to a score of 13-3. However,
they dropped the second game by a
very narrow margin, 3-0.
Almost one month later, the situation was reversed. That is, the Birds
journeyed down to sunny California
to play the last two of the four game
series of the World Cup, at Berkeley.
Tlie situation as to the games however,
was no trev#rsed; in fact it was rather
one sided, with the Thunderbirds
coming out on top in both games,
15-8 and 11-3.
AUSTRALIA HERE
On March 3, the Thunderbirds
played host to and international rugby
against, the famous Australian team,
"The Wallabies." Varsity however
wa snot thc only the competition that
the Wallabies had during their sojourn
in Vancouver, but the competition
provided on the campus far surpassed
anything found either downtown or
on    the   Island.     The     Thunderbirds
pinch and won this round-robin series \ managed   to   hold  the   powerful   Aus-
without   a   loss.     The   fact   that   the : tralian  team,  to  a  score of 20-6.
Our Congratulations and Best Wishes
Utley Armstrong
MILLINERY SALON
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EVERY SUCCESS GRADUATES!
f agnha £>tjnp
Imported Linens
China   Antiques
Oriental Gifts
2932 South Granville Street                    BAy view 9105
DICK BLOCKBERGER,  Sports Editor
Acting Editor, LAURIE  DYER
Every Success to the Class of '48
Foster's Fine Furs
Designing
Manufacturing
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Vancouver, B. C.
Marine fiV2(i
DISTINCTIVE      HAIRSTYLING
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OPPOSITE  HOTEL  VANCOUVER
CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES
from
Sorotljtj Mttttyv
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BAvview 2908
2572 Granville  Street
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FREE   'N   EASY   PLAYCLOTHES!
Choose man tailored slacks or shorts to pair with a sharkskin
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All designed for maximum comfort ... at minimum prices.
Corduroy Shorts — Wine, red, powder blue, brown $4.95
Short sleeve striped pullovers in variety of colour combinations $3.95
FOR    FUN    IN    THE    SUN    AND    SEA
Choose from our large selection
of Swim Suits . . . either one
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pure "Lastex" and showing a
rainbow of color. Sizes 32 to 38.
$7.95 to $15.95
VANCOUVER'S
FASHION
CENTRE Thursday, May 13, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
'Big Red7 Ron Grantham
a
osen
'M
an
Of y
ear
Engineer Who Risked All To Work With Artsmen
Adds Honored Title To Long List Of Laurels
RED'
Grantham,
Choice of the Publications Board for Man of the Year 1947-48 is husky,  red-headed Ron
Grantham,  president of this year's  Engineer's  Undergraduate Society.
The announcement will come as no surprise to countless students who have known the
carroi-topped Engineer s Presi-, likeable Grantham either personally or through his wide reputation as a sincere, hard-working
dent, has added title of "Man of | student, leader. Interviewed soon after he was chosen for the honor, Grantham expressed
the Year" to other distinctions,  typical qualms about his civil engineering course, in which he is slated to graduate this year.
Although he felt "surprised" and "honored" about the Pub's
decision, it is hardly a new experience for the 22-year-old native
Vancouverite to be singled out for special recognition.
His   efforts   in   numerous   activities^
have been outstanding sihce his days
BEST WISHES
to the
GRADUATING CLASS
C
rossman Machinery
CO. LTD.
806 BEACH AVE.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Vssmiwlfe sefrfsh i
We're determined to keep both our
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valuation . . . well below new
car prices.
at Kitsilano high school when he was
twice acclaimed the best all round
student, winning the Honor Award
as a junior high student and later
as a senior.
MAMOOK MEMBER
In 1944, although busy beginning
his applied science course, he managed to hold down two presidencies,
those of his own engineers' class and
of the Mamooks. His classmates
chose him as their leader the following yebr as well, a year that marked
his first and last venture into campus-
wide politics.
In that instance he ran and was e-
lected to the position of USC chairman. But a post-election investigation found him ineligible under the
existing   AMS   regulations,   since   he
was only in his third university year.
Two most notable events in Grantham's third year engineering were
his election to UBC's honorary fraternity, Sigma Tau Chi, and his trip
as president-elect of the EUS to the
Toronto conference of the Engineer's
Institute of Canada.
EUS PREXY
Heading EUS this year, Grantham
played no small part in student
government, upholding and defending t'he cause of the group he represented. He championed the engineers early last fall when they were
allotted what they considered to be
an  insufficient budget.
His whole-hearted, let's-get-behind-
and-push spirit is exemplified by the
March of Dimes campaign he engineered this year. All told, the Crippled Children's Fund benefitted by
more than 600 dollars from the drive.
Peppery Council Member
Chosen 'Co-ed of Year*
Since Nora Clarke arrived at university, she has inevitably
had her finger in "the pie" of most campus activities.
Sensationalist of the year, she became the basis of a great
controversy when she staged a walk-out at a council meeting in
defense of the future editor of the Daily Ubyssey, later handing
in her resignation as president of the Women's Undergraduate
Society. Said Miss Clarke, "My robes did not catch in the door,
and I do not think it was a childish action.'
Nora's   ability   of   leadership   .goes
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was elected vice-president of the
student council, appointed editor of
the school paper, "Camoson," and
became one of those famed diciplin-
arians, commonly known as a perfect.
She not only held .these three offices,
but she was able to win the women's
public speaking pin( and the newspaper pin.
Thus arriving at the University of
British Columbia this ambitious girl
with the ironical sense of humour
started her career after being elected
president of first-year girls which
gave her a seat on WUS. Later she
was chosen for (he first Fall Ball
Committee and finally ended the
year by having a "sup" in Beginner's
Spanish.
By second year. Nora was president
of Second Year Arts, was chosen
chairman of the Sophomore Prom,
and later the Junior-Senior Prom.
In the Mock Parliament session, she
sat in for the Retrogressive Progressive Party that had the slogan, "Look j
back to go forward."
To Nora, third year was perhaps
the most exciting for her. As vice-
president of WUS and secretary for
the co-ordinator of activities, "Buzz"
Walker, she became a member of the
honorary sorority. Delta Sigma Pi.
On thc committee for the Western
Canadian Universities Beauty Contest
she was chosen in the final eight for
Beauty Queen. This to Nora is extremely funnny as Buzz only put her
name in for a "gag." At the end of
this most successful year, with the
help of Gerry MacDonald, it was
she that was responsible for getting a
well-known architect to come and
look over the foundation of the Brock
basement for the extension of the
Radio Society. It was also she that
inaugurated the "Council at Home"
for the Frosh Reception.
Thus passing into fourth year it
was only natural that Nora should
be elected President of WUS, and as
a member of i'he Students Council
this gal caused a riot when she walked out of their regular meetings concerning the .ratification of the editor
of the Ubyssey.
Taking a  double  major  in English
and History, with a minor in sociology, Nora hopes to take her Master's
Degree at the University of Washington.
HER CHARM mixed with firecracker personality which
made her storm center of UBC
campus politics won for Nora
Clarke title of "Woman of the
Year."
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HOWE AT DUNSMUIR PAGE 14
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
Players Many lrackmeets On lap
Coming Up
Year by Year
If past progress is anything
to go by, the UBC grid machine
is on its way up. According to
the local moguls, this season's
American football has been
successful in that the Thunderbirds managed to move away
from the league cellar. After
a no-win year in their first
season at American grid, the
'Birds came back to win one
and dropped two very close
contests that gave the fans a
little hope of things to come.
At lt»e initial opening of the season last September, some 70 odd players had drawn strip. From these,
Coach Greg Kabat was able to pick
a team with plenty of prospects. The
lads who remained throughout the
season developed into strong seasoned
football players and gained the experience that is so necessary to future
success.
NEW TALENT
This year, when spring-training-
time came around, newer faces added to the team of the future. The
older and more seasoned players
were able to help the new-comers
and taught them the "tricks of the
trade."
According to those who know coach
Kabat haa done a marvelous, job
in teaching the rudiments of football.
There was so much to teach in such
a short time that he was forced to
specialize his players, He used one
team for the offensive and another
for defensive.
STARS LEAVE
Many of those who played last year
will return next year, but Bill Pearson, John Gray, John Caplette, Fred
Joplin, Harry Mark and Herb Copozzi
will graduate this spring.
As Olympic Itials Near
The Thunderbird Track Team, defending Conference champions, rolled to an impressive
victory in their first meet of the season last Saturday, May 8, at the University Oval.
Outscoring their opposition in both the track and field events, they beat out a strong
Seattle team composed of University of Washington thinclads, 48-38. Teams from Victoria, the
Vancouver Owls Club* and the Pacific Athletic  Club finished behind Seattle in that order with
19, 18 and 12, points respectively.
RUNNING MATES — Pat Minchin and Bob Piercy,
Co-eds Enjoy Great Year
In All Sports Circles
By JACQUIE SHEARMAN
With the initiation of intercollegiate
sports, the revival of the Victoria
Invasion and greater participation in
the intramural programme, women's
athletics enjoyed a successful year and
aged by Yvonne French, was considered to be one of the best the
University has produced for some
time. After a slow start, the UBC
team ended up in third place in the
same League.
In   the   Northwestern   Universities
ended up with a fair share of silver. GraM   Hockey   Conference   held   fa
war*' ..   , I Portland,  the  Varsity  team  proved
The   Varsity   Grass   Hockey   team ^^j^ ^j to ^^^  Col.
came very close to copping top honors legM ^ wJnnlng ^ ^
in the Grass Hockey League, bowing ^ ^^j
out to a strong ex-Kits aggregation!
by a score of 4-2 in the final game
of the year.  Tht Varsity team, man-
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HOOP TEAM HOT
Hie  launderette   basketball   team
was entered in the Senior B division
of the Cagette League and brought
home their share of silverware by
winning  the   City  and  The  Lower
Mainland Championships. Headed by
high  scorers  Nora  McDermott  and
Mearnle Summers, the girls had little
trouble in downing the Tracy quintette in three straight games to win
the   city   championship    and    were
equally   successful   in   defeating   a
Chilliwack team  to cop the Lower
Mainland championship. In the B.C.
finals, the Thunderettes were finally
stopped in Victoria by a strong Hudson's Bay quintette by a sojre ef 84-
102 in a two-game, total point series.
In  a baskejbal)  pWgay  held  at
Western lejSUnjgoi* College, in Bel.
llnghem,   Vajraity   fauna   swept   te
victory by winning all of their fejur
gamejL against teams from  Weptern
Everett  and  WWtmore
SOW LEARNING
The, Varsity Girls* Ski team entered
tw*, tote£cej|fi0«jf. meet, this year
at Sun. Valley, Idajie and ait Martin
F*pj,. in. Wjufcingten. A!$W#>. they
were apt succeasful in placing in
either of the. meets against stiff competition from American colleges, they
gained valoahje experience which
should assist them in future tournaments.
IMve new members were welcomed
to the Big Block Club this year at
the Annual WUS-WAA Banquet. The
new winners were Meamle Summers
for basketball, and Jean Weber, Ann
Turner, Anne Munro, Nora McDermott
and Vilan Spicer for grass hockey.
There were four rewind Doreen
Campbell and Nora McDermott for
basketball and Yvonne French and
Sheila Stewart for grass hockey.
UBC DIVOTERS
TRAVEL SOUTH
FOR TOURNEYS
After a successful opening ef their
season, the UBC divaters left home
last weekend fer distant greens. They
will be gone for more than a week.
With victories ever College ©f
Paget Sound and Western Washington
already behind them, the Blue and
Gold golfers are heading for competition in Tacoma where they will
play a return match with the Loggers
fnom CPS. From there, the divoters
travel south to Portland where they
will meet University of Portland.
Ihe final tourney of the tour will
be played in Salem( Oregon, when
Khe 'Birdmen take part In the Pacific
Intercollegiate Conference meet on
the home grounds of Willamette University.
With sprinter Chick Turner sidelined with a sore leg, the 'Birds
failed to win a single track event, but
built up an overwhelming lead in
the three weight events with three
firsts, two seconds, a third and two
fourths.
This coming Saturday, the 'Birds
have their first dual meet since the
War with the University of Washington's powerful  Freshman  team.
The meet will see the return to
action of Chick Turner and Dave
Blair, the UBC star sprinter and
hibh jumper respectively. Distance
stars Pat Minchin and Bob Piercy
will be doubling up in the mile and
two mile.
At the Conference Meet in Walla
Walla on May 22, the team's chances
of retaining the championship may
hinge on Russ Hoy, the Intramural
champion,   being   available.
In lasV Saturday's meet, the half-
mile with Al Bain and Doug Knott
entere, was the best race of the day.
Bain took the lead at the end of the
first quarter and held Jack Hutchins
of the Owls Club off until the final
rurn.
Ez Henniger was nosed out 'in a
driving finish in the 440 by Earl Robinson, University of Washington's
star, in 50.9" but came back later to
run the anchor leg in the mile relay
in 49.8" for the fastest quarter of the
day.
Effects of the examination lay-off
showed up as Pat Michin followed
Hutchins around in the mile to fonlsh
35 yards behind and Bob Piercy dropped behind Pete Salmond in the two-
mile after four laps.
Salmond went on to set a new
Canadian record of 9* 41.6" and Piercy
finished in 9' 55" well below the Conference records.
John Pavelich led the team with
thirteen points. Russ Hoy, the 'mural
champ, also showed well, throwing
the Javekin further than me best
Canadian performance of 1947.
In the mile relay the 'Birds came
very close to the flying Seattle team
but placed second despite the efforts
of Henniger in the. final stretch.
EDITORIAL
By DICK BLOCKBERGER
It seems that there are three things that should go in the editorial on.
the Sports Page of this year's Graduation Issue of the Daily Ubyssey.1 And
they're all important and sincere.
Firstly, there should be a word of "good luck" to those who are graduating from dear old UBC this year. It is our sincere hope that the education
you have received on our campus will bring you success and good fortune.
i
We also hope that you won't forget the Blue and Gold, nor the teams
that wear those colors out there on the field of battle. We want you to come
back often and always to follow the 'Birds.
Secondly, we should let you all know that we feel that we have completed
i very successful year in the world of sport. If we had the space, we could
say something nice about every team on the campus. Yes, it's been a great
year, and we want you to know that we feel that next year is going to be
even better.
And then, my third point. Just as it has been a fine year in athletics,
K> has it been an excellent year on the sports desk .We've had lots of grief
and lots of fun, but somehow we always managed to hit the deadline.
Perhaps it was because your sports editor had a great bunch of guys and
gals around the desk. All that can be said is — "Thanks."
Happy summer, all.
Congratulations and Best Wishes
To the Graduates of 1948
J. C. WALBERER
Totem Photographer
Res. 5 West 7th Ave. FAir. 1157
All Totem negatives will be kept on file for any size photographs
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Yeii Finish the Jeh Thursday, May 13, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGE 15
ca
ii -
em
Bl LAURIE DYER
THE SHOW MUST GO ON
I walked into Room 103, Semi-private, at the Vancouver
General the other day, to find "Rickie" Blockberger, our little
old sports editor, lying flat on his back and having to admit that
he was not quite all there.
Actually, I wasn't too surprised because that was what I
expected to find. You see, a little birdie had 'phoned and told
me that the poor lad was dying to see me. I must admit that at
first I couldn't figure out why he wanted to see me instead of a
cute little blonde friend of mine who happens to be one of the
better nurses down at VGH, but my alert mind soon had the
problem solved.
Not only did I know that he had lost his appendix, I also
knew that we was going to lie there groaning and beg me to
put out the sports sheet of the graduation issue for him. Well I
was right. And after all, what can a guy say in a case like that?
The Bird Started It All
But as I began to wonder what I was going to write about,
I thought about the little bird that had got me into all his work
by getting the right number when he phoned instead of the
party line. (And I'm sure that Hartt Crosby, the English rugger
star, would have made a very fine sports ed.) Anyhoo, the birdie
was Lome Glendinning. He's always good for some copy. You
know, that guy's started something.
Lome was the wee lad that was mainly responsible for the
addition to the campus sports scene of the Pep Club, an up-and-
coming little organization if this humble scribe ever saw one.
And a most necessary one too.
Of course, Lome always has been a great one for that
intangible stuff known to us all as "college spirit." In fict, given
the proper conditions (preferably a small room with a locked
door and the keys in Lome's pocket), he would talk Ihe hind
leg off a freshman in his efforts to put across his ideas about this
all-important feature of any healthy university.
And He Was Just In Time
But the good part about the whole story is that Lorro came
along just when he was most needed. You see, when a College
has the enrollment that we have, and an athletic board that
wants to progress along with the rest of the university, we need
very badly just such a pep club as Mr. Glendinning and hiscon-
federates are planning.
It fits right in with the program in which UBC is detply
entrenched at the present moment. I mean, after all, vjhat
kind of a football game would it be without lots of the old "l|h-
rah" that should be a natural part of any college grid contest.
Why, the very expression "college football" has a certain connotation of color, bands, and screaming students, plus those lonely creatures, the drum majorettes and the rhythmic movement
of their, ah, baton.
Ah yes, college football! What excitement! And from what
the grid moguls say, we're going to have a team next year. Not
that the lads did too badly during the past season, what with one
win and two very close losses on the record. But when that1
team starts winning, and the kids start filling the blue and gold
stadium, the "big brass band from Mr. Delamont" starts breaking
into rousing marches, blue skies, green field, lots of blue and
gold streaming out in the breeze ...
They've Got A Job To Do
And behind a great deal of the rah-rah that goes on that
day will be Lome and his Pep Club members. See those guys
and gals out there all dressed in white? They're the cheer leaders,
and a sincere, hard-working lot they are too. And we up heve
in the grandstand WANT to yell . . . look at those burly characters down there over the ball for the next play!
Yes, the Pep Club has a great many jobs. It all adds up
to a grand total of trying to put the spirit into college sport.
And if you don't think there's a lot of work behind that kind
of carrying on, you're way off the bit, brother.
' But Lome has problems. How are you going to teach 9000
students all the yells. And then how are you going to get them
to follow cheer leaders, even if they are kind of cute! And how
are you going to get 3000 freshmen to get behind those Varsity
teams? How are you going to make them feel that they are
part of UBC now, and that you want them to be proud of our
boys and the colors they represent?
We're Behind You, Lome
Well, Lome still has a couple of years to work on thoso
problems, but let me tell you, Lome, that the kids on this campu.s
who are athletically inclined are right behind you. At times I
wish I was going to be back next year to watch your progress.
But don't think that I'm going to forget about the dear old
Blue and Gold, Lome. I'll be there in my seat in the stadium
when football season rolls around, and that goes for the 'Bird
games on the basketball maples, too. And don't think I'll forget
about the rugger lads who make us happy every year by bringing home all the silverware they can get their hands on.
In fact, 1300 other graduates like myself will be keeping
an eye on our old alma mater. We're going to be homesick for
quite some while. Good luck, UBC. We want to hear from you
and your teams . . .
Beta's Retain Cup
In'Mural Set-up
| Beta Theta Pi Fraternity headed i
list of 38 entries to cop the Intramural
Athletic Championship for the second
successive year. The standings announced by Ivor Wynne aijcl hi
intramural Council show that th<
Betas ^retained their tiv'le by edging
a gallant Phi Delt crew by a scan
2\{> points in this year's race for thie
two gallon mug, A strong Physica'
Education   entry   placed   third.
In an interview with the Dail\
Ubyssey, Wynne revealed that the
Intramural setup had operated on -i
sound financial basis during thc 1947-'
48 session, and would face the coming year with a considerable backlog
of funds.
The athletic program was reduced
somewhat this year according to the
diminutive and erstwhile Cloverleaf
basketball • star. Touch football was
slashed from the slai'e because of
inclement weather, while the proposer!
tennis tournament was shelved duo
to insufficient time.
PHYS. ED.  ROMPS
Phys Ed took the major share of
the individual titles, sweeping to victories in the swimming meet, the
boxing and wrestling tournament,
and capturing the softball championship by a wide margin. The Phi
Delts and the Scienceman each bagged two gonfalons, the fraternity lads
nabbing the volleyball and basketball,
and the redshirts powering t'o wins
in the skiing and table tennis.
The Legion managed to eke out a
close win in the cross country bracket
at the Annual Road Race in the fall.
The badminton title fell to the Alpha
Delt shuftlecockers, while Ihe Kappa
Sigs and the Betas divided the Track
title between them.
Here are the standings:
1, Beta Theta Pi, 347%; 2. Phi Delta
Theta, 345; Pyhs Ed, 302; 4. Kappa
Sigma, 287y2; 5. Sciencemen, 229V2;
6. Delta Upsilon, 221; 7. Aggies, 205;
8. Alpha Delta Phi, 201%; 9. Psi Upsilon, 200%; 10, Kats, 200; 11. Phi
Kappa Pi, 199; 12. Jokers,-198; 13. Phj
Gamma Delta, Termites (vie), 196%;
15. Legion. 190; 16. Forestry, 158%;
17. Jondos, 151; 18. Newman Club, 131;
19. Beta Chi, 127; 20, Norvans, 120;
21, Phi Kappa Sigma, 119; 22. Pre-
Med, 110; 23. Pharmacy, 98,
Their Final Step-The Olympics?
BOB HAAS—One of the co-captains
>f this years' Thunderbird hoop quintet was Bob Haas, the lofty pivot man
who has dropped many a crucial
point for the Blue and Gold. Playing
with a bad ankle during a great
part of the season, Bob has nevertheless held the 'Birds together and is
well known for his great sportsmanship.
HARRY KERMODE-The other co-
captain of the 'Birdmen who won the
Dominion Collegiate Championship
in 1948 was the tall forward of the
Varsity club, Harry Kermode. The
calm, hard working Kermode has
made a name for himself as a dependable, sharp-eyed ball player who
could always be counted on in the
clinches.
PAT McGEER—A real mainstay of
the 'Birds is young Pat McGeer, the
leading scorer of the team and the
winner of the Bobby Gaul Trophy for
1947-48, A crafty forward who knew
how to make that left flipper work to
perfection, Pat was one of the big
guns throughout the Conference
games and the Dominion finals.
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TennisQumtet
Touring South
After three straight wins in competitions with American universities,
%e UBC tennis team "started out on
their annual tour last Sunday., The
% includes tournaments in three
s^them cities.
tast Tuesday, the tJBC team played
a return match with the College of
Pu|ft Sound in Tacoma, having de-
j feahd the Sound team 6-1 in a
preVfcus tournament' played on the
UBC home grounds,
Toiky tlie Blue and Gold will meet
Portlincl University in Portland, and
will travel , from there .to . Salem
Oregon, the home grounds of Willamette University.,
CONFERENCE  MEET
SalerawUl be the site of-the annual
Pacific Northwest Inter-collegiate
Tennis tourney slated this year for
Saturday," May 15.
In conUsts to date, the Blue and
Gold team ha.s defeated College of
Puget Sound, and has twice defeat"d
Western Washington. UBC won the
first match on their home courts, 7-0,
and then downed the Washington lads
4-3 at Bellingham last Friday.
Leading the UEC sextet is Art Jeffrey, a Davis Cup trialist of last year
and the third ceded player of these
parts.
Other members of the team are
Reg Anderson and Bill Sparling, two
top juniors of their in that bracket.
The two other mainstays are Steve
Green and Lionel Jinks,
(Tire  GOSPEL -  Continued)
a hunch Comparelli was carrying a
battery), and I'm away winging dawn
the homestretch. Things are looking
up, I can see "Happy Boy" smiling
to himself with one of those big,
toothy grins, in my rear-view mirror.
The UBC track.Jf're/toJBi and golf foams
are off to a AflealthJ start with two
big wins eaan, and it's up to them
to carry ma down to the wire. With
some help t'rom the cricketers, maybe
we'll make it by next September,
and that w*uld mean a new track
record, '
Will we v'in? Will we smash the
mark for tie 29 and one-sixteenth
mile route? Tune in again at this
same time text year, folks, when
Brousson's 31ack B'ile Beans will
bring you thi thrilling finish!
(Okay, Dyer Pay me now!)
the gospel . . .
according to LUKE MOYLS
AT THE POST
When they drag an old sports
columnist like myself out of retirement it's like bringing a plug out of
pasture to run in the Kentucky Derby.
But then, I once heard of a milk-
wagon nag who returned his supporters (even all the old biddies who
plunge with their two-buck show
bets) with nothing but greenbacks
when he won by a whisker in the
third (or was it the flftf?) at Bay
Meadows (or was it Suffolk Downs?)
Anyway, I ain't saying you would
be missing a good bet if you stopped
reading this "form chart" right now(
but when I get in with the typewriter
jockeys anything can happer, and usually does!
Laurie "Scoop" Dyer is responsible
for the current round-up of us bunch
of has-beens. Even "Frankly Speaking" Turner, a fine mudder in his
day, is being called back into action.
It seems I recall the Alumni putting
him away to stud when I first took an
interest'  in   horse-racing.
Indirectly, it was my interest in
this so-called "sport of kings" which
put me through university. I used to
be quite an authority in those days,
for I followed the horses closely—
with   a   bucket   and   shovel.
THERE THEV GO
Well, to get back to this guy Dyer,
in collecting his stable of has-beens
he rates me a hot chance over the
29-mile and one-sixteenth route. So
I start out last September, and as I
am pawing the turf, eager to break
from Clay Puett's gate, who do I
see but Greg "Hardrock" Kabat putting his Thunderbird gridders, through
their pre-season paces on the infield,
I forget to mention that none other
than Dave "Happy Boy" Comparelli,
MAD prexy, is my jockey, weighing
in at 191 which is quite an impost
for any thoroughbred to lug 29 and
one-sixteenth miles.
The bell rings, the gate flies open,
and off we go to a hot start. But it
is not till November 1st (Homecoming,
remember?) that we grab the lead and
move in on the rail as the UBC
football heroes notch their first victory
by shellacking Lewis & Clark College's Pioneers.
AT THE TURN
Rounding the Clubhouse turn, various other glue-factory prospects are
giving me plenty of challenges,
breathing hot on my neck as the
Thunderbird basketballers swing into
action. like Coach Bob Osborne's
hopping hoopers, one minute I'm in
front, and the next minute I'm not.
But I catch my second wind as I
go racing down the backstretch. That's
when the rugger stalwarts start running loose. The Varsity fifteen wins all
the silverware in sight and everything
looks rosy.
Just when we are getting near the
far turn, Jupe Pluvius suddenly decides to turn on the sprinkler system
even though nobody so much as
touches the fire alarm. Now I am
no mudder, but it so happens that
Doug Whittle's swim team comes
along at this time to win the Conference swim meet and help me through
the puddles.
AND THE STRETCH
When I am thinking of Peter Vajda's
skiers, never doing better than placing
second all year (why didn't they
sabotage Washington?—no one would
notice a little glue in their wax). I
am starting to slow down on the
turn. iBut Frank Frederickson's Ice
Hockey sextet finishes off its season
in a blaze of glory by beating Colorado College, the Western U.S. Inter-
Collegiate Champs, and I'm back in
a gallop again.
A few other startling shocks, tike
these, only more electrifying (I had
(Continued at Bottom of Page)
ONW COURT- /N ANY SPORT-
vw &€&t 6et cd
o
SCIENTIFIC LAST
Permits feet to function tfs
nature intended.
SLANT-CUT TOPS
Streamlined for flexibility
and snug fit.
CUSHION INSOLES
Absorb shocks, lessen foot
fatigue.
BREATHABLE UPPERS
Permit   air   to   circulate
freely through shoes.
NON-CHAfING TOE
Eliminates seams that cause
friction and discomfort.
rfook at the features that make Fleet Foot the
finest shoes you can buy for sports. Here's
the "Gym" — scientifically designed to
provide maximum comfort and support,
and to stand up under the most strenuous
playing conditions. High cut and oxford
styles in men's sizes, oxfords in women's
sizes. Remember to ask for Fleet Foot, the
Shoe of Champions, at your shoe dealer's.
O
a
TESTED COMPOUNDS
First in the laboratory, then
under actual wearing conditions.
I
BALANCED CONSTRUCTION
Upper and sole are correctly
built to give "balanced"
wear.
NON-MARKING SOLES
Special light coloured soles
won't mark polished floors.
DOMINION RUBBER O COMPANY LIMITED
i\ PAGE 16
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, May 13, 1948
The
Government of British Columbia
Through The
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
extends cordial greetings to the sfudents of
the University of British Columbia
The People of this Province ore proud of the ccfttri-
bvtion which the University, its Staff and its Gradiates
are making to the welfare of the Province. Facilites for
training in Law, Architecture and Pharmacy ait now
available and the next year will see the establishment
of a Faculty of Medicine.
The requirements of the University, financial and
otherwise, have always been of major conceit to the
Government. For the current year the Legislature of this
Province has provided one and one-quarter millions for
the operation of the University in addition fo special
provision for the capital cost of new buildings.
Bursaries and Loans are available to student* of ability
through a Dominion-Provincial programme of Student
Aid.
HON. BYRON I. JOHNSON
Premier
HON. WM. T. STRAITH
Minister of Education
\
L^

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