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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1921

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 3, 1921
Number 12
Student Cafeteria
in Operation
INTERESTING REPORT FROM
STUDENTS' COUNCIL
There have been many inquiries made
by students as to the financial arrangements of our cafeteria in the valley.
Desiring to secure this information, we
wandered over to the Council room to
interview Mr. W. O. Banfield, treasurer
of the Alma Mater Society.
We found that the cafeteria was outfitted by the University authorities at an
expense of nearly one thousand dollars.
After it had been equipped, the management was turned over to the Students'
Council, who are now responsible. A
contract was let by the Council to the
Tally-Ho, whereby this company provides the food, gas, and service that is
required. Payment for meals is made by
tickets which are sold by the Council.
Each week these tickets are redeemed
from the caterers, thus giving the Council a check on the amount of business
handled.
When the contract was signed it was
estimated that the daily receipts would
be $50.00. This figure has not yet been
reached, however, the daily average for
the first three weeks being $39.00, $44.00
and $43.50, respectively. The Alma Mater
Society will not share profits until the
receipts' for the month reach $1,000.00—
which is $50.00 a day. When this is
reached, our profits will be 15 per cent,
on the first $100.00 in excess of that
figure, with an added 5 per cent, for each
additional $100.00.
The store in the cafeteria is stocked
with candies and stationery, and is open
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. It is run on
a cash basis, and one-third of the profits
will be turned over to the Council.
From this array of facts, it is apparent
that the success of the cafeteria depends
entirely upon us. Reasonable criticism
and suggestions are welcomed by the
Council, for the cafeteria is operated
wholly for the benefit of the students, by
the students. It rests with us to make it
a success.
MISS MOUNCE WINS HONORS
Unique Entertain-
ment by Aggies
LISTEN   TO   THE   COMMENTARY
OF VISITING ROOSTERS
Miss Irene Mounce, who graduated
from U.B.C. in 1918, has been awarded
the Hudson's Bay Company research
scholarship in botany, of the value of
$1,500. Miss Mounce has been studying
at the University of Manitoba.
By B. P. Rock and R. C. W. Orpington
We were asked to act as patrons at the
Aggie dance, which, so we were told, was
to be the climax of the social functions
of the season. This put us on the alert,
and we spent more than the usual time
in polishing our claws and preening our
feathers. When we were introduced, we
made our best bows and gave our society
crow. We could not but notice that our
appearance and manner excited favorable
comment.
Suddenly a terrible racket arose at the
far side of the room. We perceived that
it originated from a platform where some
strange creatures were swaying back and
forth. The roosters and pullets on the
floor interlocked their wings in a strange
manner and staggered and swayed around
the room. The uproar stopped, wings
were disengaged, and all eyes were fixed
expectantly on the platform. It was all
very strange to us, but from their actions
we reasoned that they must be mannikins
who worked under the spell of the noise.
The mannikins beating their wings together made a peculiar sound, upon which
the uproar started again, and the same
strange actions continued. Truly, we
were in a strange world!
During a lull we listened to the conversation about us: "Nice decorations";
"Floor not so bad"; "I'm sorry I didn't
see you sooner to ask you for a dance";
"Yes,   Mr.   D ,   you   may   have   the
seventh, but find me early; that horrible
Mr.   M   forced  me  to  promise  it  to
him, and I won't dance with him." Evidently all promises were not kept with
the scrupulous honesty to which we are
accustomed.
Presently a gentleman in white appeared and dished out trays of feed. This
considerably upset our mannikin theory.
However, whatever they were, he must
have owned them, or he wouldn't have
taken so much interest in feeding them.
Then colored spheres floated down
from the ceiling. There was a terrible
scramble of the black mannikins, while
the others looked on and clucked encouragement. Then the uproar and strange
antics recommenced, until finally all the
mannikins stood up and crowed. This
was evidently some pre-arranged signal,
for after this they all departed and left
us in peace.
'Varsity Loses Close
Game to Elks
HOCKEY MEN DESERVE MORE
STUDENT SUPPORT
Misfortune still seems to dog the heels
of the 'Varsity hockey team. Hard luck,
the excellence of the Elks' goalkeeper,
and the absence of proper support from
the spectators all combined to contribute
to our downfall last Friday night. When
a team is fighting desperately for an
equalizing goal, as ours was doing in the
third period, organized rooting is a material help, so part of the blame for our
defeat is due to those fellows who didn't
turn out.
Both teams played a cautious game in
the first period, the close checking preventing any spectacular display. Jack
Wilson was in the limelight several times
when he evaded the Elk defense by clever
stick-handling. However, shooting on
both sides was wild, and, after a series of
end-to-end rushes, the period closed with
no score.
The second period saw both teams
settling down to a fast pace. Don Morrison was too carefully watched to get
away, but Lou Hunter played a very
pretty game. The Elks scored the first
goal about half-way through the period,
and nearly repeated this a few minutes
later; but Broadfoot made a wonderful
save, coming out of his goal to meet the
puck.
However, they scored again at the
beginning of the third period. A few
minutes later 'Varsity retaliated on a
shot from Morrison. From then on practically all the play was around the Elks'
goal. Just at the last the score was nearly tied, when their goalkeeper fell in
clearing a shot; but, unfortunately, the
puck bounced the wrong way, and the
game went to the Elks by a score of 2-1.
The team: Broadfoot, Shields, Plummer, Morrison, Wilson and Hunter.
Subs.: Ternan, McPherson and Wolverton. '
HIGH JINKS
The Women's Undergraduate Society
will hold its annual masquerade on
February 11th. A circus, with side shows
and fortune-telling booths, will provide \
amusement for those who do not wish to
dance all evening. Girls who have not
been asked to impersonate special characters should come masked, and in any
costume they choose. THE   UBYSSEY
February 3, 1921
Clothes with
> >
a "Rep
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth and Willow
"Sou need some relaxation about 4
o'clock in the afternoon. You can get
it over the tea cups at the "Palms."
Bring  your  friends.
We serve good Lunches, too; and
our Candy is top-hole.
C LUFF'S
PRE-INVENTORY
Shoe Sale
JANUARY 15th to 31st
Will save you money on all lines of
Fine FOOTWEAR
Gluff Shoe Co.
Limited
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
FIRES OF ORATORY
"The time has come," the walrus said,
"To talk of many things."
As far as University students are concerned, "the time" was last Wednesday
evening, upon the occasion of the men's
annual oratorical contest. For two hours
the gathering, which comfortably filled
the main auditorium, listened with varied
interest and "unusual consideration," to
quote one of the judges, to the five
speeches, all of which were characterized
by an entire absence of that intense feeling which' cannot be separated from a
good oration.
The judges, Prof. Wood, Prof. Sage
and Mr. Peardon, felt that none of the
speakers had come up to the standard
which would justify the presentation of
the gold medal. Mr. Cribb, Arts '21, was
given first place among the contestants;
but, as he had obtained a similar trophy
in his Sophomore year, the silver medal
reverted to Mr. Rive, famous as the organizer of "Kla-how-ya" Week.
The contest, on the whole, was about
equal to the standard of last year, if we
except the brilliant oration of Walter
Couper. For logical construction and
dignified language, Mr. Cribb's speech,
"The Value of History," was easily the
best. It was generally agreed that "Alf '
Rive gave the most interesting talk of
the evening on the subject, "The Passing
of Woodrow Wilson." The audience
appreciated especially the refreshing illustrations by which he emphasized certain controlling forces in the life of the
President. In his speech on "Citizenship," Mr. Brown, Arts '23, though the
most forceful of the five speakers, adopted a dictatorial pulpit style, which proved
fatal. Mr. Mitchell, Arts '21, in his own
inimitable manner, discussed college
affairs in general, under the topic, "What
Will Our Attitude Be?" "Jimmie" is a
strong yell leader, but he lacks the polish
and decorum of an orator. The last
speaker of the evening, Mr. C. Smith,
Arts '21, succeeded, after twenty minutes,
in convincing his audience that "Jean
Jaurez" was neither a mineral nor a
vegetable, but a great French socialist
and statesman.
JUNIOR ECONOMICS' "HOP"
Laurel Tennis Club was the scene of a
very delightful "hop" on Monday evening
given by the Junior Economics Discussion Club. Mr. Cassidy, who was selling
tickets, assured us of a lively time; and,
although we very much doubted his word,
we went along—greatly to our subsequent satisfaction.
Mrs. Becket kindly acted as patroness,
Mr. Becket, Professor Angus and Dr.
Boggs being also present. The committee in charge of the arrangements were:
W. R. Brown, H. M. Cassidy and Miss
B. Pearce. The dance was a small one,
but ably managed, and the excellent
music furnished by the college orchestra
would have inspired anyone with enthusiasm. Dancing continued till 1
o'clock.
Professor   in   Agronomy—Name   three
articles containing starch.
Freshman—Two cuffs and a collar.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot tor
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
«awx*mwLvmv»tiiMv«/"mwjL*»»vvx^
AFTER THE SHOW
Try the
704 ROBSON STREET
«f*w*T^T/8vx/8\mmiiy«i.78a^r^rr*mt^
PHONE cgon Day and Night
Seymour <
SERVICE
BIG
TAXI
SIX
Ask  for
V.  YOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmuir Street
The Lids Off. Boys
Special this week only—
Felt and Cloth Hats
regular to $9.00;
Sale Price
$5.00
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville February 3, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SENIOR GIRLS' BASKETBALL
Thursday last scored one more triumph
for the Senior girls, when they were victorious against Crofton House in their
third league basketball game. The game,
starting well with a swift pass from centre and a nicely-dropped basket, never
failed in rapid action throughout. The
Crofton girls put up a good opposition;
but the superiority of the 'Varsity team,
both in passing and shooting, was very
evident, and the game ended with a score
of 26 to 4 in our favor.
'Varsity line-up: Forwards, Eve Eveleigh and B. Pearce; centre, Gladys
Weld; guards, M. Gordon and D. Gillespie.
Owing to the disorganization of the
car service, the 8 p.m. game at the Y. M.
C. A. began promptly at 8.30.
The gym. was fairly well crowded with
supporters for the Pollyannas, but, after
a careful search, three ladies and a half-
dozen 'Varsity men were discovered in
the crowd of spectators.
Although the game only lasted 20 minutes, it was fast and well played. The
passing was good, and the shooting was
better than usual, 10 minutes' play netting seven baskets for 'Varsity.
Miss Berto's playing for the Pollyannas was excellent, one shot being
scored from the centre of the floor.
'Varsity carried off the honors by the
score of 18-6.
The team: E. Eveleigh, B. Pearce, G.
Weld, M. Gordon, D. Gillespie.
LADIES' GRASS HOCKEY
On Saturday afternoon last the 'Varsity ladies played a fast and furious game
of grass hockey, defeating the King
George team 7-0.
McDONHLD'S
CHOCOLATES
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee! it's a lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One block south of old store, corner
Robson Street)
BADMINTON   CLUB   ORGANIZES
The large attendance at the first meeting testified to the interest taken in the
game by 'Varsity students. Mr. Mercer
was made honorary president of the
club; Frank Pumphrey, president. Other
officers elected were: Vice-president,
Miss K. Duff Stuart; treasurer, Jack
Clyne.
The club has obtained the use of the
drill hall on Wednesday nights, while the
Sixth Regiment Club has been kind
enough to lend its racquets, shuttles and
nets until these can be procured. Prospective members will be welcomed at the
drill hall on Wednesday nights to learn
the game.
"JOCK" LUNDIE
Many friends of "Jock" Lundie, Arts
24, will be sorry to hear that he was
injured in the Arts-Science soccer game
on Wednesday last and has been confined
to the house since that time. For a while
it was thought that "Jock," who played
for the Arts fifteen, had broken his collarbone, but the doctor's examination showed
that the ligaments of the shoulder had
been torn. He will be under the doctor's
care for several weeks yet.
Those who played a strong game for
'Varsity were B. Garlick, M. Copping and
M. Jackson, who, unfortunately, had a
bad fall, which resulted in a badly
sprained knee.
After all the shouting and tumult of
Kla-how-ya Week has died down, the
supporters of the various teams seem
conspicuous by their absence. At the
game Saturday afternoon there were two
spares, three rooters and one McGill man
out to give what help they could to the
players.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and  Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.  SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
EASY SHAVING
Make   your   Shaving   a   daily   pleasure.     We   have   every   well-known   make   of
Safety Razors, in many styles:
Gillette   Razors    $5.00 to $7.50
Auto   Strop  Razors    $5.00 to $7.50
Durham  Duplex Razors   35c. to $5.00
Gem  Razors      $1.50
Ever-Ready   Razors    $1.50 to $3.50
Shaving   Brushes    50c. to $6.00
Razor  Strops    50c. to $5.00
Straight Edge Razors   $2.00 to $5.00
Stropping   Machines    $1.50 to $5.00
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST Phone, Seymour 152
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
Play will be resumed in the inter-class
basketball series this evening at K. E. H.
S. gym., when Agriculture and Arts '21
start the remaining half of the season.
At the present time Science '23 and
Science '24 are at the top of the league,
neither having lost a game. The schedule
for the remaining games follows:
Feb. 3—5.IS p.m., Arts '21 vs. Agriculture; 6.00 p.m., Sc. '24 vs. Arts '21.
Feb. 10—S.1S p.m., Arts '21 vs. Sc. '22;
6.00 p.m., Arts '24 vs. Sc. '23.
Feb. 17—5.15 p.m., Arts '21 vs. Arts
'24; 6.00 p.m., Agriculture vs. Arts '23.
Feb. 24—5.15 p.m., Sc. '23 vs. Arts '21;
6.00 p.m., Arts '23 vs. Sc. '24.
Mar. 3—5.15 p.m., Arts '23 vs. Arts '21;
Sc. '23 vs. Sc. '24.
M. Y. Williams, B.Sc. (Queen's), Ph.D.
(Yale), F.G.S.A., of the Geological Survey of Canada, has been appointed associate professor of paleontology. Dr.
Williams will arrive this week.
An Authority on Scott
"Are you fond of literature?" asked
Mrs. Bowdly.
"Passionately," Miss Tubbs replied.
"Then you must admire Sir Walter
Scott," she exclaimed with sudden animation. "Is not his 'Lady of the Lake' exquisite in its flowing grace and poetic
imagery?"
"It is perfectly lovely!" she assented,
clasping her hands in ecstasy. "I suppose
I have read it a dozen times."
"And Scott's 'Marmion,' ' he went on,
"and 'Peveril of the Peak?' "
"I just dote on them!" she said.
"And Scott's Emulsion?" he said hastily, a faint suspicion  dawning upon him.
"I think," she said, "that it's the best
thing he ever wrote."
—Westminster University Gazette.
THIS IS
ATHLETIC
There's a fighter's roadwork
Sweater that has made a great
hit with young men. It has a
swagger style, with plenty of
life, and strong color if you
want it. Of course, its practical purpose is to keep a man
warm.
Regular $18.00 for $14.40
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor. Robson and Granville Streets THE   UBYSSEY
February 3, 1921
WHEN YOU'RE
GIVING CANDY
If you take a happy young
thing a box of candy and it
has Purdy's on the cover, she
knows before the silk ribbon is
off that you have bought the
best chocolates obtainable.
purbys
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
COMING!  COMING!  COMING!
FOUR days
Commencing  Wednesday,   Feb. 2
Matinees Thursday and Saturday
Capt.   M.   W.   Plunkett   Presents   the
"DUMBELLS"
In their Second Edition of
BIFF!   BINGM   BANG!!!
AN   ENTIRELY   NEW   REVUE
Prices *
Evenings—$2.20,   $1.65,   $1.10   and   85c.
Matinees—$1.65,    $1.10,    85c    and    55c
Sale opens Friday, January 28
TREFOUSSE    GLOVES
Famous on account of their excellent
style, superior fit, finish and durability. The best of all Christmas Gloves,
in kid or suede.
—Trefousse Fine French Kid Gloves,
oversewn seams, two-dome style with
fine stitched points; shades of brown,
tan, grey, navy, beaver, green, champagne, and also black or white. Sizes
5% to 8, at $4.50 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Pique Sewn
Gloves with fine stitched points, perfect fitting; shown in brown, tan,
grey, navy, green, purple, wine, beaver, champagne, white or black. All
sizes, $5.00 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Gloves,
pique sewn and having two pearl
dome clasps and heavy embroidered
points. These are finished with band
at wrist. Grey, navy, brown, tans,
champagne.    All sizes, at $5.50 a pair.
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
(Member Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior  Editor A.   A.  Webster
/•A.  H. Imlah
Associate Editors < S.  M. Scott
I Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
(Miss A.  Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
Miss P. Stewart
Exchange   Editor Miss   P.   I.   Mackay
Literary  Editors \ £  £  l*™™*™
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising   Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
( D.  A.  Wallace
Assistants ■< H.   G.   Scott
I M. A.   Dyce
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the Week Miss R.  E. Verchere
A KINDLY HINT
Eighty-one inches of reading matter
appeared in last week's "Ubyssey," exclusive of exchanges and advertising.
Forty-four inches, or rather more than
one-half, was written by two people; 72
inches were written by the staff of the
"Ubyssey." The rest of you, to the number of 914, contributed six inches. The
remaining three inches were perpetrated
by two members of the Faculty.
Let's try again. About 100 inches of
reading matter, again with the above exceptions, were submitted for the issue. All
copy, with the exception of last-minute
news, is supposed to be in on Monday
afternoon. Thirty-seven inches had been
submitted by that time. All copy must
be in the printers' hands by 11 o'clock
Tuesday morning. Forty-nine inches had
then reached us. More than half the
material was sent in after the hour of
going to press. This in spite of the fact
that, with one exception, the most recent
event reported occurred on Saturday!
The "Ubyssey" is willing to take its
share of the blame. For the second condition, the staff is apparently entirely responsible. As to the first, we seem to
have failed to make you realize that the
paper is not ours, but yours; that anything you want to send in, be it editorial,
news story, literary matter, joke, poetry
or letter, receives the same attention as
anything submitted by a member of the
staff. Of course, the editors must have
the final say of acceptance or rejection.
This is our "raison d'etre.' But we are not
so satisfied with ourselves that we believe that half-a-dozen of us can do better
than nine hundred of you. Probably the
best editorial printed this year was found
in our contribution box. You have dozens of ideas equally good. Let's have
them. If you can't think of anything else,
write and tell us what you think of us.
We can stand it. If you want credit for
your work, sign your name to it. It will
be published.
"TICKET SCALPERS"
During a great World Series we often
hear of the so-called ticket "scalper"—
the man who purchases tickets for the
purpose of selling them at a greatly increased rate. The practice is recognized
everywhere as illegal. The person who
is detected is ostracized, immediately, as
an undesirable. He is considered in the
same class as the professional gambler.
You may be wondering why we are
writing in this manner in the "Ubyssey.'
We hasten to assure you that we have no
intention of comparing University students—not even the irresponsible, lightheaded type—to denizens of the underworld. But we do desire, most emphatically, to expose, in its true light,
the ever-growing practice of ticket "scalping" within our own walls." There are
some who brag of the profitableness of
purchasing a ticket, without any thought
of making personal use of it, but with
the avowed intention of taking advantage
of a less fortunate student who has already made arrangements and who is
thus prepared to pay an exorbitant price
to avoid embarrassment. No honest student would stoop to such tactics. Student
opinion demands a halt. Shall an action
which is considered a criminal offense in
the courts of the land be tolerated in
University halls?
"PUNCH"
Why can we not have "Punch" in the
reading-room? "Punch" is an epitome of
the cleanest and wittiest humor in the
English language. "Punch" reflects the
opinions and the character of the most
cultured and influential types of the English nation. A cartoon in "Punch" is a
more potent educative force than an
editorial in any newspaper written in the
English language.
Let us have "Punch" if for no other
purpose than to provide an antidote for
the vicious American serial "comic." If
the loathsome and deformed creatures
whom we know as "Polly and her Pals"
or "That Son-in-Law of Pa's"; if the
debasing vulgarities and unhumorous
absurdities which they daily perform in
our newspapers; if tne stale slang and
indecent retort which is their only
method of inter-communication; if these
are to become the moulds to shape the
character, lives and language of our
American civilization, then heaven help
us.
"Punch" might prove as helpful in the
reading-room as the "Journal of Immunology," or even the "New Phytol-
ogist." By all means let us have
"Punch."
SCHOLARSHIP DRIVE
Up to the time of going to press, rather
more than half the University quota :n
the Leroy Memorial Scholarship has
been raised. Three classes—Science 21,
Ag. '21 and Arts '22 Women—had
reached their objectives. The last-named
class have nearly doubled the sum requested from them. The Freshman
classes and (with the exception of Arts
23 Men) the Sophomores were generally
later in getting organized, and it was
hoped that the last day or two of the
drive would result in much larger returns
from these classes. February 3, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
e
orre8pot^aet>ce
r\d<
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Last Friday night the Agricultural students gave the rest of us a treat
that will not soon be forgotten.
It is not the wonderful dance nor the remarkable chicken sandwiches that I wish to
make note of as much as the evidenced cooperation and unselfishness on the part of
every one of the Aggies, who put their whole
neart and soul into making that dance a
marked success amongst the University social functions.
It is one of the smallest of the faculties,
but the esprit de corps displayed should be
an example in the propagation of University
spirit.
In such a small undergrad. an appeal for
help can be made individual, it is true; but
that is no reason why, in a larger body, the
same entnusiasm should not  be displayed.
We are really one great big family, learning not only book knowledge, but also to
help one another, and to create that wonderful spirit of comradeship which will stand
each and every one of us in good stead later
in life.
W.  O.  B., Ap.  Sc.  '22.
* *       *
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—There seems to be an abundance
of "college spirit" lately. But is it not surprising to see, at our meetings for the inculcating of this "spirit," the men comfortably seated, while many of the women have
to stand up? The old question of men giving up their seats in the street car to ladies
has been emphasized many times. 1 would
like to see the men in our Lniversity show
a little courtesy by offering their seats to
the women who are standing at the next
crowded meeting. I think it only a matter
of common courtesy for the men to step off
the sidewalk between buildings, instead of
the ladies stepping off for them, as they
have to do at present. The men were forbidden, to smoke in the corridors, at the
beginning of the session, yet some of them
continue to do this, not only in the corridors, but at meetings of the student body;
and one man in particular persists in filling
the room with tobacco smoke before the
professor arrives. What is the use of laying down a rule unless it is strictly enforced? What is the reason for the apparent
lack of chivalry among the men students?
Show your "college spirit," but be sure you
show it in the right way.
"EMELYE,"   Arts  '22.
* *       *
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—i^evity is unseemly in such
stirring times.
In tne interests of the University at large,
and certain professors in particular, we
would suggest that the Students' Council
supply with smoked glasses those professors
whose eyes are too weak to stand the blaze
of color displayed in the skull caps worn by
the students during Kla-how-ya  Week.
Several students, forced to remove such
headgear, are now in imminent danger of
making their last, and perhaps first (very
subtle), journey in a black, glass-enclosed
limousine to Mountain View.
Yours, pro bono studento co-edoque,
ETHERIALDUS.
* *       *
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Will you kindly permit me to
say a few words on college spirit? A few
weeks ago we had a Kla-how-ya Week, by
which we were to be helped into getting
the "hello" spirit. In this case I think
"practice what you preach" would be a very
timely motto to follow, and so far I have
never heard the greeting from those preachers. Others have claimed that college spirit
was something by which we would be emboldened to go begging from the people of
the city. And still others have claimed that
the spirit consists in raising a hue and cry
about the "blue and gold." All this appeals
to me much the same as the appeal to an
audience from a soap-box orator when he
asked for three British cheers and was answered by a high soprano "Rah, Rah" from
the rear.
In my opinion, college spirit can never
come with the prevailing spirit around our
University. It consists of a brotherly feeling, a desire for learning, love of good fun,
and, I may add, a good fight whenever,
wherever and whoever in the case of somebody  casting a  slur  on  our  college.
ANXIOUS.
BY THE WAY
What have we here? Our Faculty
patronizing home industry! Last week
one of its distinguished members entertained two more or less distinguished
visitors at lunch in the cafeteria.
Several people were heard to ask who
"P.I.N.S.," the contributor of the column
of exchanges last week, is. She, or he,
is "The Pacific Inter-Collegiate News
Service." Both columns of material were
prepared by the Exchange Editor. The
"Ubyssey" is in receipt of regular news
service from members of the Pacific
Inter-Collegiate Press Association, but
space limitations prevent use of very
much of it.
Once again we remind staff and contributors that copy for the "Ubyssey"
must be in not later than Monday. Only
last-minute news can be accepted on
Tuesday forenoon. Non-observance of
this rule causes great inconvenience.
Several couples who attended the
oratorical contest, for the purpose of
holding whispered conversations with one
another, complain that they were repeat-
ed'y interrupted by the speeches of the
contestants. This state of affairs shouid
not be allowed to occur again.
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and you follow
the Style
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College, Ltd.
The School of Certainties
Phone, Fairmont 2075
ON MAIN AT TENTH
VANCOUVER, B. C.
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday, February 7th, 1921
THE  UNSURPASSABLE
ALBERTINA RASCH
In
Dances from Famous Ballets
FOR PITY'S SAKE
With
TOM DURAY
A   Travesty   on   Old-Time   Melodrama
Direction of C. B. Maddock
LILLIE  JEWELL  FAULKNER
& CO.
Presenting
"PLAY BALL!"
BURKE & BETTY
MIRTHFUL, MUSICAL POT-POURRI
GERTRUDE— —MARY
MOODY  & DUNCAN
In
OPERA AND JAZZ INC.
ARTISTIC  GYMNASTS
D ELM ORE  &  LEE
A Study in Black and White
EARL— —DOROTHY
HAMPTON & BLAKE
In   BEAN   COUP  NUI-SAUCE
By Paul Gerard Smith
British Weekly
Concert Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,    Etc.
QUark* Sc Stuart OIo.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
February 3, 1921
A TIMELY
SUGGESTION
Spencer's
February
Furniture
Sale
A wonderfully opportune
time  to  furnish  a  home
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM  BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
WHERE ARE
THE AD. MEN?
Either the U.B.C. men do not
read their paper, or they do
not care to become advertising
men.
I think perhaps we had better
include the young women. I
really need some copy.
A 3-lb box of Sapp's Chocolates
for the best advertisement, or
series of them, sent through
the "Ubyssey."
Robt. Sapp
CANDY MAN
814   ROBSON   STREET
ADDRESS ON ARMENIA
A general meeting of the student body
was held on Thursday last, at noon, when
Mrs. Otis F. Lamson, an Armenian, and
a graduate of Johns Hopkins University,
gave an address. Mrs. Lamson spoke on
the troubles and persecutions of the
Armenians, a subject that is very close
to her heart. She explained that the reason for Armenia's persecutions during the
ages was threefold—racial, geographical
and religious. Because of its position,
Armenia had become the passage-way of
warring nations in every century. And
because she would not forsake Christianity for Mohammedism or paganism, this
gallant country had been persecuted time
after time. Mrs. Lamson spoke of the
Bolshevik advance in October, 1920,
showing that Armenia was placed in the
same position as in 1914, when the Turks
advanced through her territories.
She also spoke feelingly of the persecutions suffered by her countrymen, and
cited examples of the heroic bravery of
her  people.
The address made a deep impression on
the students. Dean R. W. Brock presided, in the absence of President Klinck.
A COMMENTARY
(By P. I. M., Arts '23)
"H. G. Wells is to devote an entire
fortnight, very soon, to writing a complete history of the world's literature.''
So says "Life," thinking humorously of
the industrv of the man who has just
published "The Outline of History." Mr.
Wells, in his introduction, says: "This
outline is an attempt to tell, clearly and
truly, in one continuous narrative, the
whole story of life and mankind so far as
it is known to-day'"—a stupendous task.
Mr. Wells' aim has been to treat historv
"as one whole"; one has onlv to look
down his "Scheme of Contents" to realize
at once the vastness of his subject and
the remarkable insight and mental power
brought to bear upon it. Mr. Wells has
been ably assisted by Ernest Barker, Sir
H. H. Johnston, Sir Ray Lankester, and
Prof. Gilbert Murray, but the history
does not suffer from lack of co-ordination
on this account. Mr. Wells' own lucid
and entertaining style inspires it all.
Chapter 1 is entitled "The Earth in
Space and Time," and Chapter 40 deals
with "The International Catastrophe of
1914 and the Close of the Great Power
Period." But Mr. Wells, reluctant to
leave this phenomenal work at "The
State of Men's Minds in 1920," must
needs add "The Next Stage in History."
We may add that Mr. Wells has already
attained some status as a prophet.
Jimmy (after the Glee Club)—Well,
what do you think of our execution?
Supercilious Senior (attending for the
first time)—Personally, I am in favor of
it.
The annual clsas party of Arts '23
will be held to-morrow evening in the
auditorium. As Room Y has been set
aside for the non-dancers, the executive
of '23 is busy trying to prevent too ma.vy
uninvited guests from attending.
The
Students' Cafeteria
Is Going Strong
Join your friends at
Lunch-time
A.  WALTER.
Phone,  Sey. 2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For    Light    Refreshments
Ice Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair.  840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS, Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two Blocks from Vancouver Hotel
When you compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville and  Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W. D. Wood Limited
MAURICE PERRIN,  Manager February 3, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR YOUNG MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Foster
Limited
WE SELX, CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAT YOUNG
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of -
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
AS OTHERS SEE US
It is always interesting to "see ourselves as others see us." Therefore the
following note, clipped from the December issue of the "Acadia Athenaeum," will
be of interest:
"The 'Ubyssey' is as bright and interesting as ever. It con+ains only college
news, and, according to the editor, has no
higher purpose. However, we are promised that two literary numbers will come
later, and we look forward to those with
pleasure.
"Some interesting yells are published
in this number. It seems that they have
more societies at U.B.C. than we have at
Acadia. What happens to the people
who try not to miss anything? The
freshman initiation is regarded as mild;
but we consider the eating of raw onions,
stove-blacking shampoos, anointing with
dogfish oil and eating greased macaroni
plenty severe for the uninitiated."
It was apparently written just after receipt of the first one or two numbers. We
would hate to tell what happens when we
try not to miss any of our college functions.   It s too sad.
Heaven or	
The late Bishop of London was once
ordered by his physician to spend the
winter in Algiers. The Bishop said it was
impossible, he had so many engagements.
"Well, my Lord Bishop," said the
specialist, "it either means Algiers or
heaven."
"In that case," said the Bishop, "I'll go
to Algiers.'
Fifty-Fifty
When a man and girl eat together, or
ride in a street car, or attend a theatre,
since the immemorial, the man has paid
the bills. Is that fair to him? Some students in Boston College think not, and
have formed an organization which they
call the "Fifty-Fifty Co-eds," pledged to
equal sharing of the price of bon-bons
and street car fare.
Suggestion for sign to be posted in the
cafeteria:
"Don't make fun of our tea or coffee.
You may be cold and weak yourself some
dav."
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A SAVINGS ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
TO REASONABLE
FOLKS
If each citizen in the Province
would make it a personal matter
to buy only made-in-B. C. goods,
we would have no closed factories
and basic industries, nor would we
have an unemployment question.
You can get made-in-B. C. School
Supplies  and Personal  Stationery.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturing  Stationers
VANCOUVER  AND  VICTORIA,   B. C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
February 3, 1921
IN OTHER COLLEGES
By EXCHANGE
The University of Toronto is again to
lead the way in Canadian literary circles
by issuing the first humorous (or
intended-to-be-humorous) magazine in
Canada. It is to be known as "The
Goblin" (you are requested not to think
of soap), and among its first contributors
will be Stephen Leacock and the editor
of "Life." The editors of "The Goblin"
have hit upon a splendid means of advertising and making its first edition eagerly
awaited—they have instituted a "male
and female wit" competition, the results
to be published in "The Goblin."
" 'Varsity," the University of Toronto
paper, has an editorial dealing with social
functions in that institution. The editor
says, in part:
"Are there too many social activities in
this University? One has but to look at
the weekly programme of the average
popular undergraduate to answer yes!
and, in turn, wonder if there is any studying being done. Yet it is childish to have
compulsory study nights, and, again, almost useless to curtail any social function planned by the representatives of the
undergraduate body. What, then, is the
solution?
"We would call upon the students to
use their common sense, and curtail their
dances and parties to the minimum extent that will allow them to succeed
academically. Just like everything else of
a compound nature, to get the right substance there must be correct mixture.
And in this University of ours, too great
an activity socially means Failure; too
little makes the student stale, and the
undergrad. is not getting the most of a
broadening University education."
Mr. Roy Mitchell, director of the
Toronto University Players' Club, discussed last week the place of "Music in
the Theatre." Mr. Mitchell has been for
years a close student of everything pertaining to effective production in the
modern theatre.    He said, in part:
"The art of the theatre is an art by
itself. Alone it gives the final touch to
the representation of life, with which all
art is concerned. The other acts produce
interpretations, but they fall short of that
final thing which makes a live thing live-
movement. This being, then, the distinctive feature of the drama, the dramatic art is concerned with making motion beautiful. Rhythm must be introduced, and with rhythm the dance is
reached, which is the fundamental form
of the theatre. Development of the dance
comes with the imitation of life and with
the telling of a story words must be introduced. From this point the rhythm
becomes more complex, the music is replaced by speech, giving definite ideas in
place of the vague ideas given by music,
and we come to the modern place of
music in the theatre."
The tuition fees of the University of
California will be increased this year from
$20.00 to $100.00 for non-resident students.   And yet we groan!
By P.I.N.S.
University of California: Although the
quality of English used by students entering the University is steadily improving, the committee on subject A, headed
by Prof. B. P. Kurtz, has decided that
further improvement of campus English
is necessary.
Compulsory English courses without
credit will be given for those whose
habitual use of the mother tongue shows
them to be below the standards set for
University students.
University of California: Official figures on the number of disqualified students at the University for the last
semester, August to December, 1920, released Saturday by President David B.
Barrows, shows that 521 students were
unable to return to the University this
term because of failure to pass in at least
ten units of registered work, or having
a highly satisfactory standing in at least
eight points.
This means that approximately five per
cent, of the enrolled student body was
disqualified. Of this number, 361 students were men and 160 were women.
Oregon Agricultural College: "Mystery
shrouds the proceedings for the annual
women's stunt show to be held at the
women's gym. March 4th and Sth. Managers, committee, members, and prospective actresses, when approached on
the subject, frown, grin, or look coquettish, according to their natures, and, with
finger to lip, whisper, meaningly, 'Wait
and see.' This show is considered a big
event of the college year."
"High Jinks" is coming soon — the
jealously-guarded and justly-famous institution of the women of U.B.C. It is
not along the line suggested by the preceding paragraph; it is along our own
line, which has hever been duplicated.
Concerning High Jinks there are rumors,
also—a triumphant departure from precedent is expected.
"Debating is the big activity at the
University of British Columbia," says the
University of Washington Daily, in an
advance notice of the late debate. "Last
year the Canadians defeated the University of Montreal, thereby winning the
championship of Canada.'
The University of Montreal has never
had a team equal to ours, at any rate.
"The only thing for you to do is to go
around and apologize, and ask her to forgive you."
"But I was in the right!"
"Then you d better take some flowers
and candy with you, too."
—Queen's Journal.
LATEST
*API
ALL THE TIME'
PHOTOGRAPHY
JUST ONE—PLEASE!
Mr. J. O. C. Kirby, Arts '21, won the
box of chocolates offered by Thos. Sapp
for the best ad. copy submitted last week.
This competition is still open.
GRANVIL
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
jjfafltjfatt - (graft
Thos. Fooler
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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