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The Daily Ubyssey Oct 5, 1948

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 The Daily Ubyssey
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C.,  TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1948
No. I
Campus Loses
Mirth Makers,
Soap Derbies
The Jokers' Club has finally
been dealt a joker.
After two years of frivolity
the campus wiseacres reached
a serious decision at a meeting
Friday and decided to disband.
Chief reason for the collapse, according to President Bruce Thompson,
is that "Nobody wants the Jokers."
"Both the AMS and the Pub were
against the Jokers. In fact even the
students were against us," added
Treasurer Jim Clark.
In addition Clark disclosed the
Jokers owe the AMS approximately
1405.05, largely because of the purchase of diapers for last year's Kiddle's Bawl.
The Jokers encountered considerable opposition last year. In the
course of a heated battle with the
AMS over the club hut behind Brock
Hall, the Jokers set up quarters in
front of the building, and later staged
a slapstick boxing match between
their president, Dick Ellis, and AMS
prexy Grant Livingstone. The Jokers
got their club rbom back.
Another lark which will be long
remembered was the Joker engineered
frog jumping contest. By curious
coincidence the Biology Department
announced the loss of several bull
frogs about the same time.
Medical Faculty Dean
Expected By Christmas
s>
AMS Meet
Lectures Cancelled
As Student Council
Plans Noon Meeting
First general meeting of the
AMS will be held at 11:30 tomorrow in the Armories.
All noon lectures will be cancelled
in order that students may attend,
AMS President Dave Brtousson announced last night.
Announcing the agenda for the
meeting, he stated that the pared
budget would provide the meetings'
most important single topic.
Student co-operation will be stressed at the hour-long meet.
Other items to be discussed will
include the AMS president's statement of council policy, a motion to
give aid in bringing German university students to Canada and the
adoption of the budget approved by
council last week.
Photo By Danny Wallace
SURPRISE PACKAGE for UBC co-ed Barbara Strong was this lovely fur
jacket won by her at the Gamma Phi Beta cabaret Friday night. The dance,
held at the Commodore Cabaret was the first big social event of the
university year.
Police Open Nation
Wide Hunt For Coed
Toronto Student Missing From Compus
Alpha Phi Disappears From Home
Special To The Daily Ubyssey
TORONTO, Oct., 4—Nationwide search is taking place today for twenty-one year old University of Toronto co-ed June
(Baker, who disappeared from the university campus, Thursday.
She has not been heard from since.
Police across Canada together with<»>
friends, have joined in the hunt, but
Reporters at the Varsity, U of T
haired girl remains a mystery.
the disappearance of the auburn-
student newspaper, learned Friday,
that Miss Parker had lunched with
an unknown woman at 1:30 Thursday
in a restaurant near the campus. The
two waitresses in the restaurant
stated that they had seen the girl having lunch.
SEEN FRIDAY
She was also seen in the Plantation
Room of the Colonial Restaurant,
well-known Toronto dining place, between 12:30 and 1:00 Friday afternoon. She was in the company of two
men.
P. L, Baker, the girl's father, estimated that she was carrying almost
ninety dollars in cash at ihe time of
her disappearance. She had received
this from her parents for the purpose
of paying sorority fees, and to purchase medical text books. Sorority
officials had not received the funds.
The missing pre-med student is
five feet six 'inches tall, has auburn-
colored  hair.
Scores of leads have been investigated by police with no results.
At the time of the disappearance
June was wearing a bright green
suede jacket, a black full skirted
dress,   and   black   ballet   shoes.   She
carried a note book containing medical notes and literature, and a small
blnck  wallet.
UNUSUAL CASE
Detectives at police headquarters
stated that everything possible is being done to locate her. "This is a
rfiost unusual case,'' said one official.
It  is  not  believed  that  the  young
Toronto co-ed is the victim of an abduction,  Toronto  police  stated  Monday  afternoon,
the   location   of   the   Baker   summer
Over the weekend police searched
home. Neighbors have been instructed to keep close watch on the family
cottage in the Muskoka area.
HAMLET MATINEE
TICKETS GOOD FOR
MARKED DAY ONLY
G.  Sutherland, manager of the
Park Theatre declared today that
thc special student matinee tickets
arc  valid  only  on  the  date printed
On thc front of the ticket.
Tlie special student matinees will
be at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Tucs-
*day, Thursday and Friday of this
week. In view of the fact that tho
seats are not reserved myopic students would be wise to arrive early
in Vder to obtain a choice of scats.
Soph Election
Student Apathy
Evident As Few
Cast Ballots
The smallest turnout of voters
in recent years elected Alex
Freeman, pre-med student,
Sophomore Member of the Students' Council Friday.
A mere 626 students cast ballots to
give Freeman the call over Arnold
Nemetz for the council seat vacated
by Pete Murphy. Returns showed 380
votes for Freeman as against 244
for Nemetz, with two spoiled ballots.
AMS President Dave Brousson
termed the student apathy indicated
by the scarcity of voters as a "poor
show.'' He expressed the hope that
there would be a better response for
Wednesday's AMS General Meeting
and at the spring elections.
Most neglected of the four polling
booths on Friday was the Applied
Science booth, where only three votes
were cast. However, Brousson pointed
out that students in that faculty might
have voted at one of the other booths.
Brousson expressed satisfaction with
the new voting system under which
students may vote at any bolpth on
the campus after having their AMS
cards punched. It is hoped this simpler arrangement can be used for the
general elections next spring, he said.
President Reviews Financial
Situation In Radio Address
Dr. MacKenzie, revealed in his radio address Monday night
that the University is now trying to find a suitable Dean who
will organize the medical faculty at the University.
Free Cokes Offered
To Blood Doonrs"
Students will be able to substitute
"coke" for blood when the University
Blood Clinic opens, October 18.
During the two weeks the clinic
is open 150 cases of "coke", 75 pounds
of coffee will be distributed among
donors.
'tween classes
Redmen Concerned
Over' AMS Cut; To
Be Aired At Meet
Cut in AMS grants will be
rjhief concern of campus engineers at a general meeting of
the EUS today at 12:30 in Ap
100.
EUS representative John McPhail
will report on the EIC conference
held at Banff during the summer.
Although he stressed the fact that
the money already allocated for
medical education at UBC wpuld not
begin to provide permanent buildings
for the medical faculty in view of the
prevailing inflationary costs, he felt
sure that further funds would be
made  available.
REVIEWS FINANCES
In reviewing university finances, the
president pbinted out that revenues
would soon be reduced not only by
decreasing enrolment, but also by
the substantial termination of Federal subsidies of $150 per student-
veteran at UBC. He warned that if
more money were not forthcoming,
the University would be forced to
cut its building program in half.
'We naturally assume that if the
Government and the people of the
Province are in earnest about a
Medical Faculty as they seem to be,
further necessary funds will be forthcoming," he stated.
President MacKenzie revealed further that no provision was made, in
any of the plans for a Medical Faculty at UBC, for a teaching hospital.
"We believe, hbwever,' that the
government and the city intend to
assist the Vancouver General Hospital
in enlarging and modernizing its
plant, and if they do, they will no
doubt be able to make available
400 to 500 beds for the clinical purposes of the University Medical
School," he said.
President MacKenzie also reviewed
briefly the tremendous task of housing which had to be carried on by
the University, particularly with respect to married student-veterans. He
revealed that some 800 single men and
women and almost 400 families were
now housed at F|ort, Acadia, Little
Mountain and Lulu Island Camps.
*-
Library Wing
Addition Now
Used Daily
Official Opening
At Homecoming,
New wing of th© library, to
be officially opened at F$J1
Homecoming is unofficially
open.
The added section will double the
library's seating capacity, with fad)}*
ties for over 900. However, a temper'-"
ary   shortage   of   chairs   limitl   thli''
amount at present.
Included in the new wing ia ft,
periodical room large enough to hold
a complete list of all unbound.|H|r
terial. A special lecture room far
music, and several similar rooms c^#j
other new features. -: ..&"
The top floor incorporates a kltih*
enette, lounge, and lockers for ne
staff, which is on duty from eUpt
o'clock in the morning until ten*\atf
night. £ '
The lower portion of the old W&g
will be redesigned to give space Ito
Architecture, Art and Engineetttg
rooms. In the basement W«U be Vtf9
record listening booths,' equipped by
last year's graduating class as their
gift to the university. This will «n-
able students to draw records from
the Record Loan Service and listen
to them downstairs.
MISSING EX-PRESIDENT
TURNS UP IN GAY PAREE
Grant B. Livingstone former AMS president didn't get
snared by the iron curtain after all. He just became en-
meshed in the night life of Paris.
In a terse cable from Paris to The Daily Ubyssey, Monday, he reported: "mission unsuccessful, have been delayed,
will arrive October 20.''
Livingstone went to Europe late in the summer to attend
the International Student Union conference in Prague and
remained unheard from until Monday.
It is believed that by "misison unsuccessful" he referred
to his failure to swing the IUS from its Communist path,
on the other hand he may have been referring to his love
life in Paris.
University Glee Club held its first
rehearse of the current year Thursday.
Practice of a new musical programme
wa sbegun and a new slate of officers
were elected, they include:
President—Dolores  Seymjour.
Vice-President—George Clarke.
Sec.-Treas.—Dick   Christie.
Librarian—Alice  Beharrell.
Publicity Mgr.—Don Sharpe.
The club needs more tenors, sopranos and altos. Those interested please
come to the next rehearsal in HM1 on
Tuesday, October 5, at 12:30.
He will remain in Paris two weeks,
to UBC to resume his studies.
EX-AMS PRESIDENT, Grunt Livingstone missing for two rnionths on a
trip to Europe, turned up in Paris
befot'0 flying back this week. He expects to return to
UBC where he is studying law, by the
end   of   the iujunth.
Mass Rally To
Attack Law Society
Stand On Martin
Mass rally of all campus organizations to protest barring
of Gordon Martin from law
practice has been called for
Thursday   by   Civil   Liberties
Union.
Officials of the jjunion state they
"have evidence of previous cases of
persons being barred by the society
on account -of racial, religious and
political grounds."
A bencher has been invited to
answer charges and present the Law
Society's case.
At press time no reply had been
received from the benchers. If np
benchers are available a law student
will probably be substituted.
At the same meeting Civil Liberties Union will also protest Provincial Government ruling that only
persons on the provincial voter's list
aro eligible for membersh.p in the
Law Society. This excludes aumerous
racial  and religious minorit.' groups.
Law Undergraduates Hit
Daily Ubyssey's Stand
Say "Offensive" Language Used
In Editorial On Martin Ban
Daily Ubyssey editorial hitting at the action of the B. C.
Law Society in barring law graduate Gordon Martin was con*
demned by the Law Undergraduate Society, '
Martin, a member of the LPP Club
and LPP candidate in the last provincial elections was recently refused
permission ^o practice law by the
B. C. benchers. This action was questioned in a Daily Ubyssey editorial
September 28.
OVERWHELMING SUPPORT
The Law Undergraduate Society
overwhelmingly supported a resolution
introduced by Bill Roach, third year
law student, "dissociating ourselves
from the editorial remarks regarding
the benchers refusal to call Gordon
Martin to the bar . . . because we
deprecate the offensive language and
their method of resorting to adjectives
which are not in keeping with the
benchers'  position  in  the  province."
The resolution was passed with
six dissenting voices in a meeting of
over 200 student lawyers.
As an addendum it was proposed
that Roach be empowered to make
such changes in the resolution as he
ohose in keeping with the spirit. A
letter containing the resolution was
to be sent to The Daily Ubyssey and
to  Vancouver  newspapers.
Roach termed such phrases (in the
editorial) as "narrow, snivelling
minds . . . benchers Babbit-ing"
offensive and added that though he
did not hold with the suppression of
criticism,the matter had been taken up
by The Daily Ubyssey with scant
grounds. .,;.«
<3>-
"Our stand is not taken in criticism
or support iof the Law Society's
action for we are not competent to
take a stand," he said, "bu^t I sxibmit
that the paper should' have fully informed itself of the facts before publishing   such   an   article."
Another    member    of   the    undergraduate   society   said   that   he   was
not condemning the Ubyssey's right
to criticize but only its abusive
language.
The original draft ot the resolution,
discarded after debate as to its apt*..
ness read in part that the "deprecat*
ing and offensive remarks , . . tkt*t.
unwarranted and not based on facta.",
Home In Hell
Scribes Doomed
Says Professor,
Bible Proves It
Lawyers must prepare to
spend eternity in hell, accord*
ing to Biblical evidence presented to Thursday's session of'
the Parliamentary Forum by
Dr. G. G. Sedgewick.
Dr. Sedgewick, Leader of the Op*
position, contested a resolution that
"lawyers have a vital role to play ia
society."
Before a packed Auditorium, rocked
with rioilous laughter, he claimed tht
role of the lawyer was to rob help*
less widows and befuddle filers of
income tax florms.
Prime Minister I. R. Campbell,
local barrister, contended that fine*
Dick Tracy was "just a lawyer ia
disguise" the position of the lawyer
was fully justified.
"What," he asked, "would we do
for entertainment without the lawyers who comprise all the principal
characters of our yellow-back novel*?"
"Furthermore every great author
fHom Shakespeare to Dickens haa
found the lawyer Indispensable as *
butt for his best jokes," he de Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 5, 1948
Tl
C€B
Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
Authorized  as  Second  Class Mail,  Post  Office Dept.. Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
Published  throughout  the  university  year  by  the  Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B'litish  Columbia.
# * *
Editorial opinions oxprowl lvrcin nrc thos" of the editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily those
. .        . of the Alma Mater Society  nor of  the University.
>* * H-
Offices in Brock Hall,  Phone ALma 1G21 For  display  advertising  phone  ALma  3253
EDITOK-IN-CIHI:F   -   -   .   .   RON   HAGGART
MANAGING  KDITOR   ....   VAL  SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: News Editor,. Bob Cave, Chuck Marshall; Features Editor, Ray Baines; Photography Director,
Ellanor  Hall;  Sports  Editor,  Jack   Wasserman;   Womens'    Editor.    I.oni    Francis.
..•"',""■•* Editors This Issue- CHRIS CROMBSE, RAY BAINES
Make-up Editor - MICKEY FYNN
Associate Editor - PETE NETHER
On Campus
By Frank Holm
Build The Bank
Less than one day's supply of blood is left
in the Vancouver Red Cross blood bank.
Blood collected by the mobile unit, now
tojjfring the interior of B.C., will bc flown in
tolMght ahd> pumped into some patient tomorrow.
,l'!It's;that close.
This is' the deadly situation that faces every
patient entering a hospital in this city, for
fiiedical skill dfcd equipment is helpless with-
fcuVthis life-giving fluid.
Today Red Cross personnel assisted by
the Phrateres will be on the campus to reg-
ift*r!'|>i*6SpiectiV€ donors. They want your
blood.
r1 In f>ast years response has been poor, with
less than 30 percent of the students donating,
$ft& "the quota has only been met because a
few healthy individuals gave more than once.
This .shouldn't be the case.
This season a new method of extraction
will be in operation which nurses claim is
practically painless and requires one-third
less blood than the old system. The method
is speedy and there is little possibility of the
after effects that plagued donors in previous
years.
As *;oon as the blood is received by the
unit it is processed and shipped to the central
bank where it is available to any patient
who needs it. Dozens of UBC students have
already received injections.
When the mobile unit arrives on October
18 Red Cross officials hope that every student will take advantage of this opportunity
to serve his community and save a life.
Report To Our Shareholders
ARE  YOU  A  POET
OR   DiD   YOU   TU9T WORK
IN   THE   BUSH   THIS
SUMMER ?
HQNIOAIP
Meetings
We. think the stockholders of The Daily
Ubyssey should know how their newspaper
is being produced.
'"Like"all organizations on the campus, The
i-        t .
Pajly Ubyssey has had the silver spoon
yanked from its mouth by the men who sign
- tfre( Alma Mater Society's cheques. With a
shfug of the shoulders, we will deny ourselves
tft^ year in the same spirit of co-operation
shown by all UBC groups who realize the
extra-curricular bonanza has petered out.
i a. •;.
The Publication's Board, cut to the bone
by' budget-slashing Paul Plant, will spend
$sWP) less than it had planned for thi? year.
Evtfri before this amount was trimmed from
ifel'ev£nue, the Publications Board had pared
ks planned expenditures from the record session of last year.
But despite its sickly budget, The Daily
Ubyssey will continue to offer the newspaper
service this campus needs.
The Daily Ubyssey will appear four times
a week in spite of the fact that it has already
accepted reductions in its other major branches of student government.
Tho Publications Board will carry on the
service it has offered in the past by effecting economics in all its branches and by
yanking hard on its own bootstraps.
By its own efforts, the Pub will help fill its
own. depleted coffers, a policy, by the way,
we might recommend to other wailing groups
on the campus.
iJ £
i
letters to
CENSURE IN WORDS
Dear Sir:
The Law Undergraduate Society ;r
its flr^t- general meeting passed a
. resolution of censure en the kmyuago
used by i'he editor of the Daily Uhys-
•Spy,yin,disparaging the bencher's de~
^jdoato exclude Gordon Martin from
thc bar. The sponsor of the resolution .charged that the Uby.saey's allegation did not rest on fact. True, it
did not rest en any faciei publicized
hy i'he benchers, for they did not
publicize any facts. But are we to as-
SUmeefrom th ks that no facia; can be
known? The benchers jjuve no roa:-:o:i
for their' decision—presumably because, they were .somewhat ashamed
of the actual reason upon which it
was based. This reason can be in one
way by, implication; and when one
considers that Martin was not refused admission on either of the two
IflgUiniate .grounds—scholastic rcc-
Olid aj>d general character--it can also
be arrived at by a pre;cess of elimination. Clearly, then, until such time as
thc benchers publicize ihe facts, any
criticism levelled at them cannot
help hut rely largely on such facts
as the critic can infer.  It  is nothinr;
e
ditor
la !■;    i I    re.hculuus   to   ; late     : .   dm
1 ;;a     ;.|,(  ]-,.,l,Y     1   f     tile     IVSol LI L.UI1 that
;lie (..(liter ve.e not capable of adjlldy-
::i;; ihe decision without the facts
as found by the bar association, for
if tills is tiue then any organization
has only to withhold the facts of a
controversial mailer in order to avoid
ustieism.
Doubtless (his revolution will be received with great surprise by those
sludents who heretofore entertained
X.\r opinion that law students in the
main were devoted to upholding civil
llhei tie a I wish to reassure such
sludents (hat their opinion is not fal^
hie icus—that the readiness with
which the sludejus of the law faculty
aco.uie.ed to tho resolution is not
ned'y indicative of (heir disapproval
ef (he firm .stand taken by the Ubyssey.
What, then, is il indicative of? It
will be noticed that tho resolution
was sponsored and discussed largely
by third year students: It will also be
mlicid that there was no active op-
la .alien to the resolution, for even
fast year students cannot risk in-
(. urring i'he bencher's displeasure. All
f which brings us to thc conclusion
that whenever a potential applicant
to the bar, or group of such applicants
expresses an opinion, it connot bc
regarded as having much significance.
First Year  Law  Student
NO AFFILIATION
Dear Sir:
I should like i'o make use of your
ctlumns to state that the U.B.C.
Film Society is a student organization, and is in NO way affiliated
with the National Film Society, or
with any ether such organization.
There has apparently been considerable confusion in this regard.
Yours  truly,
P. R. Mclntyre
President, U.B.C. Film Society
NOTICE r
The first meeting of i'he Physics
Society will be held on Thursday,
October 7, at 4:30 p.m. in Room 200
of the Physics Building. Dr. Shrum
of UBC will speak on "Physics Today." All those interested are welcome.
GIRL GUIDE CLUB THURSDAY
12:30 in Arts 102. All those interested
nve welcome.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB PRESENTS
Bob Steiner's Aerial Photos of the
Gulf of Georgia and Interior of B.C.
HM. 16 Mon. at 12;30,
ARCHERY   MEETING   OCTOBER   4
at 12:30 in Arts 103,
All  third  and  fourth   year  students
HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING
interested in history are invited to
attend i'he first meeting of the Historical Society at 7.00 p.m. Wednesday Oct, C in Men's Lounge, Brock
Hall.
SHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZA-
lic-n invites all students interested, to
attend its regular weekly meetings
which include testimonies of Christian Science Healing, Friday 12:30
■ p.m. in Brock Hall Stage Room.
UNIVERSITY   SYMPHONY   ORCH-
I'iitra rehearsal. The general rehearsal
of the University Symphony Orches-
;in has been changed to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 6 in the auditorium.
Warm suppers will bc available for
those who do not wish i'o bring their
own. All instrumentalists welcome.
Bring   your   music   stands.
THE REGULAR BUSINESS MEET-
ing of the student CCF Club has
been postponed to Wed. Oct. 13 to
encourage full attendance at ihe AMS
meeting on Oct. 6
PIPE  BAND FIRST PRACTICE TO
be   held   in   Armouries   6:30   Friday,
Bring  pipei,  chanters,  slicks.
ALL THOSE WISHING TO JOIN
brass band, please bring instruments
to hut B-3 (behind Brock) noon
Friday.
For Sale
GOOD PAIR SIZE 10 FOOTBALL
cleats. Phone Harry BA 1352-R after
7:00 p.m.
ORGANIC CHEM. LABORATORY
text by Fieser,. Phone HA 0279.
'42 R.C.A. VICTOR PORTABLE
radio AC or DC and short wave.
Snap $35. Also English bike, semi-
racer $25. Phone Ed. FA 1433-M.
CARNOT CYCLE, CHEAP, GOOD
rubber, absolutely efficient, comp-
letelyy reversible. Gordon AL 0279-F,
Lost
AT THE ANTARCTIC CLUB ON
Sunday morning, woman's blue bur-
beray, one pair toe rubbers and one
pair white gloces. Owoners may have
same by applying to the management.
LOST BETWEEN BUS. STOP AND
auditorium, brown wallet. Contents
urgently needed. Reward. Call Pat
at AL 2110.
BROWN LEATHER WALLET CON-
taining money and papers. Return
to AMS office. Reward,
GREEN SHAEFFER'S FOUNTAIN
pen, Friday October 1. Phone AL
1339-Y,
GOLD RING, BLACK ONYX
stone initial "R" valued as keepsake,
turn in pub.
WILL THE BOY  WHO  FOUND A
single strand of pearls in the cafeteria please phone again? Anne. BA
8415-  L
BLACK ONYX  RING INITIAL "R"
lost Wednesday. Finder please turn
in to the AMS or phone PA 2875
after 6:00. Reward.
PERSONAL
EXPERT TYPING-NOTES, ES-
says, etc. Quick service, 12 cent's per
page. Mrs. J. C. Davie, 4000 W vOth
Ave, Work can be left with J, C.
Davie,  1st year Law.
MATH REFERENCE BOOKS. MAR-
geneau and Murphy, Maths for Physics and Chem." Doetsch "Laplace
Transformation". Phone Bob at FA
7844-Y.
WANT TO FORM CAR CHAIN Vicinity 32n Ave, and Granville. Phone
BA 9333-L
ROOM   AND   BOARD   FOR   GIRL
student in return for light services.
Kerr.  5891.  5989  Hudson.
TWO SINGLE ROOMS. WILL GIVE
breakfast and lunch. Rates by ar-
ranbement. Phone Mrs. Gardner, BA
2291-R. 3991 Puget Drive.
8 TUBE OLDER TYPE PHILCO
radio. Marvellous reception for local
and distant stations. $10 cash. Phone
Chuck at BA 4051-M.
CLASSIFIED
Transportation
RIDE FROM BROADWAY AND
Main for 8:30's or 9:30's. Phone Cherie
at FA 8033-R.
RIDE FROM VICINITY DAVIE AND
Nicola for two girls 8:30 Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Phone Rae
PA 4756.
CAR CHAIN-3 CARS WANTED
from New Westminster. Phone Bill
4464 N.W. or Reno 3643-L-2-N.W.
RIDE FROM WEST END (VICINITY
of Kitsilano Beach) for 9:30 lectures
Mon. to Sat. Phone Helen BA 8476-Y.
ride from 25th and Heather for 8:30's
WANTED    BY    COMM.
daily,  Phone FA 3881-L.
STUDENT
WANT A RIDE? ANYONE LIVING
in ihe Kerrisdale district and interred in forming a car pool please phone
KE 2513-Y.
WANTED. RIDE 8:30 DAILY VICIN-
ity Hastings and Nanaimo. Phone
Jack.  HA  5379-L.
RIDE WANTED DAILY FOR 8:30
lectures from 12th and Burrard. Also,
if available, ride downtown from
UBC  at  12:30.  Phone  Reg.  CE 3744.
RIDE WANTED. ALL 8:30's MON
to Sat. inclusive from vicinity 16th
and Dunbar. Phone BA 5587-R.
ANYONE MOTORING TO THE
Cariboo this coming weekend and
phone Wendy at AL 0635 or leave
could take a paying passenger, please
note in Aggie Girl's^Common Room.
Accommodation
ROOM AND BOARD FOR 2 MEN
$12,00 per week. Phone Hast. 1292-R.
FOR RENT COMFORTABLE FRONT
sleeping room. Phone Alma 2043-L
or call at 3828 West 10th Ave.
CLEAN DOUBLE ROOMS FOR
boys. Twin beds. Morning and  eve-
FOR  RENT.  TWO  ROOMS  FOR 3
ning meal optional. AL 2948-Y.
men  si'udents.  Phone KE 5057-R.
2nd YEAR COMMERCE STUDENT
Who wants room and board within
reasonable distance of UBC. Will
share with other student. Call Bob
at KE 0548.
ROOM TO RENT. SLEEPING ROOM
for two boys sharing, Short walk to
UBC bus.AL 3165-R.
WANTED, STUDENT TO SHARE
large front room. Private home.
Breakfast optional. Car ride morning
lectures.  CE  5C79.
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
C IG A k b f T fc      '
Low Neckline Bothers Student
The day may come when I shall, no
longer find myself blushing-to the tips of my
toesies when confronted with one of those
"hoW-low-can-you-get-th is-thing'' • Christian
Dior necklines. If it ever does come it will
probably be the same day that 1 discover
© quick cure for a hangover.
I shouldn't blush. I guess. Aller all, I've-
read H. Allen Smith and Karl Wilson and
Thome .cmith and I'\e sneaked a giant M al
the appropriate pas.-wmos of t.'ue I'hu'yclopedki
Rritafiniea. I've wandered a,.,i -,lruck through
the Louvre in Paris, tli-1 Huntingdon Arl
Gallery and many copse; of J-aimiiiv. l\v
studiod the girdle ad; in Vig;i said Harm:'-;
Bavsaar. I've closely .-a'aimed (he •,!'..;i led' ■ I
beauties who e.i'aee |i,(- ! ■. >.. i< -r.-s pus lei . ao.l
I've    given    llnMi"lilful    eon ,i.kv;:i ion    lo    I i;o
bulbous babes who do their darndest to sell
me a Lov-e Brassiere. I might suggest that
I have been able to sttind up to all of this
with a certain amount of solicitude. Those
who know me well might even be so bold
a slo claim thai in most instances I have been
downright appreciative.
But when I am confronted with sex, in
person, so to speak, I find myself in a complete lunk. I have no right to feel this way.
It's nol own logical. And yet, there it is.
But the worst aspect of this whole, unnerving situation is that those horrible females who are responsible for my discomfort
: . em lo enjoy the consternation they see
wrillen all over my puss. In fact, I might
■■:> :o t;11- .■■; to suggest, thai it is all part of
■•   dark pint, planned with diabolical cunning.
Just what the plot is, I couldn't say. But
I'm certain the plot exists and that I'm going
to be the victim of it.
Look at it this way. Virtually every time
I go to one of the local supper clubs (I believe
your editor-in-chief refers to them as "gin-
mills'') my thoughts idly contemplate the cares
of the world. My conversation is its usual
brilliant self. Then, as I sit there, sipping ray
ginger ale, my mind slowly becomes aware
of my partner or, more specifically, Modern
Pointed, size 36. I lose my train of thought.
What was once a gay and scintillating conversation benomes a hackneyed and erotic
series of grunts, groans, stammers and blushes.
Now this sort of thing has got to stop.
Modern Pointed, size 30, has become a psychological and pysiologieal hazard to a sane
and settled life.
by Pon Cunliffe
i
Just what these women hope to accomplish by all their designing I can't say. But
some of the results are already self-evident.
The divorce rate is far too high. The international situation is growing more and more
tense by the day. (This is no doubt caused
by what happens at night), The sale of alcoholic stimulant is increasing by leaps and
bounds. And a por herring catch is predicted
for next year.
These are but a few examples of what
this sudden and flagrant exposition of sex
and, specifically, Modern Pointed, size 36, are
doing to the world. It is all tied in, It must be
stopped.    At once.
Let us act together and rid the world of
this menace. Let us keep a wary eye on Modern Pointed, si/e 30. We musl not flag nor
fail. We must keep abreast of (he times. Tuesday, October 5, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 8
,-jwe Tq Act In (vipvies
F53H %wteii<;? On Campus
By PETE HEPHER
You may be in the movies scon, even if you aren't a Gregory Peck or an Esther Williams'.
$■
Maybe UBC students can't act quite""stalled   two   new   Bell   and   Howell
as well as James Mason, but there
is a lixtd chance many of them will
appear on screens all over E'ritish
ColijLmbia. It all depends on the
flJUCcejB, of the UBC Film Society's
latest, venture.
'The CHiriptis film enthusiasts have
started production of a feature length
movie portraying life at this university. According to their president,
Pete Mclntyre, scenes for the movie
will, be sl|3t throughout the year
by members of the club.
THUNDERBIRD NEWSREEL
'P^ej|e..scenes, will make ..their first
appearance in the form of five min-
Ut%>»'"EhuQde;:bird Newsreels" at the
Film Society's regular weekly film
shpwings in the Auditorium. At the
en4 9I, the, term they will be com-
jjj«e4>.ancV edited into a full length
10mm film, and a sound track will be
«**•: : ■ iiiliWI
The producers plan to presents .all
ph$gey of, campus life. For instance,
intey-faculty rivalry will be por,
trayed jjy "Red Sweater Day" which
w^S filled during the recent lily
poj^d dunkings. This sequence will
appear, a&. part of next Tuesday's
«J|iVK«r %Intyre said. Other sectipns
wjh include shots of the university
biddings, sports, lab views and acti-
vitiM of student clubs.
pKovince-wide circulation
.yjlm .Sfociety. officials expect the
completed Aim to be purchased by
tt»e. University Extension Department
ftw; djiitribution throughout the provide. T^ey. hope, by. this means, to
encourage interest in UBC am(ong
hijfh school students.
r'^rodudlhg a movie is not enough
fog-tlfy, ambitious Aim club, however.
Tfye ,ppUcy pf presenting noon hom;,,
matinee and evening, shows featuring
high, quality Hollyv.faod and British
pfductlons, which w^s inaugurated
last year, is heing continued. An added attraction this year will be up
to. the minute Universal newsreels.
NEW PROJECTORS
In order to provide better presentation   of   these   programs   the   Film J
Society  and  the   AMS  recently   in-1
Filmo-Arc prbjectors in the Auditorium, at a cost of 14,000.
According to Dick Driedger, technical advisor of the society, these
are, the most irjodern 16mm pro*
jectors available and are unique, in
British. Columbia. "They will enable
showings equal in quality to those
in commercial movie louses," said
Driedger.
.The Film Society oilers projectionist
service to any campus organization
wishing to take advantage of these
new technical facilities.
Out-of-Town Vehicles
r ,...->.  , v...-   . -. ■
Must Register Now
All hcn-B.C. resident faculty members and students must register and
license their cars in line with provincial law requirements, Provincial
Police Constable Jack Dowling warned over the weekend.
Although there .has been one offence this year, Dowling reports that
students are co-operating with him
by keeping within traffic regulations.
Australian Co-ed
Anyone want to meet a gal
four thousand miles off?
Graeme Milne, co-ed at Auckland
University, has written Students
Council in search of a pen pal. She
particularly wants a  male student.
Graeme says she is "going on for
19." A part time student at a Teacher
Training College she is interested in
i'lhletics, swimming, and "most other
sports." She says she is willing to talk
about anything almost,
iice board in the AMS Offices, south
Any takers should refer to the, np-
<nd of Brock Hall.
V\
"■A
-Apl^V j Q_0um^L fym
JJtqte (xpr^ess
333
AT POPULAR
PRICES
Tlie overall registration at
UBC for the 1948-49 session
has reached 8352 it was announced at the office of the
registrar today.
With an expected drop of 1000 from
the previous year, the total is actually
only 600, less. ,
The breakdown of registration
showing the totals for some of the
faculties is as follows:
In arts and, science) first year. 1193;
secnd year, 1301; third year, 1230,
fourth year, 1127, and graduates 230,
In applied science: first year, 354,,
second year, 1301; third year, 125Q;
fourth year, 379, and graduates 32.
The balance of students are registered with the faculty of nursing,
agriculture and law.
Bigger, Better Sets
io
In order that future "hams" will be
bigger, better and more active, like
shmoos, the Amateur Radio Society
under the direction of President Ed
Hird are building their own sets.
Construction of sets is being completed in the ARS offices and parts
ares upplied by members themselves.
Competent instructors will assist any
new members in building their radio
sets. They will belong to the builders
upon   completion.
For the last three years the society
has been giving courses in radio theory
for the purpose of operating campus
.stations.
"It's a very good thing for students
who want to learn as much about
radio as possible, They receive actual
experience in construction problems,
as well as learning the theory," said
President Ed Hird.
U.S. Efaator
Spmb Here
At Noon-Honr
-.'.-. '   a  ;   ■ ;  . e ' s -  ■   *     '.
Olsen Speaks to
' ." • '■:.     f .     "\ -'■ a . . ie i,   <
Acadia Audience
Well-known educator Dr. E.
G. Olsen will speak at Acadia
Camp at 1:30 this afternoon on
the topic "What It Means To
Grow Up.'^
Dr. Olsen, who is Director of
Schools and Community Relations
for the State of, Washington, is a
graduate of Columbia University. He
has held a number of important positions in the field of education, including the chairmanship of the Department of Education at Colgate
University.
He was also Director of the School
of Education at Russell Sage Institute, His summer lecture tours have
taken him to universities in all parts
of America.
Dr. Olsen opened the two-day session of the Vancouver Parents' Institute which began last night in the
Mnyfair Room of the Hotel Vancouv-
er. His address was on the theme
"Let's Vitalize our Schools."
LOCKSMITHS BEAT BffS
AS TAPE REPLACES LOCK
A great new field has been opened for manufacturers
of cellulose tape. ,f
The Students' Council pioneered the new development
by replacing locks on Sophomore ballot boxes with tape.
Proponents of the tape method claim that it's Cheaper
and also "the box is easier to open—no keys.''
Lock makers are reported to be working on an advertising
campaign to combat spread of this radical discovery.
Students Awed
At Non-Existence
You don't exist.
Nobody exists but Dr, Savery of
the Department of Philosophy.
At least that's what Dr. Savery
set out to prove to his Philosophy
class Monday.
He challenges anyone (even If
they don't exist) to disprove, his
contention by any rational prbe'ess,
Public  Stenography
Manuscripts, Mimeographing
Typing,  Theses
CATHERINE   STEWART
KErr.   1407R
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-Squarcs, Protractors, Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RULES
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
Pre-Med Body
Elects New
Executive
Pre-med   officials  were   elected   ati
a special meeting of pre-meds Friday
when UBC's medical faculty arrangements were discussed.
Bob Devito was unanimously elected president of the PMUS Friday.
Other members of the executive
elected at the meeting were Alex
Boggie, Vice-presidet, and Harry
Cummerford, fourth year rep. Remainder of the executive for '48-4?
are Ray Parkinson, Alex Freeman,
Claire Green, and Jim Duxbirry.
A special meeting of all freshmen
pre-meds will be called when they
will elect a representative.
Gra<totmg Students
Will your picture be in the T949Totern?
If you are in
Home Ec - Pharmacy - Phys, Ed -
Teachers Training - Social Work -
Engineers - Architects - Aggie* -
Law - Nursing a<   ^
you must have your picture taken before
Friday.
If you are in
Arts or Commerce '
your picture must be taken in the w<e$k
of October 11 - 15.
Photos will be taken in the Photography studio behind
the Brock Hall . . . cost is $1.50 which entitles, you to
one mounted picture . . . choice of proofs is offmed.
Appointment sheets are posted on the Quad1 notice
board.  Sign up now.
-A *—.' ■*[.,!
"Fall Dresses and Suits to enslave the   \
Feminine Heart"
STYLE - QUALITY - VALUE  f |
V !      . A ■ , A      :■ !j   •< ■ :
AT |
; kay:s fashion shoi*
2545 ALMA ROAD
ZIPPER  RING  BOOKS
Complete,  with  Sheets  and   Intex
From $2.60
FOUNTAIN  PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
Stationers  and  Printers
550 Seymour St.     Vancouver, B.C.
AKf rot/A
1-DAY
SERVICE
On Shirts
Expertly  Laundered
W0 W. 10th Ave.'
,___^____t_U •__(__&__£___!_ tic-',-'. ■__[
GIVE BLOOD...
That Others May Live
YOU have an opportunity to save a life! Will YOU'acle^t tftfe
responsibility? Your answer is important for it ma$ mean
LIFE to some sick or injured child or adult. Volunteer as a.
Blood DONOR in the great Red Cross FREE Civilian Rlood
Transfusion Service.  •*.    \
REGISTER YOUR APPOINTMENT NOW!
for the
UBC Blood Donor Clinic
BOOTHS ARE OPEN 10:30 a.m. to *:30 p!m.
ON THE CAMPUS
OCT. 5 to OCT. 12
CANADIAN
RED* CROSS ft*»l
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 5,193!
FRED MOONEN, Sports Editor
Editor Tills Issue - DAVE CROSS
Soccer XI Shows Class
In Opening Day Triumph
Advance predictions about the Varsity soccer club proved
too modest Saturday, when the smooth-working Blue and Gold
eleven rolled to a 6-1 triumph over South Hill for the most
convincing V and D League opening day score.
. $
South Hill got the first goal of the
game on a penalty kick, but after
Jack Cowan had evened the count,
also on a penalty kick, it was Varsity
all the way. Coach Davies was delighted with the woirk of the team as
a whole, and particularly with the
newcomers who played like veterans.
Don Gleig, Ken Campbell, Murdo
McLefxl and Gill Blair all fitted in
perfectly in their debut in first division company.
Varsity led 3-1 at half time, with
Don Gleig and Stu Todd adding goals
to Cowan's free shot. After the
breather Cowan sank another penalty
shot, fpllowed by counters by Bobby
Moulds and Gord Shepherd to turn
the contest into a near rout.
Making his first start in the Varsity
goal, Gil Blair gave a steady performance, aided by strong support
from the fullbacks and the half line.
From the goal out the team looked
definitely stronger than last year's
squad, and promises to be one of the
mjost powerful student entries in recent seasons.
The intermediate team is still in
need of several players, and manager
Jerry Supeene has issued an urgent
appeal for anyone interested to inquire at the South end of the Stadium
at noon today.
Forwards Supply
Punch For Frank
As Hockey Nears
With the 1948-49 hockey season approaching fast, coach
Frank Frederickson is busy
laying the groundwork for a
series of exhibition games with
American college teams.
Ten lettermen are returning to
form the nucleus of this year's squad.
Varsity's high scoring forwards are
headed by Haas Young, who has had
a brilliant career in senior and professional hockey. Last season Haas
could not untrack himelf, but promises to show the form for which he is
famous.
FAST WINGERS
Bob Koch needs no introduction to
coast fans, having starred with New
Westminster Royals and Vancouver's
KCAF team. Bob is a Frederickon
type player combining lightning speed
with hockey savvy. Fred Andrew is
the consistent type, and has been
chosen on three all-star teams in
three seasons.
This record is warranted since Fred
can score goals from any angle and
under any pressure. Bill Wagner is
another consistent goal getter. He
has had a wealth of experience in
senior hockey and showed well with
UBC last season. Lloyd Torfason is
a real crowd pleaser as his type of
plays provides thrills to even the
most critical fan.
OPTOMISTIC
The enthusiasm one meets in the
Thunderbird camp, tends to optimism
on the part of their coach Frank
Frederickson. Frank, a N.H.L. star
in his own right, is well known for
the teams he has coached. Besides
the Thunderbirds, he coached an
R.C.A.F. squad from Vancouver
which boasted a galaxy 'of big league
stars. Frank is more proud of the
character of his team than their accomplishments. One thing is certain,
the UBC outfit will be a clean hard
fighting one.
INTERMURAL VOLLEYBALL
All Games Played At 12:30 P.M.
Tuesday, October 5
YARDSTICK
Thunderbirds         bf               Vikings
62
Yds. Gained Passing
101
49
No. Plays un
62
119
Yds.   Gained  Rushing
248
18
Yds Lost Rushing
17
62
Yds.   Gained   Passing
101
14
Yds.  Lost  Passing
14
6
Passes Completed
4
10
Passes Incompleted
10
3
N Passes   Intercepted
1
3
Fumbles
5
4
Fumble  Recovered
4
15
Yds.  Lost  Penalties
50
292
Yds.  Punting
266
27.45
Punts Averaged
33.25
36
Yds.   Punts  Returned
49
0
Touchdowns
6
0
Converts
4
8
First downs Rushing
16
4
First Downs Passing
5
»vf'
mu, t     u,, ti.n  ■wr. n.
1. Phys. Ed. "A''
2. Sciencemen
3. Beta B.
4. Phi Gamma "A"
5. Phi Delt "B"
Wednesday, October 6
1. Kappa Sig "B"
2. Beta Chi "A"
Thursday, Octobeer 7
1. D.U. "A"
2. Newman "B"
3. Phi Kappa Pi
4. Phi Sigma Chi
5. Kappa Sig "A"
Friday, October 8
1. Newman "A"
2. Psi U. "A"
3. Phys. Ed. "A"     ,JV
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
vs
Alpha Delta
Chi Delta "A"
Legion
Phys. Ed. "B"
Forestry "A"
Forestry "B"
Zebes
Chi Delta "B"
A.T.O. "A"
Phi Gamma "|B"
Legion
V.C.F.
F.H.
F.H.
F.H.
Gym
Gym
Gym
Gym
F.H.
F.H.
F.H.
Gym
Gym
SYMBOLIC of UBC's loss on Saurday is this tackle by a Western
Washington Viking. The difference between the two clubs was
in part measured by the inability of the locals to bring down
their men, while the Vikings could as demonstrated above.
Bird Gridders Tire Fast;
WWC Get 4 In Last Half
Storey, Murphy Star But Vikings
Have Too Much, Too Often
By FRED MOONEN
'Outweighed, outplayed, and outsmarted' might be a suitable epitaph for the Thunderbird grid machine of last Saturday,
but it can't be said that they were outgamed.
However ,gameness is not the only
thing necesary to win football games. The rest of the backs tackled ffly
Tackling and touchdowns are also wel1' havin§ to come UP £rom thelr
necessary,   and   last     Saturday   Ijie k°sitions to finish off a cripple which
Birds showed a decided  inability to
come  up with either  of these  cbm-
modities *  «'^Si;ii
What the 'birds did come up with
was an inconsistent offense and a
spotty defense. Two touchdbwns can
be attributed to the ends, who
had a clear shot at the passer but
rather than tackle, tried to block the
pass as it left Roy Richardsbn's talented fingers.
Another thing which could be laid
to the ends was their failure to
roll into the interference so as 1)o
clear the way for the secondaries
to make the tackle. The way the
Vikings' interference was running, an
end could easily have rolled into the
lead man and in so doing knocked
away the whole of the ball-carriers
protection.
The centre of the line worked fairly
well, with tackles Gil' Stcar and
Alec Lamb doing yeoman service.
Guards Jim Breen and Cece Taylor
took a terrific beating frtom the
heavy forward wall of the Washington
crew, but stayed in there and fought
the club to a standstill through the
centre for a good part of the game.
Bob Murphy, not greatly rated as a
defensive back showed well, coming lult weeks to get in shape for their
up with a good display of last-ditch 11L'xt 'scheduled game, and in that
tackling, and all-round slound foot- time should be able to sharpen both
ball. _, <-i*MMMBi lhcir atlack and defcnse-
the   secondaries   had   failed   to   hit
solidly.
On the offensive side, Dave Storey
stale the show, running like a scared
rabbit whenever his interference gave
him  hiilf a  chance.
On tho few occasions that the Bird
supporters had something to cheer
iibuut, it was Dave who supplied that
.something, and his interception of a
lung WWC pass on his own five
.'aid line left the crowd basping.
Taking the ball over his head with
one hand, he tucked the leather
under his arm and proceeded in the
general direction of the Viking's goal,
twisting, turning, cutting,and generally making life miserable for the
would-be tacklcrs. and just as it
seemed as though he was completely
free, the WW safety man brought
him down. One more twist and UBC
would have been on the scoreboard,
but Dave was so tired by this time
that  one  more  twist  wasn't  there.
One other time, Storey was away
except for the safety, but that worthy
dipped Dave after he had gained
26 yards.
The one bright point in the 'Birds
thoughts  is  that  they  will have'two
UBC FOIL EXPERTS WIN
TOURNEYS THIS SUMMER
Campus Blademen's Flashing Steel       |
Touche's Downtown Fencing Champs
The fencing club has been working>$-
hard this last season. During the summers the boys who were in town did
Women Hoopsters
Look To Strong
Club In Senior B
This season the girls are entering two teams in the newly
formed Vancouver Cagette
League, a Senior B and an
intermediate A team. The season" will open at the end of
October, with some games being
played in the University Gymnasium.
" This year's team promises to be
just as strong as last years with
Nora McDermott, Mearnie Summers,
Betty Crooks, and Joan Weeden returning from last seasfon's Lower
Mainland Senior B champions, the
Thunderettes. Outstanding newcomers
aro Shirley Lewis and Eleanor Ny-
holm from John Oliver High School,
and   Mimi   Wright   frtom   Trail.
The practices for the teams are
held on Monday 6-8 pm, and Thursday 5:30-6:30 in the gym. All who
wish to try out for the teams are
requested to be at the practices.
INTRAMURALS.
The women's intramural program
will get under way next week with
tennis and vtolleyball as the initial
competitions. All girls interested are
requested to sign up immediately
in the gym office where forms are
available. Volleyball will take place
Monday, Wednesday and Friday at
noon hours and tennis matches will
bo played Outdoors or in the Field
House in case of rain on Tuesday
from 3 to 5 pm. Teams cbnsist of
Arts 1, 2, 3, 4, Home Ec, Aggie,
Commerce, Nurses, Grads, etc, so
come on out and support ylour faculty.
BIG BLOCK
Big Block members who wish t'o
pick up their sweaters should go
clown to Sparling's on Granville St.,
<opp. the Vogue Theatre). Remember,
it's  first  come  first  serve.
Members must be down there between the 5th and 15th,
VOC ,.
Long hike to Camp Elphinstone.
Total cost about $3.00*. .Pay Ron
Leslie in Quad at noon Tuesday or
Wednesday.
Specializing in
Printing
FOR
FRATERNITIES
AND
SORORITIES
GEHRKE
Stationery   and   Printing   Co.
566 Seymour St.
more than their share in carrying the
colors of old UBC into the various
tournaments. ••
In the Vancouver city champion-
ships the boys took all the classes in
which they were entered. David
Morton, Harry Statsny and Dan
Lambert took the top honors in the
prep novice and junior events. Bob
Simpson, the team captain, and the
only three weapon man on the UBC
team took part in the senior events,
The good showing the boys made is
due in a great part to the instruc*
tion of Major G. M. Braund, the 1947
Dominion fall champion. Bob Simp^
son the 1947 Dominion Sabre Champion and Major Braund were invitea
to take their places in the Olympic J
Canadian team for the Olympic
games held in London this summer.,
Due to business pressure and lack of?'
funds they were not able to attend.
For the end of this month the Pacific International Fehcing tournament is scheduled. At this competition top flight entries from as far
south as Hollywood, San Francisco,
and Los Angeles are entered. This Is
the BIG event of the fencing year
and the boys of the fencing club are
working hard* to get into shape for
the hardest battle of the year.
' The club is making plans for the
formation of a three weapon team to<
fence   off   in   competition   with   thel
universities  to  the  south  and wlth!|
ihe teams of the local fencing clubs.
Major Braund will be the instructor;
for this group, and it is hoped that |
we will be able to make a good show*
ing against our competition.
RUGGER LOSSES
UBC's two entries in the second.
division English rugby league suffer*;
ed defeat in their opening contests,'
The Phys-Eds were blanked 11-0. |
by the Vindex at Wallace Park.
The Varsity Sophs were handed att'J
even more humiliating defeat whenl
they were smothered 25-0 by the]
powerful Ex-Britannia A's on tho |
Upper Varsity field.
Off For The
Weekend?
In an hour or so we could
send you forth completely
lubricated, oil changed,
washed and polished—proud
as ever to be behind that
wheel. We wouldn't forget to
check battery, tires and othet
safety features either. Know
of a quicker, more complete
service? See you soon!
DUECK
CHEVROLET OLDSMOBILE
CINIRAL    MOTORS
WHOLfSALf PARTS PIS1RIBUI0RX]
' WfSl RMAWAi
NOTICES
Architects F.H.
Alpha Tau Omega 'B' F.H.
Kappa Sig "B" F.H.
ONE PAIR SKIS ALSO SNOW-
shoes.   Cheap.   Phone  AL  0340-L.
•33 CHEV STANDARD ' SEDAN IN
good condiiion. See at 3460 W. 41st
Ave.,  Van.,  B.C.   anytime  after   12:00
noon. " -. .   >,V|f
Peter S. Mathewson
SERVICE SUPERVISOR
600 Royal Bank Building
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Telephone
PAc. 5321
West 1619-L-l
GOLF    	
Meeting of those interested in form-
in:.; n &\l club to be held Tuesday
October 4, in the upstairs Brock South
club room at 12:30.
Elections and discussion of the
year's events will take place.
GEOGRAPHY 102 TEXT, CASE AND
Beihsmni'k Phone KE 0797-L.
GENT'S WINTER OVERCOAT SIZE
42. Color, dark navy. Almost new.
Less than half price. Phone AL 0340-L
U.N. CLUB MEETING ARTS 100,
12-30, Tues., Oct. 5. Speaker: Mrs.
Grace Maclnnis, "Canada's Part in
U.N.
Smart, Practical
NAVY BLUE BLAZERS
SUN LIFE OF CANADA
Typevvr
•ink
, Essays,
Theses,
Notes
M;
nu.seri pit
, Etc.
HATES
MODERATE
Mrs.
A.
O.  Robinson
41 SO West
1.1th
Ave.
AL. 0915R
ENGLISH GREY WORSTED SLACKS
All sizes in stock or carefully tailored tq
your individual style and measurements!
Richards & Smith
Limited
577 HOWE ST.
PAi 6724
\
"Thc shop  for  men  that are going places'/
■■Mil

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