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The Daily Ubyssey Sep 30, 1948

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 VOL. XXXI
The Daily Ubyssey
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30,1948
No. 7
Graduates
Face Camera
October 5
4
Studio   Set   Up
In   Brock   Huts
Cap - and - gowned graduates
will go before the Totem cameras beginning Monday, October 5th.
Photographers will be busy in ,the
studio behind Brock Hall from 9:00
to 11:30 and from 12:30 to 5:00 taking
all   graduates   in   ceremonial   robes.
Beginning with Applied Science
grads and continuing with other faculties for two weeks this year's photography promises to be very worthwhile to the student.
Two or three shots will be taken
and two proofs will be mailed to
each person. For $1.50 one will be
mounted.
However photographers warn that
if proofs are not returned to the
studio within two days they will
choose the one to be mounted.
Detailed information will be forthcoming in the Friday Ubyssey.
Scholarships Open
For UBC Women
The Canadian Federation of
University Women is offering
three scholarships as ollows:
Travelling Scholarship, $1,250;
Professional Scholarship, $700
and Junior Scholarship, $850.
The first two scholarships are open
to women holding a degree from a
Canadian University, not more than
35 years of age at the time of the
award, and residing in Canada or
Newfoundland. Age requirements
for the third states that applicants
must not be over 25 years of age.
Awards will be based on evidence
of character, intellectual achievement,  and promise for the future.
Girton College, Cambridge, Eng.
land, announces a scholarship for
women grauates of Canada who wish
to study as a research student for the
degrees of M. Litt., M.Sc., or Ph. D„
or as an affiliated student for one
of the Tripos examinations for the
the degree of Honors B.A.
For information and application
forms regarding these scholarships,
all communications should be addressed to Mrs. Frank M. Ross, 4899
Belmont Ave., Vancouver.
Daily Ubyssey Photo By Bill Wallace
BLONDE, PETITE Betty Philips, first year arts student was
named Lambda Chi's Freshette Queen last night during the
annual Frosh reception in the Armories. Miss Philips is shown
above receiving a silver cup as a momento of the occasion from
Charles Marshall, secretary of the fraternity.
Betty Phillips Named
Queen Of Freshettes
"Gosh!   I'm   Scared"   Said
Queen   At   Frosh   Reception
Amid the popping of flashbulbs and the applause of Frosh
dancers, blonde, attractive, 18-year-old Betty Philips of White
Rock, B.C., was named Lambda Chi's Freshette Queen of 1948.
In a brief ceremony during the an-^
nual Frosh reception held last night
CCF Club Meeting Raps
Ban On Red Law Grad
-<8>
in
in the university armouries. Miss
Phillips was proclaimed by members
of the fraternity as the "freshette
they would most like to fraternize
with" and preented a silver loving
cup by Charles Marshall, secretary
of the Greek Society.
GARDENIAS
Accompanying the cup was a corsage of white gardenias and red roses.
A first year arts student, Betty
hails from White Rock and is presently staying in town with friends.
Her only comment' during the pro-
ceedigs was, "Gosh! I'm scared."
The name of the petite Miss Phillips
was announced during a short intermission and she was called up
to the bad stand by Marshall to receive thc silver cup and the flowers.
LOVING CUP '
The loving cup which will be returned temporarily to the fraternity
for engraving, became her property
(o keep as a memento of the occasion.
Miss Phillips is the first in what
the fraternity expects to be a long
line of freshette queens chosen by
thc-m each year at this time,
Music for the traditional Frosh
evening was provided by Joe Micelli's
orchestra while Don Cunliffe and
Bob Weir handled the master of ceremonies position.
Mamooks had the armouries decorated in blue and gold with a "class of
'52 motif,"
Sound Truck To Spread
Latest Campus Gossip
Latest addition to the equipment of the University Radio
Society, a sound truck, will soon make its appearance on the
campus.
Pre-meds Urged
To Hear Policy
Report Friday
Election of officers will highlight the meeting of the Premedical Undergraduate Society
to be held in Applied Science
100 Friday at 12:30.
The offices of president, fourth
year representative and first year
representative are to be filled. The
meeting will be open for nominations
frtsm t'he floor.
The pre-med executive will present a statement of general policy to
the meeting for its approval. Committees will then bo appointed to
carry out the year's activities. Among
;hc latter a men's smoker and a Fall
mixer are planned, and arrangements
will be put under way for the spring
formal bal.
The meeting will also be given details regarding the establishment of
a medical faculty at UBC.
In view of the importance of the
agenda, the executive urges all pre-
med students to attend the meeting.
Acting president Bob Devito said
Wednesday that "unless every member turns out, the future policy of
the  PUS   will   be  at stake.''
Forum Debate
Opens Season
Friday Noon
The Parliamentary Forum will open this season on Friday, October 1
with the traditional inter-faculty debate
Mr. A. T. E. Campbell, a downtown lawyer and honorary member
of the law faculty will share the
platform with Dr. G. G. Sedgewick.
Subject of the debate is "Resolved that lawyers are beneficial
to society."
Regular Thursday meetings of the
Forum  start  October 7  in  Arts 100.
Unofficial" Resouliion
For Martin Gets Majority
A wildcat controversial motion condemning the ban against
Gordon Martin, UBC Law student, was passed by a meeting
of the Student CCF Club, Wednesday.
Music Head Plans
Concerto Lectures
Professor Harry Adaskin of the
Univesity Department of Music plans
a series of concert lectures explain-
the "why and wherefor" of violin
concertos.
Professor Adaskin and his accompanist, Frances Marr, begin the series
of lectures Tuesday, October 5 at 8:00
p.m. They will be held in the Vancouver Art Gallery.
The concertos, a different one on
each night of the 10 week series will
include Bach's E major Mozart's A
Major, Bethoven, Baganninix, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovski, Brahms, Sibelius, Delius, and Hindermuth. They
will first be analysed and discussed
musically, historically,- and techni-
j caUy. After an intermission the concerto will  be played  in its entirety.
The "truck," an Austin sedan
owned by Dave Shearer, Chief operator of the Radsoc. All technical
equipment is carried in the trunk of
of the car, with the dual loudspeakers mounted on a removable platform on top.
All the work was clone by Shearer
and Don Moore, head of Radsoc's
engineering department.
With the car, club president George
Barnes pointed out, the facilities of
thc radio society as a campus service
organization    are    greatly    increased.
Services of the car are available to
any student organization.
LONG   WEEKEND
HOLIDAY   SOON
FOR   CLASS-WEARY
Class-weary students will give
thanks In more ways than one
October 11.
In observance of Thanksgiving
holiday, the university will close
Saturday morning, October I) until
Tuesday, October  12.
®-
Frat Rushees
Number Boosted
By Late Boom
IFC rushing activities ended in a
boom after a slow start, tU.spiIt; the
handicap imposed by caf restrictions
on fraternity tables.
Registration figures which stood
at 35 last week and 140 Monday noon
had jumped to 257 yesterday noon, it
was announced by Bob Thurston,
IFC treasurer. Seventy rushees registered on Monday and GG on Tuesday.
Yesterday's figure was still about
50 below that of last year. However.
Thurston expected there would lie
another 20 registrations before Friday,    when    late    registration
E-fc
i.otu
expressed    the
salist'ied    the
■.   Functions   I'm
yesterday.
closes.
opinion    everyone
had
way    rushing
10
ru
lie
)('-
UNTD Recruiting
Goes Over The Top
Over fifty applicants have applied for the available 25 openings in the UNTD.
A selected screening method has
been devised this year by Frank
Turner, O C of thc UNTD to fill the
openings in thc division with the
most  capable   cadet   candidates.
Candidates arc given a "G" test
lo find their mental ability and a
medical to insure physical fitness,
If they pass these tests with good
standing they go before the screening   board.
Those who gain admission to the
UNTD will receive full training and
must go before a cadet selection
board in  their first year.
Cadets must take two full summers
of sea training The.Navy recommend
that this training be taken during
(he first two years. It will be paid
for at  the rate of ?I,4,'i per month.
Those who are interested are asked
to attend the earliest possible parade
as acceptions will be limited to 25
of this yea's applicants. The next
pai ado ia Tuesday, October 5 at 7:0(1
p ii al HMCS Discovery. A -special
bus  leaves  the  Armouries  at' 0:15.
Thumbs   Down:
Councillors Won't
'Play Tag' Appeal
For Tots Denied
Jingling coin cans and lapel tags
are things of the past for UBC.
Council Monday night put a firm
foot down, terminating what has
been a familiar campus standby in i
past years—tag days.
The Protestant Home for Children
asked to sponsor a tag day on*Saturday October 2nd. This request was
turned down on the grounds that it
is "unfair to students to ask them to
subscribe to all and sundry charities." ,
Roger Pederson, president of the
LSE in a statement said, "many students are not ostentatious enough to
wear a tag saying 'I have contributed
10c'  The principle  is wrong."
Phrateres also turned down a similar request last week.
Resolution was proposed by an un
identified student form the floor.
It was later decided that this motion "need not necessarily.be present"
the official opinion of the CCF Club,
About 60 per cent of the 300 students present voted in favor of the motion which read: "This meeting strong-
strongly protests the action of the
B.C. Law Society in banning a graduate of this university from his chosen  profession.
Gordon Martin told the Daily Ubys-
by the Law Society He said he might
contest the ban against him imposed
sey earlier this week that he would
bring the matter to court,.
WORK IN MINES
Martin also said he might be forced
to seek employment in the mines or
forests to support his family, since
he had been banned from legal practice.
PREVENT WAR
Guest speakers were Angus Maclnnes, senior CCF member at Ottawa, and Rod Young, former UBC
student, now member of Parliament
of Vancouver Centre.
Commenting on the. shaky international situation, Young said that
war "could best be prevented" by
ing to take sies in the Russian-Amer-
the middle and small powers refus-
ican dispute.
Maclnnes called upon students to
start working for the "brotherhood
in the world of tomorrow."
*-
University Housing
Hits Ail-Time High
"All suites at Little Mountain, Acadia, Wesbrook, and
Fort Camps are full.''
This was the statement of
Mr. A. R. Baird, University
Housing Administrator. He
said several of the camps are
over capacity.
Housing facilities are extremely
poor. There is nothing available for
'amilies with children and the number of housekeeping rooms are limited as to quantity and quality. All
dormitories are full. There is a waiting list of over 100.
Mr. Baird and his assistant Mr.
Harry Dewar, Chairman of the Canadian Legion Housing Committee
have a difficult problem. "There
must be homes in the city that could
accomodate one or more of these
veterans. If you can help call the
university now.  Alma 1191,
Mamooks Ration
Noticeboard Space
Mamooks has exiled all stale news
from its notice-boards.
Effective today, all news of an un-
acedemic nature can remain only two
weeks on the boards. Those to remain
longer must be stamped and certified by Mamooks.
Major clubs requiring advertising
space must book it through Mamooks.
Uncertified notices found oil any
board will be torn down.
Final words of the ultimatum:
"Any complainers see the Mamooks
in Brock South Basement."
Three
Patrol
New Constables
Caf, Brock
Grad Record Exams
Set For October
Announcement of Graduate Record Examinations was posted this
week.
Admission to many of the graduate
schools in the United States depends
upon the results of the Graduate Record Examinations. Theee examinations are given on a nation wide
scale every three months.
Examiner at UBC is Dr. W. G.
Black.
Graduates and prospective graduates intending to write these exams
should apply to Dr. Black at hut M7.
Registration hours are Monday,
Wednesday and Friday afternoons
until October 7.
All applicants must register with
the   examiner   before   the   deadlines.
October 1948 examinations are Monday and Tuesday, October 2!> and
October 26. Registration deadline is
October  7.
Grauate Record examinations will
also be held in February and May.
Dates of the February exams will
be Monday and Tuesday, February 7
and February 8. The May exams will
be held on Monday and Tuesday May
2 and May 3. Registration will close
eighteen days before the examinations.
This year's Discipline Committee headed by Dave Williams
has empowered three special constables to enorce discipline
regulations.
Correction
In last Thursday's edition of the
Ubyssey, Dr. Opechowski,new associate professor of physics at UBC,
was erroneously reported to have
stated that atomic power will replace
the present forms of energy—coal,
petroleum, water power and natural
gas—in our generation. This statement should have read, "will NOT
replace  .  .  ."
The Daily Ubyssey regrets this
typographical error and hopes that
it lias not caused Dr. Opechowski
any undue embarrassment.
To enforce the committee edicts,
the Brock Lounge constables will be
Joe Collins, janitor, and head Brock
janitor   Tom   Grantham.
Caf offenders will be checked by
manager  Frank   Underhill.
The special constables will check
lunching in the Brock Lounge, placing feet on the furniture and not
checking  coats  outside.
Bridge playing in the caf will bc
Ihe chief offense to be checked by
special   constable   Underhill.
Student offenders will be reported
to the Discipline Committee which
will hold hearings and punish offenders.
Dave Williams in a policy statement to the Daily Ubyssey said, "In
the past there lias been no attempt
to have these people help, this system avoids Ihe unpleasantness of
having discipline eonunil'.ee members
ire   also   s-'udeiu's   check   nl'1'eu..l-
w
New Courses Offered
By   Extension   Dept.
New courses are being launched
by the Department of University
Extension this year.
Most of the 35 courses will begin
on the evening, of October 5 and will
run for 16 weeks. They will be one
night a week from 8:00 p.m. to 9:30
p.m.
Parents of pre-scbool children and
school age children will be particularly interested in one of the courses
offered. It will present various aspects of child development in a series
of film programmes. The series will
bc led by Dr. G. M. Kirkpatrick, Dr.
Elda  Lindenfielcl and Mrs. E. Winn.
Other courses to be given include
a course on current international
problems by Mr. G. O. B. Davies,
a psychology laboratory course, business courses and Dr. G. G. Sedge-
wick's noted course on Shakespeare.
Commercemen Add
Woman To Club
The women are getting bolder.
Commorcemen's Public Speaking
Club boasts a co-ed among its membership of 58, George Clark, president  has announced.
Club will meet Thursday at noon
in hut HG7 to elect: an executive and
outline a schedule of meetings for
the year.
Professor Bert Hughes of the English Department, a well-known authority on public speaking, will instruct the members. Richard A. Mahoney. of Commerce Departement,
will sponsor the group.
As formerly, club activities will include a beginners' course and an ad- ,•
valued   course  in   speaking. /
/ Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 30, 1948
The Daily Ubyssey
1 Member Canadian University Press
Authorized  as  Second Class Mail,  Post  Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
Published  throughout tlie  university year  by  the  Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
* -Y< *
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily tnose
of the Alma Mater Society nor of  the University.
* H> *
Offices in Brock Hall.  Phone ALma 1024 For  display  advertising  phone  ALma  3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF   -   -   -   -   RON  HAGGART
MANAGING EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL SEARS
GENfiBAL STAFF: News Editor, Bob Cave, Chuck Marshall; Features Editor, Ray Baines; Photography Director,
Ellanor Hall;  Sports Editor, Jack  Wasserman;   Womens'    Editor!   Loni    Francis.
Editor This Issue — JACK LEGGATT
Associate Editor — ART WELSH
Maybe This Time
Tftie Thunderbirds had an anniversary last
Saturday. It was the third annual renewal of
their quest for gridiron laurels. They celebrated, in a sort of a way, by losing.
It couldn't have happeened to a nicer
bunch ,of guys. The boys that are wearing tho
Blue and Gold this year are one of the most
spirited gangs ever to represent the university.
lichen they take to the field they are out to
Win and hough the odds become rather steep.
ai times they never stop trying.
But those odds are steep.
Pon Wilson, coaching his first year in collegiate ball, found that out Saturday when he
sent his team, composed mostly of inexeperi-
enced players onto the fieeld against Pacific
University. The Badgers were waiting with 21
men back from the squad that was runner-up
i&.the conference last season.
The result was a one-sided score that will
probably have a discouraging effect on the
UBC fans who didn't see the game and don't
realize that the score was not an indication
of the play.
It is a shame for the morale of the players
and the student body that the UBC team is
breed into the position of being the perpetual
underdog. That the cause is the lack of vision
and imagination of the planners rather than
the lack of fight in the team makes the situation even more discouraging.
What the university needs is a more broad-
minded approach to the problems arising
from competition with Ameerican schools.
It is high time that those responsible for
the promotion of ootball started a movement
to have he game played in high schools. No
one can blame Wilson for the loss Saturday
when it is realized that he had to start at
rock bottom two weeks earlier to mold a
team.
Another step in the direction of a good won-
lost record for the ''Birds is encouragement
of likely athletes to attend UBC.
It might be necessary to do more than
dangle the 'old school tie' in front of these
boys but something must be done.
The ignominy of being trounced by schools
that have an enrolment smaller than our
Faculty of Applied Science is something that
no team or student body should have to face
year after year.
Down With Sound Trucks
Word that University Radio Society has
purchased a sound truck has ruled out the
possibility of students getting any sleep at
all during lectures.
Party-tired co-eds, looking forward to a
few winks between caf sessions may just a.s
well give up hope as long as these 'squack
boxes" on wheels are plaguing the campus.
Fortunately in the past years clubs wishing
to advertise functions in this manner have
been restricted by the necessity of hiring
men and equipment, but this term if the facilities of the URS are put at their disposal
at a minimum cost the result will be a bedlam
of noise.
A "gentleman's agreement" between the
Administration and the Alma Mater Socieiy
requests that sound trucks be in action only
during the lunch period but last week their
bull-throated roar could be heard at almost
any hour of the day.
Alarmed by this threat to the sanctity of
the lecturer hour the Faculty Council has a
motion on thc agenda for next Friday's meeting putting teeth in this "agreement.''
It is almost certain that this regulation
will be passed and if it is it should win the
hearty approval of every student who has heed
the delightfully soporific effect of a lecturer
voice ruined by the roar of a loudspeaker.
SIGNBOARD
Lost
LOST; '.N GYM OR BUS HUTS-
Voightlander camera. Finder please
phone N. Nixon. Cedar 23G1. Reward.
LOST-WOULD THE PERSON WHO
mistook my pavy raincoat for theirs
ojitside the Bad. 201 lab on Tuesday
please contact' me during the Thursday lab. on phone. Alma 0S68 R.
A POLYPHASE SLIDRULE ON
Chancellor Bid. between Blanca Ave.
and Marine Drive. Please phone AL
1738-M.
INDEXED POCKET SIZE NOTE
note book. Reward. Phcnc Dan. at
Alma 0763-R
FRIDAY ON CROSS CAMPUS
sprint. Grey striped Parker vacuum-
atic. S. Weir. Aima 3233.
BLACK LEATHER WALLET Belonging to Chris Windebank. Would
finder please return papers t.j A'MS
Office.
WILL PERSON WHO PICKED LT'
John Ise Economics text in IIL-'i
plea=e  return  to  lost and  found.
IN THE BUS^HUTS (I THINK) 0>,
Monday morning, Volghtlandet' camera. Phone N. Nixon at CE 2361.
Reward.
WILL THE GIRL WHO PICKED UP
the black wallet in the Arts Common
Room Tuesday a.m., please return it
to thc AMS office.
WILL THE FROSH TO WHOM 1
loaned my grey eversharp on re;.p.i-
treticn da\ please heturn same as i!
i.s a keepsake. H. Perin; al 21 hi \\
8th Ave,
GLASSES, BASEMENT CHEMICAL
BldK., Sept. Z'.'.d. Finder please return.
to  AMS.
BROWN LEATHER BRIEF CASE,
contained notes and cconomico text.
Bill  Pratt,   Hul   I'-bi  ,,:   Aunt   MM-R
WOULD     TUB     STUDENT      WIR.R
picked    up   in   t n or    I '.-.> cR lopy    .-;. R
Life   book   oui.side   Ilia   n.ii In r   s no.,
on Friday  2-llh,  please  [ ■ .1  n   ;n  p.   ii,e
AMS   ol'fl.i. ;
Meetings
ARCHERYCLUB MEETING 12:31)
Sept. lit) in Arts 103. Members and
those   interested,
GENERAL MEETING OF THE
Thunderbird Ski Club will be held
Monday,  Oct.  4 at  12:30  p.m.
FIRST PROGRAMME AND GEN-
cral meeting of Music Appreciation
Club will bc held Monday Oct., 4 at'
12:30  in  South  Brcck.
MUSICAL FILMS "WILL BE SHOWN
by the Music ,Appreciation Club on
Friady, Oct. 1 ai 12:30 in Phy.-R-s 201.
THE FJS1I AND GAME CLUB WILL
meet Friday noon in Ap. Sc. 202.
AH those iulcrcste are invite to attend.
CASH     FOR     GOOD     PORTABLE
MEETING    THURSDAY    NOON    IN j tvpovvriter.   Write,   giving   p.ia:   a, d
heil   L-ii   of   Physical   Education   Un- j description    to    Alison    Martin,    2,'Hb
dere.raciuate   Socieiy.   All   Phys.   Ed. j Cornwall  St.
majors  are   asked   t'o  attend
Miscellaneous
NOTICE TO D.V.A. STUDENTS.
D.V.A. cheques must bc picked up on
the 14th and 15th of October and the
4th and 5th of each month thereafter.
Cheques will be returned to D.V.A
the day after specified dates, Pay
parade will be held in the Armoury
A to M en the first day and Mc to Z
en the following day from 9:30 to
4:30. Afternoon arc least busy.
Wanted To Buy
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM
for English 409. Phone Connie Anna
WHIRL.
SIZE 9 OR 91/-. TRACK SHOES.
Phone Gordon Kerr. 3055-R.
love  letters
During the "Devotion to Frosh" week, several false impressions arc foisted upon the unwary newcomer.
1. That a debt o gratitude is owing to his
country for this opportunity.
2. That university education ensures a rosy
future.
3. That this is a seat of higher culture. HA!
"Conceit" would be a better word.
4. That co-education is a desirable institution (as yet this is only in experimental stages
at UBC).
5. That culmination of social ambitions
come with one's acceptance by a sorority or
fraternity.
6. That thc egg came before the chicken.
It is true that there is a certain debt owing
on. the part of a few. These few are those
fortunate enough to have parents who can
agord to pay their way. The ability of these
nickel-grabbing parents to pay clearly indicates their propensity for abusing the profit
system. The burden of carrying these grandiloquent sports, therefore, reverts to (if you'll
pardon the expression) the labouring class.
The rest, who for four or more vears sweat
all summer merely to sweat all winter so
that they may be qualified, upon graduation,
for a place in society where they will earn
$10 a month less than their "uneducated"
neighbour, owe nothing. This conclusively
proves that the atom bomb is not the solution
for Ripple Rock.
BEST EQUIPPED
"The person best equipped to stand firmly
rooted when caught on the horns of a dilemma, or to gird •his loins with the breast-plate
of knowledge and the sword of courage when
grasping the bull by the tail, is the well-
trained university graduate," some say. ''Justice, truth and honor will triumph over all,
justice a beacon to the traveller in the night,
justice a needle gets lost in a haystack," wo
say. ■< "*   M    "'   ? '"     '
Many a student, having guaranteed his fu'.-
ure by enroling in a double honors course
(philosophy and animal husbandry), decides
to fake one of Dr. Black's pbpular vocational
aptitude tests, his reason for doing this usually
by watson and van der hoop
•>'!■; a desire to check on the accuracy of
these tests. When he is advised that he is
more suited for research chemistry, he becomes convinced that Dr. Black is anti-margarine and a wild-eyed radical. However, he
continues in his present course. Upon graduation, he discovers that although the philosophy and poultry husbandry fields are overcrowded, research chemistry is crying for
workers. His comment: "This is indeed a
Black day for me.'' This shows that although
a university education may benefit some,
it will have little effect on the penguin situation in the Artie.
CULTURE
Culture. What is culture? That is, what
really is culture? What is culture, anyway?
Culture appears to have originated with the
Greeks, a deep thinking race, when they gave
us the expression "Better culture toenails,
you're ripping the sheets." As people become
more and more cultured, they naturally begin to look for higher types of entertainment.
The search or the ideal recreation went on
through the ages; finally the Romans hit
upon co-education. This became immensely
popular overnight .daytime, too) but unfortunately a serious blow fell: It was banned in
rostrum. The Romans, however, were free
thinkers—they hardly ever thought of anything else—and so co-education survived and
retrogressed to the form in which we know it
today.
NOT IMPRESSED
Of course, some were not impressed by the
apparent advantages of co-education. These
non-conformists banded together in reactionary groups known as sororities, fraternities,
and single veterans. Each group has a motto:
Sororities: We want to be alone.
Fraternities: We want to be alone.
Single Veterans: We want to get a loan.
For these misogynists we can only*point
out that
Pepsi-Cola   hits   the   spot,
Twelve full ounces—that's a lot!
Millions of our readers will have difficulty
understanding this.
Public   Stenography
Manuscripts, Mimeographing
Typing,  Theses
CATHERINE   STEWART
KErr.   1407R
YOUII GIVE*
SING? ALL ARE WELCOME TO
:lu; Clio Club Rehearsal on Thursday. Etpt. :;;jth  in  HAI-1 a!   12:;;o.
CAMERA CLUB—THLRi; WILL BE
a meisma; ,n 'Arts LJ0l, 12:31) Friday,
Gel. I lor a'.l those inlere.-'lod ill joiu-
liie;. If you sipned up on club clay
please   atleud,
LE CERCLE FRANCAIS WILL
hold it.-; fir.-1 :o:ree on Friday, Oct,
1.  at HE!;)  p.m.  at  3.1-1S  '.Vallate  Crcsc.
MEETING OF THE PROGRESSIVE
a'' 0 ('! vitivo Club will he heL! Frill.i\    a;    I'MR   in   Ar!s   111).
For Safe
R   Sd'ERESAKER   CIIAMRIOM   XX-
.1::,   1 [.mallear,   radio.   Rst   1 la.. .-   eon E-
Pon.   S'ifRn.   I.l.'li)  Fast   Mr I.   A\e.
EiM     MODEL    "A"     FORI).    ROOD
. ' ''•■''' ■   a;     a' 1 a' lybauP     Rhone     A'.m.i
Ii20:-L.
Accommodation
TOP-NOTCH   BACHELOR   ACCOM-
odation,    2    vacancies,    100   per    ec
.■indent   house  close  to  UBC.  Private
study.   4000   West   10th.   Phone   Aim 1
3-WI-L.
WANTED, 2 ROYS TO SHARE ONi
larpo   room,   with   garage    if   neede 1
al    GMl')   Ontario   Street    <    2   btoel
from    41st),     breakfast    and    diinu
given,    also    packed    lunch;    l>-!e>    ,111
month   per   bow   Plume   Fraser   ;192
TOP-NOTCH   BACHELOR   ACCOM
m (Ration,    2    vacancies.     RM    percent
■■indent   home   dure   to   UBC.   Rriva
-'orjy,   8 ll'l   ride,   -la1))))   \V    hith.   E'hal
Alma   .'J450-L.
Found
SMALL   BROWN   CHANGE   IT US J
X*a\    I.a   1 R la'd   v.;-.   ;,!    i im .;   1 '.■    , ('IT...
A   WA! Ried'  CONTAINING   A  CoN
■ • "'oracle   .-urn   of   mat1   y   1 iu!.-i. la    i ■
"■'■■■■  u ■■LaPrii      R 1  '.: I"        Apple     a
1 ■■■ lla-r'.s    nfl'i '".
R  '( P.!   AM)   ERE VisE VsT  :R      Mr
llowanl,   3813   West   1.1th.
FOR HEALTHY,
GOOD-LOOKING
-/fait*.*
5 drops in the morning
...hair groomed for the day
Can "dry scalp" and lifeless,- hard-to*
manage-   hair  bo checked ?  You   bet   they
,^        can—-with "Vaseline" Hair Tonic.
*\ And you don't have to douse your hair
"iCf     cither.  A  few drops  of this  helpful  Hair
Ionic  each   morning   before  brushing or
j      combing,   supplements   the   natural   scalp
oils, p;ives your hair that soft, lustrous look
e\ervbo(ly  admires.   No  alcohol  or  other
drying ingredient in "\ aseliue" Hair Tonic;
it   works   wXh.   nature-— not   against   it —lo
:,room your hair and keep il; "roomed.
Ask lor ' \ aseliue" I lair Tonic-iJ.Sf' and
-at  any  toilet  roods  counter.
Use it, too, for 0 BETTER SHAMPOO
Rub ' \ aseliue" 11 a' r Ton io gcueroiisl v onto
I a.- sc ilp, then w .-I • 11 \ an i' h.tir in I lie us u a I
v..::, IR'-ii'll: in \ 1: ■. 11 ailed scilp—no loose
i-iU'h'ulf re.ill-, clean 1i.ii]'. !' 1m.tllv, 5 drops
d   '  \ . 1 -1■ 11111 ■     II or   I ai.ii' Im'Pu'C brushing,
it  in di :. u'.'d  I.... L all d.iv  lane.
Cli     jrouj    t   1    t    I    n;i  Co. Coo'd Thursday, September 30, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
ARNOLD NEMETZ
For Sophmore Slot
Second candidate for sophomore
"cookie server" on Student Council
Is Arnold Nemetz. He will contest
Alec Freeman in the two man race.
Elections arc slated for Friday, October 1. Nemetz and his scconndcr's
statements   follow.
Platform
The duties of the Sophomore member as defined in the code of the AMS
are,, "to assist the council in a general capacity. My platform is based
on these duties, 1 promise if elected,
to, do my best to help the council
solve the many problems which face
it now and which will face it in thc
future. In regard to such immediate
problems as thc lack of funds in thc
treasurery and the crowded conditions in the cafeteria, I am right behind the council in their policy.
From what I know of the council
members I a,m sure that they are
working as a first rate team for cur
gcod. There is, however, one player
missing and 1 sincerely believe that
I have the energy and enthusiasm to
take his place. I fully realize that
this job would require at least eight
hours during the week days in addition tq all of Monday night, however, I am prepared to sacrifice my
time because I believe I can do some
good.
Seconder's   Statement
I nominate Amy Nemetz to contest the position of Sophomore member because I, as well as many other
friends, believe him capable of fulfilling  this  position.
He has the necessary drive for organizing, having been president of a
local youth organization and also  its
district vice-president,
*
He has spent some time in the United States and has seen youth work in
California  and  Illinois.
He has travelled much and heis
gained wide experience in dealing
with people. Ncmef/ has seen many
of the hardships of life while working on beats between San Francisco
and   Shanghai.
.Once, he undertakes a task he
works tirelessly until it is completed.
His sincerity for the welfare of UBC
is well known omong his many
friends.
A' first class student, member of
C.O.C.T., a good mixer with a vivac-
ieus personality, a sincere an inter-
,cs1ed Sophomore who roams tlie
campus to learn for himself, Amy
Nemetz will be tlie students choice
this   Fridav.
ffW.»UA
"**J     l!" V
*-va/
SERVICE
On  Shirts
E *:p e ri I y   La under ed
i "in v;  in h .\\o
Aero Club Members
Complete Solo Circuit
Fifty new pilots of the UBC Aei;o Club may be flying
solo by the time exams make a forced landing next April according to Jack Matthews, flight leader of the club.
Despite some bad breaks and even
worse weather, two members of the
club have already been up "on their
own." Jack Leggatt accomplished thc
feat at Sea Island several weeks ago,
using a Fleet "80" instead of thc
ekib plane, which was in for overhaul.
Wally Evans followed suit on September 26. Clouds and a cold drizzly
dr.y forced Evans to fly the club.s
PA-11 at a low altitude.
Regardless of the weather, thc
Aero Club's summer flight had many
enjoyable Sundays during the summer, club officials report, Five members participated in the open competitions at Chilliwack on August 8,
and grabbed off first place in bombing and second in the relay race.
The Aero Club will hold a general
meeting on Friday  at 12:30 in room
202  Physics  building.  Those  wishing
information or interested in membership are invited to attend.
NAVY Bi,UE LEATHER WALLET
lost Thursday Sept. 23rd. Please return to Betty Ridley. Kerr. 3245-L.
LOST
SMALL LIGHT- BROWN LEATHER
change purse Thursday containing
$10.  Phcnc Kerr.  1035-L.
GREY PARKER 51 NEAR COM-
merce huts. Reward, cturn to AMS
Office.
PALE BLUE HANDKERCHIEF,
with large red flower in corner near
Quad. Reward. Return to AMS office.
MONDAY SEPT. 20. BROWN LEATH
er purse. Urgently needed. Reward.
Please leave atAMSorphone Marion
Reid  Kerr.  6083-L
FROM AGGIE COMMON ROOM
Tuesday, Sept. 21, Brown leather
brief case. Name inside flap. Return
to Ian Paton, Dean's Office, Aggie
building,
IN ARTS BUILDING NEAR QUAD,
khaki colored cloth jacket containing scarf and fountain pen. Please
return to AMS office.
■*
Want A Lift?!
DAILY UBYSSEY RIDE MART
i
I
i i
UIDE FROM VICINITY OF 41st &
Ounville.   Call   Vicki,   Kerr.   G320-R
RIDE FROM 2nd AND TOLMIE
(or thereabouts) wanted by second
year engineer. Please phone Al 1227-
M.
RIDE FROM 25th AND CAMBIE ST
for 8:30's or 9:30's. Phone Helen. FA
3C06.
RIDE FROM 33rd AND DUNBAR
for 8:30's every clay. Phone Kerr.
1093-R. Joan.
RIDE FOR 8:30 LECTURES MON,
Wed., Fri., and Sat. from corner of
Haro and Denman. Phone John PA
7970.
RIDE WANTED FROM JOYCE RD.
ad 45th Ave. for 8:30's. Phone Bob
Chambers.   Dexter   3158-L.
ANYONE MOTORING TO OKAN-
agan valley for Thanksgiving weekend with room for paying passenger
please phone H. Venables at BA
4932-M.
RIDE FROM WEST END FOR 8:30's
every  day.  Phone  Marine  3400.
WANTED CAR CHAIN FROM Vicinity of West Boulevard and 49th
needs two more cars. Phone Kerr.
2072-M.
'BEARDS FORfSUCCESS'
SAY CAMPUS WOOLLEYS
One UBC man in every four grows a mustache, beard
or low side-burns.
A survey conducted by The Daily Ubyssey reveals that
most men cultivate facial "fungus'' to improve their chances
of success.
A hairy face, they feel, contribute materially to their
personality, individuality and a successful love-life.
Brock barbers report that although many mustaches and
beards have been trimmed since the beginning of the term,
only one bushy beard was "completely destroyed."
Reason: the student claimed it "interfered with his work."
What type of work he didn't say.
RIDE FROM NANTON AND MAR-
gucritc (.3 blocks west of Granville
on 27th, 8:30's or 9:30's. BA 0087. Ask
for Mary.
HIDE WANTED TO 8:30 LECTURES
every morning from 27th and Balaclava or vicinity. Urgent. Phone Kay
BA  2012-R
3rd YR. MECH. NEEDS RIDE FROM
vicinity 28th and Dunbar, all 8:30's.
Phone BA 4507-L or C. S. White
Group 24 Mcch 50.
GEOLOGY GRAD WITH WORK TO
dc in vicinity of Whonnock would
like to contact UBC students from
that district with a view t'o swapping transportation home at weekends for a Saturday night's lodgings.
Sec LEE HM 15A.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30 FROM
either 12th and Vine or 16th and Vine
every morning or Mon. ad Wed, oly.
Prefer to arrive by 8:10 or 8:15. CE.
1454.
RIDE WANTED FROM 3?29 W 11th
Ave., for two every moring. Sec Peter
D\ke  at  thc  barber  shop,
RIDE HWANTED FROM NORTH
Vancouver Tues. Wed. and Fri. to
arrive at university by 10:00 a.m.
North 1907-R
RIDE WANTED VICINITY 23RD &
Lillooct to 10:30 lectures Monday,
Wed., and Fri., and 9:30 Tues. Thurs.
and Sat., or as many days as pos-
ible.  Phone  Dexter  3011.  Rene.
CAR CHAIN-CAR AT DISPOSAL
any day of week—in or around 12th
and Oak, 8:30 CE 1484. Joe.
'.f
l 11 w
DORM   REQUISITES   FOR   COLLEGIANS...
PYJAMAS ... WARM ROBES ... FROM A
WONDERFUL   COLLECTION    AT   WOODWARD'S
'TOM GIRL' PYJAMAS. Defy each dormitory draft in cozy
flannelette. Blue and Rose stripes on white background. Tailored
collar, long sleeves. Small, medium and large
3.69
"Tookettcs''—cotton   pyjamas   tailored
in fine broadcloth by "Tooke."
Lime, Blue, Rose and Yellow in wide
and narrow stripes. Short sleeves. Small
medium and largo.
9.00
Plain colors of yellow, pink and blue.
Small,  medium  and  large
6.00 and 6.50
WOOL TARTAN HOUSECOATS  in zipper and wrap around
styles. Variety of color combinations. Sizes  14  lo 20
16.95 to 29.50
PLAIN BRITISH WOOL FLANNEL HOUSECOATS, Tailoiv
collar, silk ties in Blue, Wine, and Black, Sizes !■! to 20
3,4,95
te        *^tH       '"'IS 2
•W
-4.JJ.
VANCOUVER'S FAMILY SHOPPING CKNTRN
ifefv
«*nr.
KHiumuvMuuiwiiw uimv p**l
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 30, 1949
FRED MOONEN, Sports, Editor
Editor This Issue, GIL GRAY
Campus Champions Back
For New Mitt Season
A number of last year's boxing crew, together with some-
up-and-coming reserve talent under the guiding hand of Jimmy
Gove, should be the combination to produce some sure winners
this season.
Outstanding mitter of  the club is^J
light    heavyweight    Phil    Anderson,
Winner of the divisional title in last
year's Vancouver Island Golden
Gloves. Phil dropped a close decision
to Jerls Jamel, Pacific Coast's tyght-
heavy in the Sun Golden Gloves.
WORTHINGTON HOT
Power puncher "Panther" Pete
Worthington, Golden Gloves finalist
of last year, is rounding out in good
shape and shows promise of having
a great year.
Holding up the middle weight division is university champion Johnny
McDiarmak, one of the classiest boxers on the coast.
Hard hitting Jim Corey, smooth
Don Codville, and Seymour Adle-
tnan will be the leading contenders
in the welter division. Novice champ
Bob Milton will also be a threat' to
the welter weight title.
WALKER ALONE
Only returning star of the lightweights is finalist Johnny Walker,
but it is hoped that more talent' will
Come out in this class in the next
few weeks.
Bantam division is in the same state
with only Nick Harrick, UBC'c bantam king, returning to the ring.
More talent in all weights, especially in the lighter weights, are urged
to turn out in noon hours in the
Stadium.
HEAVY HOPES
Director has hopes that heavyweights Danny McDonald and Phil
Olson, two outstanding hitters and
boxers, will turn out' for training
again this year. With these two
completing the roster, UBC's chances
are the best yet.
The best programme since the organization of the club has been outlined this year. Participation in several downtown shows, trips south,
as well as UBC's own boxing cards
have  been  planned.   A  COTC-spon-
sored show in November will include
most of British Columbia's top-flight
amateurs.
•**»:!
m
Wotherspoon^
Leads Blocks]
New executive of the UBC
Men's iBig Block Club was elected at a recent meeting.
Former rugger star, Hilary Wotherspoon, was the popular choice for
president by this year's clubmen
who are some seventy-five strong,
Wotherspoon is currently active on
the Thunderbird American grid
team.
Second in command of the group
is Hugh Ross, a starry right half on
Ihe UBC soccer team. Stan Clarke
was elected to the position of secretory of the Big Block Club. Clarke is
featured at the three-quarter position
on the UBC rugger squad.
This year'e executive promises a
revitalization of the club on the
campus. In their opinion there has
been a certain tendency for the club
to become almost inactive and they
are moving towards activity at the
present time.
A special meeting of the Big Block
Club, formerly to be held this Friday
is called for Monday noon, Wothers
spoon asks that there be a complete
attendance at this nil important meet.
»HG BLOCK
CORRECTION
The meeting of the Big Block Club,
previously scheduled for Friday will
be held in the Men's Club Room in
the Brock Hall this Monday at 12:30.
MEDICAL   EXAMINATIONS
Team Managers or coaches must pick up time schedules for medical
examinations and appointment slips at the Health Service Office, Hut A2
Activity
Last day Last day for
. for picking     returning names Dales allotted for
up the above on appt. sheets   the med. exam.
English Rugby
English Rugby & Soccer
Soccer
Sat.  Oct.  2
Tues. Oct 5
Wed. Oct. fi
vr.-m-  M«,n. Oct. 4
Oct Tues. 5 a.m.
Thurs. Oct. 7, am.
Fri, Oct 8, p.m.
Wed. Oct.  6,  p.m.
Grass Hockey
Cross Country
Fri. Oct. 1      Wed. Oct. (j Fri. Oct. 8, p.m.
Thurs. Oct. 7      Tues. Oct. 12, p.m.
Fri. Oct 8 Wed.  Oct.   13,   p.m.
Basketball and boxing    Tues. Oct. 5    Tues. Oct. 12      Thurs. Oct.14, p.m.
Wed. Oct. 13       Fri. Oct. IT., p.m.
Skiing and Ice Hockey  Tues. Oct. 12 Mon Oct. 15       Wed. .Oct. 27, a.m.
Tues. Oct. 26      Thurs. Oct. 28, p.m.
$2.00 fine on students for missing appointments.
American Football
Oct. 2 Western Washington College of
Education at UBC*
.WWC 35 — UBC 0)
Oct. 9 Open Date
Oct. 16 Willamette University at UBC
(Willamette 33 — UBC 0)
Oct. 23 Whitman College at UBC
(Whitman 7 — UBC 6)
Oct. 30 College of Idaho (Homecoming)
at UBC
(Idaho 33 — UBC 13)
Nov. 6 Lewis and Clarke College at UBC
(Lewis and Clarke 7 — UBC 26)
Nov. 13 Linfield College at UBC
(Linfieeld 21 - UBC 0)
Nov. 25 Western Washington College of
Education at Bellingham*
♦Denotes non - confer nee games
Scores are from last year's games
MINOR SPORTS MANAGERS
HOMEWARD BOUND, members of the UBC ski team that competed at Sun Valley last year
load their equipment for the long trip home. Skiers include Doug Fraser, Jack Leggatt, Don
Anderson, Don Fernside, and Gar Robinson.
UBC Ski learn Preps
For Conference Meets
Once again the thoughts of the Thunderbird Ski Club have turned towards the problem
of selecting a strong team to represent the university at the proposed intercollegiate ski meet
to be held later in the winter.
 ' 3>   UBC ski teams during the past two<§>
years have carried i'he blue and
gold to several important victories
al  such  renowned   winter  resorts  as
Afiainct \Aiith Hill Sun Valley'Idaho' Ban'ff'Rossiaml
HlJUllljl     JUUIII     I llll   and Martin's'Pass. Last year the club
Soccer Team Opens
inst South Hill
Saturday Afternoon
One of the most promising
elevens to wear university colons in recent years takes the
field against South Hill at
Memorial Park Saturday to
open the Vancouver and District Soccer League 1948
schedule.
Assistant coach Ivan Carr has been
putting the team through daily prac-
ices, and predicts that great things
may be expected (his season. Eight of
last year's regulars are back to form
a solid nucleus for the club, and tho
gaps have been filled in with former
UBC players and a couple of promising newcomers.
Returning to action for Varsity is
ihe steadiest fullback combination in
the- league last year, Jack Cowan
,',nd Stew Wilson. Other repeal' por-
fcrmcrs include centre-half Gus Me-
Sween, half-back Hugh Ross, and
forwards Bobby Moulds, Howie O-
bcrne, Gord Shepherd and Stu Todd,
Gil Blair is rated as a certainty for
ihe goalkeeping spot vacated by
Freddy Morrow's graduation. Another prospect who has looked good in
practices is Don Glegg, whose soccer
savvy will make him a valuable replacement for thc centre-forward position left open by thc retirement of
Ivan  Carr.
Murdo McLeod of thc UBC eleven
seems to have won a starting berth
at left half, while on hand for substitution purposes, will be Jim Foster,
Ken Campbell and Dave Thompson.
Carr may also be pressed into service
if  necessary.
In addition to thc Varsity entry in
die V and D a UBC team will play
\a tho intermediate league. Teams in
ill is circuit will have their own Mainland and provincial cup ties, and
there will be lots of opportunity for
travel. Players are still needed to fill
vacancies   on   the   intermediate   club.
ranked second only to the University
of Washington in the Pacific North
West ahead of such strong learns as
University of Idaho, Washington
State, Oregon, Oregon State, Montana, Montana State, Eastern Washington, Gonzaga and the University
of Alberta.
The team also ranked a creditable
fifth in the intercollegiate championship hold at Sun Valley, where ten
cf the continents top teams were
competing.
This season although Thunderbird
skiiers intend to improve or at least
keep this rank high, they will have
their work cut out to break the traditional supremecy of Washington
plankmen,
Feter Vajda, UBC coach, sincerely
feels that this dream can be realized
in full through thc medium of intensive training both on and off thc
ski slopes, and with such competent
and enthusiastic skiiers as Doug
Fiaser. John Frazee, Arnie Teasdale.
Gar Robinson, Gord Cowan, Bev
Robertson, Joe Costello and Shirley
Welsh enrolled in the campus, his
hopes seem well founded.
At thc present time, however,
there seems to be a lack of proficient
jumpers and cross-country men, and
since all the intercollegiate meets
f.ie 4-way tournament's, Peter is
desperately in need of skiiers to
participate   in   these   specialities.
The Thunderbird Ski Club is attempting to form an 8-man team as
well as a women's team to represent
the university in meets at' thc same
sknds as those al which last year's
club did so well. Also included on
thc prospective list are thc local
meets held on the mountains surrounding   Vancouver.
Vajda also wishes to organize preseason training programmes, .so he,
along with club president Don Johnston, have called for a meeting of all
those interested in competetive skiing. This conclave will take place on
Monday, October 4 at 12:30 in Arts
203.
Frederickson Sure
Of Good Puck Club
As All Stars Back
URS To Air
Home Games
Football fans need not be pushed,
scraped or moulded this year in order to cheer at UBC home games.
Don Winchester and Ben McConnel
experienced annoucers will broadcast over CKMO on Saturdays, 2 to
4:30,  all home games.
The URS plans to present the University Forum on Sundays at 2:30
in which a University discussion
group will participate The guest
speaker this week  is Dr. Topping.
The    musical   department   of   the
URS is hoping for a talent show to,
be  broadcast  from   the  Brock  Hall,
and to organize also a string quartette
ICE HOCKEY
An organizational meeting will be
held Friday October 1, at 12:30 In
Arts 204 All interested are asked to
attend.
SIGNBOARD
SWIMMING TEAM
There will be a general infonna-
;ion meeting of the swimming team
in thc training room of the UBC gymnasium  at  .12:30  on  Friday,   Oct.   1...
INTKAMURALS
A meeting will be held in hut GI!
at noon Friday for the purpose of
electing officers and for discussion
on  eligibility   for  fall  events.
This year's edition, of the
puck-chasing fraternity is in
for a banner season if the word
of their world famous coach,
Frank Fredrickson, carries any
weight. With the bulk of last
seasons starters returning,
Frank predicts that with the
addition of a few good players
he will bring top-notch hockey
to the campus.
The only absentee from last year's
much travelled and much heralded
hockeyists is Hugh Berry, their sensational left winger. Hugh is now
residing  in  Prince George.
Returning members include their
capable manager Mac Porteous who
reports that last seasons hockey or-
f.iani/ation was financially solvent
and is now expecting an even more
profitable season. He bases his opinion
on the slated visit of California's
"Golden   Bears"   early   in   December,
The Thunderbird defense outlook
is bright as stalwarts Bob Saunders
and Terry Nelford, both recently
married, are returning along with
pospects Jim Rowledge, Bob Peebles
and Mai Hughes. UBC's sometimes
sen.satinonal goaltender, Bill House,
is back and promises more consistent
performances in thc net.
Sold
•v«rywMrfl
In handy P*
lubtt
There's nothing like\well«i
groomed hair to improve your)
appearance—and make a hit
with the girls! That's why ,
Brylcreem is so popular with
men everywhere ... why it is
the largest selling hair dressing
in  Canada!  It  instantly
makes your hair smooth, well-
groomed, attractive—without
being smelly or greasy.
GIRLS—Brylcreem is an ex-j
cellent dressing for your hair]
too—try it!
FREE COMB Get a special j
rncc  wwmp ^  Brylcreem)
pocket-comb and case! Send ati|
empty Brylcreem carton with your;
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Brylcreem, Department   SD     jj
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Toronto, Ontario
Bryicreem
NO GUM • NO SOAP • NO ALCOHOL - NO STARCH
SPORT    "
■* ;<wa-   ■
"i it ■!  a '
MANAGER
PHONE
Archery   Don Chant AL. 1379M
Badminton  Ian Sprinkling   AL. 0535M
Boxing   Jim Grove   Stadium at noon
Cricket  Pclc Hobson  AL. 1358M
Fencing Dan Lambert  BA.  1965
Golf  Dave Dale   W. 531R
Grass Hockey  Bob Ross   AL. 1466L
Gymnasium  Dave Roxbui'ough   HA. 0601L
Ice Hockey Mac Porteous GL. 0351M
Outdoor Club  Harry Smith AL. 0355R
Swimming Bob Stangroom  AL. 06381'"
Tennis  Jack Volkovitch FA. 717--IR
Track   Al  Baine    AL.  2.">5!L
Thunderbird Ski Club .Syd Voting   KE. OfiUR
You should! Because Burley is one of the mildest
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easily . . . burns slowly . . . leaves a clean,
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New pipe smokers enjoy this cool, sweet
tobacco,  right   from  the  first  pipeful.   Veteran  smoker*
swear by it. Try a Pipe ol
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i

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