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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 1938

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 A. M. S. MEETING
WEDNESDAY
<_JIj_> :ilby0B_>£r
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
A.M.S. MEETING
WEDNESDAY
Vol. XXI.
VANOOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OOTOBER 4, 1938
No. 4
PITMAN IS
ELECTED TO
A. M. S^POST
SMALL TURNOUT  FOR
ELECTION
In the Friday polls, Gertrude Pitman   waa   elected   with   a   total   of
eight-three    votes    ,a    majority    of
twenty over her nearest competitor.
Originally a Vancouverlte, Gertie
now halls from Prince George. She
Is   a   senior   student   In   Arta   and
majoring  In  bacterlalogy  and  --oology.
The fall election was necessitated
by the resignation of Peggy Thomp-
scn, who was elected at the spring
polls.
The total number of votes registered was one hundred and ninety-
nine, the smallest poll count that has
been recorded for a number of years.
EUROPEAN CULTURE
AND HANDICRAFT AT ,
ANNUAL FOLK FEST
Varsity students are urged to attend the Folk Festival to be held in
the Vancouver Hotel on October 6-9
Inclusive.
A specially reduced admission
price is available to students who
may obtai ntlokets for 38c rather
than the regular 60c.
The Festival Is designed to preserve and encourage the culture and
handicrafts which Canadian citizens
of European origin have brought
from their homelands.
Tickets may be secured from members of the Cosmopolitan Club including Ted Nichols, Kunls Hidaka,
Shirley Johnson, Norma Dobson,
Frances Montgomery and Alfred
Kitchen.
ALL-PHRATERES TEA
FETED NEW MEMBERS
SAT'DAY AFTERNOON
New members of Phrateres were
welcomed Into the club when All-
phraterians held a tea ln their honour  Saturday  afternoon.
The affair took place at the home
of Ruth Hutchinson, Kingstone
Avenue. In the receiving line were
Miss M. L. Bollert, dean of women
and honorary member of the club;
President Biddy McNeill, Vice-President Sheila Hutchinson, and the hostess.
The table, covered with white Venetian lace, was attractively appointed with autumn flowers in the club
colours—blue and gold. The gold
was repeated in the tapering candles.
Asked to pour were: Mrs. Hutchinson, Miss J. Hallmore, Miss D. Dallas, and Miss Norah Sibley. Servl-
tures included all members of the
new  executive.
TAKE REST CURE AT
S.C.M. F1RC0M CAMP
Take a brief pause before the hectic pre-Christmas grind by attending the S.C.M. Fall Camp at Fircom,
Gambier   Island,   from   Oct.   8  to   10.
Two dollars and fifty cents includes
a registration fee of fifty cents,
transportation, and three full days'
fcuperbe nourishment and entertainment.
S.C.M. study-groups will get underway during the next two weeks. The
following have been planned for this
term: Psychology and Life, Contemporary Leadership (study of methods! and philosophies of leading
wolid figures), Social Adjustment
(the "whys?" of existence) . . . separate groups for Freshmen and
Freshettes; Life of Jesus; New
Testament; Social Reconstruction;
College Problems . . . for Upper Class
women; Protestant Belief (discussion of variety of belief:1) ; and Contemporary   Drama.
Registration for study-groups
.houkl bi> made at tho S.C.M. Room
312  Auditorium   Budg., at   once.
SECRETARY
Gertrude Pitman, senior eoed was
elected secretary for Students'
Council on Friday. The election
was necessitated by the retirement
of Peggy Thompson from that
position.
RECORD  MEMBERSHIP
FOR SONGSTERS
ON CAMPUS
The last newcomer has tooted his
flute, or blown his French horn; the
laat soprano has hit High C, and
Jimmy the Janitor in the Auditorium
building can go on with his dusting
safe in the knowledge that the Musical Society try-outs are over for another year.
Those ln charge were pleasantly
surprised by the results of the tests
just concluded, as considerable new
talent was found to fill up gaps left
by old members who graduated in
the spring.
The newly-elected business manager, Owen Sheffield, announced
Saturday that an all-time record
membership of 180 persona had
been reached.
Plans for the Formal Dance for
members ,to take place at the Peter
Pan Ballroom on October 13, have
been almost completed, -with Catherine Washington heading the committee ln charge of arrangements for
the  dance.
Speculation ls still rife ln musical
circles on the campus as to what
operetta will be presented in February. Rumours ,as yet unconfirmed,
have suggested that, because of Increased membership and a larger
orchestra, the Society will attempt
something a little more ambitious
this year, perhaps a Victor Herbert
show or the sequel to "Robin Hood."
SUCCESSFUL
New members in the soprana section are: Mary Muttart, Margaret
Kaggart, Helen Lakie, Gwen Peter,
Marygold Nash, Rose Weiss, Kay
Johnston, Peggy Hassall, Sheila Moffat, Barbara Logan, Marguerite Finch,
Marcella Moodie.
Tenor additions are Arthur Phys-
ick,  Percy   Wldkett,  Loriss  Selkirk,
Victor Moore and Pat Downey.
New altos: Dorothy Sheratt, Dort-
thea Tompkins, Doreen Henderson,
Joan Ashbey, Betty Cole, Peggy
Crone, Betty Badger, Helen Straith,
Phyllis Nicholson, Patricia Gather-
cole and  Dahphne Allen.
New   basses:   Tom   Robinson,   Alf
Shephrard,     John     Wilson,    Donald
Duncan.
ORCHESTRA
Instrumentalists Joining the orchestra are Joan Bruce, Alice Grace,
Doug. Walker, Bill Osborne, Jack
Margeson, Dorothy McDonell, Gordon Fierheller, Bert Saunders, Robert
Murray .John Fletcher and P. Nicholson.
Taking care of the technical end
of production will be new members
Dorothy Hamilton, Jean Wallls, Morris NovlkofT. Harold Graham, Beverly Matthews, R. White. Garth Wade,
U>. Macfayden. Verna MacKenzie,
Gwen Baldwin, Patty Slaghall, Betty
Henderson   and   Gladys  McMichael.
SERVICE CLUB
OF BIG BLOCK
UNDER DAVIS
BROTHERHOOD     MAIN
CLUB   OBJECT
A new day has come to the hitherto almost dormant Big Block Club
with the reorganization of this club
through the efforts of three men.
Jack Davis, Frank Turner and Joe
Rita At a general meeting held ln
the Gym on Friday last at 12.30 these
three were appointed as a special executive to draw up a tentative schedule of activities of the B. B. O.
B. B. C. DINNER.
A dinner will be held ln the faculty
toom ln the caf. at 7.30 tonight. It ls
Important that all men wearing the
B. C. are present since there will
be an organisation meeting and election of officers.
The much publicised Service Club
under the able guidance of Jack
Davis is concerned primarily with
the promotion of a feeling ot brotherhood among all athletes In the
Big Block Club. To keep up this
feeling money-making social functions have been scheduled, the proceeds of whieh are to be donated
to worthy causes such MS the Brook
Memorial Fund.
SERVICE CLUB.
Contrary    to    popular    belief    the
Service   Club   has   no   intentions   of
infringing on the rights of other organizations   of  a   similar   nature.  In
confining   their  activities  to  athletic
functions    only,    Davis   shows    commendable  and sound Judgment.
There  will  be organised parades,
entertainment   for   visiting   players
and strict supervision of the playing fields; all under the control of
the  B.  B.  C.'s  Service Club.
For   home-coming   all   Big   Blocks
will  occupy  one section of  the  Stadium at the games. Along with present   members  these  will  orally  support   and   encourage   all   playing   for
the Gold and Blue.
EIGHTEEN NEW
THESPIANS IN
PLAYERS CLUB
NOTICE TO STUDENTS
Monday,   October   10th,   has
been proclaimed Thanksgiving
Day. The University will be
closed Saturday, October 8th,
and Monday, October 10th,
1038.
L. S. KLINCK.
• President.
eighteen applicants were successful In gaining membership ln the
Players Club and feel well on their
way to stardom.
All Saturday afternoon nervous
freshmen and freshettes struggled
wtth the lines of the quarrel scene
from Richard Sheridan's famous
comedy of manners "The School for
Scandel" before the keen eyes and
ears of the Player's Club Advisory
Board.
' Many   of   the   newcomers   will   be
seen ln the plays that the club presents    ln    November,    Tragedy    and
melodrama,  comedy and  farce, usually make up the balanced program.
The exeoutive and honorary president are reading playa suitable for
olub performance, and the results
of their tolls will be announced on
October 10.
ANOTHER CHANCE
There may be still another chance
for the unsuccessful candidates and
any others who feel the urge of the
footlights, as several retiring members may leave vacancies. Further
Information as to the chances and
numbers admitted will, no doubt, be
forthcoming, and the Green Room,
is always Interested in seeing new
faces of Interested  undergraduates.
The new members are June
Armour, Evelyn Barwlck, Jean
Croll, Denise Darling, Ruth Hayer,
Margaret Morris, Josephine Kennedy, Daphne Preston, Isabel Sullivan, Thomas Bailey, David Bone,
John Carson, Bruce Emerson, John
Glen, Wallace Gillespie, Jaok Gray,
and Thomas McDowell.
'Technical appointments to date are
as follows: Pamela Runkle and
Bunty Butters
AGGIES TO HOLD
ANNUAL FIELD DAY
NEXT WEDNESDAY
Class elections for Aggie '41 were
held on Monday and plans made for
the Fall Field Day.
President for the coming year Is
Anson McKlm and Carmen Planta
has the office of Secretary-Treasurer.
The Field Day ls an annual affair
which is held on the University farm
grounds. It will be held this year on
October 5.
TECHNOCRACY   SOCIETY   TODAY
Meeting today ln Arts 101 at 12.30
Paul J. Sykes will lecture on "The
Collapse of the Price System." Those
desiring to learn the findings of science with respect to the social order
are cordially Invited to attend.
MacDonald and Rome Team
As Australian Opposition
The Imperial debate is only four
days distant. This Friday evening at
8:10 p.m. In the Hotel Georgia, U.B.C.
will send some of its best wits to
battle against the debaters from
Australia, Fred Thoneman and Hugh
Robson.
Alex Macdonald and Harold
Rome, seasoned
U.B.C parllamen-
t a r 1 a n s have
have been selected to uphold
the high honors
U.B.C. won last
year.
PARTNERSHIP
Macdonald    and
Rome   have   been
Alex Macdonald ln Partnership for
many years. Starting as classmates ln Prince of 'Wales
High School, they teamed up ln their
third year of High to reach the finals
of the  Inter-school  debates.
In   their  Matrlc  year,  Macdonald
and   Rome  again  succeeded  to   the
Inter-High  School finals,  this time
to win the Birks Trophy.
Continuing  their alliance  onto  the
campus,   the   veteran   partners   entered  the McGoun  contests together. In
1936      they      successfully      defended
U.B.C. in  the McGoun Oup encounter
against Alberta held  in Vancouver.
Last year they materially assist
ed In bringing U.B.C. Its flrst McGoun Cup by defeating University
of   Saskatchewan.
AMUS   PRESIDENT
Macdonald has been active In student leadership as well as debating.
Last year h e
was president of
the Arts Men's
Und ergraduate
Society. In this
capacity he Introduced the
Arts Faculty to
representa tion
ln Open House
Day.
Rome has
concent rated
most of his energies ln the
field o f public
speaking. He has won many medals and cups for his splendid ability
as a public orator.
SOCIALIST LEADER ,
This year Rome opens the Political
Discussions Club as Premier and
leader  of the  Socialists.
U.B.C.'s well experienced team will
uphold the affirmative of the resolution that "Nationalism is the Enemy
of   Civilization."
All students holding pus.tr!* will
be admitted absolutely free of
charge   to   Friday's  debate.
Harold Rome
A.M.S. MEET CALLED
WEDNESDAY TO RAISE
CRUCIAL QUESTIONS
Semi-Annual Meet Brings Questions of Campaign Policy,
Fees and Union Building Finances
With the semi-annual meeting of the Alma Mater Society called for
Wednesday noon Students' Council offices are buzzing today with preparations for what promises to be something of more than pfosalc Interest.
Highlights of the day will be the report of Student Campaign Committee, prepared following the refusal of the Board of Governor's to
rescind the $25 raise In fees.
CAMPAIGN REPORT.
The report will include a statement of policy on the present impasse with the Governors.
The presentation of the report
Is expected to Involve dlsousslon of
"don't pay" notices recently posted
around the campus, together with
the growing undercurrent of opinion on the oampus in favor of a
"fee strike."
Just what form the report of the
Committee will take is not yet
known, but it ls announced by stu-
luent officials that definite polloy will
be outlined In regard to future action
in regard to the raised fees.
Definite authorisation for further action  will  be   aaked   by   the
Campaign  Committee   whan   they
come before the meeting.
In conjunction with the proposals
of the Committee, Students' Council
will   bring   up   the   matter    of   the
Brock    Memorial    Union    Building
whioh is part of the four point program of the Campaign Committee as
presented in the Ubyssey last Tuesday.
OCTOBBR  SOCIAL
FUNCTIONS
Major   sooial   functions   for
the month of October Include
all faculties and are aa follows:
Oct.  0—Out-of-town   girls  tea,
Arts 88-89.
7—Out-of-town   girls  tea,
Arts 40-41.
18—Musical   Society   Formal; Aggie Undergraduate Banquet.
Oct. SO—Phateres Initiations
Sclenoe Banquet.
Oct. 91—.Flayers Club Formal.
Oct. SS—Homecoming.
Oct. ST—Senior Class Party.
Oct.
Oct.
VARSITY TIME
MAKES DEBUT
FRIDAy_NIGHT
RADIO     HEADS     STILL
SEEKING    FOR
TALENT
At the organization meeting held
last Friday for "Varsity Time", Program Director Ozzie Durkin outlined
the policies for the year. "Varsity
Time" intends to co-operate with the
Student Campaign Committee to interest the students and to make the
public  U.B.C. conscious.
Two new appointments have been
made on the staff. Radio News Editor
ls J. D. Macfarlane who will take
charge of Varsity news. This ls to be
presented in dramatized fo'rm. He
will have an assistant to give resumes of the week's sports and report
on the games to come.
Speech Editor John Garrett will
select prominent people to discourse on university affairs.
There is still room for musical and
dramatic talent and if the little Gar-
bos, Valentines, and Lily Ponses will
only turn out they will be welcomed
with open arms.
An outline of Friday's program
which will come over CJOR from
fl.15 to 8.45 p.m., will be found ln the
next Ubyssey.
UBYSSEY REPORTERS
MEET FRIDAY NOON
There will be an important meeting of all members of the publications staff in the office at 12.30 Friday.
All old members and the following new reporters will be expected
to attend: Joan- Thompson, Ruth
Millar, Hurndall, Bob Manson, Bill
Bookman, Janet Walker, Ted Underbill, Jaquea Metford, Brlta Ves-
terback, Bob Osborne, and Jack
Margeson.
There    are    still    vacancies    for    a
number of reporters. New applicants
and   trial   assignments   will   be   received    in    the    pub.    office    until    5
o'clock  Wednesday afternoon.
TOTEM   STAFF
A meeting of the Totem Staff will
be held ln Arts 108 at 12.30 on Wednesday for the purpose of outlining
the year's activities. Anybody who ls
interested in the work of publishing
the Year Book, and who has not yet
applied or been appointed to the staff
i.s asked to attend.
NEWMAN CLUB
The first meeting of the Newman
Club will be held on Wednesday,
October 5, at the home of Miss Florence Cruise, 4411 West 11th Avenue.
Guest speaker will be Rev. Fr.
Pope of Seattle. Members, new and
old,   are  urged   to  attend.
ADDITIONAL GRANT.
At that time it was announced that
proposals were being presented to
the Board of Governors asking for
an additional grant from the Governors of $2,600 a year for ten years
to supplement building funds already collected for the construction
of the Union Building.
Viewpoint expressed by the A.M.S.
officials is that the request is justified ln view of the fact that the sum
ls only a small portion of the total
sum already collected by the students and that no money for buildings has been forthcoming from tha
Board of Governors since the nt-
\erslty was  built.
Says Carson McGuire, AJVI.S.
Prealdent and head ot the Campaign Committee, "This campaign
la by no meana dead."
SLOW  FEES.
Meanwhile fees at the Bursar's
Office, although rolling In fairly well
Saturday and yesterday, still are far
behind last year as students wait to
see what may be done.
Rumours spreading on the campus Monday waa for a "fee strike,"
but no official conftnrmtion for the
move  could  be  obtained.
Cryptic    reply   of   student     leaders
was "wait till Wednesday" as reporters  tried  to  secure  information.
IMPERIAL DEBATER
FIRST SPEAKER AT
FIRST LAW MEETING
Hugh Robson, Imperial debater
from Sidney, Australia, will be guest
speaker at the first meeting of the
University   Law   Society.
Mr. Robson. who is a graduate
'lawyer will speak about the Faculty
of  Law at   his   University.
Inasmuch as U.B.C. has hopes of
soon possessing such a faculty it
will be Interesting to hear how such
a   faculty   functions   "down   under."
The meeting is called for Thursday evening, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. in t.he
faculty room of the Library. New
members who have applied for membership will   be   permitted   to  attend.
EDUCATION   AND   TEACHERS
All persons holding teacher's certificates or in the education class are
requested to attend a meeting today,
Tuesday,   October   4,   in   Arts   204   at
12.30.
Mr. Clinrlesworth, secretary of the
B.C. Teachers Federation, will explain
•lie p'.irpo.-.es ol that organization and
tentative plans for the University
branch  will  be  outlined. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 4, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building - - - Phone Point Grey 206
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR  EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
Friday
Robert King
SPORTS EDITOR
Orme Dier
C. U. P. EDITOR
James D. Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Irene Eedy James Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
Basil Robinson
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Ossy Durkin Jack Mercer Joyce Cooper
Van Perry Lester Pronger Rosemary Collins
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
YOUR LAST CHANGE
An Alma Mater meeting has been.called for "Wednesday to
discuss the latest developments in what seems to be an almost
hopeless cause—-the Student Campaign for the reduction of fees.
Whatever form the discusigon takes it is well to remember
that very little can be accomplished without the active participation of the whole student body.
The students, seeing only press notices, ure apt to lose sight
of the fact that it is their fight that the Committee is waging, and
that their active support is needed.
It is becoming apparent that it is "now or never"—that the
time has come when, if some kind of action isn't forthcoming—
and very soon—we might as well wrap up the whole thing and
forget it.
Tomorrow is your last chance—so don't let the opportunity
pass.
VARSITY TIME
On Friday the University ot! B.C. goes before the public. And
each week throughout the year it will continue to do so.
We refer to the opening broadcast of the infant Varsity-Time
which, reliable reports tell us, appears to be out of its swaddling
clothes.
We sincerely trust that that is so, tuul tluit the devastating
exhibitions of last year will  not be repeated.
However, that will depend on the support given to the feature
by the students whom it  represents.
No program can be successful without talent, and without
new ideas, no mutter how much the managing staff strives to put
it over.
There is plenty of talent, and plenty of ideas on this campus.
Actors, writers, technical staff, and idwas are required, and the
place to take them i.s to the "<Izzie" Durkin, program manager,
whom you may find in the Ubyssey office at almost anytime. And
if he cannot be fount! there, other representatives of the staff can
be found there by asking for "Varsity Time."
Ozzie has worked heroically to bring the program up to standard, and, from present appearances it looks as if he has gone a long
way in doing so. But even a superman such as Ozzie can't do
everything. If you have no talent, at least listen in, and offer
any suggestions or criticism you may have by writing to the
Editor of the Ubyssey.
Only by supporting their own activities to the full can U.B.C.
students ever hope to gain public sympathy.
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Special student rates have been arranged in order that the
university student desiring to hear the Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra  may do so this  winter,  inexpensively.
On the campus, there is the growing interest of the student
body in the art of music, an interest which points out the desire
of the student  for a  liberal  education.
Now the opportunity is offered.
Faculty departments at our university do not include one of
music, but nevertheless music as an extra curricular activity does
abound. Last year, credits in the third and fourth years were
offered for eertnin standing in music, attained by the student outside of the university. This year, as well as the Musical Society, a
university band has been formed.
With all this in mind, the musical circles outside the university have deemed it worthy to grant a special student rate for the
civic presentations of symphonic, compositions.  .  .
Opportunity only knocks but onoe.
FURNISHED  SUITE
Large bed sitting room; full
sized kitchen; well heated;
good location. Block from park
and beach. Close to street car.
Suitable for 2 students, especially students studying French
or German.
Tuition ln French and German
by experienced High School
teacher.
For  Information   phone
Bayview 1488-L	
Campus Clothes
for
CAMPUS MEN
DOCKER'S
Men's 'Jl^X^ear
807  GRANVILLE   (at Robson)
See  campus  representative
—Herb Burke
HERE'N* THERE
with the
Exchange Editor
599 Different Newspapers, Magazines and British Mail
WORLD WIDE NEWS    or.Tv.„.
When downtown use our PHONE FREE
TUUM  EST—
A word about "Tuum Est."
On Friday  109 students out of an
approximate   2000   went   to  the   polls
to  elect  a  Students'  Council  Secretary.
Over a week back, there was a bonfire and spme 20 sophomores turned
out at the deadline to meet the frosh.
Its about time some people around
here got the Idea that student affairs
are not in the form of a perpetual
motion machine.
Students' Council members are
elected to do the business of the
Alma Mater Society . . . which
means the business of every student on this campus.
Each student pays $13.00 to the
central funds of that Society, and
the appointed executive, giving their
time free, puts in many hours arranging the affairs and functions
which you, the students, will later
enjoy.
They, the Council, make possible
the organization which puts Into operation a very efficient Pass System.
They make possible ln the same way,
the conducting of a building program, and you have a gymnasium to
play ln, a stadium for your football
games, and soon you will have a
Brock Memorial for your club activities.
"Tuum Est" is a spirit around this
campus, and lt ls up to you to support, and take an interest in, the proceedings of your Students' Council
... if you want any kind of progressive action at all ln this the University of B.C.
On Wednesday there will be an
Alma Mater Society Meeting, and
It will be Important.
The Campaign Committee will be
there, and you owe them your support.  In  the laat few months they
have gone a long way in securing
student demands . . . but they still
have ground to cover . . . FEES.
From      little      rumours      running
around   the  campus  today,  we  Judge
that Wednesday's get-together ought
lo  provide  some  interesting  happen
ings.
Apparently notices haven't been
posted around this campus for nothing. So keep awake till then, anyway.
FILM   SOCIETY.
We are told that Dick Jervis, Presl
dent of the Film  Society,  ls respon
-sible   for   the   grand   idea   about   pre
senting   the   Metropolitan   Opera   on
Saturdays.  Orchids  to you,  Dick. We
also   hear   that    the   Film   Society  is
♦using a new 16mm. projection machine   this  year  will  be  operated  from
the balcony booth . . . and there will
be   no  misdirected  patch  of  light  to
the   right   of   the   stage   this   time,
either, for which we are very thankful.
INITIATION,
It is a rumour around these western extremities of Point Orey that
the freshmen plan to take matters
Into their own hands and approach
the "nine" with the idea of planning
a controlled initiation ln advance.
That ls to say, sophomores want to
make themselves responsible for a
well organized ana? planned initiation
next year.
Bravo,  my  lads.  That's  the  best
thing we have heard in a long time.
It is only fair that the main participants should get busy and plan
something   "hearty   but   harmless."
It is not fair to leave suoh  things
as a bonfire to rest on the should-
ders of a small committee of students who are already overburdened
with   A.M.S.  work.  Nothing  ean  be
better   worked   out   and   controlled
than    by   thoae   who   are   actually
taking part in an affair.
We   hope   that   students.   If   they
really   hage  got  the  intestinal  fortitude   to   offer   to   help,   will   preserve
what   has   been   used   this   year   and
work   lt  out   to   a   harmless   solution
.  .  . which, as we have already suggested  ln   this  column,  ls  quite  possible. Now that the weak points have
been seen ln actual practice, lt ought
to be easy.
Idea! How about a Big Brother
movement on this campus. The
women seem to have done a pretty
good job of things in that direction.
All we ask Is that nobody suggests
that freshmen wear short pants.
The campus beauty ought to be
preserved.      ,
MARRIAGE LECTURES
Item from U. of Washington. Juniors and Seniors at the Seattle University will have the opportunity ot
hearing a series of six lectures on
marriage to be given there in the
near  future.
The lecturea are free, except for
20%   REDUCTION
ON    SYMPHONY
TICKETS  GIVEN
Students whose pocketbooks are
more limited than their appreciation
of the beauty to be found in great
music will be able to Indulge themselves freely net Sunday when, for
a small admission price, they can
hear one of the Greatest Canadian
symphony orchestra leaders conduct
the Vancouver aggregation through
a programme of the finest music.
The concert next Sunday is the
first of a series of six to be held ln
the Orpheum Theater and will be
conducted by the eminent Toronto
musician, Sir Ernest MacMillan.
Later in the season two more noted
conductors will come to Vancouver
to direct concerts.
The event will be comparatively
Inexpensive since prices for most
seats have been scaled down 20%.
In view of the low prices students who appreciate music should
avail themselves of this opportunity to not only enjoy themselves
but also to support a civic Institution which deserve* every assistance.
CORRESPONDENCE
Editor:
We the members of the Frosh,
class of 1942, resent the criticism
which the staff of the Ubyssey has
given in condemning the bonfire.
We feel that great good was done
by this form of initiation ln that lt
solidified the ranks of the Frosh.
Strangers fighting side by side became  friends.
Although we admit that the criticism was somewhat Justifiable we
still maintain that the freshmen
class are not to be blamed in that
they did not use gas bombs and
flares as did the sophomores. We
claim that the sophomores should
have been properly organized last
year and properly schooled in the
traditions of the University. Realizing this, 'we will endeavor to learn
these traditions ourselves and educate the Incoming Frosh next year.
—Members of  Fresh  1942.
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED . . . transportation from
57th and Sperling every day. see Virginia Galloway, Publications Office.
"Let me serve your oar and your car will serve you"
"Prank" Pioke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY S3
THE DOLPHIN
Friendly place for luncheons and dinner parties
SPECIAL RATES FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS
Relax looking over the sea
Miss Helen Darling for reservations
DOLPHIN TEA  HOUSE
 '■nii-Titiiit
6th   FOLK   FESTIVAL
Vancouver's   Great   Adventure   in    Understanding
1000   artists   presenting   WED.,   OCT.   5,   8   F.M.:
• "History in Clothes";  Your Responsibility Drama
tized. Produced by Mrs. E. Bernluf Clegg. 8 P.M.:
Grand Opening; Lieut. Governor and Mrs. E. W.
Hamber, Massed Choirs; Guest Artists Chief
Os-ke-non-ton and Roger Ernestl, Folk Programmes. THURS., OCT. 6, 3 PJM.s "Development
of Handicrafts," Professor P. A. Boving. 8 F-M.l
Folk Programmes. FRI., OCT. 7, 8 P.M.) Dr. G. G.
Sedgewick, Folk 'Ballads. 8 P.M.: Folk Programmes. SAT., OCT. 8, 8 P.M.: Recital by Canada's Greatest Indian Artist, Os-ke-non-ton, Mohawk Chieftain, Folk Songs and Operatic Arias,
assisted by Roger Ernestl, Indian Dancer. 8 P.M.:
Closing programme Folk Songs and Dances
University students, upon presentation of student
pass will receive rate of He for evening performances and Saturday afternoon, not including tea
or reserved seats.
Crystal Ballroom    HOTEL   VANCOUVER
Special
Stud«nt
Tickets
IIMIIIIIMIMMIMIIIIIIMIIHIIItlHIIIIMMIIMIIIMIIIIItllllMHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMMMIIMMIIIIIMMMIMMMMKMIHIIIIIMIIIIIIIIItl
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 0 a.m. to S p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m, to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology  Paper, ALL YOUR
Loose  Leaf  Refills,  Fountain  Pens  and  Ink      BOOK SUPPLIES
and Drawing Instruments.
SOLD  HERE
IIIMIIIMIIIIMttlllllltllllHIIMIItllHMIIIIMIMtlllllMIMMIIIMHMIMIiniHIIMIIIMIItllllllMMMIMMIII.MlllllMl<tll4tHflMIUIIIIIMIII
Sophomores and Juniors
Prepare for Totem Photos
A new policy has been decided upon by the Totem staff this year regarding the classes to be photographed for the Annual. Instead of
restricting the glittering faces to
owners in but a few of the many
years on the Campus, the present
book will Include each and every
student of each and every year.
With almost three hundred Freshmen photographed, the Studio In the
Gymnasium will move along to the
next year. Sophomores can now' make
appointments, and duly be sent down
to  posterity  on  the  sensitized   plate.
SOPH  PICTURES
In aa muoh aa some two hundred
Freshmen were photographed last
year .the number of Sophs to be
taken thla year will not be ao
large. All portraits token last year
can be used this year. But all
those atudenta who did not have
their picture taken last year, or
who desire a new one, ore asked to
make appointments now at the
Publications Office in the Auditorium Building.
To facilitate the task of photographing all the years in the University, Juniors may start to have
their portraits done now, to gether
with the  remaining Sophomores.
Since the complete Junior class
will have to be taken, students are
asked to use a full measure of rapidity In making their appointments.
To handle everyone there 'will be a
representative of the Totem staff In
the Auditorium Box Office from 11.30
a.m. until 1.30 p.m. from Monday to
Friday Inclusive.
Thla la the flrst year that all
classes have been Included in the
Totem, and It will be greatly appreciated if students will co-operate with the staff of the Totem,
and will ahow a measure of enthusiasm in complying with the
few simple requests.
a  registration charge of 28c.    Different aspects to be treated in the
lectures include:    Sociological   Aspects of Marriage, by Dr. Norman
Hayner of sociology dept.;  Eugenics   by   Prof.   Trevor    Kincaid    of
zoology;   Physiological   Aspects   of
Marriage, by Dr. Carl Helwig; Financial Aspects of Marriage, by Dr.
Marlon    Flsh;     Psychological    Aspects  of  Marriage,  by  Dr.  Edwin
Guthrie   of  psychology;   and   Spiritual Aspects of Marriage, by Rev.
Harold Jensen.
Nice  going Washington.     That's  a
wonderful line-up of topics, and some
opportunity  for students.    What  we
are particularly interested ln are the
Financial   Aspects.     How    about    a
circular?
tH PERSON
STARTING
FRIDAY!
(§tvVi£*vm
OET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THB
CLARKE & STUART
0O. LIMITED
Stationers and Printers
880  SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
2107.
..*.*
Call in at the
VARSITY
BOOKSHOP
A large selection
of University Books
on hand
_B21 W. 10th Ave.
(Where the bus stops.)
.._.«
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
. at  the   Spanish   Orlll
 * MIMMMItt MMIMI tllMMHtl tllMMIItMlfllMMMIIMMIMMMMIMIIMtlllllllllllllllllllltll ■ tl
Opening: Concert
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Next Sunday, 3 p.m., Orpheum Theatre
SIR  ERNEST MacMILLAN, Guest  Conductor
Tickets on  sale at M.  A.  Kelly—839 Granville  St.,  Trinity  1638
20c   to  92.00   *
Season's  Tickets  for Six Concerts—83.00 to $9.60
' ..IMMHMHIIimilHIHHIimimiltHHMMMtHIHIHIHmilllHIMMim.l MIMMIIMIIIIIIIMIMIIIHtKIIIMIUIIMIIIHIIIHI.IIIM.II Tuesday, October 4, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
GORDON MANLEY, YOUNG PIANIST
THRILLS STUDENT AUDIENCE
CHOPIN       AND       MOZART
BEST    RECEIVED    BY
STUDENTS
Vancouver's prominent young pianist, Gordon Manley, Introduced by
Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, made his first
appearance before the University
audience in the auditorium on Monday noon—for the first of pass system
features presented to the students by
the Alma Mater Society.
LEAVING FO RNEW YORK
Mr. Manley Is leaving next week to
continue his studies of concert compositions under his former master
Siglsmund Stojowski ln New York.
Mr. Manley displayed a wide talent
in his program, selected for the students. His opening number, the first
movement of the Sonata ln A major,
by Mozart, in the form of variations
on a theme, was played with sympathy and understanding, each subtle
variation being given the proper emphasis and contrast to keep the audience continually interested.
FINISHED PERFORMANCE
Of special note was the tension of
the audience after the second number, the Chopin Etude ln E major.
The pianist had finished the performance, and for fully a second there
was not a breath in the auditorium
—then the enthusiastic audience
broke Into a cataract af opplause.
This Etude has the singular effect of
a berceuse, and was handled with
the reverence that was Its due.
GLITTERING CHOPIN
The most glittering Chopin was the
Scherzo,   Op.   31,   brilliant  from   the
opening   bars.   The   rather   haunting
spirit of these lntial bars makes the
audience   expect   a   great   revelation,
nor  are they  disappointed either  by
the composer, or by the Interpreter.
The   second   group   started   with
one   of   the   less   complicated,   and
therefore more interesting Godow-
sky compositions:  Alt Wlen, recalling  the glamour that was Vienna,
with  Emperor's  Balls,  and   hooped
skirts.
The   Spanish   group,  the  last   two
PIANIST
pieces on the program, and the first
encore, provided a very sharp contrast, from point of view of technique, as well as of theme. The
rhythm, ably depleted Old Madrid,
bull fights, and fair senorltas.
Wo were very Interested to hear
two of the numbers composed by
the pianist's master, Stojowsky: his
Chant d'Amour, and a Valse. Mr.
Manley has gained much by study-
under this famous student of Pad-
rewsky, and we are looking forward
to healing another concert by the
Vancouver pianist when he returns
from his successful study In New
York, and from the control he had
over the audience yesterday, we are
going to require a larger Auditorium when he returns. Good Luck,
and we're with you, Mr. Manley.
—D.M.
€tLove Parade" and Disney
For First Film Feature
"Love Parade" Is the fetching title
of the campus Film Society's initial
presentation this year. Starring the
lovely Jeanette MacDonald and the
naughty Maurice Chevalier, it is full
of melodious song and rollicking
humour.
Produced at a time when repercussions from the '29 output of sex
pictures were being felt to their fullest, lt succeeded, ln spite of the Hays
office,  ln  retaining  Its  appeal.
CENSOR PROOF
Lubltsch was chiefly responsible
for this since he has a technique tor
combining his Interpretation of life
with the facts of life.
Consequently censors find lt difficult to cut out any of the picture
without destroying the whole.
The seoond feature will be "Plane
Crazy," the first cartoon In whloh
Walt Disney  used  Mickey Mouse.
Aa a atudy In retrospect and the
advances made ln screen cartooning It should prove Interesting.
A general meeting for all old and
new members will be  held  today  In
Arts   100   at   12.30.   At   this   meeting
the   executive  will   be   completed   by
electing   av   ice-president,   treasurer
and committee.
All   those   who   are    Interested   in
wilting film reviews and scenarios,
ot- in make-up, costume, set lighting,
shooting pictures, cutting and editing should make a special attempt to
be present.
Admission to shows will he by a
season   ticket   costing   one   dollar
and   good   for   both    terms.   Thla
brings  the   cost  of  each   presentation down to ten cents.
The   supply   of   season   tickets   Is
limited. By a ruling of the Students'
Council    the    Society    ls    prohibited
from   selling   tickets    to   Individual
shows.
NAME CONTEST
A contest startng today and closing at noon Friday, Oct. 14, Is being
held to obtain a name for the film
review to be published monthly by
the Society.
Simply write the name you think
best suited on n slip of paper with
your name and address, enclose It
In   an  envelope   addressed   to  the
Film Society,  U.B.C, Campua, and
place It in any of the campua letter boxes.
The   prizes   will   consist  of   season
tickets to this year's shows. The flrst
prize  for the best name ts two tickets and for the three next best, one
ticket each.
«,t««lllll'lll11tlllllltMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIMflMIMIItMIII«MIIIII*'(ll*lltlllllllMtllllllMI(IMIIIIII«l«lllltlMI«l*MlltlllMIIIIII1ffM*IIMMI
Smart - - New - - Colorful . . .
are Autumn's Accessories
BIRKS display an intriguing selection of
COSTUME JEWELLERY
and
BIRKS
HANDBAGS Vancouver, B. C.
I.IIIIMMHIIIIItlllllHIIIMIIIIHHIMHI IM(1IIIMIIM3IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII««MtMIIMMtlf •IIIIIIIIM.IItMIIIMIMf MIMIIIIMMMMIIItlHI
897
ORANVILLE
(At Smythe)
ICE OREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY, Arts '31
JACK PARKER. Arts '30
ALONG
By PROXY
Things haven't been going any too
well around here lately, so the mood
ot this strip will likely be anything
but pleasant. Read it at your own
risk.
*        *        *
It wasn't so bad until this morning, when I picked up a copy of last
Tuesday's Ubyssey.
Perhaps you have noticed this column of words entitled "Mlckles and
Muckles", put together by a person
who chooses—for not very obvious
reasons—to hide behind the name
"Scotty." •
No one has ever told me who Scotty
is, but I have an Idea what he's like.
Scotty is a definite type. He U a
fault-finder. He ls a product ot small
town environment — probably lived
most of his life ln New Westminster
or Victoria. He has certainly never
been closer to Scotland than Port
Moody.
Here's the point. Scotty tells us
that he saw the Canadian Football
game at V. A. C. the other day. He
says, quote: "To see about so many
hundred human beings sitting, or
rather vibrating ln an orgy of sadistic delight was sad—tragic."
It we are to believe Scotty, a football player might be defined as one
who likes to struggle ln an orgy of
masochistic delight. In other words,
men play football because they like
to be hurt.
In fine, I think Scotty makes a
pretty smug generalization when he
holds up football as proof that civilization ls going to the dogs. Only a
person who has never been around
would be so dogmatic about the
thing. If Scotty had ever been to
Edinburgh, or traveled even a bit on
this continent, he would be too
worldly to suggest that Canadian
Football ls motivated by perversion.
The perversion, I think, is ln Scotty's
own mind—if I may flatter him to
that  extent.
t*      *      *
In the same copy of the Ubyssey,
an article appeared on the Sports
page to the effect that Jack Davis
was undertaking the reorganization
of the men's Big Block Club. This
put me ln a still uglier frame of
mind.
Davis   plans   to   turn   over  certain
social events, pep meets and parades,
campus policing, and "Service Club"
work to Big Blockers. A fine thing.
Let's pretend.
Let's pretend the Big Blockers are
handling a social event. Without indulging ln personalities, lt seems to
me that the average Big Blocker at
a social event looks like a workhorse
lu the Kentucky Derby.
Let's pretend the B. B.'s are handling a pep meet and parade. No one
would attend but B. B.'s. Why? Because such events are usually held by
students ln honor of the teams. If
the B. B.s feel that they can do a
better Job when they honor themselves, let them go ahead. They can
mirror their ego in their own ugly
maps, and leave the rest of us out
of It.
Let's pretend the campus Is policed
by B. B.'s. The Freshman arrives on'
the campus, and is immediately surrounded by big masses of muscle. He
rapidly becomes a civtim of Inferiority, and ls tormented by claustrophobia. And the B. B. has every right
to become even more conscious of his
own importance than he already ls.
Let's not pretend any more. What
have we got a Pep Club for? The
real reason that Pepsters command
no respect ls that they are eternally
being deprecated by men like Davis.
This ls a condition that exists upon
no other campus, so far as I know.
At most schools, the Pep Club man
ls one of the most popular people ln
the student-body.
If Spud Davis wants to get his
name in the paper, if he wants to
Justify his position on Council, let
him do something really ■worth while.
Let him place the Pep Club ln its
proper position—one of Importance.
Let him make the Pepster a person
who ls not Ignored by campus snobs.
Let him do his reorganizing ln the
Pep Olub itself, instead of tearing
madly around heaping more and
more power on the wonderful shoulders of his Big Blocker friends.
We can't all be athletes.
PETER'S PERIL
OR
CHANG SUEY
AT THE PEARLY GATES
CHAPTER TWO
In a dank, badly-furnished cavern,
eight robed figures \yere crouching,
warming their hands by a stack of
burning call-slips. Suddenly, a wlngjing flashed across the room and
quivered In the ground before one of
them. In the doorway stood a tall,
menacing figure.
"Chang Suey," breathed the eight.
"Yes," hissed their leader, stepping Into the cave. "And if I ever
catch you snitching my marshmal-
lows again, No. 3, I shall detach some
of your moving  parts!"
"Did you find out about the fat
frail   from   Nebraska,   Chief?"
"Gad, yes," murmured Chang Suey.
"I'll never forget lt. One bus had
to go, and lt was the Nebraskan,"
"Was she moidered?"
"No, fool, lt was accidental death.
The lights of her car flashed suddenly on a University bus, and she died
of apoplexy before she even  hit."
For a moment,, the cavern was silent but for the puffing of Blood
Creek as lt ran through the meadow.
Then a gleam came Into the good
eye  of No. 4.
"You brothers better quit feasting
your eyes on the Chief," he burbled. "Remember, he ain't government-Inspected !"
For a while,  he  rolled around  on
the  floor,  cackling.    Then   he   went
and   Bat   in   the   corner,   and   picked
the wing-Jlngs out of his back.
New Blood.
"Men," said Chang Suey, loosely,
"We must get stralghter dope. Just
the other day, I received a report
that the University Theatre was full
of stiffs. My agents went through
fifty pockets, before they realized lt
was the Opening Address Ceremony.
Henceforth our spy at large will be
Artsman Horace Q. Fizzle. He will
report the news as he sees It. Meeting's adjourned.
Swiftly and silently, Chang Suey
melted Into the darkness, with a Calendar under one arm, and a cup of
Caf. coffee under the other. The
eight looked at one another, and
wondered who had run afoul of thetr
leader that he should give them the
Double Torture.
Bulletin.
The night-watchman was last seen
passing through Yuma, Arizona,
which ls ln the United States of America. He was running easily and
smoothly. If weather conditions remain favorable, he should reach
Mexico before or sooner. The report that the local boy crossed the
Grand Canyon ln one Jump has proved to be unfounded. He took two
Jumps.
Walk, don't run, to next week's
exciting  episode!
LA  CANADIENNE
The first meeting of La Canadienne
will be held at the home of Dr. Dallas, 2045 West Fifteenth Avenue, on
Tuesday, October 4 at 8 o'clock. All
second, third and fourth year students interested are cordially Invited.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
"Personality ln Business" will be
the subject of a talk by Dr. Joseph
E. Morsh at the first open meeting
of the Psychology Club in Arts 100
on Thursday, October 6 at 12.45
sharp. This Is the flrst of a series of
talks to be given ln the fall term on
"Psychology ln the Modern Society."
The activities of the club will be
outlined and the qualifications for
membership explained. All Interested
are Invited to attend.
Clearance!
7 ONLY
U.B.C. Blazers
Regular 13.73
$6.50
Don't pass up this final opportunity to get an offlolal
U.B.O. blazer at this olose out price. This will be your
last chanoe aa we are not stocking them again.
NOTE—As these blazers are sold only to students and
graduates, please bring your student pass card with
you as a means of identification.
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
"Always the Best at Spencer's"
SOCIETIES  CLAMOUR   FOR
DISMISSAL OF  PROFESSOR
POLITICAL DEBATE
, The Political Discussion Club will
debate the problem of Canadian
Immigration at its first meeting,
Friday, October 7th ln Arts 100 at
1_.30. New members will be accepted
at that time.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   UNION
Dr. Herbert Lockyer, formerly of
Liverpool, will address the V.C.U. on
Friday. October 7, in Arts 206 at
12.45 p.m.
Dr, Lockyer ls now a member of
the extension staff of the Moody
Bible Institute of Chicago. He was
one of the group of speakers that
visited Vancouver ln November, 1037,
during the Moody Centenary. This
address Is open to all.
BROOCH LOST
Lost ... at Frosh Reception ... a
red bone brooch depleting the London Parliament Buildings. Valued as
a souvenir. Return to C. Washington,
Musical  Society  Room,   Aud.  207.
LOST
Will the person who took the umbrella out of Selenee 300 at 10.30 on
Friday   morning   pleaae   return   it   to
the Lost and Found, U.B.C.
0SKEN0NT0N, FAMOUS
MOHAWK SINGER, HERE
FOR FOLK FESTIVAL
"Caruso of His Race."—New York
Times.
When forty-flve national groups
gather this week ln the Hotel Vancouver, distinguished guest artist will
be Os-ke-non-ton, lntematlonally-
famous Mohawk Chieftain, who
comes to Vancouver especially to take
part in Vancouver's Sixth Annual
Folk  Festival.
This yearly adventure is understanding brings together all citizens
cf Canada, both English-speaking
and new Canadians, who make their
annual contribution of arts and
crafts and music during this Festival.
Among the many colorful programs
will be a lecture on handicrafts on
Thursday afternoon at 3 p.m. ln the
Crystal Ballroom by your own Professor P. A. Boving. Friday afternoon
will feature Dr. O. G. Sedgewick ln
a talk on Folk Ballads, accompanied
by Carrie Mahalek and Luther Roberts, Mus. Bac. Saturday afternoon
will feature the distinguished Mo-
hawjf Chieftain, Os-ke-non-ton, in a
program of Indian folk music and
arias from famous operas. He will be
assisted by Roger Ernestl, Indian
dancer, from the Department ot
Archaeology, University ot Washington.
On Wednesday, October 5, Mrs. E.
Bernulf Clegg, who so recently won
acclaim for her performance in Trojan Women, will present "History in
Clothes", costumes of all nations
dramatically Interpreted.
When the Lieutenant-Governor,
His Honor, E. W. Hamber and Mrs.
Hamber come to open the Festival
officially at 8 p.m. on Wednesday
evening, they will be greeted by 12
massed choirs, singing an eight-part
arrangement of "O Canada" never
before sung on this Coast.
Each evening will present a variety
of folk programs, with commentation
by E. V. Young upon the contributions made by each of these groups
to Canada.
Special rates are offered to all University students who will naturally
find much to interest them ln this
great gathering  of  nations.
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED . . . transportation from
3rd and MacDonald. See Irene Eedy^
Publications Office.
ttMIM*IHIIHH.HHI*H.tMfll«HMIIHIII1IIHIiml«imHtfll.HM
Just  about   all   you  could   ask
for    .    .    .
ARISTOCRATIC
HAMBURGERS
Limited
10th and Alma
TAKE    SOME    HOME
HHMHHMI,HMmiH<l«IHtlllMHItltl«IIMIII«HMIMIHHItttHI«i
SA3KATOON (C.U.P.) Oct. 3-*Dr.
Carlyle King, English professor at
the University of Saskatchewan, haa
achieved considerable notoriety in
that province for his outspoken declarations on British foreign policy
and   colonial  administration.
Opposition   was   to   be   expected.
But  certain   Individuals  and  societies, Instead of Intelligently refuting  his  statements  and establishing their own case, have resorted
to  personal  attacks  by  clamoring
for the dismissal of the professor.
Throughout   the   controversy,   the
vast   majority  of  his  students  while
not   necessarily    agreeing   with    his
opinions,   insist   that   he   be   allowed
to   publicly   express   those   opinions.
Last week he spoke to the Kinsmen
Club in Saskatoon, criticizing certain
aspects    of    British    diplomacy    and
colonial exploitation.
PREVENTED FROM SPEAKING
From that speech criticism arose
again and "demands for his dismissal" became so powerful that he felt
he could speak again only at the
risk of losing his Job or putting
President Thomson of the University
in on embarrassing predicament. He
preferred neither alternative, so he
refused to speak at the meeting
sponsored by the Saskatoon League
for Peace and Democracy lTast night.
Says the U. of S. student newspaper: "It ls our hope that Dr. King
be allowed to resume, unhampered,
stating his opinion on matters of
International politics. This can only
happen through a concerted campaign directed at those responsible
for his 'muzzling'."
In an editorial on the subject,
the Sheaf, U. of S. paper, states:
"Academic freedom is In serious
Jeopardy. We do not know from
where demands for Dr. King's dismissal are coming, but we do know
that some action ought to be taken
to bring them to light. The situation demands Investigation by all
citizens Interested in preserving
the British principles of freedom
of speech.
"We students have been perlous-
ly close to  being called to a war
against   a   nation   whioh   tells   Its
professors what they may say. We
prefer that  our country  be  Innocent  of   such  a  brazen  attaok  on
Education."
In  a  stop  press  it 'was  announced
that the League for Peace and Democracy at which Dr. King was scheduled   to   speak,   a   resolution   to   take
steps   to   preserve  academic   freedom
and  the   freedom  of  the  members   of
the University of Saskatchewan, was
passed with an overwhelming majority.
^•HIIIHI III Mill miMMMMH tit MtllllilllMIIUUMMIIIt llllll tlllltJ
VARSITY SERVICE.
STATION
"AT   THE   GATES"
'■OUR   SERVICE   MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
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Seymour 8334
A oomplete Laundry nnd Dry Cleaning Service
Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaner
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Have a real
HOME-COOKED   MEAL
with Mr. and Mrs. Thomson at
THE   OABLES   INN
IIUtHHUIIHHIIIH-tllMIHtlllHItltMIHIIIIllllll l| I-••-■.). RESULTS
RUGGER:
Varsity—-88; U.B.C.—«.
HOCKEY:
Varsity—0; Cricketer—6.
Co-eds—0;  Grads—0.
OR-T
RESULTS
FOOTBALL:
Varsity—IB; Meralomaa—0.
Varaity Juniors—0;  Trojan—0.
Pour
TH
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Ootober 4, 1038
U. B. C. Downs Kitsies; Go East Thurs.
By LIONEL SALT
Continuing their winning ways, the Varsity grid squad rolled
up an impressive win on Saturday when they blanked the Meralomas 19-0. Led by the ghost-running of Tommy Williams, the
students pushed the Kitsies all over the turf of the new Stadium
with their vaunted running attack. apRoberts started the scoring
splurge with a touchdown in the first few minutes when he recovered a Meralomas fumble behind the line, and then converted.
A second-quarter touchdown by Drummond was disallowed duo
to use of hands in the line. _
Finlay came back a. few plays later when he took a forward pass
from Pearson and ran lt down to the
Ave yard line, plunging over the line
two plays later, Grey doing the converting. Two rouges in the third
quarter and a touchdown, the second
tor Finlay, ln the fourth completed
the scoring,
stAong team.
The Impressive win of the students
lidded further strength to their proposed Prairie Jaunt this week. An
entourage Including twenty-t w o
players, several coaches, and managers leaves on Thursday for two scheduled games with the Universities of
Alberta and Sasakatchewan. This
is the second year that this trip has
been taken, the prairie colleges retaliating later In the season, and
bids fair to be a college tradition rivaling those below the line.
A surprisingly light squad will be
making the trip this year along with
Maury Van Vllet, the average weight
of the baokfleld being around 170 lbs.
The students will take with them the
seasoning accrued from two victories of the current season and the
reputation for having one of the
hardest hitting lines in the Big Four
section.
Especially atrong  Is the middle
position with McGulre and Stradlottl  holding  down  regular  bertha
and dependable reserves In Mclvor
and   Provensano..   Thla  la  Strad'a
third year with  the Varsity  team
and the lad has a  reputation  for
being   one  of  the   hardest  hitting
middle*  in  the  business.
POWERHOUSE BACKF1ELD.
Although hampered with a broken
nose Lee Straight, snap, will accompany the team as a reserve man with
Oscar Orr holding down the regular
berth while on the trip. The inside
positions will be filled by Hodgson,
Smith, Stevenson, and McGhee with
Hodgson and Freddie Smith grabbing   first   string   positions.
The backfleld, spearhead of the
Varsity jittack, has such notables as
Williams, Qrey, ap Roberts, and Renwlck and Finlay. All men are accomplished line plungers with Tommy Williams and Evans ap Roberts
as standouts. Almost too strong ln
the backfleld, Van Vllet has perhaps
overemphasized the offense department, and consequently has yet to
perfect a proper pass defence as
shown in last Saturday's game. However practises this week will be held
to strengthen this, and the boys will
leave on Thursday a more balanced
team.
JUNIORS DOWN TROJANS
IN CLOSE STRUGGLE
Varsity Junior gridders came
through with an Impressive 6-0 win
over the Trojans from the city Saturday afternoon on the upper pitch
before a  good sized crowd.
Bolton's Bombers opened fast with
a razzle-dazzle attack when a lateral
pass off a short forward moved the
ball in close. Bill McGhee dove over
the pay line for an unconverted five
points and .gave the students the
lead.
Late in the third quarter the Blue
and Gold swarmed over the Trojan
line to smear the safety man for a
one point rouge. Both the backfleld
nnd the line showed up well and the
boys are expecting to burn up the
league.
HIIHHHIMIIHIIMIHIMIIMMIIHMMIMMIHHMIIMHMIIMHIIIIIIM
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
IIIMIIIIIIIIHMIHIIIHHHMMIMHHMIIMIMIIIIHMIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlll
BASKETBALL.
Coach Bob Osborne announces that
commencing with Wednesday, Oct. 5,
attendance at all basketball practices
will be recorded. This means that you
must register a 00 per cent, "here"
at all workouts ln order to get those
40 points for "service so necessary
for getting yourself a Big Block
sweater. Practices are Wednesday at
5.30 and Friday at 4.30, with an
hour's shooting practice at 8.30 each
Monday morning.
GYM  CLASSES.
Now that gym classes are ln full
swing, and registration for «ame has
more or less settled down, it is most
essential that you be on the floor and
ready for action at the appointed
time. Late comers simply cannot be
tolerated I
INTER-COLLEGIATE
ARCHERY NOTE.
This annual tournament ls to be
staged in a fortnight's time. This
means that would-be shooters should
be practising most diligently as endurance ls the key-note of this bout.
An hour a day is what the doctor
prescribes for all women hoping to
make this Important team.
RIDING.
Many women have registered their
Interest ln riding, but few have hopped over to the gym office to make
final arrangements for same. Take
with you $5.00 and an idea of when
you'd like your rides.
INTRA-MURALS.
Dear Class-mates:
Please be in the gym Monday and
Tuesday noons and help us win 'hat'
Womens' Intra-Mural Trophy.
Yours hopefully,
Arts 30, 40, 41, 42, Ed, Aggies, and
Nurses.
HOCKEY.
The hockeyists certainly came
through Saturday and made good
some of their boasts with their
smashing 0-0 win against the strong
Grandview team. League officials and
members of other teams sat up and
took notice with a vengeance—we
don't blame them. The Grandview
goalie never had a chance as the
beautifully-combining Varsity forward string swept down on her time
and again. Sheila Wilson and Gerry
Armstrong were particularly good ln
their respective wing positions.
Also a bouquet ln due Marjorie
Lean for warding off several dangerous rushes in brilliant fashion.
Hortense Warne and Betty Cole in
their positions as fullbacks were all
but impenetrable, and the halves
combined very well considering the
absence of Betty Muir who was disporting herself for the touring team.
NOTICE
Sons and Daughters of Poseidon
nnd Neptune. . . . Swimmers, swimmers rally round. Swimming club
practices will be held Tuesday and
Friday from 6.30-8.00 starting this
Friday.
Entrance fee to Pool $2.00 per term.
This fee is payable in advance to
Hetty   Cole.
Percy  Norman will  coach.
Attend meeting Wednesday at 12.40
in room to be announced later. . . .
Come one, splash all!
NEVISON STARS AS
U. B. C. CO-EDS
TROUNCE GRADS
Mark down the U.B.C. Coed Grass
Hockey squad as the team to beat
this year in Lower Mainland Women's League.
For Sattirday, paced by the outstanding performance of acting-
captain inside right Myrne Nevi-
son who scored no leas than four
goals, the Coeds celebrated the
opening of their season at Con
Jones Park by soundly whipping
Grandview Grads by a score of
8-0.
All in all, the girls really had a big
clay, and with freshette-that-was
Faye Burnham counting two beautiful goals, and the whole team show-
ins almost astonishing form, league
officials were unanimous in their
praises.
VARSITY BOYS OVERPOWER
U.B.C. IN FAMILY BATTLE
CAPTAIN
This feUow Is Bob Smith, the col-
dilating treasurer of the AJW.8.
who captained the U.B.C. side in
their valiant battle against the
Varsity team In Saturday's English rugger fixture at Brookton
Point.
offside
—orme dier
MONDAY MORNING
QUARTERBACK.
Don't look now but that little grid
game out at the stadium last Saturday was one of the screwiest battles
of brawn and brain ever to amase
the  spectators  ln  these  hyar  parts.
Take for Instance the time our
good friend ap Roberts took the ball
behind his own goal line, said hello
to seventeen Meraloma tacklers In
the nicest old English manner, and
then suddenly remembered he had
to see a man about a dog, so he bussed around over the goal line and
kept the Varsity slate clean. Maybe
the boys were affected by the new-
peace movement now abroad in Europe, or maybe It was Just the good
old . "after you Alphonse" play for
the  Orange  and   Black  laddies.
A MEAN LINE.
Then again, did any one notice the
bit of contrast on the Varsity line
when little George Lowe held down
right end position ln the second half.
"Moanin' " weighs about 120 after a
big meal, and there he was giving
the boys the devil right along side a
little fellow name Carson McGulre,
who tips the beams at about twice
Joe's   gross   tonnage.
And the Varaity line has plenty
on the ball these fine Saturday afternoons, and regardless of all the
paudits handed out to the backfleld division, It is the Varsity line
and no other that makes the Thunderbirds such a threat.
TRIP IT LIGHTLY.
Getting around to the prairie trip
which has the gridiron heroes up ln
the air in one way or another, it
looks bad for the defending champs
from Saskatchewan when the Thunderbirds from the coast fly Into
town, because at this time of the
year, the Blue and Gold squad looks
stronger than it ever has before,
while the Blue and White of the
Saskatoon laddies is much weaked
by   the   ravages   of   graduation.
So if our Maurymen walk off with
the Intercollegiate laurels as well as
the local Big Four crown, don't say
we didn't tell you. Of course if
they don't just forget about the
whole  thing.
It's beside the point but someone
just remarked that a certain would-
be columnist on the sput page thinks
he is onside. Actually, the only time
he is in that happy state is when he
is outside. Or do you follow us
there,   Oscar?
LOST
Waterman fountain pen, mottled
red, black, grey, on the campus
Thursday. Please return to Margaret
Macdonald     care     of     Mr.     Home's
YOUNG SQUAD 8HOW8
OREAT PROMISE
By ORMY HALL
Varaity'a   "wonder  rugby   team"
settled  the    University    civil   war
situation   for   the   time    being   at
least on  Saturday  by downing U.
B.C. 38-6 at Brocton  Point.   However,    the    rebels—.U.B.C.    to    you
sir—were    decidedly    superior    to
their   advance   notices   and   were
quelled only after  a bitter  struggle.
In fact It looked for a time during
the flrst quarter that the "B's" would
spring    an    upset.      They    marched
right Into Varsity territory, forced a
penalty and teed the ball up for Junior  Lamb  who smacked  it  between
the posts for three points,
STRONG  THREE'S.
Upset by this disturbing turn of
affairs the Varaity called in thetr
shock troops, namely Ted McPhee,
Will College, Waddle Robertson,
Strat Leggat and Tod Trembley who
Anally managed to merge Into a
three line that resembled last year's
"'wonder" aide. Two or three brilliant cuts through the middle by McPhee and College opened up the way
for both Strat Leggat and Tod
Tremblay to go for tries. The latter
converted on both occasions to boost
the Varsity total to 10.
TOOT PEEP.
Aa If waiting for orders from the
three quarter line to attack the Varsity scrum also put on the pressure
and for the last ten minutes of the
initial half the U.B.C. boys were
penned In their own two-bit line
where only desperate tackling and
the timely whistle blowing by referee "Buster" Woodward kept their
line from being crossed again before
the  breather.
U.B.C. started the second half
along the same lines as the first and
from quite a tough angle Junior
Lamb booted his second penalty of
the duy to bring the "B's" within
four points of their opponents. That
was the last time they even threatened, however, as the Varsity immediately too kover control and ran
over three tries In a row.
SCORES.
Sandy Lang started the avalanche
by nipping around the blind side of
the scrum to score from 30 yards'
out. Big Jim Harmer barged over
for another seconds later and Will
College applied the finishing touches
by taking a pass from Ted McPhee
to score  under the  posts.
Todd Tremblay made good on two
out of three converts to boost his
personal total of points for the day
to  11-one try and  four  converts.
OIVOTERS OPTIMISTIC
AS CUP WARFARE
COMMENCES
Campus followers of the Royal and
Ancient Pastime—golf-players to me
and probably to you—receive their
baptism of fire this week, as the
qualifying round for the University
Cup   commences.
Golf Club officials state that
rounds can be played any time this
week in the qualifying bracket, and
that cards must be handed in by
next   Monday   noon.
Out of the sixteen divoters who
emerge from this -week's competition, a champion will be found to
succeed Wilf Balderston, last year's
holder, who graduated in the spring.
And just because you don't happen to be one of the charmed circle,
it does not necessarily mean that you.
are completely ostracized and forgotten as far as the golf clubbers are
concerned. To accommodate those
who fail to make the qualifying
bracket, further battles in first, second  and  third  flights will  be  staged.
At a meeting of the golfmen on
Friday, Roy Leckie was re-elected
President,     Mansfield     Beach    made
?4 of
the towi
RICH, DARK, FR1NCH
STYLI CHOCOLATI
PACKID WITH CRISP,
CRUNCHY ALMONDS
C.»T«
INTRAMURALS
TOMORROW
Let the class spirit reign supreme,
for Wednesday the classes clash in
their flrst competitive efforts of the
season. Class repts are now in conference drawing up a tentative schedule under the supervision of Maury
Van Vllet.
An innovation this year has been
the Inclusion of the Anglican College
teams to replace Education. Also, a
cup has been donated for competition
ln English rugby by some very enthusiastic supporter of ye old rugger.
Said donor ls reputed to be a mean
peddler of English himself.
Members of class teams are urgently requested to keep in touch with
the schedules as posted and to present themselves on time for their
struggles. As has already been Intimated volleyball leads off the list
of  activities starting  on  Wednesday.
Due to the absence of Maury opening ceremonies will unfortunately
have to be dispensed with but don't
let that stop all you loyal supporters
from rallying around tomorrow.
GRASS HOCKEY
In a pre-season game the Cricketers downed a fighting Varsity squad
5 goals to nil. Despite the score the
game was actually close. Lack of
finish in all departments of the game
did as much as anything to defeat
the Varsity side. 'With a few more
practices to knock off rough edges;
the team should go to town and mop
up the league, according to skipper
Macaulay, the showing of this year's
recruits  is  more  than   promising.
PACHYDERMS!
CALLING    ALL    WRESTLERS —
squirm and twist under the eagle
eye of Coach Maury Van Vliet. Wander over to the gym on Weds, at
3:30 and try out your strength. If
you know nothing don't let that
deter you; you might know more
than  all  the  rest combined.
Secretary   and   Bill   Charlton,   Treasurer.
A bumptor year ls anticipated as
no less than three men. Bill Charlton,
Stan Durkin and Jack Stark of last
year's team will be back ln the fight
of the fairways and freshmen talent
is plentiful.
TRACK MEN PREP FOR
PRAIRIETRIP
News and good news.
From a reliable source, none other
than recently-appointed traok manager Sam Wolfe, comes word that
tbe track team might upset the old
dope bucket and put out one of the
strongest and fastest bunch of boys
ln recent years.
Best news lies ln the little statement that all-star trackman Howie
McPhee Just might doff the blue and
gold for dear old Alma Mater. Here
may be the deciding factor one way
or the other when the Blue and Gold
clash with the Green and Gold at
the University of Alberta, on October
15th.
However, one man never did make
a good track team so let's look at
other standouts and other hopefuls.
Lucas all-round sport with high
Jump as his specialty is expected to
turn  in a  smart performance.
Ward DeBeck who arrived home
from Victoria last Thursday and
8cott 880 and 440 yard man are also
pepping up for the track tryoutts.
Campbell Williams and Fournier will
also be there. Just watch these two
as they are supposedly Maury Van
Vliet's  hopeful   newcomers.
But with all this material to work
on coaches and manager are still not
satisfied with the rumored number of
boys that' are expected to turn out.
So come on you freshmen—there's a
grand chance for a trip to the prairies and one swell time. Remember
that even though there are good men
to run against your chance is every
bit as good as theres.
—COHEN.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving:
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,    'AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
568  Seymour  St.
iiiiMiniKir
 MIIIUMIMIIIMIIIHIM MM t IMHIMtllltl/ MIMHMIHMIHMIMUl IHMMMK
HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME? JIB!"  7 \)t^
IF IT'S -*^    ^Bli%is5ii <___»    jtf»
■ A  SLICE
■ A HOOK ---'"
■ TOPPING YOUR     A.
BALL W
Take   a   six   months   course   i:t
Hal Rhodes Golf School
1155 W. Pender Street        Seymour 5223
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