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The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1955

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 - <^.<.
TBE UBYSSEY
VOLUME XXXVIII
VANCOUVER, B.C.. THURSDAY. JANUARY 6, 1955
Price 5c;
No. 32
'Semi-Permanent' Dorms Proposed
Lack of  Funds Bars
Permanent Buildings
WALT YOUNG
Rhodes Scholar
TO   OXFORD
Walt Young
B.C.Rhodes
Scholar
UBC student Walter Young has
been chosen the province's
Rhodes  scholar  for   1053.
The scholarship, which if
worth £600 a year,* will entitle
the 21-year-old winner to attend
Oxford University for two years
he will study philosophy, economics and politics. *
The 12 Rhodes scholarships
awarded annually to Canadians
are granted for all-round ability,
not merely to the most brilliant
scholars.
Winning scholarship is nothing new for Walt, but winning
this one really awed him. "II
seemed like a miracle that I
vsis fol-Owtaff*ome Illustrious
B.C. men to Oxford," Walt said.
claimed.
He received the citizenship
cup for the bets all-round student when he graduated from
Oak Bay High school in 1951,
and the president's award for
scholastic standing, leadership
and participation in student affairs when he left Victoria College in 1953.
Last year he won the John
and Annie Southcott memorial
scholarship for research in B.C.
history. He has also won several debating honors. ,
Young, whose home is in Victoria, was captain of the English
rugby team at Victoria College
and one-time hglder of the B.C.
Juvenile 100-yard dash record
with a time of 10.2 seconds.
After graduation from Oxford,
Walt hopes to into Canada's external affairs department, or,
failing this, to be a university
professor.
He will receive his bachelor of
arts degree from UBC at the
spring convocation.
NFCUS Hit
By Scribes;
Lacklssues'
OTTAWA—(CUP) — "Unimaginative activities of the
National Federation of Canadian University Students were
rapped by editors attending
the 17th annual conference of
the Canadian University Press.
The editors urged the Federation to start a campaign for increased student rights in Canadian universities "which would
capture 'the imagination of Canadian students."
The criticism foildwed a plea
from a NFCUS representative
addressing the conference that
CUP "be more sympathetic" to
the problems of NFCUS. Peter
Martin, Ontario vice-president
of NFCUS, made a lengthy attack on what he called "irresponsible criticism of NFCUS" on
the part of student editors.
The CUP criticism was embodied in two resolutions pre
3ent;ed by Clyde Batten, editor
jf The Varsity of the University
)f Toronto and defeated candidate for the presidency of NFCUS during its recent convention.
Batten said the recent NFCUS
convention was "dealing with
.he same old issues." As an example, he said the current NFCUS campaign for government
scholarships is exactly the same
,—in every detail—as « similar
campaign  conducted  in   1949.
"For the past seven years,
NFCUS conferences have been
almost identical," said Batten.
'NFCUS is in >a rut."
The resolution containing this
criticism was passed by the CUP
conference only after consider-
(Continued on Page 3)
See NFCUS
• ♦
t
f
NFCUS    Promises
Lower Text Costs
OTTAWA (CUP)—Lower book
prices are on the way for Canadian university students, according to a National Federatiort
of Canadian University Students
representative who addressed
the conference of the Canadian
UniversityvPress.
Peter Martin, Ontario vice-
president for NFCUS, told CUP
editors that NFCUS has "contacted Canadian book publishers
and a sizeable reduction in text
book costs is on the way."
Editors   Drop
Censure  Of
Duplessis
OTTAWA—(CUP) — Quebec
Premier Maurice Duplessis has
won negative applause from
Canadian University Press editors for his taxation stand
against the Federal Government.
Editorial committee of the
annual CUP conference voted to
kill a resolution condemning the
Quebec premier which had been
passed the year before by CUP,
but not yet forwarded to him
by letter.
The resolution had objected
to Duplessis' refusal to accept
federal aid to universities on
the ground tihat the Federal
Government does not have the
right" to earmark tax monies
which should be spent at the discretion of a Provincial Government. Duplessis also contended
that federal aid would usurp
traditional provincial autonomy
in respect to all educational
matters.
Since then, however, Duplessis has substantially increased
grants to Quebec universities.
CUP editors agreed that this
fact, together with the recent
negotiations between Duplessis
and Prime Minister St. Laurent,
demanded that the CUP action
be dropped.
MARDI GRAS KING CANDIDATES Keith "Tweedie"
Liddle, Phi Delta Theta, and Beta candidate Ted McAlpine
assure the public that there will be no ballot stuffing this
year. Elections will be held at the Mardi Gras Pep Meet
today at noon in the Armory, and in front of the library.
—Quan Photo
•
African Mar dis Gras
Planned By Greeks
Campus Greek letter societies have mobilized into action
to present the biggest event of the University's social calendar. The "Mardi Gras in Africa" will be celebrated January
13th and 14th at the Commodore.
Pf««iaf *of -the   gala   two"
ANTIDISCRIMINATION  STAND
OF UBYSSEY WINS PRAISE
OTTAWA—(CUP)—Anti-discrimination stands of The
Ubyssey won praise from editors attending the 17th annual conference oi the Canadian University Press.
Congratulations to The Ubyssey for its "vigorous attitude towards discrimination" were made in an executive
report by Le Quartier Latin of the University of Montreal,
and subsequently approved by the whole conference.
The report termed The Ubyssey stand "an honour to
the university press."
night affair will be donated to
the fight against Multiple Sclerosis.
Said co-chairman Bill Gart-
side: "Mardi Gras is not just a
fraternity-sorority affair, and
we're out to get everyone's support. Last year we raised over
$200 dollars for Multiple Sclerosis, and this year we're trying
for  $3000.''
Pep meet will, be held today
at noon in the Armoury to elect
King candidates and drum up
interest in the Mardi Gras. Admission price is three raffle
tickets, and Ren Williams' Dixieland Band, actor Doug Haskins,
MC Don Jabour, and CBC thrush
will be in attendance.
King candidates include: Keith
"Tweed ie" Liddle, Phi Delta
Theta; Stu Madill, Phi Gamma
Delta; Gord Mundle, Sigma Chi;
Jim MacAulay, Phi Kappa Pi;
Denny Ottewell, Sigma Phi Delta Gordon Richardson, Lambda
Chi Alpha; Glen Buckley, Kappa
Sigma; Sam Huberman, Sigma
Alpha Mu; Jim Carter, Delta Upsilon; Bruce Spencer. Delta
Kappa Epsilon; John Newton,
Alpha Delta Phi; Mike Rose,
Psi Upsilon Harvey King, Alpha
Tau Omega; Jprry LeCovin, Zeta
Beta Tau; and Ted McAlpine,
Beta Theta Pi.
Candidates for Mardi Gras
Queen have been selected, and
the winner will be chosen by the
votes of the party-goers attending the festivities. Candidates include: Jeannie Wilson, Alpha
Gamma Delta; Dianne Driscoll,
Alpha Delta Pi; Marlene Hill,
Alpha Omicron Pi; Margot
Young, Gamma Phi Beta; Jan
Henderson, Delta Gamma. Cookie Diestel, Delta Phy Epsilon:
Sandra Sturdy, Kappa Kappa
Gamma; Maxine Green, Kappa
Alpha Theta; and Pat Trick, Alpha Phi.
Sororities were busy Wednesday decorating posts in the caf,
and Fraternities were busy publicizing their respective King
candidates.
Ticket   sales
favorably.
Alums Press
For Housing,
Scholarships
Campaign for new residences
and more scholarships for UBC
students will receive a boost
from the alums, executive secre:
tary Art Sager has announced.
Along with the President's
Fund, housing and financial aid
to students have been cited the
majof objectives of the UBC Development Fund Campaign opening January  15.
More than $150.00 has been
raised from the fund, mostly
from ajumni contributions. It
has been used to promote and
sponsor special lecture and fine
arts series, campus projects and
to provide book collections, and
to sponsor ten regional provincial scholarships.
Sager warned'UBC was facing
a "financial crisis" as revenue
was outstripped by mounting operating costs and expanding services.
FEES MUST BE PAYED
BY JANUARY 15
Students have until January
15 to pay second term fees
Accountant H. White announced Wednesday.
Payment of fees is progressing well, White commented,
as students are taking advantage of the mailing system.
Fees may be mailed to the
Accounting office or paid there
in person. Students are requested to include their, registration numbers in making
payments.
■_------B-M_-_-a--B----BB_-_-M__B__B_»
'twttn clottts
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Alexander,
3229 Neville Street, entertained
the staff of the Burnaby Courier
at a pre-christmas party last
Thursday evening.
Two modern, semi-permanent dormitories for^gtudent housing are expected to be built on the campus within the next
three years.
Dr, G. M. Shrum, University
Housing Administrator, described the proposed buildings in an
interview Tuesday.
The structures are to be of one
or two storeys of pumice similar
to the B.C. Research Council
building. Rooms are to be small,
affording accommodation for "as
many students as  possible."
Dr. Shrum explained that
semi-permtament housing is being
accepted because the university
cannot afford to build permanent struotures with the funds it
will be able to get in the forsee-
able future.
IMAGINATION NEEDED
"With some imagination we
can develop here the type of
housing adequate for our cli-
nvate," Dr. Shrum said.
"It will be inexpensive for
students and still be very much
better than anything that can
be obtained in private houses
for the money," he continued.
The policy of the Housing
Committee has been to press for
additional accommodation for
students <and faculty. "In the
meantime," Dr. Shrum stated,
"we intend to continue the policy followed in the last four
years and try to improve the
huts being used at present.
PRIORITY LIST
The building of a clinical medical building and a combined
lecture rooms and office building, to be called the Arts Building, come before housing on the
priority list, the housing administrator said., ^
Two sites have been propel
ed for the new dorms, a site
between Acadia and Wesbrook
Camps for men and the corner
of the West Mall and Maxine
Drive for women.
The property between Westbrook and Acadia is part of the
University Endowment Plan
and will have to be secured
from the government before
building can be started.
Plans for the new residences
include playing fields and tennis
courts.
Dr. Shrum attested that the
housing committee . is able to
make modest improvements out
of operative earnings of the
camps, but are not able to keep
up with the registration increase.
Japan To Go Red,
Says Ottawa Editor
OTTAWA (CUP)—Prediction
that Japan will eventually enter
the Communist fold was made
by an Ottawa newspaper editor.
Charles Woodsworth, editor of
The Ottawa Citizen and son of
the founder of the CCF party,
made the prediction during an
address on his recent tour of the
far East.
He said economic factors will
lead to a Red victory in Japan,
pointing out that Japan is seriously over-populated and is experiencing severe trade difficulties which could be solved by
closer relation with China.
Forum To Hold
Important Meet
PARLIAMENTARY   FORUM
will hold an important general
meeting Friday noon in Arts
204. All members are urged to
attend.
*r *r *r
FILMSOC presents "Desperate Moment", a full-length feature, at noon today in the auditorium. Admission 35c.
*r *r *r
ALL FROSH interested in intramural athletics— basketball,
track, wrestling, boxing — will
meet in HL1 today at noon.
¥      *      ¥
FILM CLASSICS cards ere
now on sale in AMS offices and
at all Filmsoc shows. This card
admits you to seven Tuesday
noon-hour shows, and sells for
50c.
*r *r *F ^
INTERNATIONAL HO US if
presents Dr. K. D. Naegele,
Sociologist in talk to members
and friends "On Being a Foreigner" at 8:30 p.m., Friday, ln
Club Hut L4. Informal social'
evening will follow.
Cash Offered
For  Stories
Christopher films of New
York is sponsoring a TV short
story contest for college students in Canada and the U.S.
Prizes totalling $4,000 will
be given for the best short
stories of 1,000 words which
could be used in a TV show.
First prize is $1000, second
$750, third $500 and fourth $250.
The four subjects are "Teenagers Can Shape the Future,"
"Improving Labor Relations,"
"Earnings and Property the
Right of All," and "Changing
the World Through the Housewife."
Contest closes March 31, 1955,
and all entries should be addressed to Christopher College
Student Contest, 18 East 48th
St., New York 17, N.Y.
UBYSSEY    EDITORIAL   PRAISED
Toronto Paper Wins Trophy
are   progressing
Students were warned to re
train from posting notices on
the doors and walls of tin-
Brock, by Activities Co-ordinator
Jerome   Angel   Wednesday.
Notices are to be posted ou
sie.n  boards  only, he  .uid.
OTTAWA— (CUP) — Best
English - language university
newspaper published in Canada twice-weekly or more is
The Varsity, daily student
publication of the University
of Toronto.
Varsity editor Clyde Batten
was awarded the Southam Trophy at the 17th annual conference of the Canadian University Press by Charles
Woodsworth, editor of The Ottawa  Citizen.
The Ubyssey placed third in
the contest, for the third
straight year. Second place
weni to The lVI;w\itoban, ol the
Univci'bU.>   oi   Manitoba,
The Southam Trophy was
one of four college press
awards made at a dinner in
Chateau Laurier at the close
of the three-day  conference.
Award for the best editorials, the Bracken Trophy, was
given to Le Carabin, French-
language newspaper of Laval
University in Montreal. The
McGill Daily of Montreal's McGill University won second-
place mention, while The
Ubyssey received praise for
the most outstanding single
editorial submitted — a three-
sentence comment on sororities   entitled   "Shake".
La  Itoloudc,  ol  the   Univer
sity of Ottawa, was awarded
the Le Droit Trophy, given annually to the best French-
language newspaper in CUP.
The Jacques Bureau Trophy, awarded to the best English-language newspaper published less than twice weekly,
was presented to The Gazette,
of the University of Western
Ontario.
The Gazette Was a consistent winner ol the Southam
Trophy up until this year,
when competitors for the top
prize were limited to those
publishing al least twice weekly. Page Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6, 1955
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mall, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Mill subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published ln Vaaeouver through'
OUt the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
AJma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
(Minions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
tfeysney, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
the University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 1230
or Alma 1231. Advertising Manager is Geoff Conway.
'   EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Ray Logie News Editor Pol Carney
pU? Editor—Ret* Paterson Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Aiseeiate Editor—Stan Beck       Executive Editor—Geoff Conway
Senior Editor This Issue—Sandy Ross
Reporters:  Judy  Thormahlen,   Rod   Smith,   Jean   Whiteside,
flat Russel, Sylvia Shorthouse.
SjJorts: Nlll McDonald, Peter Worthington, Maurice Gibbons.
<A   Good   Buy?
Student Housihg of any kind would be an improvement
oyer our present army hut slums, and Dr. Shrum's announcement that new housing will be provided within three years
is welcome news.
Yet the label "semi-permanent" used by Dr. Shrum is
semewhat disconcerting, as is the vague description of the
nature of the proposed residences. The reference to "small"
rooms ifi particularly unnerving.
s Will the .new residences be torn down after about ten
yttto! use? Is the Housing Administration merely attempting
tp alleviate overcrowding? Does it intend to provide UBC
pjudents with new—yet poorer—housing as a makeshift
alternative to the shacks now in use?
Something more detailed in the way of a description
would be very welcome. '
... Cheaper housing for UBC is actually a good idea. The
* supi ipint on "the new Women's Residences amounted to
something akin to extravagance. If the housing outlined by
- Dr. Shrum is a result of better shopping, the Housing Administration will have made a more sensible decision.
flat it the plan means that UBC students will be given
further stop-gap accommodation, then it is foolish. The problem of housing has been too serious for too long to merit
mere stop-gap measures.
We hope the Housing Administration intends to provide
worthwhile accommodation, and that it is .not merely running out of army huts.
Clyde Batten Urges
IUS  Connections
Beware
■ Editors at the Canadian University Press conference in
Ottawa expressed disfavor at the increasing popularity of
Time and Life magazines at Canadian universities, due
largely to the high-pressure campaigns and cut rates offered
by the Luce publications,
Although the editors did not pass a resolution denouncing Time and life for "biased and unfactual reporting" as
was done the year before, they might well have gone even a
step further. In general, all publications in North America
%t Jeast are becoming less reliable. Many, of course, are still
maintaining the same high standard of objectivity they have
possessed for years.
Yet many others are] being caught in the' volley of propaganda directed at the Communist world and the Communist philosophy, a quantity of propaganda which has never
before been equalled on, this continent.
These publications would be bad enough if they were
Only .subject to specific political bias against Communism, but
this great quantity of propaganda has long since been reaching into every aspect of our life. Almost every issue of consideration, it seems, is weighed in terms of East versus
West, or Communism versus non-Communism.
Deplorable as this is, perhaps it is to be expected when
the size and intensity of the conflict we are today involved in
is considered.
Nevertheless, our helplesness need not extend to our own
consumption. We can and should take greater pains to
select our reading, choosing those journals which have remained true to our traditions of honest and intelligent journalism. Most of all, we should read everything we pick up
with'a much more critical eye.
My Dog Has Fleas
ROD SMITH
SANDY ROSS
We see that Dave Brubeck,
the famous jazz pianist, is
coming to town this Sunday
night down at the Georgia
Auditorium. We imagine that
just about everyone in town
•will be 'there at half past eight,
because these days jazz is big
business, which means that you
have to pay fifty cent to get in.
The second coming of Mr.
Brubeck reminds us of the time
when WE tried to become jazz
musicians. It was like this:
"When are you guys going to
pay your bar bill?" asked Ceee,
the over-genial waiter. "Just as
soon as we get jobs, Ceee," we
said, "but just you wait! Right
now we're putting fireflies inside Cheezie bags, and we'll
sell them for Christmas tree ornaments.
"But Christmas is over."
"Alh, but there's next Christmas;, Ceee," we snappily replied. "H'.Kste makes watite, you
know."
"Yah, and taste makes waist
too, you slobs," he said poking
at our tummies at the point
where they were beginning to
peep 'between our belts and our
Mickey Mouse tee shirts.
"Have a oare you skally-
wag," we flung back at him,
"how do you know we're not
with child?"
"The kind of girls I've seen
you with I don't,"  he said.
"Okay, Ceee, you win," we
gaily replied. "Now, how about
a round of beers for the losers?"
But Cece's words of wisdom
had not gone in vain; as soon
as we ventured out onto the
city's streets, we set up the
banjo on the corner, and prepared to rip off a few rousing
elionises of Rock of Ages, and
other inspiring tunes, both
Western and Spcred.
"What'll we play first, Rod?"
Following Is tho complete
report of Clyde Batten, editor of the Varsity of the
University of Toronto, who
attended the 1954 International Union of Students
conference in Moscow as a
Canadian University Press
observer. The report was
given to the annual CUP
conference in Oitawt at
Christmas.—Ed.
Unfortunately the Press and
Information Department of the
International Union of Students thinks that the permanent address of the CUP is
Hart House at the University
of Toronto. Consequently we
were not surprised to receive
during tbe test week of June a
letter from the head office of
IUS which contained a request
for the CUP to send an observer /to the annual council
in Moscow trom the 20th to the
26th of August.
Immediately I contacted
Francois Vachon of the Quar-
tier Latin and Mary Draper of
the Western Gazette and asked
for permission to attend the
conference. They both agreed
that this would be all right
and in a few weeks I received
an official mandate from Yves
Guerard and Francois Vachon.
The expenses of the trip were
financed by a loan of $1000 I
had to make.
On arriving In Meseew the
first incident of note was the
attempt of the Canadian delegation to have the constitution with respect to membership clarified. This clause in
the constitution is very obscure and is interpreted so
loosely that in practice any
organisation, from any country, which has even the most
tenuous ef contacts with the
student world, can be a full
voting member.
The result of this interpretation is that the Australian
Federation of Labour Youth
which has about four thousand
members is a full voting member of the IUS while the Nat-
ional Union of Australian University Students is only an
observer and cannot vote. It
was this untenable situation
which the Canadian delegation
attempted to clear up with
little success.
Naturally my major concern
was with the Press Commission. The work of this commission was devoted mainly
to a discussion of thc report
handed down by the editorial
board of the Press and Information Department of the IUS.
In my main intervention I
was privileged to point out
the basic principles upon
which we base our work as
editors. v
It is our conviction that
the university paper is unique
in that it reflects the recurring
vitality of the university community. It is further privileged
in that it provides a forum for
that most controversial and incisive of human expression,
mature student opinion. It is
still further privileged in that
it is free from all external
pressures. However, we must
recognize that these privileges
entail very ,real responsibilities. The student newspaper
must be accurate and show
evidence of thorough investigation of the facts. It must
repudiate all semblance of bias
or prejudice, for the truth is
the greatest of all liberators.
On these two major points
our oganisation has been unable to agree with the Press
and Information Department
of the IUS. It is abvious that
"Something with only one
chord, I guess."
"Well, how about the 'If
There's Anything I Like To
Hear Its About Myself, So
Please Don't Talk About Me
When I'm Gone Blues'?"
"Well, I can't exactly play
that either."
"Why not? It's only got one
chord."
"Yeah, but the banjo's only
got one string, and I'm holding
my pants up with that."
It looked as if we were beaten; and as a mailer of fact, we
were, so we went: home.
And thit, ended our career
as j u-.i musicians, almost ov-
fore it started. But we feel sure
thai Mr. Brubeck will do a lot
better on Sunday night. At
least we hope so.
in so many cases we simply
do no* see eye to eye. Many
of the catchwords employed
in their periodicals—peace,
freedom, democracy are not
subject to the samo definition
as we are accustomed to attach to them. These catchwords are distasteful to us in
those connotations and upon
them and in their, interpretation we e*peslet»ee the widest
possible divergence.
However, We have noted the
change-in the nature of the
publications of the IUS., a
change which is so great that
the editorial board of the IUS
felt compelled to comment
upon it and to call it an improvement. To expect fundamental changes in the attitude
of Canadian students and editors on the basis of so transitory an improvement, particularly after so many years of
intense mistrust and bitter
suspicion, is nothing short of
arrant pipedreaming.
In 1953, Mr. Charles Taylor
sat on the press commission
of the council which met in
Warsaw. He made a suggestion
that material for IUS piilica-
tions shoulcj be solicited directly from the countries concerned. This was done because
of the unfortunate experiences
We have had with articles appearing in these publications.
At Toronto we had a person
who was submitting articles
to the Press and Information
Department which purported
to present thc viewpoint of the
students of Canada. These articles were written by the
leader of the Communist club
on the campus. It was toward
this type of incident that the
suggestion of Mr. Taylor was
directed.
Following that and the presentation of the Taylor Report
at the next NFCUS conference
NFCUS passed a motion to
the effect that the CUP should
send clippings and papers to
the IUS. According to the report of the PID they are receiving Le Carabin, McGill
Daily, Varsity and the Saskatchewan Sheaf. This is certainly
a representative cross-section
of student opinion in Canada.
(Continuod on Page 3)
See BATTEN
EMPLOYMENT
WANTED
FRENCH   COACHING.   MAD-
ame Fraser-Dcbacq, from Paris.
1202 Harwood. PAcific 5072.
* *      *
URGENTLY NEED RIDE from
6650  Raleigh.     Phone  Marge,
ELgin 2869.
s/fs eft tfs
RIDE WANTED FROM 48TH
& Main. Contact Mrs. Hubick,
193 E. 48th or R. Norminton,
4th Yr. Mech.'Eng.
* *      *
1 WOULD LIKE A RIDE
from 16th and Arbutus, both
to and from Varsity, to make
8:30 lectures, Mon.-Fri. Phone
George Taylor, ALma 1561.
*V *F V
GRADUATE AND POSTGRA-
dute Students — Your work a
specialty with us. Also University typing of all kinds. Competent work, dampus r.vtes.
ELOISE STREET, AL 0655-R.
Just off the campus.
*r        *r        9f.
TYPING, MIMEOGRAPHING.
Electric typewriter. Carbon
paper and ribbons generously
used. Accurate work. Mrs. F.
M. Gow, 4456 West 10th Ave.,
ALma  3682.
>(•%•>(.
FOR RENT
2 SINGLE FURNISHED RMS.,
private  bath,   nice  view,   one
block, 3 buses, shops. Ilth Ave.
West, of Alma. $7 weekly. Ph. \
AL.  0506M eevnings. i
* #       X*
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warm    basement    room    with
housekeeping   facilities,     Suitable for two girls   --   4518  W.'
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meri't, bachelor suite, with or
without furnilure. warm: self-
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* *       H*
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Attention engineering Students
The CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS has openings
for graduates and under-graduates In CIVIL, ELECTRIC -
AL, and MECHANICAL Engineering.
Their interviewing team will be on the campus
Thursday and Friday, January 13th and 14th.
Brochures and Application Forms are available at the
Personnel Office (Hot :M7 by the Armouries)
Do not delay—arrange your appointment today.
■_■_■
Is   Your   Future   Properly   and
Adequately   Planned ?
You can very easily determine and plan your future
through the scientific procedures now widely accepted
by leaders in business and industry.
DON'T BE MISGtJIDED-CONSULT
JOHN W. A. FLEURY
Personnel Consultant Industrial Psychologist
806 Stock Exchange Bldg. TAtlow 7748
.1
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
CIVIL SERVICE OF CANADA
MR. D. L. MeGIVERN
and
MR. R. B. GRIFFITHS
of the Civil Service Commission at Ottawa
W4LL VISIT
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
from
,    January 6 to January 10
inclusive
Students interested in exploring employment opportunities in
the Federal Civil Service should arrange nor interviews as
follows:
MB. D. L. MeGIVERN—Students in general Arts. Law. Com*
merce and Agriculture.
MR. R. B. GRIFFITHS—Students in Engineering. Physics,
Chemistry, Mathematics, etc.
Arrange ments for such interviews can be made through the
office of:  4
Col. J. F. MceLan,
Director of Personnel Services,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
EMPLOYMENT BULLETIN
If you are...
... a post-graduate student in Cnemistry, Chemical
Engineering, Geology or Geological Engineering;
. . a prospective graduate in Chemical, Metallurgical,
Geological or Mining Engineering, Honours Chemistry
or Honours Geology;
... an undergraduate in Geology, Geological Engineering or Mining Engineering;
. . . and are interested in a lare, progressive, well-
established Canadian company,
arrange with your employment service* to see the
COMINCO representative, January 17, 18, 19.
COMINCO
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada Limited
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
for
SCIENTISTS and ENGINEERS
» with the
Defence Research Board
• Join a vital, growing research and development
organization!
• Canada's defence research program offers graduates at the bachelor's, master's, and doctor's level
interesting full-time positions with ample opportunity for advancement.
REPRESENTATIVES   OF  THE  BOARD
WILL BE AT YOUR UNIVERSITY ON:
January 10 to 14, incl.
If you are interested in discussing employment with them,
obtain an application form frqm your university placement
officer. When completed, the forms should be returned to
the placement officer who will then arrange an interview
for you with our representatives.
COME IN AND EFT US TELL YOU ABOUT
CANADA'S DEFENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM Thursday, January 6, 1955
MacGregor
Honoured
For Work
Dr. Malcolm F. McGregor,
chairman of the UBC classics
department, has been named to
■hare with two other scholars
the Award of Merit of the American Philological Association.
He and his two colleagues,
B. D..Meritt and H. T. Wade-
Gery, completed a four-volume
work entitled "The Athenian
Tribute Lists," a study of the
financial records of Athens in
the fifth century B.C.
Prior. to his present teaching
position at UBC, Br. McGregor
taught at University of Cincinnati, where he took his doctorate.
e|t ep qp
UBC lost one of Its most popular professors with the death of
Professor George Finlayson
Drummond on December 21.
Professor Drummond taught
economics eX BBC for 25 years,
add was made professor emeritus in IMS because of a serious
iHnon.
Born in Scotland, he took his
MA at the University of St.
Andrews in 1917, and received
hifMSo sit the London School of
Economics in 1923.
He survived by his wife, two
Sons, one sister, and a brother.
Editora Spurn
Public's   Eye
OTTAWA—(CUP)— Suppression of news on the part of student newspapers in ihe interests
of better university public relations wes denounced by the Canadian University Press.
Editors attending the 17th annual CUP conference approved
a resolution presented by The
Ubyesey which decreed that
"Journalistic standards" rattier
than public relations should be
the primary consideration in the
printing of all news ttories.
The measure passed by a
majority of only*two votes.
BATTEN
(Continued from Page 2)
I closed my intervention by
pointing out that' a student
press blinded by the prejudices arising from within is as
much of a travesty on the profession of journalism as that
hampered by political and social pressures from the exterior. To us in Canada, ihe
publications of the IUS have
been clearly that. We regret
that they are either unable
or unwilling to perceive it.
We de welcome what little
change we have been able to
discern and we trust that it
augures well for the future.
In conclusion I cited that
NFCUS Declaration of Student
Rights and Responsibilities,
which point out that it is the
responsibility of every student
to seek, publish and discuss,
—the truth. I reminded them
of the words of Socrates,
echoed by one Jesus of Nazareth and later by the excommunicated Jew, Spinoza, "Ye
shall- know the truth and the
truth shall make you free."
Conscious as we are of these
aspects of IUS publications
which seem to us to be* less
than accurate and objective,
let us also be aware of those
areas wherein our attitude towards them has been at fault.
There can be no doubt that
the IUS is communist in principle and practice. However,
it represents a very significant portion of the student
population of the world. It is,
I believe, imperative that our
viewpoints and way of life
should be accurately represented in their press and that
theirs should be accurately
presented in ours.
In conclusion then, I would
recommend that the CUP
should make every effort to
send an observer lo the next
world Conference of the IUS
which will be held in the city
of Sofia, I believe.
Secondly the sending of information  to the IUS should
be undertaken by   the executive paper or some one paper
mandated by this conference.
C. Clyde Batten,
Editor
The Varsity.
.THE    UBYSSEY
Page Three
Dave Brubefck... in time
Brilliant Brubeck To
At Georgia
CUP Refuses
By PAT CARNEY
Dave Brubeck, creator of the most weird and wonderful
sounds in modern music is scheduled to appear in Vancouver
Sunday, Jan. 9, at the Georgia Auditorium.
Cited in a Time Cover story
as "the most exciting new jazz
artist at work today," pianist
Brubeck has been one of the
most stimulating influences on
the Jazz scene for several years.
His forceful, complex, yet lyrical music has created *a new
era for jazz, an era where counterpoint and polytonallty are
no longer baffling and irritating
dissonances to the average listener, but are becoming as familiar and as stimulating as Bach
and Bartok, possibly Brubeck's
most obvious inspirations.
Paul Desmond's serene and
incredibly lyrical alto sax will
be blowing with Brubeck with
a rhythm laid down by Joe
Dodge and Bob Bates described
by Time as "rich and firm as a
deep pile carpet."
Budding impressario Gerry
Hodge arranged Brubeck's tour
of colleges in 'the U.S. North
West. Ironically, Hodge found it
financially impossible to bring
Brubeck to UBC so has booked
him into the New Jazz Society
meeting Sunday.
Brubeck, who has won the dubious distinction of out-selling
Li'berace, has won an outstanding following among college
situdents. They may listen to Bix,
Dizzy or Hank Snow, but they
all dig Brubeck.
Anyone who knows the story
of the Oberlin concert; anyone
who has heard the slow and stately "StaTdust" or the Jazz Goes
to College album; anyone who
has ever experienced the sensation of being in >a Brubeck
audience—they will be at the
Georgia Sunday.
. Baby talk may be very charming to parents when their infant
is first learning to speak but it
is not wise to encourage this
habit as he begins to gain command of the language.
OTTAWA—(CUP) —The Ry-
ersonian, student newspaper of
the Ryerson Institute of Technology, was refused membership
in the Canadian University
Press by editors at the 17th annual CUP conference.
Produced by students in the
Institute's Journalism Department under the supervision of
professors, The Ryersonian was
refused membership on the
grounds that it is "too professional" and "not a college newspaper in the full sense of the
term."
However, CUP editors voted
to carry on a full exchange of
papers with the newspaper.
SOCIAL   NOTES
Cook Rites
Solemnized
Tall standards of white chrysanthemums graced the altar,
and white blooms of lily of the
valley festooned with purple
ribbons adorned the intimate
Bellingham Episcopal Church as
Miss Beverly Cook, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Cook of Nan-
aimo, became the bride of Mr.
Walter Richard Dacre Underhill,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard W.
Underhill of Vancouver.
The bride was radiant in a
stunning suit of cinnamon brown
of soft worsted, with matching
accessories of winter white and
brown.
The groom was nervous in a
blue  blazer..
The Reverend Dr. Francis
Webb solemnized the ceremony
which was of wide interest in
university circles.
Bride's attendant was Miss
Mary Ann Norton, who wore a
tasteful ensemble of green and
white with brown   accessories.
Best man was Mr. Jack Ridley of Vancouver, who proposed
the toast to the bride at a reception, held at the Leopold Hotel
in Bellingham.
After a short honeymoon in
Bellingham, • the bride and
groom returned to make their
home in Vancouver.1
Miss Cook is affiliated With
the Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority, and Mr. Underhill is affiliated with the Phi Delta Theta!
fraternity.
Mr. Underhill is president of
the  Alma Mater Society.
NFCUS
(Continued teem Page 1)
able debate—and then by a slim
margin. Some editors maintained (that "the same old issues" are
very Important ones, and argued
that for NFCUS to drop them
would mean ignoring some very
real needs of Canadian students.
Among the traditional NFCUS
Issues are campaigns for lower
book prices and government
scholarships.
Batten's second resolution
won easier passage. It asked thwt
students have full autonomy in
"all student affairs outside the
university curriculum."
The Varsity editor said UBC
is the only university in Canada
which can boast that ii possesses
a truly autonomous student government. "Others have a very
nearly completely autonomous
government," said B'atten,
while still others have almost no
government at all, let alone a
'free one."
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THERE'S A REASON -
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STATI0I1IRY AND
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In presenting the resolution,
Batten said its passage would
both quieten NFCUS complaints of "non-constructive"
criticism on the part of CUP,
and also provided NFCUS with
"what it has always been crying
for—an issue which will capture
the imagination of Canadian
students."
The address by NFCUS representative Peter Martin contained a plea for greater unity between NFCUS and CUP, phis a
bitter attack on what he termed
"Irresponsible editorials" which
—he said->-were often the result
of purely personal antipathies
between university editors end
local representatives.
1088 Seymour St.,
Vancouver, 1,0.
FHm Glossies Cords
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Get your costume at the special student rate of $4.00 at
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 a.m. • 5 p.m.   Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned and Operated by
The University of B.C.
The little old lady fell down)
the stairs and broke her leg
The doctor, after he had put the1
leg in a cast, warned her that
she wasn't to walk up and down
the stairs. After several months
of slow healing, the cast we removed.
Husk an t
Photographer and Camera Sales
4888 West 10th Ave. JACK RUSHAUT
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BUYING A CAMERA?
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jr~ iNCOftPORATeo a** may te7o.       ""'•TV
A Page Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6, 1955
T^eTfTfTTToNA^SoiiND*
WESTERN WASHINGTON
COLLEGE VIKINGS"
ettLIKdHAM
WASHINGTON^
COLLEGE  OF
BASKETBAI
CONFERENCE^'1955
ALTA
PUGET SOUND   *•&#£,
WHITWORTH
COLLEGE URATES"
LOGGERS"
TACOMA
PACIFIC IUJHE&N iSLADlATOgy
CENT WASHINGTON
>IL0CAT5M
EASTERN
COLLEGE
CMtNiy
WASHINGTON
"SAVAGES"
Sports Editor—KEN LAMB
Few   Fans  See
Birds   Drop  Game
The Thunderbird hockey team showed flashe's of brilliance
last night in the first game of a double header at the forum,
but flashes were'nt enouglh and the fast skating New Westminster club shut out the Birds 6-0.
The hard checking of the Birds
.STICKING HIS LARGE NOSE over the clapboard along
the 49th parallel, Totie takes a look at the 1955 Thunderbird opposition in the Evergreen circuit. Note the smile.
L'lt's become fixed after six year wearing but maybe for
once his teeth will show. Gome sometime in March he
may be gnashing the same teeth as he has done for some
years. Time will tell.
Conference Opens Friday
Birds Face CPS. PLC, Odds
couldn't overcome the goal
mouth finesse of the Royal City
kids. Nor did the Birds succeed
in puncturing the fine defense
thrown up by New Westminster
goalie George Wood.
The New Westminster Club
broke through for two goals in
each period, and on five of them
UBC goalie Howie Thomas never
had much of a chance.
Standout player for UBC was
defenseman Bob Gilhooley who
took on angry New Westminster-
ites two at a time and always
came out on his feet. Besides
rebuffing the overtures of the
Royal City fans, Bob played a
heady game on defense.
But the Birds' loss was incidental and so was the crowd, all
103 ot them of which eight were
UBC fans. Nice support wot?
Proven  Rookies Meet
Buchans' Conquerors
By KEN LAMB
1.
.'; Evergreen Conference basketball officially opens this
weekend when the 1955 edition of the Birds and UBC Memorial
Gym play hosts to the CPS Loggers and PLC Gladiators.
. Gladiators are the 1954 winners of the Totem Tournament,
a trophy they copped with a
one point win over, the Birds.
PLC are also conquerors of Seattle Buchans, .an aggregation
now winning more games than
the Clover Leafs in the Northwest set-up.
.NO INFO
CPS meanwhile, though they
have sent along no information
re their omnipotent axemen, are
expected to carry on somewhat
in the same fashion in which
they left off last year, and will
no doubt play as a team fitting
one of the top three positions.
And what about the third
team, the one most important
in this corner of the province?
Athletes'
Clinic
Opens
The UBC department of P.E.,
in conjunction with the Canadian Association for Health, P.E.,
and Recreation, is holding a four
day clinic for basketball and
track and field.
STARTED
Basketball clinic opened last
night, with Porky Andrews in
the chair. Second session will be
held Jan. 10, starting at 9 a.m.
Western Washington basketball
coach Bill MacDonald will lecture on the organization of team
play at the high school level.
Track and field clinic opens
Saturday, Jan. 8 at 10:00 a.m.
with Fred Rowell, national
track and field chairman officiating along with Bus Phillips and
Bob   Osborne  of  tiie   P.E.  .stall'.
CONTINUES
It continues Sunday at the
same time. Registration fees,
available at the gym, arc $2.00
for the track and field clinic
and $1.00 for the basketball
session.
For further info phone the
gym,    Alma    Hi! I I    or    see    Bus
Phillips.
Well, the Birds will enter the
series as underdogs because facts
are facts and the Birds are
Birds, But not nectssarily for
them.
DIRTY GLASS
This is as good a time as any
to forecast—having borrowed
Uncle Ezra's crystal ball, And
Al, the nejxt time you make
home-brew in it would you
wash it. The aroma almots killed my secretary—that the Birds
will win four games in the conference, which will be double
last* season's all-time record of
two.
So things look better. The
biggest worry of all, the rookies,
have come through. Pomfret's
'55 five looks as good as his '54.
ROOKIES STAR
Fellows like Ed Wild, Jim
Carter, Jim Polock, Herb Forward and Stu Madill, who before the season were unknown
quantities as first string material
have come through with not only
flying, but jet propelled, colors.
So, come Friday evening, at
about 8:30, after a prelim game
featuring the UBC Braves and
the Lord Byng squad, after Bus
Philliys and accompanying dignitaries have officially opened
the proceedings, it should be an
interesting   ball-game.
After all, who could accuse
one of being sentimental if he
were to bet on the Birds. They're
bound to win sooner or later.
ENGINEERS LEAD INTRAMURALS,
BASKETBALL ENTRIES WANTED
With one-half the intramural season finished, it appears the Engineers, despite their miserable showing in the
cross-country, are dominating the point totals.
The Redshirts lead the pack with 202 points. Phi Delts
have 160, Commerce 117, Alpha Delts 115, and Beta Theta
Pi. 112.
And Dick Mitchell will be extremely incensed if the
entries for the intramural basketball sked are not in his
clutching palms by Monday, January 10.
COME TO THE POST
BALL GAME BALL
There will be a dance.
Name: Basketball Bounce.
Place: Women's Gym.
Time: 9 to who knows when
Friday   night.
Price: $1.25 per pair.
Music:   Brick   Henderson.
Object:   Post   exam   sorrow
drowning and wake holding.
Rugger Opens Again
Where's  P. J W.  Gone?
The Rugger schedule picks up from a three-week layoff
this Saturday when the Chiefs entertain the Kats on the infallible turf at Johnny Owen stadium.
TOMMIES
Tommyhawks will meet Rowing Club on the Aggie field and
the Braves will do battle with
an opponent as yet unknown,
Though off the current performance of the second team wonders, the result is a foregone
conclusion, regardless of who
the opposition  is.
A fourth team is in the offing.
Let it be announced throughout the realm that Don Coryell,
more notably known as a football coach, will hold class at
noon on the gym field for aspirants to play English ruggah
under  his   tutelage.
RUMOURS
As yet unnamed, the fourth's
are rumoured to be known as
the Blunderbirds. But that is
a   rumour.
Biggest story in rugby circles
this week is that fullback Bill
Whyte, who will be back in
•two weeks, has got a haircut.
Voila Peter Dyke!
He was unrecognized yesterday by at least four close friends
Albert has even considered using
him as a secret weapon, though
it appears Bill's famous trick
of hiding the ball under his
curly locks will have to go by
the boards.
VOILA PETER1
The opposition might now
stand a chance of catching him.
Voila Peter Dyke!
And Ted Hunt has lost his
boots, Anyone knowing the
whereabouts will be met with
open arms if he tells Ted all.
Only the Fij Isalanders play rugger in bare feet, so the Brave's
scrum half would appreciate any
assistance.
And where is Pete Worthington?
Badminton
Tonight
Men's Gym
AUSTIN SALES AND SERVICE CENTRE
tfcriC&rft
TENTH and ALMA ST,      CEdar 8105
FILMSOC
For Student, And STArr Qni.m /
TODAY
12:00
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337 W. Pender
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Discount fer Students
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BAyvUw 3425
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If no answer CEdar 8878
Alma Hall, 3679 W. Broadway
Dressmaking and Tailoring to your own
individual suggestions.
Parisian Ladies' Dress Shop
Opposite Safeway on Tenth Avenue
"COME IN AND SEE OUR SEPARATES"
THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF OF
CASTLE JEWELLERS
Wishes to acknowledge with thanks your patronage in the
past. May we continue to serve you at our down town store,
752 Granville. MA. 8711. Wishing* you all a very Happy New
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A. SMITH, Manager.
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SUN LIFE OF  CANADA

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