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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1923

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume V.
VANCOUVER, B. G., FEB. 1, 1923
No. iaj
VICTORIA
ENGINEERS
INVASION
Invaders  Carry  Off Honours  in
Two Events—and Then
Everybody Danced
WOMENS' PUBLIC SPEAKING
CONTEST REVEALS TALENT
Varying Points of View, Serious and Otherwise, are Expressed
by Argument and Wit—Miss Winnie
Cawthorne Takes First Place
G.GOULDING    i
ADDRESSES
TRACK CLUB
Victoria College engineered a successful invasion last Saturday when
they downed the Varsity senior ladies'
team and the U. B. C. intermediate
firsts after two fast and hard-fought
contests, which were featured by the
snappy combination play of the visitors. An added attraction was the
scheduled league game between the
Varsity senior A quintette and X-
Normals, which resulted in a win for
the Varsity 28-19.
INTERMEDIATE   GAME
The first game between the Varsity
and Victoria College intermediates,
was a desperately close affair, and
had Varsity played a steadier game
around the basket in the second
frame the result would have been a
much reversed version of the 26-24
score by which the University quintette lost. The half time score was
16-13. Tn the second half Varsity
pulled up and the score was tied at
18 all and at 21 all. However, Varsity
could not catch up to the fast-stepping
visitors who, aided by Hartley, a former Varsity senior A man, were displaying an excellent brand of basketball.    The final  score was 26-24.
The teams: Varsity — Henderson
and S. Arkley; Fulton; McKay and
Gill. Victoria uollege — Christie;
Hoadley, Hemingway. Hartley; Forbes
and Caviness.
 (Continued   on   Page   8)
The Week's Events
Thursday,  Feb.  1—Auditorium, 4 p.m.
Lectures on "Vocations for Women."
(Auspices of W.  U.  S.).
Physics Building, 8:15 p.m., Vancou-
■ nstitute Lecture — Architectural
Institute   of   B.   C.     "Town-Planning"—G.    L.    Thornton    Sharpe,
Esq.,  A.R.I.B.A.
Friday,   Feb.  2—Auditorium,  8  p.m.—
"High-Jinks," K. of P. Hall—Arts
Men's Smoker.
Saturday, Feb. 3—(Weather Permitting)—Rugby, MacKechnie Cup —
Varsity vs. Victoria.
Soccer—Imperial Cup Game—Varsity
vs. Province.
Basketball:—Normal Gym— 7 p.m.—
Three Games.
Monday, Feb. 5—Reception in the Auditorium for Arts '23 by the Dean
and Mrs. Coleman.
Tuesday,  Feb. 6—Sigma Delta Kappa
Meeting, Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Engineering  Discussion   Club  meeting,  First Year Science  Classroom.
"Whaling Industry of North Pacific"
Wednesday, Feb. 7— Meeting of the
Agricultural Discussion- Club, Auditorium, 8  p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 8—Vancouver Institute
Lecture—"Folk Lore" — Miss M. L.
Bollert.
The speeches delivered by the competitors in the Women's Public Speaking Contest this year were of an exceptionally   high   order.
The first speaker, Miss Margaret
Kerr, Nursing '26, took as her subject "Canadian Sub-Arctics." In a
clear, concise manner she outlined the
possibilities of the Northern region
of Canada. This is ideal cattle country she said, where Caribou, Reindeer,
and Musk-ox could be extensively
raised as food for many million of the
world's hungry population.
In a quiet conventional voice Mis^
Agnes Gillam, Arts '24, gave a description of a typical rural school
house, showing that many advantages
are derived from the consolidation of
four or five such schools. The maintenance of small ungraded schools i<?
nothing short of an injustice to both
pupils and teachers. 	
Miss Winnie Cawthorne '24, gave an
entertaining historical account of the
Ku  Klux  Klan.
At its inception it was merely a
small social club. Later, at the time
of the negro emancipation it was reorganized for political purposes, the
aim being to protect the weak and
innocent from the powerful bucks.
Occasionally the night-riders stooped
to physical maltreatment, but usual'y
they < ontented themselves with "scar
ing their victims  to death."
Miss Wilma Morden, '23, gave some
reasons "Why I do not believe in
evolution." In an earnest, thoughtful
manner she pointed out that evolution is just an hypothesis, although
regarded by some people as an established   fact.     Darwin   himself   confes-
(Continued on Page 2)
World's Champion Walker Tells
Track Enthusiasts How
To Keep  Fit
APPETITES WILL
GATGH DIGESTIONS
More   Pie   'n   Coffee   'n   Butter
For Patrons of the
Cafeteria
.More reforms in the Cafeteria!
Instead of the pudding or bakers' pie
which usually rounds off a 25 cent
luncheon, real, home-made pie may
be had for an additional nickel. Miss
Handsford may soon wonder at the
neglect suffered by her equally excellent puddings. Note—this is REAL
pie.
For this same 25 or 30 cents thirsty
lunchers may now have two cups of
tea or coffee (not milk). (N.B.—This
thirst must be the result of a full cafeteria lunch, and not a paper bag one).
Tn the matter of butter, two pieces
are allowed, but one may ask for the
extra bit instead of taking it off a
plate meant for someone else.
It should not be imagined that the
cafeteria in the afternoon is the bustling place it is at the noon hour. From
3 to 5 one may enjoy a leisurely cup
of tea or cocoa with toast or crumpets
and honey, or toasted cheese sandwiches and other good things, at
dainty tea tables presided over by
Miss  Handsford's  trim  assistants.
This sounds too good to be true but
a visit to the cafeteria is convincing.
SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIPS.
The Registrar's Office has received
notification that applications are in
order for three Fellowships in Scientific Research. The Fellowships are
of an annual value of £175 (or $875),
and the holders will be attached to a
department of the Imperial College of
Science and Technology, London, England. Further information may be
obtained from the Registrar's Office.
LECTURES AND
RECITALS COMING
Attractive    Musical    Programme
Being Prepared by
Varsity Club
For this season's activities the
Musical Society has prepared an interesting and attractive programme.
No student recitals will be held but
a series of lectures on the history and
appreciation of music will be given.
These lectures will be illustrated by
selections from the works of the great
masters.
The permanent Honorary President
of the Society, Professor E. H. Russell
of Victoria College, will hegln the
series by a lecture to be given in the
Auditorium on February 14th, at 3:15
p.m. He will deal with the early development of music, taking especially
the classic masters, Buck, Handei,
Mozart and Beethoven. The charac-
terestic features of their works will
be shown in approDriate selections. * -
Professor Russell, has made a special
study of the history of music this lecture should be <JT great interest to all
music lovers.
Through co-operation with the Vancouver Music Teachers' Association
the Musical Society has been able to
secure Mrs. Louise Van Ogle of the
Department of Music, University of
Washington, for the evening of February 26th. Mrs. Van Ogle, a specialist in piano and the history of music,
is widely known as a gifted and able
lecturer. She will speak on the work
of the early ^Romantic composers, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Schubert, Van
Weber and Chopin. Her lecture, likewise, will be illustrated with suitable
selections to be plaved by members
and friends of the Society.
| (Continued   on   Page  6)
At a most enthusiastic meeting of
the U. B. C. track club, George
Goulding, world's champion walker,
and a booster of athletics in Vancouver, gave an interesting and effective
address about training. Goulding
started his speech by describing the
build of an athlete for various standard running events and remarked
that no definite rule could be made as
in the century dash and in a marathon, runners of all heights and builds
had starred in the past. But as a
general rule the shorter events such
as the 440 yard dash, required a man
of muscle and good physique, whilst
a small well knit man had the advantage in some of the shorter distance
races. Alf Shrubb was quoted as an
example of a man who was of comparatively small ouilt yet holds practically all the world's records from
two to ten miles and will probably
continue to do so.
Track  Training.
Goulding then outlined a procedure
that might be well adapted for any
man desirous of keeping himself fit.
The point that George Goulding
stressed most, however, was clean
living and lots of sleep. Any man
who was training should retire early
and get at least eight hours' sleep
and should cut out dances. (How
many track men were at the Aggie
dance Friday night?)
Mr. Goulding stated that, considering the lack of equipment we had
here compared with some of the other
'colleges, he was glad to see such an
interest taken in one of the finest of
all sports, namely, track. He expressed his willingness to aid at any
time in whatever way he could and
(Continued on Page 2)
NOISE IN THE HALLS.
"Jock" Lundie, the Marshall, has issued the following statement regarding noise in the halls, intimating that
drastic measures to preserve silence
may be taken if the present honour
system is not more effective:
"Complaints concerning noise in the
common room and corridors still continue. The faculty has enough to put
up with without the petty annoyance
caused by a few thoughtless and irresponsible people who insist on acting
as if they were attending kindergarten. Neither the lecturer nor the
students attending lectures can make
progress when loud talking or scuffling is going on outside.
We must vindicate our student self-
government, or acknowledge that our
efforts are a failure.   TTJUM EST." THE    UBYSSEY
February 1st; 1823
THE VARSITY CLOTHES SHOP
Our Spring Stock of Young
Men's Pep Suits, styled in
• one, two and three button,
high waisted, are now in
stock.
$27.50   to   $37.50
Fashion Craft
Thos. Foster & Co.
LIMITED
514  Granville   St.
ONE   STORE   ONLY
OVEIRCOATS
We are giving prices on Good
Overcoats that can't be duplicated.
It will pay: you to visit our
January Sale.
■   □
Turpin Bros., Ltd.
Men's   Outfitters
629   Granville  St.
DRESSMAKING
MISS  SIMPSON
LEE   BtriLDNQ
Broadway   and   Main
Phone Fairmont 3699-R
ED. DA MOTT A
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather St.
•DISTINCTIVE
Engraved Calling Cards
Dance 'Invitations
Programmes
Place; Oards.
■■j:i:   \;:t i;:i'i   "■' ''
3. W. ^hrke< Co.
. ...^I/ED,. ;.
Enstavers, Pnnter.s,.Society Stationers
.    . 651 SEiXMouS S?REET
(Adioiniha Hudson's Bay)
"Dominance th'rtAjfefi fixfelualvenesa"
<   ,.- --■ ■■■:   ■..!,. -A-.l:  v    '■.'":'
Dora tells her Diary
about the Aggie Dance
Friday,  Jan.   26—7:30  p.m.—
It has been a usual college day,
dear Diary, monotonous and dull. I
skipped one lecture, hoping to see
"Him' but he wasn't in the hall today—I don't think he can be an Arts
man!
It is terrible weather, snow and
slush—what a night for a dance—a
hick dance at that! I don't really
want to go a scrap—but Dick's calling at 8:45, so I must run and dress.
*******
Saturday, Jan. 27, 2:30 a.m.—
I simply cannot go to sleep without
telling you about the Dance, Diary.
I'm frightfully tired, but, oh, so excited! It was the best dance yet—the
best crowd, the best music, the best
"eats" and—to top it all—I met "Him."
and "He's" an Aggie, at that.
Lester's was decorated for the occasion. There was a mesh-work of
serpentine hanging from the ceiling,
a nine-piece orchestra and real, live
chicken in cages!
The programmes were all numbered
(the lucky number drew a huge box
of chocolates), and on each was the
name of a "rendezvous, the Hen
House, the Cow Barn, the Horse
Stable and the Sheep Pen—I was in
the Hen  House—can you beat it!
Supper was wonderful, Diary—-heaps
of chicken sandwiches, cake, ice cream
cai dy and olives, and at each place,
the  duckiest little  favours.
After supper, some "Aggie" men put
on a skit—but I was powdering my
nose—I   missed   it!
Why, oh why, do all good dances
have to stop at 1 a.m.? I'm so sorry
for those who didn't go—but then,
there's still the Science Dance—goodnight,   Diary—until   morning:—!
TEA   FOR   PLAYERS'   CLUB
On Saturday afternoon, January 27,
Mr. F. G. C. Wood entertained the
members of the Players' Club at a
delightful tea at the home of his
mother,  Mrs.  Wood.
The tea table, artistically decorated,
was presided over by M rs. Wood and
Mrs. Larsen. while Miss Dorothy
Adams and Miss Norah Willis, former
presidents of the club, assisted in
serving.
An enjoyable contest which caused
much diversion was won by Miss
Grace Hope, who received a "corsage
bouquet" of violets, and Mr. Percy
liarr who was presented with a "bou-
toniere."
WOMEN'S PUBLIC SPEAKING
(Continued from  Page 1)
sed    that "In    spite of all    efforts cf
trained   observers  there  is  no  record
of one change of species into another."
The fifth speaker, Miss Dorothy
Murray '25, took as her subject "The
signs of the Times." She declared
"Some people would lead you to think
that the world is on its way to perdition. On the contrary, everything
points to a glorious future." (Loud
applause). Miss Murray then gave
an account of progress in the domains
of politics, religion  and  science.
The audience was asked by Miss Jo
Paradis '24. to consider themselves
c'tizens of Canada in the last year of
this century. In 1976 women had
gained the upper hand in politics, and
had deprived men of the right to vote.
"Vote for Men" was the speaker's platform. In conclusion she said, "I will
leave to them the privilege of thanking you."
On behalf of the men. Mr. Lome
Mo'-gan moved a vote of thanks to the
Inst speaker.
After < considerable consultation the
iiidges;-JV(r.s.- Clark^-pr. Buchanan and
■ Drr :\racDenald deeidsd that first place
sbpuld-.be -given tOrMiss Winnie- Caw^
throne; and-se-cortd:j.to MissJo ParadR
^-.r-jie/.y.ephHrerrtsv were -then served by
the Women-a'Literary "Society.':-
Arts '23 Girls Win
Swimming Meet
(By D. S.)
The first event of the Girl's Interclass sports for the Spencer Cup was
held last Wednesday at Chalmers
Tank. The meet was attended by an
enthusiastic crowd, who it may be
said showed their true sportsmanship
by the way they cheered, regardless of the class to which they
belonged-, and by the fine backing
which each year gave its representatives. Those competing tried hard,
not for themselves but for their classes. If the other events for this cup
are as successful it augurs well for
this year far surpassing any other in
girls' athletics.
In the first event, the plunge was
won by Frances Gifnae, Arts '25, who
plunged 48% feet, nearly the length
of the tank. Muriel Linton, '26, came
a close second, and Dorothy Holmes,
'24, came third.
Alary Chapman started piling up
points for Arts '23 by swimming the
50 yard open style, and from the results it will be seen that once started
the class went straight ahead to first
place. Beth Tingley, '26, came second
and Phyllis Edgell, '24, third.
The honors of the third race, the
breast stroke, were carried off by
Sylvia Thrupp, Arts '2r>; Gladys Weld,
'23 and Pern James, '24, coming second  and  third  respectively.
ProbUbly the prettiest and most
keenly contested event was the diving. Mary Chapman, Arts '23, and
Phyllis Edgell, Arts '24, were so close
for first place that Norman Cox. who
judged the events, found it necessary
to have them repeat their dives several times. The decision was finally
given to Miss Edgell. Margaret McKechnie  came  third.
The Freshettes are certainly to be
congratulated on their splendid relay
team, composed of Margaret McKechnie, Muriel Linton and Beth Ting-
ley. Second place was won by Arts
'23, and third by Arts '24.
It is curious to note that at the end
of the relay, Arts '23 and Arts '26
were tied for first place, each with 11
points, so that the 50 yard back stroke
was the deciding feature. Mary Chapman, Arts '23, tied with Eloise Angell,
Arts '24, and won first place for her
vear. Svlvia Thrupp. Arts '25, came
third.
This race ended the swimming
meet, the teams standing, 1st, Arts '23,
with 13% points; 2nd, Arts '26 with
11 points; 3rd, Arts '24 with 10%
points;  4th. Arts '25 with 8 points.
GEORGE GOULDING TALKS
(Continued from Page 1)
earnestly hoped that track would
make good at U. H. C. as at other
colleges. Mr. Goulding was thanked
by President Hope for his splendid
speech and Hope expressed the sentiment of the meeting when he said
that everyone had materially benefited
by the address.
The regular business of the meeting was taken up and motions were
put forward as follows: Moved that
there be two big blocks given at the
track meet for track champions; one
to the all around champion of the
Pentalhelon system, to be run off on
a separate day, and the second to the
aggregate man the same as last year.
The man who wins the All Around
championship will be a more all
around man in.that he will have to
compete in certain fixed events ,
220. yards; (2) 1 mile; (3) shot, put;
(4) broad, jump; (5) any event he may
choose on the track meet day. The
pqiptg for. the all around do not count
for...the Faculty Cup. The .javelin
.event was added as an aditional event,
r.as it is common in all .other colleges.
Students Loose Leaf Books
and Supplies
Drawing Sets,  etc.
THE VANCOUVEB
STATIONERS, LTD.
Booksellers,  Stationers  and
Printers
Sey. 5119 683 GranvilU St.
D
PURDYS
Headquarters
Chocolates
Ice Cream
Fountain
Drinks
Light   Lunch
Afternoon Teas
A   Specialty
□
Vancouver's Young Men's
Store
33rd Anniversary
Sale
Yomiii'  Mens  Suits  and
Overcoats   at   greatly   reduced  prices.
Tuxedo   Coats   and   Suits
in all Sizes
fo
Clubb & Stewart
Ltd.
623 Granville St.
309 Hastings St. W.
THE GREAT WEST
Life Insurance Co.
Head Office, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Policy  No.  P 31366 Age 30
Amount $1000.00 - Premium $31.70
Plan—20 Payment Life With
Quinquennial Profits
Caih Dividends—
Sth   Year $25.00
10th Year  _  43.85
15th  Year    55.00
Accumulation of Dividends
at 6 per cent. $158.40
■ProfiU required at end of
the 15th year to convert
to "a paid-up Policy  115.00
640 HASTINGS ST. WEST
Vancouver Branch Office February 1st, 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster
Limited
TWO  STORES
Society   Brand   Clothes
Shop
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville
Fit-Reform   Wardrobe
345 Hastings Street, West
Clothes for Young Men and Men
Who Stay Young
Alter You Graduate
Remember
THE
Mutual Life of Canada
Est    1869
Strictly Canadian
Purely Mutual
Annual Dividends
Reducing: Premiums.
For Full Information Apply
WILLIAM ... TWISS
Manatfer
402 Pender St.  West
Vancouver, B. C.
Get a
VARSITY PENNANT
For the
FOOTBALL   MATCHES
"We have them in stock
SHAW & McCILL, LTD.
SPORTING GOODS
658   Robson   St.
8ervlce  Bldg., 4  Doors  East  of
Granville  St.
They Say
We're Crazy
Nine out. of ten people
who mention the move
say we're crazy for going
down to 1020—it's business suicide, and all the
rest of it.
However we 're going
over the top with the idea
and if we die we die with
our boots on.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor. Robson and Granville
Streets
i BLUEBIRDS TOO GOOD FOR  VARSITY'S CHANCE TO COP
!    VARSITY PUCK ARTISTS    SOCCER HONOURS GOOD
The first game between Varsity and
: Bluebirds to decide the winner of the
I intermediate   city  championship   was
I played  last Friday at the arena and
resulted   in   a  decisive   win   for   the
| "Birds"  10-2.    The  Varsity  team  did
: not   play   their   usual   game,   and   although   the   squad    tried    hard,    they
were at times decidely outclassed by
j the  superior  brand  of  hockey which
: the   Bluebird   team   as   a   whole   un-
'corked.
The  Bluebirds  played  good hockey
all   the  way   and   every  man   was  in
good  form.    The    first    peroid    gave
some evidence of what was to come,
when the Bluebirds ran in three goals.
However, Varsity never gave up hope
of trying to even matters up and with
more encouragement on the side lines
might yet have saved the game.    The
second  period  went  to the  Bluebirds
by a wide margin, and their superiority was very marked.    Four counters
were  collected  in  all.    Stoodley, Varsity net minder, could not fathom the
Bluebird   sharpshooters   who   pressed
in   continually;   his   clearing   was   erratic and the usual stonewall defensive which he presents was brokein on
numerous     occasions.        .McCutcheon
played   a   good     game     for     Varsity,
breaking   away   fast   and   leading   re-
j peated  attacks  on   the  Bluebird  goal.
\ McPherson  also   played  a  fair  game,
and   combined   with   McCutcheon   for
; Varsity's first score.    The third period
; opened with the Bluebirds on the war-
j path  and   playing  a  fine  combination
I game  they   were  able  to  go  through
for three more counters, while Varsity
j was collecting one  through  McCutcheon.    Colton, defense man for Varsity,
j was injured early in the game.
!     The    Teams:       Varsity — Stoodley;
Colton,    Newmarch;     Demidoff,    McCutcheon, MCPherson.    Subs, Morgan,
Lipsey, McKinnon.    Bluebirds—Campbell;   Anderson,  Clarke;   Davis, Gage,
Barkdell.       Subs,    Morrow,     Murphy,
Johnston.
SECOND   GAME
The second game of the play-offs
will be played tomorrow night. The
handicap which the team has to overcome is a. great, but not impossible,
one, and the Varsity aggregation of
puck chasers deserve all the support
which U. B. C. rooters can give.
|    Owing    to the    inclemency    of the i
weather  and   the   poor  conditions   of !
; the   grounds   resulting   therefrom,   all
i Soccer    games   were     cancelled   last
' Saturday.    The Varsity did  not meet
the Province in the first round for the
Imperial   Cup,   but   will   do   so   at   a
later date.
Varsity  now  stands  second  in  the
i First Division, four points behind the
j league leading Veterans, but with two
games in hand.    To tie the  Soldiers,
the     Collegians   must   win   the   next
\ two games, and a playoff may then be
necessary.
The Province team is the Students'
nearest adversary in the league. They
are one point to the "bad," but, even
so, they are extremely dangerous. Although weakened considerably by the
loss of Whitehurst they have secured
the services of Vernon Whitworth,
well-known to Vancouverites as a brilliant middle distance runner. Whitworth is a valuable acquisition to the
Newspapermen, although he was a
, little off form in his last match.
Tom Wilkinson has returned to the
: Varsity team and he showed to great
i advantage in his last game. Although
| the Blue and Gold are junable to
i utilize him for Imperial Cup games,
Johnny McLeod is within a few hours
of the city and in a crucial situation
I may always be relied upon to play his
I old  position.
j With the Province and Veterans dis-
j playing somewhat mediocre form the
j chances of the Varsity seem extremely
I rosy, and the team is worthy of en-
: thusiastic support.
BASKETBALL   SHOTS
Varsity Basketball quintettes will
hold sway next Saturday night at the
Normal Gymn when three league
games will be played. The Varsity
Senior A squad is scheduled to play
the Native Sons and the Varsity Senior Ladies and Intermediate Firsts
will stack up against the Adanac
quintettes from New Westminster. All
games are important and will have
a direct bearing on the standing of
the teams in the different leagues. A
good crowd is expected out to cheer
on the teams. At present the Senior
Ladies are leading the way in the
Senior Ladies League, while the In-
terediates are very much in the running for honors. The Senior A men
are holding down the cellar position
in the Senior A league, but with more
moral support from Varsity rooters
still have a good chance of boosting
their stock. The standing of the Senior A league is as follows:
W L
Y. M. C. A     4 1
Native  Sons       4 2
Ex-Normals         2 4
Varsity  _     l 4
SENIOR LADIES DEFEAT
ADANACS.
While a large majority of the fair
ones of the University were indulging
in the light fantastic at Lester's Cow
Hop last Friday night, the Varsity
Senior Ladies' Basketball Team was
attempting an invasion into the stronghold of the fast-stepping Adanacs, at
New Westminster. The invasion was
successful and the Varsity squad was
returned the victors by a score of 2*5—
11. After the first five minutes of play,
which was productive of very even
basketball, Varsity got going in fine
style and ran the score up to 18 points.
The remainder of the half was distinctly in Varsity's favor, the exhibition of passing being excellent. Early
in the game Helen Tatlow sprained
her thumb, but continued in spite of
the injury. In the second half the Adanac girls tightened up and the play
became more even. Eve Eveleigh
turned out with the Varsity squad and
played her old speedy game, but seemed to have a weighty problem in her
check. Doris Lee played a strong game
at guard, while Isobel Russell intercepted many passes and notched 4
points. Gladys Weld figured prominently in nearly every play and played
a hard game throughout. The final
j score was 26—11 in favor of the Blue
land Gold. !
'    The team and individual score:  Eve
i Eveleigh     (41,    Helen    Tatlow     (16),
j Gladys  Weld   (2),    Doris   Lee,   Isobel
Russell   (4).
VARSITY  THEATRE   NIGHT
The Orpheum theatre will be the
scene of the Annual Varsity Theatre
Night. This much-anticipated event
is to take place Thursday, February
22, and blocks of tickets will be supplied to the class presidents within
the next week. The committee suggests that students procure tickets
promptly in order to be sure of get-
ing a seat with the members of their
own   classes.
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods   and   Bicycle
Dealer
829 Pender St. W.
If you haven't found
the right corset
it is because you haven't gone to
the right shop. If you want an
exactly-right , corset—one that
will always be comfortable, one
that will never need "breaking,"
one that will make you look
your best—all you need to do is
to permit us to properly fit you
according to the never-failing
system of corsetry.
Corsets and Brassiere for
every figure type
Drysdale's Corset Shop and  Fitting   Rooms—Second   Floor
UMITCO
575  Granville   St.
SEYMOUR   3540
printing
Invitations
Dance   Programs
School Annuals
Magazines
Lionel Ward & Co. Ltd.
PRINTERS
Phone Sey. 195
318 HomerSt.     :    Vancouver, B.C.
BROADWAY TAXI
D.   A.   RITCHIE
Res. Bay. 2884-Y
Fair. 2762 2558 Heather St. THE/ ;.D.'BY.B'BEY
Febbiary lg^.j,
I  (Mei^ber  Picific later-CoIIegMM Pre»»
i •'*    ' Association)
I ■*
Issued   every   Thursday   by   the   Publications
Board  of the University of  British Columbia.
■For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising
Manager.
'! EDITORIAL   STAFF:
F.jlilor-in-Chief H.  M.  Cassidy ',
Senior   Editor A.   G.   Bruun
Associate  Editors Miss  P.  I.   Mackay
C. C. Upshall j
Eric,   \Y.   Jackson .
Feature    Editor Cliff    Dowling
Literary Editor ...Miss  Lucy  Ingram
Exchange Editor Miss Helen Turpin
Sporting  Editor H.   B.   Cantelon
Chief Reporter A. A. Drennan
Feature Writers J.  C.  Nelson
REPORTOR1AL   STAFF:
R. A. McLachlan.   Eve   Eveleigh,       K.   Schell,
Jean   Faulkner,  Grace Hope
L.     Buckley,    H.     B.    Goult, H. E.F. Clark
A. Hugo Ray.
BUSINESS   STAFF:
Business Manager  C. S.  Evans
Assist.   Business   Manager G.   F.   Hagelstein
Advertising Manager R.   E.  Walker
Circulation Manager  F.  J.  Brand
Business Assistants  H. O. Arkley
J. Schaffer
J. Bridges
J.  Keenan
Editor   for   the   Week  C. C. Upshall
SEVERE  STRAIN   ON   STUDENT
ALTIUISM
As the student body increases, the
duties of the necessary organizations
of the University demand a proportionate increase in the time required
for their fulfillment. The time that
may be devoted to work of an executive nature without detriment to one's
course is, of necessity, limited in an
institution where no official credit is
given for callable participation in student activities. Several offices are
rapidly approaching the point where
it wili be impossible for any student
to do justice both to the duties of the
office and the requirements of the curriculum. One must be taken and the
other left.
With the growing enrollment and
the need of mere intimate contact with
the public, certain phases of the work
of some organizations are encroaching
on the student's studies. Since the
latter form the criterion by which the
success of the student's University career is gauged they must have prece- ,
d,ence. j
That  several   have   been   obliged   to J
resign   important   positions     for     the l
sake   of   their   studies   is   proof   that
certain  offices  are  exacting  a greater;
expenditure ot the students' time than
if. consistent with their official value.
Tl   these   offices   are   to  continue   being filled by students, a re-adjustment
of  the   work  is  inevitable.    It  is  too'
severe   a   strain   on   the   altruism   of
the students to expect them to occupy |
important   executive   positions   at   the .
cost   of   a   much   lowered    scholastic |
standing.
WHAT   THE    STUDENTS    OF    CANADA  ARE  THINKING.
To us in British Columbia, so isolated from other universities, one of
the most pleasing results of the recent Toronto Conference is that representatives of our student body have
come into intimate contact with, students from various Canadian colleges
and have learned something of the
life and thought of these young men
and women. The testimony of the Toronto delegates confirms frequent reports we have received to the effect
that the thinking of other Canadian
students is very similar to that of our
own undergraduates. At Toronto, for
example, the members of the British
Columbia group found that delegates
from other provinces were enthusiastically in accord with them as to the
necessity of there being great economic and social changes in the structure of society.
There exists among the students of
Canada a deep dissatisfaction with the
existent order of things economic, social and political. They are shocked
at the poverty and destitution that is
all too common, they are indignant at
the injustices suffered by great masses
cf the people, they are displeased with
the corruption, meanness and dishonourable practices so rife in politics,
and they share the feeling, deep
though ill-expressed, of gieat numbers
of men and women, that "there is
something wrong." On this point at
least thinking students are well agreed
—that change is imperative and that
programmes of reform must be laid
down and put into effect with as much
expedition as possible.
As to the means of reform they are
no more in agreement than any other
class ot people. But there has been
aroused in many of them a passionate
desiie to find a way to improvement.
They are reading avidly the theories
of social evolution and the proposals
of reform put forward by the leading
thinkers of the day. They are discussing social problems enthusiastically,
sympathetically, and, we believe, intelligently. Amongst them various
schools of thought, expounding solutions varying from the extreme radical to the moderate liberal, have found
following*. Best of all, they aie facing current problems with open minds,
unafraid ot the past or of the future,
drinking in the ideas of others, criticising the ideas of others, and thinking-
out solutions of their own.
Here is evidence of intellectual life
among Canadian students. And here
is hope for a more just, a more equitable and a more happy state of society in that they are following the
tiend of the day and earnestly seeking for remedies to present ills.
By the Way
It seems sacreligious to make a
harsh remark about such an enjoyable
event as the Aggie dance, but really
the skit was pointless and everyone
would much rather have been dancing.
*.       *        *
Someone incautiously quoted the
other day, that "thought was a disease,'' whereon several undergraduates went and had themselves innocu-
lated. As they are still convalescent,
please take care not to jostle them.
SCHEDULE    FOR    MEN'S    LIT.
Jan. 31—Arts '23 and 26—
"Resolved that the French are justified in their occupation of the Ruhr
Valley.
Feb. 8—Arts '24 vs. Agriculture—
"Resolved that the present government's policy of assisted immigration
is in  the  best  interests of Canada."
Feb. 12—Eliminations for Oratorical
Contest—
Feb. 28—ORATORICAL CONTEST.
LANE &. TOOWE
beg to announce that on or about
November 10th
The Little  Bookshop  on  Kichaxds
Street  will  be  closed.
But on the same date
BEN   TOON'S   BOOKSHOP
will   be   opened   at
724   HASTINGS   STREET   WEST
Have  Your Eyes  Tested
by our  Graduated  Optician
All Testing, Grinding and Fitting
Glasses  are  Backed  by  the
Allan  Guarantee  of Absolute  Satisfaction.
0. B. ALLAN, LTD.
THE HOUSE  OF DIAMONDS
480-486 Granville. St. at Fender
BEFORE   THE    NEXT    DANCE
Have    Your    Suit    Cleaned    and
Pressed   by
WM.  TEMPLETON
101   Broadway  E.,  West of Main
Fairmont 1666-R
417  Hastings Street  West
/'look   for  the   Biff  Red  Arrow-
J. N. Harvey's
NEW   STORE   NOW   OPEN
We bought a large stock of
Men's New Spring Suits and
Overcoat models, made for exhibition purposes from the very
best quality cloths in all the
leading styles, so that we can
sell them 25 per cent, below
regular prices.
Regular  Values $40.00 to  $60.00
On sale  now at
$30.00 $40.00 $45.00
JIItaj,ltd.
417 Hastings St. West
Also 614 Yates St., Victoria
.Look  for  the  Big Red  Axt<rwJ
TECHNIQUE
Technique is  hers, which no one  can
deny:
You read it in the very way her feet
Pensively   swing,   as   with   a   wistful
sigh,
She raises melancholy eyes to meet
His  own—you  know,  she  always   calculates
The time exactly—then at once she
will
Drop them instinctively; she hesitates.
And   looks  to  see   if  he   is   looking
still.
This is the third since Christmas.   He
well act
Just   as   the   others   did,   who   also
knew
The  magic  of  her eyes  and   conversation.
It's fun for her, and good for him.    In
fact,
She has an educative value too,
And  somehow Science  men
need education.
NANCY   LKE.
- See the
Doctor of Pens
Fountain   Pen     and   Eversharp.
P.encil   Service   Station
Complete   line   of   Dennison's
Merchandise and  Crepe  Paper
Students' Loose Leaf Books
Drawing   Instruments,   Etc.
Mitchell.Foley, Ltd.
Printers and Stationers
Sey. 1C85      129 Hastings St. W.
PHOTOGRAPHY
The kind of Portraits that you
and your friends will appreciate.
We make them at most reasonable prices.
rtj
Broadway Studio
BROADWAY   AND   MAIN
Phone   Fairmont  3831
N.B.—Save   25'/,    by   letting   us
do   your   films.
ESTELLA  M. TULLY
Teacher of  Piano
225   LEE   BLDG.
Corner  Broadway  and   Main
Phone   Fairmont 3699-L
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery,
Ice Cream and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served also
Afternoon Tea.    -       J*
Phone  Fair. 377
Cor.  I0th and Heather St.
DR. H. WOOD
Dentist
rtj
215   LEE   BLDG.
Corner   Main   and   Broadway
Phone   Fairmont  1581
Discount to  University Students
Announcing  Adv;uiee  Showing   of
SPRING SUITS
DRESSES
MILLINERY
for your inspection.
oTo
556   GRANVILLE   8T. FebKUaby < 1st,  192$
THE    UB,YSp¥
1
CHIROPRACTIC
A   S^fe  and Sane  Way   to  Health
;  -.    ■ DR.   GALLANT
408 Carter Cotton Bldff.
Seymour   8790
Branch   Office   at   Jubilee
Member   B. .C.   Chiropractic  Ass'n.
BROADWAY
THEATRE
Main and Brondway
Now Playing
Thursday.   Friday,   Sa' ur-
day, Feb.  1. 2, 3
John Barryrnore
Sherlock  Holmes
Founded   in   Sir   Oonaii
 Doyle's Stories	
(Joining—Fel).  8.  9,   10:
"Oliver Twist"
With -Jackie Coogan
Keystone
School
Supplies
The manufacture of School
Supplies has assumed an important place in our province.
Keystone Brand has won this
position through making bet-
, ter goods at the same or
lower  prices.
Ask for Keystone Loose Leaf
Binders. They come in all
shapes and sizes for Varsity
use.
Smith, Davidson k Wright
Manufacturers  of  School  Supplies
Vancouver       -       -       -      Victoria
Evans & Hastings
Better    Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball  Programmes
Etc.,  Etc.
Students   would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour St.    Phone Sey. 189
Mt.    Pleasant    Methodist    Church
Tenth Ave. and Ontario St.
Pastor—REV.   o.   M.   SANKOR1")
Good    Music.       Sermons    for    the
present     day.       Hearty     welcome.
Vounf?    People's    Organization    of
most  attractive   type.
Religion    includes    Education.
Education    includes    Religion.
GUSIGK
700 BROADWAY
Makes a specialty of home-made
candy and afternoon tea,
^0WJ^&/itwiflfe<rMe
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others .who wish to express themselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility for any of the views
expressed.
All contributions must be written
legibly, in ink, on one side of the paper
only. They must not exceed two hundred words in length, and must reach
this office not later than noon Monday,
in order to appear in the issue of the
following   Thursday.
TAKE   THIS   LADIES!
Editor   Ubyssey,—
A friend of mine invited a University
girl to the Aggie dance two weeks in advance of the event. A few days later
the young lady discovered that he had
invited another girl first but that owing
to a previous engagement she had been
unable to accept. She, the girl who had
accepted, promptly phoned my friend
and told him that she would not be able
to   go  to  the  dance  with  him.
In view of the fact that there were
several social events on that evening,
this was a foolish attitude on the part
of the University girl, and it is little
wonder that most of the men prefer to
take outside girls to University dances,
and that when we have a class party
we have to resort to a "draw" in order
to have more than a sprinkling of the i
women   present.
Indignantly, [
KUDOLOPH.      !
l'.S.—The girl who refused him did
not  get  to  the Dance. |
AN   APPRECIATION
The pluck and presence of mind
which Jack McPherson displayed last
week at. the inner harbor is to be
highly commended. Not only did he
disregard his own safety in the plucky
rescue, but even further jeopardized
his own safety in making the rescue
still more thorough. The spirit of the
rescue is highly typical of the spirit
which runs throughout our various
athletic teams. In acknowledging
this deed the Students' Council has
expressed the opinion of the student
body. The Council has sent the following letter of appreciation to the
"Ubyssey:"
the  F.ditor  "I'byssey."
Dear   Sir:
On behalf of the Students' Council, I wish
to express to Mr. J. W. McPherson, of Science '25, our very sincere appreciation of the
bravery which he displayed at Coal Harbor
on January 21. The denial of any remarkable achievement on tlie part of Mr. McPherson, himself, furnishes an additional reason why we wish to make this recognition
of  his   pluck.
Very   sincerely.
DOROTHY   H.   WALSH,
Sec'y.   A.   M.   S.
SMOKE  OF THE SMOKER
■-,■■■    (By the Voyageur)     , .
Last night the spirit of the Arts
Men's Smoker disturbed my sleep and
I have seen in advance some of the
wild  doings of to-morrow night.
The K. of P. hall, the home of the
Smoker, was surrounded by a cloud of
smoke, but the spirit pushed me
Through this and I found all about me
my old friends from the TJ. B. C.
Everywhere on the tables were large
boxes of "Players" and everyone was
helping himself. Hunter Lewis, president of the Arts Men, was official announcer and just as I found a chair
he said that the "Wonderful Women"
would hold the attention of the "gentlemen." They were good, but I cannot give their act away. There were
several other stunts, including "Mystifying Magic," "Japanese Jiu-Jitsu,"
'Peppy Performers" and "Bug-house
Boxing" and, being hired, were sure
killers. There were the "Dainty Dancers" but the other men crowded so
close to them that I never had a
chance. They held the attention of
the men for five minutes and some
of the frosh held them for the rest
of the evening. Quite a few freshmen were sick from their first smoke.
There were plenty of fellows not
partaking of the weed, but there was
heaps of fun for them. I heard that
some of the classes had stunts, but
one of the "Wonderful Women" vamped me and 1 went home with her
about 11 o'clock. When I got back
at 3 o'clock, it was all over. I awoke
disappointed that I had missed the
last of it.
This morning I asked Hunter Lewis
how to get to the K. of P. hall.    It is
at 303 Eighth Avenue East. It is
about half a block east of Kingsway,
on Eighth Avenue, and about a block
and a half east of Main. The time
for the fun is 8:30 and the smokes
and   entertainment  are   free   .
LETTERS CLUB ENJOYS
ANATOLE FRANCE
One of the most successful meetings
of the Letters Club of the year, was
held on Tuesday night at the home
of Mr. R. L. Reid, K.C. Miss Madge
Portsmouth read a paper on "Anatole
France," one of the most comprehensive and brilliant ever given before
the Club. Miss Portsmouth deserves
especial congratulations in view of
the fact that this is the first time a
European author has appeared upon
the Letters Club programme. Several
of the compatriots of M. Prance expressed their delight in hearing their
I greatest writer treated so ably. The
record attendance was a tribute to
the interest of the subject, and fully
justified the departure to foreign
fields.
INTER-CLASS   BOXING
The Boxing Club makes the following announcement: The various classes of weights in the inter-class boxing contests will be as follows: (1)
Under 125 lbs.; (2) Under 135; (3)
Under 145; 14) Under 155; (5) Under
165; (6) Over 165. Each class will
be limited to eight entrants. The entries for the contests must be in the
hands of the secretary, A. McLachlan,
'25. not later than Friday, February
9. Eliminations will commence on
Thursday, February 15. For further
information prospective mit-wielders
are asked to see George Lipsey, Sc.
'24; T. Louden, Sc. '26; or A. McLachlan, Sc. '25.
rANGELL ENGRAVING CO I
Are you Reading
The Sportsman?
Now on Sale—10c a Copy
The livest weekly on
general topics in Western
Canada.
High-class writers giving
high-class opinions on the
things every thinker is interested in.
You do not have to be
concerned with football
competitions to appreciate
The Sportsman
Get this week's copy—
you'll be glad to cultivate
the habit.
The Sportsman
'' Prank—Fearless—Fair''
THE
CLARKE&STUART
Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers—
Educational  Stationery.
Students Note Books in
Genuine Leather and Tex-
hide Bindings—
Drawing Instruments  and
Materials.
£
550 Seymour St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TAKE HER IN A  OAR
DRIVE YOURSELF
Brandon Auto Livery
Cor.  Georgia and   Richards  Sts.
Sey. 4777
Day  and  Night  Service
(Eanafctatt iExtrnatnn HntarBity
69-73 FAIRFIELD BUILDING
445 Granville Street Vancouver, B.C.
Special Coaching for University Examinations
Mathematics, Latin, Greek, French, Spanish, Physics,
Chemistry etc. 6
THE    UBYSSEY
February 1st, 1923
SPORT JOTTINGS
Point awards for all interclass competition for the Governor's Cup will
be as last year, 4, 3, 2, 1. It is quite
probable that Rowing will be included.
OUR
IMPERIAL BRAND
SILK HOSE
are positively unparalleled value, and with hose
playing such an important
part in the season's new
fashions, "Imperial'' hose
, should be in very big demand. They are made o".
a superfine quality pure
thread silk. The toes and
heels (where the wear
comes most) are specially
reinforced, and they come
in white and black, and
all wanted shades, with
hemmed or ribbed tops.
Made expressly for the
Hudson's Hay Company,
and are tlie most remarkable hose value on the
market, at, per pair....$2.00
Hudson's Bay
Company
SPRING PLAYS WILL BE
STAGED AT THE ORPHEUM j
Those who prefer comfort and a
central locality to the cramped and:
out of the way quarters of the Avenue \
theatre will be glad to hear that the
Spring play "You Never Can Tell," is
to be produced at the Orpheum Theatre this year.
Mr. Jack Clyne, president of the
Players' Club, has had great difficulty
in making arrangements, but, owing to
the help and influence of Dean Coleman, Mr. Harting, Manager of the
Orpheum Theatre, and the Kiwanis
Club, permission has been obtained
to present the play on March 16th and '
17th. The Club greatly appreciate this
kindness and feels that the change is
a  great  step  forward.
The
Literary Corner
Travellers
Sample Suits
ALL the latest Styles
for Young Men. On sale
at prices less than wholesale.
$18.75 to $31.50
D. K. BOOK
LIMITED
137 MlMttng* St. W«rt
(Opposite   Province)
ORPHEUM  THEATRE
The First Big Road Show
Mon. & Tues. "antignhts Feb. 5, 6
Matinees, 25c. to $1.00
Evenings, 50c. to $2.00
SEATS NOW
CAPT. M. W. PLUNKETT'S
DUMBELL'S
in the Oversea's Revue
"CARRY ON"
THE   BEST   OF   THE   DUMBELLS   SERIES
THE   CRIPPLED   CHILD   DREAMS
Past the dull streets and beyond
The  mist,  o'er  the waveless sea,
Sunset and shadows of evening
Softly are  calling me
Out on the  mountains to watch and
wander
And. play till the close of day,—
Till the sun has taken his flight, and
sleeps
In the palace far away.
All the glory of life I see;
[Freshest the mountain air I breathe;
Sweetest the cadence that I hear,—
Like the laughter of children at play,
Like the murmur of wind in the air,
Like the song of the sea in the thell,
Like and yet unlike—O thou inimitable
Water Sprite.
And ever I wind on my pathless way.
Mounting  upward  through  the  snow
To the palace on the heights I go,—
Where  the  glory  of  sunset  wreathes
its glow,
Where in the upper casement of light
The Moon Queen beckons.
Yet  I  am   won't  to   cleave  the  throbbing  earth
Till the sun has passed to the lonely
place bevond.
And I am left alone.
I do not cry, I cannot sigh,—
For  still   I  may   dream   and   run   and
fly.
As I lie in solitude, even I.
T.  H.
MUSICAL  PROGRAMME
(Continued from Page 1)
The series will be concluded with
an event of especial interest, namely,
a recital to be given early in March
by Godowsky. This arrangement has
been made possible through the kind-
nessof Miss Laverock, his manager.
Further particulars of this will be
given later.
These lectures are open to the student body, and members of the Musical
Society have the privilege of bringing
two friends outside of the College.
It's not as though you really cared
But still it's rather hard at times
To have your reputation aired.
It's  not as  though you  really cared,
But when your dignityjs impaired
By crude accounts of early crimes,
It's not as though you really cared
Btu still it's rather hard at times.
GET ACQUAINTED
WITH OUR CLEANING
AND PRESSING
DEPARTMENT
Special Acquaintence
Society Rate   —   Club Rate
These  Rates Issued Only by
The
Parisienne Dry
CLEANERS AND DYERS
571 Broadway West
Phone Fair. 5223
WILLOW   HALL
806   Seventeenth   Avenue   West
One Block West of Heather St.
Have you seen this new hall
for dancing and private parties?
We have accommodation for
two hundred dancers. It is like
a big "chateau" with beautiful
lounge room and open fire place,
card room, spring floor for dancing, fancy lighting effects, ladies'
and gents' dressing rooms, with
fully  equipped  kitchen.
It is for rent to clubs and
private parties at $15.00 per
night up to 12 p.m. One dollar
per hour after.
F. S.  LOCKETT,  Proprietor
Phone   Fair.   77   or   Fair.   2885-R
rENUS
PENCILS
c&r tuyerf selling Qptli&f
pencil in the yrorld
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivab
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Ave.
New York
Write for
booklet on
VENUS Pencils and
'ENUS EVERPOINTED
lechanical Pencils
It's   Time   You   Had   Yours
Taken
Your   Photograph,   a   really
good one, by
F. L. Hacking
Leigh-Spencer   Building
553 Granville Street
LANGTRY
The Tailor
Suits $25.00 up, to Measure
Overcoats, $25.00 up
318 Hastings St., W.
Union Label
&
Indoor and Outdoor
Athletic Equipment
Everything for
every sport, including sw;:ters,
jerseys, shoes, etc
Catalogue sent on request
424 Hastings St.
OF CANADA, LTD.
w r
February 1st, 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
MUCK-AMUCK
^<3
A  NEW  PLACE TO  EAT
Good meals served from 7:15
a.m.   to   10:30   p.m.
Sundays from 9  a.m.
University  Boys   welcome.
A   full   line   of   confectionery,
soft drinks.
Matches FREE with smokes.
LEONARD'S
1469   BROADWAY   WEST
(Just Off Granville)
(Etjaiiitrlppr
Vancouver's Best Cafe
and
Confectionery
Chocolates, 75c per lb.
774 GRANVILLE ST.
Orpheum
CIRCUIT
Now Playing
Pathe  News Aesops  Fables
WILLIAM FAVERSHAM
In  a   One-act   Flay
'A Marriage Has Been Arranged'
By  Alfred  Sutro
IiOVE   TWINS
JACK OSTERMAN
CARLE—FRANCIS &
CLAIRE
LUCAS   8c   INEZ
CBYSTAL BENNETT  & CO.
PRANK DAVIS & A DELE
* '  DARNELL
Nights, 25c to $1.00
Mats.,  15c to  40c
POLICY:—Putrid, Polluted, and Piffling.
WEATHER:—'Wrank and Wretched.
BALLADE  OF THE  MINNESiNGERS |
(With apologies to G. B. >l.) i
When  Minnesingers went around
And peddled verses second-rate.
At every Castle door they found
Their welcome, it is safe to state     ,
Was  something  we  should hesitate j
In   this  decadent  age  and  clime
(Though sorely fain)  to emulate—
They  had  the  devil of a time.
The   mediaeval   music  hound
Who   Missed   the   hint   to   pull   his
freight
You promptly levelled on the ground
With one shrewd carom off his pate,
I    And  though  he  might retaliate
! With   songs   that   spattered   you   with
slime
Your  wallop carried quite a weight-
They had the devil of a time.
To-day, alas, our hands are bound!
We   never   could   approximate
The  versatility that crowned
Those  gentlemen  of  former date.
They  used  to  hang bards from the
gate.
Or boil them in a bath of lime,
Or even chop them up as bait—
They had the devil  of a time.
L'ENVOI
O   Prince,  a  boon  I  supplicate!
An thou approvest not my rhyme
Spare  me  the   Minnesingers'  fate—
They had tlie devil of a time.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
A meeting of the Devil Worshippers
will be held in the Morgue of the General Hospital at 10:30 p.m. Friday.
All Worshippers are requested to
bring powder-puffs.
» * •
Mr. Jack Grant is leaving for the
home of his parents on Robson street
this evening at four o'clock. It is
some ten hours since Mr. Grant has
seen his parents, and in all probability he will not return here until after
breakfast  tomorrow  morning.
On February 3, at 8 pjmj Dr. Sedgewick will address the Booster's Club
in the Labor Temple. The subject of
the address will be "It Just is, that's
all. it just is."
• • •
It will be a source of regret to most
students to learn that Ab Richards is
once again compelled to make the trip
east. Mr. Richards will, in all probability, travel as far as the Exhibition
Grounds where he will judge a Hereford   Bull.
T'was in the Cafeteria they met.
Our Romeo and Juliet;
'Twas  there he  first went  into debt.
For   Romeo'd   what   Juliet;
Campaigns   are  like  the   poor,  they
aie  always  with us.
SCIENTIFIC  LOVE
He was a science man, steeped in
Calculus, Astronomy, Biology, etc. He
was a science man and yet he was not
so steeped but that he was able to
love in his own scientific ways a girl.
On those soft mellow nights when the
moon was high in the heavens and all
was peaceful under the stars, he
would walk with her in the garden
calling her by such an endearing
phrase as "Peg O' My Blood-pump,"
and telling her over and over again
that she was the "Apple of his
Retina."
DEVIL    WORSHIP
I own it with a sense of shame,
The wicked ones appeal to me.
I join the righteous in  their blame
(1 own it with a sense of shame),
But, as I know I'm just the same,
: The sinners get my sympathy.
I own it with a sense of shame,
The wicked ones appeal to me.
  OBITUARY
You  ca::i do anything you like with1 Jock Macdonald chanced to meet
your  own   name,  but  lor  the  love   of ■ Angus  Murray on the street;
the girl you mean to dance with, don't i They saw a nickel at their feet . . .
put it on your own program. Will Scottish papers please repeat.
UNCLE   JOSH'S   COLUMN
: Dear   Uncle Josh:—•
1 do hope that you will help me in
my great and unique trouble. I am
in love. The person I am in love with
is a man, a college man. I think,
Uncle Josh, that he is the most beautiful man 1 have ever seen. He has
a broad and noble forehead which in
its entirety resembles a sidewalk; he
has eyes like deep pools of molasses,
and a complexion like the dawn of
sunset. He has a Chaplin moustache
with Rudolph extensions to his hair:
can you wonder that I care for him.
But alas, Uncle Josh, he knows me
not and that is my great trouble. I
have tried every means I know to attract his attention but alas everything
| has failed.    When sitting behind him
j once I emptied my fountain pen down
! his  collar.    He  said  the  roof leaked.
I I put a number of thumb-tacks on his
seat.     He   said  he   had   burrs   on  his
j trousers. I tide the tail-end of his
gown to my seat but when he got up
1 he left it behind. I got his gown and
took it home. I cherish it. It is the
(inly   thing  of His   which   I   have   to
Dear  Little One: —
Uncle Josh sympathises deeply with
you in your great and unique trouble.
But cheer up Little One for by the
description you have given of this
young man Uncle Josh is able to surmise a number of things about his
character which may help us to attract his attention. That the man's
forehead is like a sidewalk signifies
that he is broad-minded; that his eyes
are like pools of molasses signifies
that he is of a sweet disposition; that
his complexion is like the dawn of
sunset signifies that he will rise in the
world; that he has a Chaplin moustache signifies that he has a sense of
humour, and that he has Rudolph Extensions signifies that ne Is a "Passionate Lover." If, however, tne Little
One would bring the gown to Uncle
Josh, he might be able to tell a great
deal about the young mans character
by judging the brand of tobacco which
he smokes.
And now, dear Little One. if you
will come around to the Publications
Office   some   noon   hour   when   Uncle
love. It smells of the tobacco which i Josh is eating his peanut butter sand
he smokes and I am happy. Dear j wiches, he will do all he can to soothe
Uncle Josh can you help me to at-1 Your troubled heart, and perhaps help
tract  his  attention? "mi to attract the young man's atten-
you'rs in hone, j t'ion'.' A Friend to all Little Ones,
'""i      LITTLE  ONE. ■■".."' Uncle   Josh. :
FOR
Tasty Lunches
Afternoon Tea
and
Confectionery
TRY
MRS.TERRIERS LUNCH ROOM
"Down  by the  Car"
767 Broadway West
Spencers Surveyor
Boot Holds the
Record for
Endurance
Our Surveyor Boot is made
of black box calf, specially
tanned to ensure catisfaction
under heavy wear; full double oak tanned soles; Goodyear welt sewn, heavy leather insoles, solid boxings and
counters. strongly sewn
seams in uppers. These are
some of the special feature*
of this boot. An extra wide
last insures comfort for men
who need wide fittings.
Spencer's guarantee of satisfaction backs every pair;
all sizes from 6 to 11.
Selling   $8.95
4*
David Spencer
Ltd/ 8
THE    UBYSSEY
February 1st, 1923
PAPER   MAKING.
At a meeting of the Engineering
Discussion Club on Tuesday ndoh;vC..
Arnott, Sc. '25, spoke on "The Me}
chanical Process of Paper Making as
Carried Out at Powell River." He
traced the course of the log from its
entrance into the mill till the time
when it was wound as rolls of paper
ready for shipment. -,       ■  •
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and Heather ft.
W. H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phone Fair. 840
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Exercise Books
Looseleaf Covers
and  Refills
Waterman's Pens
Eversharp  Pencils
-DANCING-
Every Wednesday and Saturday
evenings, 9  o'clock.
ALEXANDRA
H   DANCING ACADEMY   H
Cor.  Robson  and Hornby
The Alexandra Orchestra, featuring the Sousa Phone, always
in attendance.
NEW   SPRING
STYLES and   FABRICS
HAVE   ARRIVED
ONE
PRICE
$07 oo
MADE
TO
MEASURE
We invite you to inspect our
values. Our suits are made to
your measure, and tailored to
fit, in any style you may choose.
Up-Top Tailors
301   Hastings 8treet Weit
Vancouver,  B. C.
Opposite Hamilton Street
Ptrnia:   Fairmont i.
f. J. Kearney & Co.
Jtaural Btrrrtnra
♦
Private Ambulance Service
IM   liudwir   W. VANCOUVER
VICTORIA   INVASION
i   (Continued .from Page 1)
SENIOR   LADIES   LOSE   16-8. |
The ladies' games between Varsity j
and Victoria College was featured by j
heavy checking and clever passing.
Varsity started well and-the team was
able to hold the visitors to a half-time
score of 6-5. After the interval, how-'
ever, the Victoria College squad stepped out and managed to run in 10
points, while Varsity was collecting
3. Doris Shorney replaced Eloise Angell in the second period and played
a very useful game. Mabel McKinnon also showed well at centre and
was in the fray at all stages.
The teams: Varsity—Isobel Russel,
Helen Tatlow, Isobel McKinnon, Doris Lee, Eloise Angell, Doris Shorney.
Victoria College:—Misses Styar and
Bell, Miss Musgrave. Misses Lewis
and Barnet.
Senior A  Game
. Varsity took revenge on X-Normals
in the last game of the evening and
backed by an enthusiastic gallery of
spectators, were able to step over the
husky teachers by the score of 28-19.
The Teams: Varsity—Bickell, Basset, Penwell, Carlisle, Currie,  Lewis.
X-Normals — Wilkinson, Bryson,
Woodcock, Meadows, Kemp. Spare—
Fisher.
The   Dance
After the series of games, the enthusiastic gallery had an oppportunity
of displaying their ability on the gym.
floor, which was quickly turned into
a dance hall on the appearance of an
orchestra, the piano of which was
kindly supplied by Fletcher Bros. The
evening's entertainment was decidedly a success, and much credit is coming to the Men's and Women's Ath
letic Associations, under whose auspices  the  affair was  held.
Arts.
Arts '23 will be the guests of Dean
and Mrs. H. T. Coleman at a reception to be held in the Auditorium
Monday, Feb. 5. Dean Coleman is the
honorary president of the class.
On Feb. 23, the second class party
of Arts '23 will be held. It will take
the form of a masquerade.
Arts '25 will be the guests of one
of , the members of • the class to a
party in North Vancouver soon.
Helen MacGill, K. Schell and Eddie
Chapman are looking after the Arts
'25 pages of the Annuals. Bright ideas
are welcome.
Arts '26 will have a hike and dance
at West Vancouver during the first
week  of  arch.
Jean  Faulkner  and  Pierce  Selwood
are     general     supervisors     for     the
"Frosh"   pages   of  the  annual.
Science.
Science '26 were hosts at a class
party Tuesday night. The affair was
held at Willow Hall. The committees
in charge of the entertainment and
refreshments included. Dave Hatch.
J. Oliver. C. Barton, F. Abernethy and
"Fatty"   Bayliss.
Aqriculture.
The Ageries had their cow hoo last
Fridav. The skit was "rotten" but
the   dance  and   eats   were  good.
Agriculture '25 and '26 have combined for a class party to be held
soon.
MCKECHNIE   CUP   RUGBY
Providing old man Frost lays off
treezing, Varsity will tangle with Victoria Rep. at Brockton Point on Saturday.
If you haven't got a thermometer,
watch the notice boards for announcements.
Vocational Training for Women
Is The Subject of Lectures
The Vocational Conference, already
common in many of the Eastern and
American Universities is being introduced to Varsity women this week,
ana the enthusiastic meetings indicate
that the conference will become an
p.'niual   affair.
While undoubtedly, many students
entering University have already made
their choice of a life work, a recent
survey of American colleges shows
that in the Freshman classes, while
approximately 60'/, of the men have
chosen their profesion, only 50% of
the women have arrived at a decision.
It is to fill this need that the Women's
Undergraduate Society has inaugurated the Vocational Conference in the
University.
Miss Bollert's Address
Miss Bollert, in her address stated
that a poet once said "No man is born
into the world whose work it not
born with him." Unfortunately many
persons fail to recognize the vocations for which they are intended.
In such instances arises the necessity
of  the  Vocational  Conference.
"Socinl Service Work in Industry,"
was (he subject ot the address given
by Miss Bollert, in the vocational
series. Miss Pollert stated that social
work in industry, including educational guidance, employment, management, doctor and nursing service and
the direction of social activities
among the employees in industrial
institutions, opened up an increasingly attractive and renumerative field
'or women, which has as yet not been
subject to  overcrowding.
Bacteriology   and   Nursing
Miss M. Mounce gave a talk on
'Bacteriology as a Vocation for
Women."
"In the phenomenal development
within recent years of the Science
of Bacteriology, women workers have
played no unimportant part," said
Miss Mounce. "Some conception of
the opportunities which Bacteriology
will offer for women in the future,
may be gained when the scope of the
work still to be done is realized. The
application of the findings of Bacteriologists in control work, in public
health and industrial laboratories is
unlimited. The preparation for such
work should consist of a university
training and the possibility of advancement in bacteriological work is
shown by the number of high positions held  by women."
Miss Johns spoke of the opportunities afforded University women in the
higher reaches of the practise of Nursing, such as Teaching and Administration in Schools of Nursing, and in
Public Health. She described the
combined Course in Nursing now being given in eighteen major Universities, on the American Continent, and
outlined the qualifications necessary
and approximate cost. Undoubtedly
Nursing not only affords University
Women full scope for their energies,
but it is a vocation in which their
special gifts of sound eaucation and
culture are much needed.
Miss Helen White gave an address
on Y. W. C. A. work in its various branches, the work of general
secretaries, economic and employment secretaries, educational work,
work in the various groups and in
foreign fields. "Of course, a college
or university education is necessary,
followed by one year at. Toronto. McGill, or the New York National Training School. Everywhere there are
openings for these trained workers,"
said the speaker. In closing Miss
White gave a brief description of the
work carried on in the Y. W. C. A. in
Vancouver.
All Overcoats
Reduced as        / x
Follows:
$25.00, now      $1&65
$29.50, now .......' $19.75
$34.50, now  $23.00
$37.50, now $25.00
C. D. BRUCE
LIMITED
Cor. Homer and Hastings Sts.
BOYS !
Patronize   Canada's  Finest Bar-
• ber Shop.    18 Chairs.    All First
Class Barbers and  Manicurists.
THE  ROGERS  BUILDING
Wm. BIEH5UT, Proprietor
464 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone   Sey. 7853-0
"Down   the   Marble   Stain"
"Say It With Flowers"
BROWN BROS. & GO.
LTD.
Florists,  Nurserymen and
Seedsmen
TWO STORES:
48   Hastings  Street  Bast
Phones:   Sey. 988 and 672
665 Granville Street
Phones:  Sey. 9513 and 1391
ENGLISH
WOOL   RIBBED   SOX
65c.
NEW    KNITTED
TIES
65c.
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MANNS"
Mann's Man's Wear
Two   Specialty   Shops
for  Men   and   the   Young  Fellows:
411-474   Granville   St.
Wilbur G. Grant
A.T.C.M.
TEACHER  OF PIANO
Organist and  Choirmaster
First Baptist Church
Studio:     2213   Granville   Street
Phone Bayview 3140 H
1
LIONEL WARD ft COMPANY.  LTD..printers.

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