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The Ubyssey Mar 25, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 25, 1920
Number 22
U.B.C. Debaters
Defeat Alberta
WIN  DECISION  OF TWO JUDGES
IN THE FIRST DEBATE WITH
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY
In the inter-collegiate debate with
Alberta, held here on Saturday evening,
the University of B. C. was declared
victor by the decision of two judges in
its favor. The debate was well attended,
and was somewhat shorter than usual,
owing to the fifteen-minute speeches and
the single rebuttal.
Professor Sage, occupying the chair,
stated that this was the first debate that
U..B.C. had held with another Canadian
university, the first organized by the
Sigma Delta Kappa, and the first in
which a woman took part. He explained
that, in the absence of Mr. R. L. Reid,
Dr. S. D. Scott had consented to act as
judge, his colleagues being Mr. Macfar-
lane and Dr. Weld. The University of
B. C. was supporting the negative side
on the resolution, "That the presidential
form of government is better adapted to
serve the best interests of democracy
than the parliamentary system as exemplified in Canada."
Mr. A. Scroggie, leader of the
affirmative, defined the true interests of
democracy as "government by the people, of the people, and for the people."
He declared the government of the
United States to have these advantages:
the constitution defines the duties of its
officers; the executive can be chosen
from the whole country, the only consideration being special qualifications;
and the executive has no external duties
to distract it. He declared the superiority of the elective Senate over the Canadian Upper House.
For the negative, Mr. G. E. MacKinnon, whose array of facts was somewhat
impaired by his rapidity of utterance,
said that, to carry out the nation's
wishes, the executive body must be
elected. In the United States all legislation is fettered by an eighteenth-
century constitution, which cannot cope
with changing national requirements.
The final interpretation of constitutional
questions rests with the Supreme Court
of nine members, not responsible to the
people. The departments of government
are isolated, and between them deadlocks are frequent—there were fifty-nine
in fifteen years. The system of "checks
and balances" leads to petty interference
but not to co-operation, and the lack of
this latter causes the government policy
to be frequently confused and uncertain.
(Continued on Page 8)
COUNCIL, 1920-21
With   the   election   on   Monday,
the last vacancy on the  Students'
Council was filled.    Following are
the men and women who will govern us next year:
President—A. E. Lord.
Secretary—Miss I. S. Miller.
Treasurer—A. Munro.
Lit. and Hist. Dept.—A. Rive.
Men's Athletics—J. R. Kingham.
Women's Athletics—Miss G. Rob-
son.
Arts Men's U.S.—J. L. Lawrence.
Arts Women's U.S. —Miss M. E.
Kilpatrick.
Science U.S.—S. Anderson.
Agriculture U.S.—G. E. W. Clarke.
Ed'iltor-in-Chief,   Publications—.
P.  N.  Whitley.
"Sophs" Carry
Off The Honors
ARTS   '22   WOMEN   DEFEAT   THE
SENIORS IN FINAL DEBATE
Arts '22 won the shield for debating
in the inter-class series held by the
Women's Literary Society, when Miss
L. Cowdell and Miss Ruth Verchere, on-
the negative of the question, "Resolved
that credits counting towards a university degree should be given leaders in
student activities," won the decision over
Miss Janet Gilley and Miss V. Walsh,
of Arts '20. The judges were Mr. Wood,
Mr.  Larsen, and Dr. Boggs.
The affirmative held that it is imperative to have the student activities well
organized to get the best out of them.
To attain this end, the leaders must be
in a position to give considerable time
and work to the societies. The only
way this can be done is to give them
credits for their work, so they will not
be called on to sacrifice their own course
too much. We come to get an ideal of
service, and such an ideal is not encouraged by allowing some to do all the work
for nothing, while the rest sit back with
hands  folded  and  reap  all  the  benefits.
The negative argued that the work we
do in student activities is not work, but
recreation. Mark Twain said,, "Play is
work we don't have to do." They then
showed the bad effects of any system of
credits on the student body. How is it
going to be decided how many credits an
office is worth, or whether the holder of
the office has earned the credits? Any
such course would necessitate Faculty
supervision, besides lowering the University standard.
Successful Concert
by Musical Society
A   CAPACITY   AUDIENCE   GREETS
U. B. C. ARTISTS AT VANCOUVER HOTEL BALLROOM
That the Musical Society is an organization of which the University can be
justly proud was fully evidenced by the
splendid concert which was given before a large and enthusiastic audience
in the Hotel Vancouver ballroom last
Friday evening. Too much praise cannot be given to Mr. Russell, not only
for his work in connection with the
Musical Society, but also for all that he
has done towards fostering a love for
music amongst all the students of the
University.
It is difficult to decide which of the
numbers given by the combined glee
clubs was the most effective, but perhaps the number which won the greatest applause was Evans' "A Wet Sheet
and a Flowing Sea." Good rhythm, admirable scale work, and a remarkable
clearness of diction were characteristics of this number, and showed clearly
that the members of the Musical Society
must have worked hard and persever-
ingly during the year. "The Three
Chafers" was so well sung that the audience demanded it a second time. Of
the glees, the Lullaby, from "Ermine,"
was the best rendered. It was a real
pleasure to hear Miss Healy sing, and
we hope that we shall hear her many
times more next year. In "The Maid
of Athens" the boys sang too quickly,
and exaggerated the very clever contrast
which the composer had in mind. This
same fault was paramount in "The Bulldog." No matter how well a song is
sung, the effect is considerably diminished if one is unable, as was the case
in this particular instance, to hear the
words. Abt's beautiful music is heard
only too little nowadays, and it was a
real pleasure to hear the harmonious
blending of the voices in his "Thurin-
gian Volkslied." The splendid quality
of Mr. Russell's training of the Glee
Clubs was shown very clearly in this
number. "Men of Harlech" was sung
correctly enough from a strictly musical
point of view, but the chorus did not
enter sufficiently into the spirit of the
composition. The same criticism applies to Bullard's "Winter Song." There
was not enough life and enthusiasm, and
there was a tendency to consider the
music only, and to neglect the context.
By far the best number by the Men's
Glee Club was the "Tinkers' Chorus,"
from "Robin  Hood."
(Continued on Page 2) THE   UBYSSEY
March 25, 1920
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HOCKEY TITLE IS STILL
UNDECIDED
Battling for the intermediate hockey
championship of Vancouver, 'Varsity
and the Xationals played to a four goal
draw at the Arena on Tuesday night.
The teams played twelve minutes overtime, and only left the ice when it was
time for the evening skating session to
begin.
'Varsity played the Xats off their
feet in the lirst period and in the
opening minutes of the second, sending
in three straight goals. Jack Wilson
got the lirst and third, and Norm. Grimmett scored the second. The Xats then
took a hand in the scoring, and, sending
in three quick goals, evened the count.
Before the session ended, Grimmett put
'Varsity  one  goal  to  the  good.
The Nationals again evened the score
soon after the beginning of the third,
and, though the 'Varsity had the puck
in front of their opponents' net for the
rest of the game, and throughout the
overtime period, they could not score.
Cory Hesse, the manager of the Xationals, again made himself conspicuous
by loudly declaring that lie would protest the game if McPherson went on
the ice wearing a sweater a shade darker than those worn by the rest of the
team. Hesse is the Protest King of
amateur sport in these parts. Sportsmanship is lacking from his makeup.
Tuesday's re-play was necessary because
he protested the deciding game, which
was won by 'Varsity, because the sweaters  were  not all  of the same color.
The 'Varsity lineup was as follows:
Lambert, Plummer, J. Grimmett, Mc-
Diarmid, X. Grimmett, Ternan and
Wilson.    Subs.,  Manuel and McPherson.
SUCCESSFUL CONCERT
(Continued from Page 1)
As regards the orchestra, it must be
said that the members acquitted themselves most admirably. Bohm's ''Calm
as the Xight," featuring G. E. Wood-
worth, trombone, and E. Emmons, cornet, was well received. The Pizzicati,
from "Sylvia," and Chaminade's "Scarf
Dance" are most difficult to play effectively, but they were both played with
all the grace and delicacy which they
demand. In Brahms' Hungarian Dance,
Xo. 6, the alternating quick and slow
movements were played most commend-
ably. U.B.C. students have every reason
to be proud of their orchestra.
As for Mrs. Gertrude Huntley Green,
it is a very difficult task to express the
beauty of her wonderful playing, and
the enjoyment it gave to the audience,
by mere epithets of praise. Those who
were privileged to hear her will not forget her splendid interpretations of
music, and her masterly technique, very
quickly.
Let it once more be said that the
Musical Society has proved itself to be
an organization of which the University
can be justly proud, and deserves every
success in the coming year.
National
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Being porous, yet showerproof,
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We are showing two of the
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Both extremely dressy and beautifully made.
Every man who considers good
taste, coupled with style and quality, should have one of these coats
in his  wardrobe.
Priced at
$35.00
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
EVANS    &
HASTINGS
PRINTERS
 of	
" The   Ubyssey "
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
Phone, Seymour 189 March 25„ 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
ADDITIONAL   SCHOLARSHIPS  TO
BE AWARDED
The following scholarships and prizes
will be awarded at the end of the
present session, in addition to those
mentioned in the calendar:
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship
This scholarship of the value of
$100.00, donated by the Women's Club
of the University, will be open to both
men and women graduates of this University who intend to pursue post-graduate study in this or any other approved
University.
Applications for this scholarship
should be made to the Registrar not
later than the last day of the final examinations.
The Arts '19 Scholarship
This scholarship of the value of
$150.00. given by the students of Arts
'19, will be awarded, on the recommendation of the Faculty Committee on
Scholarships, to a third year student in
Arts proceeding to the fourth year.
The award will be based on (1) literary and scholastic attainments, and (2)
exhibition of moral force of character
and instincts to lead and take an interest
in fellow-students and in University
activities.
This scholarship will be paid in full to
the winner at the beginning of the session.
Convocation Scholarship
This scholarship of the value of $50.00,
donated by Convocation of the University of British Columbia, will be awarded
annually to the student obtaining first.
place in the fourth year of Applied
Science.
The Women's Liberal Association
Prize
This prize of the value of $25.00, given
by the Women's Liberal Association will
be awarded in 1920 to the student of
first year Arts obtaining first place in
English  Literature.
Historical Society Prize
Through the generosity of R. L. Reid,
Esq., K.C., the newly-organized Historical Society of the University has been
able to offer for the session 1919-20 a
prize of $25.00, open to all students in
Arts, for the best essay on any one of
three subjects announced by the executive of the society.
Captain Leroy Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship has been awarded bj
the Universities Service Club, and will
be awarded for the academic years 1920-
31. Full particulars concerning it wert
given in a previous issue.
FINAL MEETING
MEDAL   OFFERED   FOR   HISTORY
STUDENTS
An addition has been made to the list
of scholarships and prizes by the offer
of a medal for the member of the Fourth
year doing the best work in History.
The number of courses taken in that
subject during the four years of college
attendance will be taken into consideration in making the award, as will the
interest shown in History outside lecture rooms. The medal will be awarded
each  year,  beginning  with   this  spring.
Since Mr. Lacey Fisher found himself
unable to give his paper on Tuesday
last, the meeting of the Letters Club
has been postponed until next Tuesday,
March 30th, when Mr. G. G. Coope will
read a paper on the American poetess,
Miss Amy Lowell. This is the last
meeting of the session.
TICKETS LIMITED
To-morrow is the last day on which
students may obtain tickets for the Congregation dance, which will be held in
Lester Court on Thursday, May 6th. The
tickets are limited. Examinations will be
a thing of the past, and this promises
to be the most popular dance of the
year. The Congregation dance is given
each year by the Juniors for the graduating  class.
DISTINCTIVE MARK FOR
FRESHETTES
The annual meeting of the Women's
Undergraduate Society was held on
Wednesday at noon. At this meeting a
motion was put before the society favoring the adoption of the recommendation
of the executive that all future classes
of Freshettes be made to wear 'round
their necks green cords for their locker
keys. The motion was carried by a vote
of 64 to 45. The retiring president, after
thanking her executive for their cooperation throughout the term, introduced the new president. Miss Myrtle
Kilpatrick. Elections for the offices of
vice-president and secretary then took
place. Miss Christine Urquhart. Arts
'22, was elected to the vice-presidency,
and Miss Annie Anderson, Arts '21i, was
made  secretary.
FORM  OUTDOOR CLUB
At a meeting held on Friday, at noon,
the Outdoor Club, the latest organization under the Alma Mater, was formed.
The idea was originated by Mr. A. Rive,
who took charge of the meeting until
the president, Mr. George Barnwell, was
elected. An executive was then elected,
and the constitution, which .had been
outlined by Mr. Rive, was adopted. The
purpose of this club is to arrange outdoor excursions for its members during
both summer and winter. The first
official function will be the picnic on
April 24th, to which all the University
is invited. All those who wish to join
now may do so by applying to the vice-
president of the club. Miss Verchere,
Arts '22, or to the secretary, Mr. Winston  Smith, Arts '21.
GIRLS  WIN  FARRELL  CUP
By defeating Crofton House on Tuesday afternoon, by a score of 19-4, the
'Varsity girls won the Earrell cup, emblematic of the basketball championship
of Vancouver. U. B. C. has not lost a
game this season. B. Pearce and M.
Borden   were   the   stars   of  the   winners.
'Varsity lined up as follows: Guards.
M. Gordon and M. Kilpatrick: centre, G.
Weld; forwards, B. Pearce and 10. Eveleigh.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Sprott-Shaw Stamp—Quality
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods''
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
1 0% off to Returned Men
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about tomorrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
The last Y.W.C.A. meeting of the year
will be held in the Auditorium on Tuesday, March liOth, at noon, and promises
to  be   very  interesting. THE   UBYSSEY
March 25, 1920
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FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the  University of British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
{Lillian Cowdell
A.   H.   Imlah
C. D. Taylor
Chief Reporter A.   Evan  Boss
Exchange  Editor G.   G.   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business  Manager J.   N.  Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
.     . I D. A. Wallace       W. R. Smith
Assistants	
^ W.  McKee
Circulation   Manager A.    Crawford
Editor for the Week C.  D. Tayloi
AVE ATQUE VALE!
With this number, the "Ubyssey"
makes its last appearance for the year
1919-20. In the time-honored manner,
therefore, the Publications Board takes
its final opportunity of laying before the
students grave and weighty precepts,
and of bidding a formal farewell to its
friends of the past term.
This is no time to review the plans
of the Editorial Board, or the hopes and
fears of the staff, of little interest save
to those who felt them. Nevertheless,
it might be possible to say one word
before leaving the stage to our successors. Last year the "Ubyssey" was
transformed from a monthly to its present form, and we have occasionally
heard criticism voiced in respect to this
change, and complaints that the paper
should have a distinct literary side, at
present unemphasized. Our answer is
short. The weekly form serves best the
purpose of binding together the activities of this somewhat straggling and uncoordinated college life. There is room
for literary contributions, and we have
asked for them repeatedly. There is a
real need for such in our paper, and a
conspicuous place will be forthcoming
when they are submitted. Nevertheless,
the most pressing duty of the "Ubyssey"
at the present time is to keep each and
every student directly in touch with
what is happening, and thus do its part
in the moulding of that University life
—which can only come with perfect cooperation and acquaintance with the
work of every other branch of activities.
Before making our official bow, and
relinquishing our small but cherished
domicile to the tender mercies of the
janitors, we wish to thank all those who
have given us aid or comfort in our
labors of the year. We appreciate deeply the assistance of our contributors,
advertisers, and subscribers, and trust
that their sympathetic interest will continue next term. Our critics also must
come in for their meed of praise for the
interest they have displayed.' And, finally, we must mention the untiring services of Mr. Tansley, who has done
much to cheer our weary way. To one
and all, farewell for the present!
GOING UP!
At the annual meeting of the Alma
Mater Society, to-morrow, the advisibil-
ity of raising the student fees will be
discussed. This year each member paid
$5.00 to the society at the beginning of
the session, $3.00 of which was allotted
to the Publications' Board. The remaining $2.00 has been used to meet the general expenditures of the student organizations. The present suggestion is that
this latter amount be raised to $4.00.
To anyone who is in a position to
appreciate the difficulty which confronts
the Students' Council in their task of
meeting the demands which are made
upon the treasury, and, at the same time,
of showing a credit balance at the end
of the term, it is clear that the existing
fee is entirely inadequate. Why should
it be necessary to sell tickets for a debate, in order to defray the expenses incurred? It is only fair that the whole
student body should share in the responsibility of sending U. B. C- debaters to
other colleges. In our present condition
it is also impossible to consider arange-
ments for inter-collegiate spirit of any
kind, because of our inability to finance
the necessary teams.
These are a few of the features which
immediately appeal to us. Think them
over, and come to the meeting to-morrow, prepared to render an intelligent
decision.
EX CATHEDRA
S'long,  folks.    The "Ubsysey"  will be
back again next year.
The person who left the chocolate bar
in the editorial basket may find out what
happened to it by applying to Johnny
Weld.
Latest rumor: The publications office
is to be used as a lecture hall next session.
"Micky" McDougall suggests a slumming expedition to the girls' common
room.
The "Annual" is now on the press, and
will be distributed a few days before the
examinations.
We may as well accustom ourselves to
the open air now, as it will almost certainly be necessary to hold lectures on
the grass next fall. Join the Outdoors
Club!
GOOD NEWS
We are glad to learn that Dr. Eastman has at length received excellent
news from overseas. After a long and
critical illness in Paris, his wife has
recovered and is now completing her
convalescence in England. We hope to
welcome her into our University life
next autumn.
DO YOU WANT A JOB?
All those who are interested in college publications are asked to attend a
meeting which will be held next week.
The day and hour will be announced
later.    Watch  the  notice  boards. March 25„ 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
OUTWITTED!
BEING A TALE OF FALSTAFF AND
HIS MERRY REVELLERS
The following little scene, if inserted
between scenes 2 and 3, Act V., of the
first part of "King Henry V.", would
throw a little light on the character of
Falstaff, and, incidentally, explain how it
was that the wine bottle got into his
pistol-case before the Battle of Shrewsbury.
Scene: "Brimming Bowl Inn," ten
miles from Shrewsbury. Falstaff and
his lieutenants, Catchpenny, Bardolph
and  Poins, diceing about a table.
Poms: Odds blood! Go slow; give me
those dice, ye beefy swine. Methinks
they sound like deadened putty-balls as
they strike the snowy deal. I'll give up
my place in Paradise an' that juicy hog
do not play with cogged dice.
Fal.: List' to him rave, good gentlemen. Forsooth! 'tis easy for him to give
up that place in heaven that he'll never
have. For my part, good sirs, may I
never sweat thin in my cosy corner in
hell an' these dice be not honest enough
for an angel to wager on. Did I not
borrow these self-same dice from his
grace, the  Bishop of York?
Catch.: Methinks that paunchy John
doth drain our purses unseeming fast.
Fal.: Knave! Thou hast a hole in thy
purse, for I did but win two copper eyepieces of thee. Never did I see such a
rabbit-whiskered, weak-kneed, water-
stomached better in all my life.
Poins: Thou pot-bellied, flabby-jouled,
double-chinned, coarse- faced mountain
of flesh! Thou dost fawn around thy
superiors all day long and hang thy
pudgy hands about Prince Hal's neck.
Thou dost cling to him like a wet shirt,
and art as unwelcome. At the same time
you take on great airs with us who are
thy equals, and more. Thou goest into
high dudgeon with those unfortunate
menials who tend thy beery hide. Thou
wert  a  gentleman  once,  but   since   hast
drowned thy breeding in a stream of amber sack 'till thou hast nought left but a
fat paunch and a lean pate. Thou art a
coward, too, and thou knowest it.
Fal.: Have done; make an end, I say.
Go vent thy spleen	
Poins: Hear me out, ye heap of spineless jelly. I say that what little knowledge thou hast left, thou usest to lie, to,
rob, and to cheat. Where are thy ragged
soldiers that ye swindled of their pay?
Tell me that. All this I could pardon,
but a livid anger sears my soul when
thou dost take mine golden groats with
loaded dice. Believe me, Prince Hal.
shall hear of this.
(Exit. Poins.)
Fal.: What an ejaculation of spleen!
Poins consumes himself with an envious
rage, till he becomes a living rake. Methinks he is envious of my good point,
in sooth, my superfluous flesh, to cover
the ribs in the coffin-case of his jealous
soul. What thinkest thou, my noble
Bardolph?
Bard.: Thou speakest truly, Sir John.
His fit of spleen is unaccountable else.
Fal.: And to show you, my good sirs,
that these be not cogged dice, I cast
them into the blazing hearth lest they
bother us more. Come, mine snivelling
host! Three rounds of sack apiece. Let
us drink and drown our sorrows; though
mine, alack! are like fishes, and have
learned to swim.
Catch.: Agreed, Sir John; but first
give us a song. Let us see thee shake
thy sides in a merry roundelay.
Fal.: 'Tis well said. Come, clink the
glasses while I sing.    (He sings.)
Dan Cupid sat on a wine-glass edge,
And Psyche sat on another,
And   each   did  look  from  their   slippery
ledge,
O'er the sparkling foam, at  the other.
Bold  Cupid  wink'd at  the  sweet young
dear,
And, 'tis said, she winked at him;
But as the tale goes on we hear,
Excited Dan, the wine fell in.
Chorus (together)
Come,   fill  up  the  glass  and   fill   up   the
bowl,
Be merry men while we may;
Let   joyful   songs   go   the   gay   throng
'round
Before the break of day.
(Enter Prince Henry.)
P. Hen.:   Falstaff!
Fal.: How now, sweet Hal., thou dost
come upon us unawares, and no doubt
art enticed hither by the melodious music
of our song.
P. Hen.: Malodorous music, you mean.
I heard nothing but the clatter of
pewter-pots and the hoarse rattle of
ribald mirth.
Fal.: Thou canst not say hoarse,
sweet Hal., not hoarse.
P. Hen.:   I prithee, why not?
Fal.: Thou knowest full well, tin-
shriven knave, that ye stole my horse.
P. Hen.: Enough of this, ye merry
pudding; wilt never be serious? Why
daudle ye here, o'er beer-pots, while
Hotspur has half the Scots of Scotland
arrayed in the field against us? Where
are thy tattered soldiery?
Fal.: They forage their supper as best
they may.
P. Hen.: What! Sirrah! Hast thou
embezzled the King's expense money?
Fal.: 'Tis not I that embezzled it,
Hal.; 'tis the naughty landlord there.
Besides, why should we waste good
sack and fat suppers on such cannon
fodder as they?
P. Hen.: List' the mule bray of fodder. Ye wobbling tub of flesh, thy
stomach could hold a king's ransom, so
the tittle of a company's rations may be
pardoned. It is said that flesh is weak,
and the Lord knows thou hast plenty of
it. But stir your beefy hide and collect
your mob of unfielded scarecrows, for
the fighting is about to begin. For fear
the knaves betray us, thou shalt lead
them in the van of the army.
Fal.: Ay, brave Hal., put me in the
front line. Thou knowest how I lately
fought a score of buff-Jerkins single-
handed. I warrant me I'll do the execution  of a  dozen  men.
P. Hen.: Fare the well, good John. I
hasten to Shrewsbury Plain. Gather thy
ragamuffins as best ye can, and follow
me with all dispatch.    Farewell!
(Exit. Prince Henry.)
(Continued on Page 7)
The New Spring Models in Footwear
For Young Men and Young Women
are a gathering of the best Shoe Values and the choicest Shoe Styles to be
found anywhere.
We will take the greatest pleasure in showing you the handsome new
creations for the Spring season.
ike INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
March 25, 1920
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A., Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Keystone Covers
Are Handy
tJThere is a size for every use,
with top or side opening.
IJThey refill in a moment, are
strong and sturdy, with good
looks thrown in.
IJInsist on getting  Keystone
Covers and Sheets.
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  &  Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -.  B. C.
R.e.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
PLAYERS' CLUB  VISIT THE
"COAL CITY"
"Green Stockings" seem to be far
from worn out, judging from the reception the flayers' Club received in Na-
naimo last week.
After two hours passed with dancing
and attempting to persuade the purser
of the Princess Pat. to open the dining-
room after hours, the party was able to
do justice to a dinner at the Windsor
Hotel which would shame "Mr. Vancouver's" efforts in the culinary art. Between playing to a capacity house, which
was almost flatteringly appreciative, and
enjoying an excellent supper and dance
afterwards, at the home of Mrs. Powers,
the regent of the Bastion Chapter, I. O.
D. E., t'ie evening was passed in a very
pleasant " manner. Perhaps the impromptu party conducted by the caste at
the hotel in the "wee sma' hours" acted
as  the perfect nightcap.
Between acts, Mr. Wood told the citizens of Nanaimo a few things about
U.B.C, which, from the looks of admiring surprise, were entirely new to them.
(In fact, they were new to some of the
students.)
As a result of the trip, a few more
dollars have gone towards the Nanaimo
Public Library, to which the proceeds
went, and some undergraduates have all
too willingly put a "Third Mortgage" on
April (and, if necessary, might be content  to  place  a  "Fourth").
TRACK CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS
FOR NEXT YEAR
At the annual meeting of the Track
Club, held on Wednesday, March 17th,
officers for the ensuing year were
elected. Mr. A. Buchanan was the popular choice for the office of president and
he took over the meeting from the retiring president, Mr. Solloway, who has
done such good work for the Track Club
during the past year. The members
unanimously chose Dr. Davidson as
honorary president, and expressed their
appreciation of the kindly interest he has
taken in track activities. The other
officers elected were: Vice-president,
Winston Smith, Arts '21; secretary, Cliff
Mathers, Sc. '23, and treasurer, H. Ross,'
Arts '22.
At noon, Friday, March 26th, a meeting will be held in the Auditorium, when
ribbons will be presented to the winners
of the various events of this year's track
meet. The programme for next year will
also be outlined and a definite date set
for the inter-class relay race. All interested in track affairs are requested to
attend this meeting.
CHEMISTRY  DANCE, APRIL 23
The Chemistry Society will hold their
annual dance in the Auditorium on Friday, April 23rd. All who feel the need
of a relapse to sanity after the strain of
the exams, should try to get tickets1
when they are put on sale during the
first week of April. The executive are
working on the plans, and those who
know promise that this will be one of
the best "hops" of the year.
Art and Style Clothes Shop
Holeproof
Hosier^
SAY,  BOYS!
We don't like to say too much
about the goods we sell, but feel
that we must say a few words
about
Holeproof
Silk and Lisle Socks
They are the best that your money
can buy. All colors, for 75c and
$1.50 pair.
Yours for real service,
Ben  Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Castle Hotel is next door)
Trcsb Cut Tlowtrt.     funeral Work a Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice   Cream  and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN  STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone,  Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey.  2313
932  Granville   St. Phone,  Sey. 8723
VICTORIA  BRANCH:
1235   Government   St. Phone 4742 March 25„ 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
OUTWITTED!
(Continued from  Page 5)
Fal.: Fare thee well, sweet Prince.
Thou attenuated string-bean, who
wouldst stick me on the front line.
Marry, but I'll contrive to be chief guard
to the wine butts, or I'll take this tavern
in my knapsack. Ho! mine host, bring
me a dozen bottles of Burgundy. S'death
an' I do not pack myself like a travelling inn. Out, ye mortal pistol, and'
make room for a bottle of life. Come,
my brave captains, let us depart.
Host: Not so fast, Sir John. The
reckoning, Sir John, an' 't please your
grace, is two pounds.
Fal.: An' 't please my grace, thou
stealing varlet! How darest thou charge
two pounds for ten pennyworth of sack?
Besides, why come to me? Catchpenny
there has the privy purse.
Catch.: He speaks truly, good host. I
have the purse, but he hath my monnie.
Host: See here, Sir John, I know thee,
Sir John, thou owest me twenty pound
that is yet unpaid. Thou shalt cheat me
no more, or I'll crack this stone demijohn on thy fatty pate.
Fal.: How durst thou defy a knight,
ye country clout! But hold, 'tis no need
to wave that jar so loosely, sweet host.
Of course, I'll pay. Or, more truly, we
shall pay—for I intend to play a merry
prank. The .scheme is this: Since no
one will pay, let us blindfold mine host,
spin him thrice, and the first that he
shall lay his hand on shall square the
reckoning.
Catch.:   'Tis  a  sporting scheme.
Host: It is a foolish trick; but, so long
as I get paid, I'll do it, an' it please you,
gentlemen.
Bard.: I'll wager old Falstaff gets
caught, for he is thrice as big as anyone
else.
Fal.: Hold thy head while I bind this
napkin athwart thine eyes.
(Exeunt Catchpenny and Bardolph.)
Fal.: Art sure thou cannot see, mine
host?
Host:   By my faith, I cannot.
Fal.: I well believe it, fore truly thou
art a muddy knave. There, gently,
round and round; fear not. Thou shalt
be roundly done.
(Goes to door and puts bench between
himself and host.)
Now, mine muddy publican, thou art
free to play the game. Catch me however you may devise; but if you catch
me on this side of the grave, or Shrewsbury, I'll give thee an armful of notes
on  Paradise.
(Exit.  Falstaff.)
Host (Runs to door, stumbles over
bench and bumps head on floor): Ho!
my good lads. Ho! Stacey, ho! butler,
ostler, good men all, assistance to the
taproom, quick. I am set upon by a trio
of thieving knaves. O, spare me, good
sirs. Pardon my worthless carcass. All
my money is hidden under the hearth.
(Unties bandage.) Zounds! Where are
they?    Tricked again by that oily swine!
Back, ye robbers! Come back, ye
hounds! I knew right well you'd steal
my pounds.
(Exit,  after  Falstaff.)
The Universities Service Club wishes
to acknowledge receipt of $50.00 from
the Women's Canadian Club, to be used
towards the Capt. Leroy Scholarship
Fund.
PHONE. SEYMOUR  7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
,,  W
■Hf
='{,*
l^lllli'Sl^ill^li^l
*^''j^£i>$»
U.B.C.  Students  Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS  BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
M.  PERRIN, Manager —■ 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT   PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
'Again,  it  may  be  the  dance  floor—or  the  atmosphere  that  pervades—or  the
character of the people.
PERHAPS  it  is  all  three—for  the  BARRON  is different,  and  that  is  why  this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee  Luncheon,  11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER   Every Day,  including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
The Newest Suits
for Young Men
X
Spring
19    2   0
X
Styles, Fabrics and Colors of the
very highest standard. Each Suit
price represents remarkable value
at
$35,00, $45.00, $50.00 to $75.00
J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
125-127 Hastings Street, West
Also* 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the Big Red Arrow Sign
MAKE    OUR   STORE    YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouwr Stationers Dd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
.. the ..
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and   Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and   Second-Hand
Book  Shop
Specialists in University Books THE   UBYSSEY
March 25, 1920
ARTS '21 ELECTS OFFICERS
FOR NEXT YEAR
Arts '21 met on Tuesday, at noon, to
elect officers for next year. The following were chosen: Hon. president, Dr.
Boggs; president, Mr. James Mitchell;
vice-president, Miss Muriel Munro; secretary, Miss Hope McKee; treasurer,
Mr. Winston R. Smith; representative to
Women's Lit., Miss Gwen Lewis; class
reporter, Mr. H. W. McLean.
In addition to these regular officers,
Miss Lawrence and Mr. E. Solloway
were appointed to look after the class
athletics for the women and men, respectively.
SOCCER TEAM DRAWS
The Firemen held the 'Varsity soccer
eleven to another scoreless draw last
Wednesday, at the Cambie Street
grounds. The game was a hard-fought
affair from the beginning, and 'Varsity
did well to get off with a draw. The
Firemen lost two of their best men during the game, and were forced to play
on the defensive most of the time. When
they did get away, however, they were
well handled by Crute, Wolverton and
Baker, who formed an efficient defence.
'Varsity lined up as follows: Crowe,
Wolverton, Baker, Mitchell, Crute, Cant,
Cameron, Denham, Jackson, F"oley and
McLeod.
U.B.C. DEBATERS DEFEAT ALT A.
(Continued from Page 1)
Mr. Walter Dunham, of Alberta, declared that in Canada the private member has no voice in legislation, as his
opposition to a government measure
might lead to the fall of the party. If
President and Congress are of different
parties, it proves that the people wish
to check the President; thus no one department becomes absolute. The constitution of the U. S. can be changed, but
only with a degree of difficulty precluding emotional  extremes of legislation.
Miss Louie Stirk produced some
effective arguments for the negative.
The powers of the President in time of
war, and his veto, she showed to be
practically absolute. The elected representatives of the people cannot be members of the executive, and the latter
cannot explain in person their policy to
Congress. The system she described as
particularly op«i to "log-rolling," and
told how the budget may be passed by
the fifteen executive heads, without debate.
Mr. Scroggie, in his rebuttal, said that
the American Senate's opposition to a
bill resulted in a compromise acceptable
to all. Of a Canadian Cabinet meeting,
where the most important legislation
goes on, no report is ever made public.
He declared the check of the Supreme
Court to be practically obsolete.
It may be remarked that both the Alberta representatives had an unhurried,
conversational style, which was very
acceptable, and did not make use of
notes. Mr. Macfarlane, on behalf of the
judges, congratulated the speakers on
the high standard of the debate. An informal dance followed.
GOOD TIME IN STORE FOR
STUDENTS
Say! Did you go to Indian River last
year? Or had you not yet reached the
status of a real live college student?
Whatever the answer, don't miss it this
year, for if you do you will be sorry, and
so will those sympathetic souls who always want everybody else to have a
good time. The reason is—this picnic
is going to be the happiest, jolliest event
that the whole college has had an opportunity of attending this term. Everybody will be there. It is up to you to see
that you are there to join in the fun.
(And, whisper it, Dr. Sedgewick is going.)
DEFEAT VICTORIA
Last Saturday the girls' grass hockey
team duplicated their former victory at
Victoria, when they defeated the Victoria ladies by a score of 1-0 in the return match played at the K. E. H. S.
grounds. The small score was not
representative of the play, for the 'Varsity kept up a strong offensive, pressing
the Victoria defence throughout the
match.
'Varsity lineup: Goal, V. Herman;
backs, M. Copping (captain), M. Wilcox;
halfbacks, J. Bickerfield, B. Garlick, R.
Gross; forwards, C. Fitch, S. Thornston-
stein, H. Draper (1), D. Hopper, M.
Jackson.
After the game the visitors were entertained at a luncheon given by Prof,
and Mrs. Boving, who has so ably acted
as coach during the past season.
OH, JANET
Janet G.—-I wonder if that C , from
Alberta, is the man we met at Des
Moines?
Jealous—Why?    Did you  fall?
Janet G.—No, but he did.
Studio
ATHENAEUM
319 Pender St. W.
Wile, marie de. Hocbe
LATEST BALLROOM   DANCES
For  Appointment
Phone between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Seymour 7640
MISS ANDERSON
Teaches the latest Ballroom
•Dances at her home. Small classes
arranged for.
1299 Seventh Avenue, West
Phone, Bayview 3104R
COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,     Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, GLENCOE LODGE
Phone,.Seymour 0022
Teachers Wanted
For Vacation
The experience would be invaluable. All down-to-date Boards
write or wire us their needs, taking
pains to give every detail relating
to the school, boarding accommodation, attendance, people, etc.,
and, in turn, require our careful
attention.
Our work has extended over
some RIGHT YEARS, and we are
the only Incorporated Teachers'
Bureau in  the Dominion.
Fullest particulars and ' PERSONAL ATTENTION given.
Good vacancies in B. C. and Alberta. Schools open immediately
the University closes. ARRANGE
EARLY.
B.C. Teachers' Agency
Limited
J. J.  DOUGAN,  Manager,
1601 Third Ave., East,
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone, Highland 979
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The "Combination"
*I A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over instep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
<I This insures that perfect glove fit
around the instep and ankle. The
maximum of comfort and sttyle.
Guff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite  Bank of Commerce

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