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The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1944

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 Greek Letter Societies Meeting Today
Red Cross Ball
Committee To
Discuss Plans
•   A MASS MEETING of all fraternities and sororities to
discuss details for the Red Cross Ball is being held today
at noon in the Auditorium.
This is he first time in the history of the university that
a joint meeting of all members of Panhellenlc and Interfraternity Councils has ever been held.
Purpose of the meeting, which
is being called by the committee
in charge of the Red Cross Ball, ls
to obtain opinions on some questions which have arisen in connection with the Ball, and to show
Greek Letter society members
what has been accomplished to
date.
Members of the committee will
give reports on their activities.
Anne DuMoulin, chairman of the
committee' will be in charge of the
meeting.
THIRTY PRIZES
R.J. Pop has donated a squirrel
coat for first prize in the raffle,
it was announced yesterday.
Thirty other prizes have also been
donated by various other city
firms, and raffle tickets will be
available next week for sale on
the campus through members of
the fraternities and sororities.
The Ball Is to be strictly Dutch
treat, this year as in others, and
the price per person will be $2.50.
The committee has requested that
no corsages be given, and also advises that students make their reservations early.
Sororities
Hold Open
Bids Tues.
• ALL girls  eligible for,
and interested in joining
a sorority must be registered
by 1:30 today. Bids will be
given out on Tuesday ac
noon between 1 and 1:15 in
the Cafeteria.
Once a rushee accepts a bid she
cannot exchange lt for another
However, she is allowed 15 minutes in which to decide whether
she will accept a bid or not.
Pledging will take place Tuesday
night
»
The fraternities will also hold
open bidding this term. Each
fraternity is allowed to choose
five new pledges between November 1 and March 1, and the bidding is very informal. It Is primarily for the benefit of senior
matrlo students who were unacquainted with fraternities In the
early fall.
Each plerge must be registered
with the IFC for one week before
being pledged.
Demon Flu
Vanquishes
Thespians
• THIS is the story of fifteen sad Thespians.
Lines had been relearned,
make-up was out of storage,
properties were ready, final
farwells were bidden—then
it came! The much talked of,
much heralded tour to tho
military camps was cancelled!
Thus, several days before Christmas the select group of Players'
Clubbers wore faced with the
horrifying thought of nothing to
do in thc holidays but slouch.
The excuse made by the "Powers
That Be" was that the influenza
epidemic had spread to such an
extent that all tours to military
camps were to be cancelled without further notice.
A further rumor has reached
the UBYSSEY which suggests
that their is a possibility of the
tour sometime ln February.
Deadline Set
For Photo
Sittings
• APPOINTMENTS for
grad issue photos must
be made not later than January 13 in the Publications
Board Office. Any student
of the grad class who has
not made an appointment by
then will not have his picture in the yearbook.
Artona studios has Just announced that they will be closed
all day Wednesday this year. Students who have registered for
photos on a Wednesday are therefor asked to change theij: appointments as soon as possible. Cost
for Grad pictures will be $1.25
with a mounted picture Included.
NO COST
The Grad issue will be distributed free of charge to the students
at the end of the spring term. Application for copy will be through
forms which will be published in
the Ubyssey.
The Yearbook this year will be
more on the lines of the "Totem,"
UBC's picture record of the year
that was voluntarily discontinued
because of shortages of materials.
The 1944 Grad Issue will be considerably enlarged over last year's,
but wartime restrictions still will
prevent a return to the pre-war
size and swank of the Totem.
In 1941 and 1942 the Totem was
judged All American In competition with American Universities,
the highest award that could be
given. 1941 was the first time
that any Canadian University had
won the award.
AMS Offers
Swing Fans
Records
• JIVE FANS will now be
able to listen to a wide
variety of swing records both
hot and cold, collected during the past term by the
Council.
There are selections played by
nearly every notable band: Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Duke Ellington, Freddy Martin, Vaughn
Munroe, Count Basie, Glen Miller,
Benny Goodman, Harry James,
Jimmy Dorsey, Bob Crosby, Coleman Hawkins, Alvlno Rey, Xavier
Cugat, Sonny Dunham, Al Goodman, Raymond Paige, Wayne King,
Benny Carter, and Mart Kenny.
Also there are a few records by
Bing Crosby, Mills Brothers, Four
Vagabonds and perhaps even Sinatra.
These records are kept in the
AMS- office and may be taken out
ttnd played on the Brock record
player at any time.
Audit. Balcony
Reopened As Result
Of Good Behavior
e "BECAUSE of student cooperation during the past term tho
Auditorium balcony will be reopened, and shall be kept open
pending the future cooperation of
the students," announced Bob
Whyte, AMS President.
Wild displays of emotion during
pep meets necessitated the closing
of the balcony to students for this
type of meeting early in the
Chrismas term. Whether or not
the balcony stays open will depend
on the state of student behavior.
Tkefflutm
Vol. XXVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 1944
No. 21
Sad Story Of Students So
Far Spurned By S. Service
By JOHN GREEN
•   PITY THE SAD FATE of the student nobody wants.
All last term the awful form of selective service crouched
in the shadows and under the caf benches, waiting, waiting,
gazing with fiendish anticipation at the unfortunate students
as they hurried madly about their studies. "Christmas," it
said to itself, "Christmas, then I'll get him!''
FRENZY 	
Terrified at the awful fate a-
waiting them, eligible Varsity
males (don't misunderstand me,
girls) worked with feverish frenzied haste in a hopeless effort to
escape the unescapable.
Came the 28th of December and
eighty-two unfortunates found
that their struggle had Indeed been
in vain. They were caught. Their
destiny lay In the merciless hands
of the bureaucrats.
But what of selective service,
what fiendish plan had they prepared to spring on the helpless
victims who had fallen into their
hands?
Friends of the unfortunates held
their breath. Would they ever
hear from their old cronies again?
When would the casualty lists be
posted?
ANTI CLIMAX
Then the Impossible happened.
Some of the draftees were still
to be seen around their old haunts,
nothing had happened to them,
nothing seemed to be going to
happen to them. One or two of
the most fortunate (and of the
lowest medical category) even reappeared at varsity. ,
These lucky individuals did not
know why they were allowed to
return, they did not know if the
move was permanent. They did
not know what had happened to
their more athletic compatriots.
Tiie university did not know,  The
Radio Soc.
National
Plans Foiled
• JUST LIKE the 1943
Christmas trees, the University Radio Society has
been foiled again. A few
weeks ago the news came
out that the station over
which the society broadcasts,
CKWX, was going on a Dominion-wide hookup.
Immediately this little group of
radio actors began wondering If by
any chance they would possibly
be broadcasting all across Canada,
as CKWX was to be on the network from five to eight in the
afternoon, and their program ls
on at 6:45.
However, according to CKWX,
for the next two or three weeks
anyway, 'Varsity Varieties' will go
on the air only to the local
audience.
Reading Supplied
For Brock Lounge
e TIME, Coronet, Life and the
Digests now grace the hitherto
empty tables and magazine racks
In the Brock. The AMS, with a
view to improving the students'
idle hours, has begun to supply
magazines ln the Lounge.
There is no regulated scheme for
supplying the magazines, but new
issues will be available from time
to time. The selections made
cover a wide range, from politics
to sports and back through art.
Henceforth bridge gives place to
the fascination of Life's cover
Cirls, Coronet's color photography,
and the Indubitable interest of a
political discussion straight from
Time.
COTC was in the dark.. Only the
navy and the air force had definite
information on what was to happen to their charges.
What happened? Had weakness
finally appeared among the servants of the government? Were
the "Horrors of Hastings Street"
really human?
FRUSTRATION
Finally the NSS itself was contacted. "Could they please tell
just what was - - •" "Just a minute, I'll connect you witfi someone else." I'd like to find - - -"
"I'm sorry, I'll put you through to
- - -", "Hello, could you" "No,
just a minute". "Could you - - -"
Click, click! "Hello, could- - - "
"One moment". "What happened
to the UBC students who were - -
- '-" 'Tm sorry, I can't tell you
now, the board is still considering
the case!"
There you have it. For four
months the awful unknown has
been pondering on the horrible
things It would do to the students
when it got them. Now it isn't
even sure it wants them.
The terror of the campus turns
out to be a mild-mannered and
somewhat befuddled St. Bernard.
The holders of the BAC (bounced
at Christmas) degree are still alive
end out of jail. Their fate is still
before them. What will happen?
Will anyone come to claim them,
or must they wait for the NSS for
ever?
Canadian
Club Essay
Contest On
• A PRIZE of one hundred dollars given in its
entirety or divided among
two or three contestants will
be awarded this year for the
best short story or stories
submitted to the Women's
Canadian Club of Toronto,
it was recently announced in
a letter received by the
Ubyssey.
The contest is open to both nonprofessional and professional writers throughout the dominion and
must develope some aspect of
piesent-day Canadian life or
thought. Additional rules are that
the manuscript must be approximately 2500 words in length.
Stories which have already been
produced or published will not be
accepted and contestants who havo
previously received the Club prize
shall not be eligible.
Three typewritten copies shall
be required and each must be
signed with the writers pseudonym. The name and address of
the writer shall be enclosed in
separate sealed envelopes on th'j
outside of which shall appear the
writers pseudonym. A further rule
is that the appearance of the
wr.tcr's name or other identification marks on the manuscript will
disqualify   it.
Manuscripts should be addressed
to the Secretary-Treasurer of the
Women's Canadian Club of Toronto, 69 Bloor Street East. Stories must be submitted by February 16.
If the judges feel that no entry
merits a prize awards will not be
given.
Guest Speakers To
Attend Religious
Conference Here
•   TWO OF THE FOUR guest speakers who will address
various groups during the discussion on Religion and
Life, to be held on the campus January 16 to January 19,
are Chancellor George P. Gilmour and Miss 'Gertrude L.
Rutherford.
Chancellor   Gilmour  serves  in
————————— two capacities at McMaster University, as President and Chancellor. His appointment to the latter post was made ln 1941. Descended from pioneer Baptist stock
in eastern Canada, he has served
for twelve years in the chair of
Church History at McMaster and
is renowned as a leader in Canadian Baptist Church educational
circles.
Dr. P. Gilmour
Full Term
Planned
By Forum
•   AN  EXTENSIVE  program is planned by the
Parliamentary   Forum   for
the next two months.
Things start off with a bang during the third week in January
when the annual debate with Victoria College will be held on the
campus.
Last year Victoria escaped with
the sllverwear, but forumites are
confident that they will not bo
able to repeat the performance.
Tryouts for the two man team to
represent UBC will be held next
week.
MOCK PARLIAMENT II
Second feature on the forum
program ls a second mock parliament to be held on Tuesday,
February 1. The session will commence at 4:00 p.m.
The discussion on the speech
from the throne will last until six
o'clock when a recess will be held
until seven. The house will then
reconvene and the major bill of
the evening will be moved and
discussed.
The annual McGoun Cup debate
Is (he third item on the club
agenda. Plans for the debate are
not definitely decided as yet, but
the procedure will probably be the
same as last year. Date of the
contest is February 18.
At their regular meetings this
term the forum plans to discuss
student affairs. Topics under consideration include lengthening of
the school year and other subjects
of Interest to students.
Ten Social Events
Scheduled For
January - February
POPULAR
Dr. Gilmour is a graduate of McMaster, and has taken post-graduate studies at Oxford and Yale
Universities. His enviable record
in scholarship and public speaking
as well as his continued interest
in student activities has won for
him a wide popularity as a speaker at young people's conferences.
Miss Rutherford is the Principal
of the United Church of Canada
Training School for women leaders, having previously served as
assistant to the Dean of Women at
Victoria College of the University
of Toronto, her Alma Mater.
Her connection with Christian
Youth movements are widespread,
and she occupied the position of
associate general secretary of the
Student Christian Movement Besides post-graduate work in economics, she obtained a Bachelor of
Divinity degree from Yale Divinity
School.
MUCH TRAVELLED
Miss Rutherford's participation
in student conferences has led her
to visit all parts of the world, including India, Ceylon, China, Europe, and the United States. She
was a member of the team visiting
Queen's University last year during the Religion and Life week.
Information regarding Dr. Leslie
G. Kilborn and Bishop Remington,
the other two leaders, will be
printed in next Tuesday's Ubyssey,
and a complete program of discussions and other data will follow In Friday's issue.
"lolanthe"
Committees
Form Today
• COMMITTEES in charge
of costumes, props, scenery,
makeup and tickets for "lolanthe", the coming Musical
Society production, will be
formed today at a meeting
for all members of the Mus-
soc in Applied Science 100
at 12:30.
Everyone who has anything at
all to do with th© coming production of "lolanthe" must attend.
Members who intend to act as
ushers must be on hand as well as
nil members of the cast.
Rehearsals for the operetta will
definitely begin on Monday, January 10.  Details are posted on tho
notice board.   Further information
concerning  the  Mussoc  Advertls-
The following calendar of social        ing   banquet  and  dance  will   be
events has been approved by the       published in the next Ubyssey.
Student's Council:
Jan. 10 Phrateres   Chapter   Dance APPLICATION FOR
Jan. 13 Mus. Soc. Ticket Dance teciri?
Jan. 14 Phrateres Chapter Dance GRAD ISSUE
Jan. 16, 17, 18 Conference on Re-       Name   	
ligion and Life Year   Faculty  	
Jan. 27 Red Cross Ball Mailing Address   	
Jan. 29 W.A.A. Swimming' Meet 	
Jan. 31-Feb. 5 I.S.S. Week The Grad Issue will be distribu-
Feb. 10 Science  Ball ted free to those students who fill
Feb. 22-26 Mus. Soc. Operetta out this form and return it to the
Fob. 29 W.U.S. Co-ed. AMS office. Greek Letter Societies Meeting Today
Red Cross Ball
Committee To
Discuss Plans
•   A MASS MEETING of all fraternities and sororities to
discuss details for the Red Cross Ball is being held today
at noon in the Auditorium.
This is he first time in the history of the university that
a joint meeting of all members of Panhellenlc and Interfraternity Councils has ever been held.
Purpose of the meeting, which
is being called by the committee
in charge of the Red Cross Ball, is
to obtain opinions on some questions which have arisen in connection with the Ball, and to show
Greek Letter society members
what has been accomplished to
date.
Members of the committee will
give reports on their activities.
Anne DuMoulin, chairman of the
committee' will be ln charge of the
meeting.
THIRTY PRIZES
R.J. Pop has donated a squirrel
coat for first prize in the raffle,
it waa announced yesterday.
Thirty other prizes have also been
donated by various other city
firms, and raffle tickets will be
available next week for sale on
the campus through members of
the fraternities and sororities.
The BaU is to be strictly Dutch
treat, this year as in others, and
the price per person will be &S0.
The committee has requested that
no corsages be given, and also advises that students make their reservations early.
Sororities
Hold Open
Bids Tues.
* ALL girls  eligible for,
and interested in joining
a sorority must be registered
by 1:30 today. Bids will be
given out on Tuesday ac
noon between 1 and 1:15 in
the Cafeteria.
Once a rushee accepts a bid she
cannot exchange it for another
However, she is allowed 15 minutes in which to decide whether
she will accept a bid or not.
Pledging will take place Tuesday
night
The fraternities will also hold
open bidding this term. Each
fraternity is allowed to choose
five new pledges between November 1 and March 1, and the bidding is very informal. It is primarily for the benefit of senior
matrio students who were unacquainted with fraternities ln tho
early fall.
Each plerge must be registered
with the IFC for one week before
being pledged.
Demon Flu
Vanquishes
Thespians
• THIS is the story of fifteen sad Thespians.
Lines had been relearned,
make-up was out of storage,
properties were ready, final
farwells were bidden—then
it came! The much talked of,
much heralded tour to the
military camps was cancelled!
Thus, several clays before Christmas the select group of Players'
Clubbers were faced with the
horrifying thought of nothing to
do in the holidays but slouch.
The excuse made by the "Powers
That Be" was that the influenza
epidemic had spread to such an
extent that all tours to military
camps were to be cancelled without further notice.
A further rumor has reached
the UBYSSEY which suggests
that their is a possibility of the
tour sometime In February.
Deadline Set
For Photo
Sittings
• APPOINTMENTS for
grad issue photos must
be made not later than January 13 in the Publications
Board Office. Any student
of the grad class who has
not made an appointment by
then will not have his picture in the yearbook.
Artona studios has just announced that they will be closed
all day Wednesday this year. Students who have registered for
photos on a Wednesday are therefor asked to change their appointments as soon as possible. Cost
for Grad pictures will be $1.25
with a mounted picture included.
NO COST
The Grad issue will be distributed free of charge to the students
at the end of the spring term. Application for copy will be through
forms which will be published in
the Ubyssey.
The Yearbook this year will be
more on the lines of the "Totem,"
UBC's picture record of the year
that was voluntarily discontinued
because of shortages of materials.
The 1944 Grad Issue will be considerably enlarged over last year's,
but wartime restrictions still will
prevent a return to the pre-war
size and swank of the Totem.
In 1941 and 1942 the Totem was
judged All American in competition with American Universities,
the highest award that could be
given. 1941 was the first time
that any Canadian University had
won the award.
AMS Offers
Swing Fans
Records
• JIVE FANS will now be
able to listen to a wide
variety of swing records both
hot and cold, collected during the past term by the
Council.
There are selections played by
nearly every notable band: Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Duke Ellington, Freddy Martin, Vaughn
Munroe, Count Basle, Glen Miller,
Benny Goodman, Harry James,
Jimmy Dorsey, Bob Crosby, Coleman Hawkins, Alvino Rey, Xavier
Cugat, Sonny Dunham, Al Goodman, Raymond Paige, Wayne King,
Benny Carter, and Mart Kenny.
Also there are a few records by
Blng Crosby, Mills Brothers, Four
Vagabonds and perhaps even Sinatra.
These records are kept ln the
AMS- office and may be taken out
end played on the Brock record
player at any time.
Audit Balcony
Reopened As Result
Of Good Behavior
• "BECAUSE of student cooperation during the past term tho
Auditorium balcony will be reopened, and shall be kept open
pending the future cooperation of
the students," announced Bob
Whyte, AMS President.
Wild displays of emotion during
pep meets necessitated the closing
of the balcony to students for this
type of meeting early in the
Chrismas term. Whether or not
the balcony stays open will depend
on the state of student behavior.
TfalktyMf
Vol. XXVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 7,1944
No. 21
Sad Story Of Students So
Far Spurned By S, Service
By JOHN GREEN
•   PITY THE SAD FATE of the student nobody wants.
All last term the awful form of selective service crouched
in the shadows and under the caf benches, waiting, waiting,
gazing with fiendish anticipation at the unfortunate students
as they hurried madly about their studies. "Christmas," it
said to itself, "Christmas, then I'll get him!"
FRENZY __________
Terrified at the awful fate a-
waiting them, eligible Varsity
males (don't misunderstand me,
girls) worked with feverish frenzied haste in a hopeless effort to
escape the unescapable.
Came the 28th of December and
eighty-two unfortunates found
that their struggle hsd Indeed been
in vain. They were caught. Their
destiny lay in the merciless hands
of the bureaucrats.
But what of selective service,
what fiendish plan had they prepared to spring on the helpless
victims who had fallen into their
hands?
Friends of the unfortunates held
their breath. Would they ever
hear from their old cronies again?
When would the casualty lists be
posted?
ANTI CLIMAX
Then the impossible happened.
Some of the draftees were still
to be seen around their old haunts,
nothing had happened to them,
nothing seemed to be going to
happen to them. One or two of
the most fortunate (and of the
lowest medical category) even reappeared at varsity. ,
These lucky individuals did not
know why they were allowed to
return, they did not know if the
move was permanent. They did
not know what had happened to
their more athletic compatriots.
The university did not know. The
Radio Soc.
National
Plans Foiled
• JUST LIKE the 1943
Christmas trees, the University Radio Society has
been foiled again. A few
weeks ago the news came
out that the station over
which the society broadcasts,
CKWX, was going on a Dominion-wide hookup.
Immediately this little group of
radio actors began wondering if by
any chance they would possibly
be broadcasting all across Canada,
as CKWX was to be on the network from five to eight In the
afternoon, and their program is
on at 6:45.
However, according to CKWX,
for the next two or three weeks
anyway, 'Varsity Varieties' will go
on the air only to the local
audience.
Reading Supplied
For Brock Lounge
• TIME, Coronet, Life and the
Digests now grace the hitherto
empty tables and magazine racks
In the Brock. The AMS, with a
view to improving the students'
idle hours, has begun to supply
magazines In the Lounge.
There is no regulated scheme for
supplying the magazines, but new
issues will be available from time
to time. The selections made
cover a wide range, from politics
to sports and back through art.
Henceforth bridge gives place to
the fascination of Life's cover
girls, Coronet's color photography,
and the Indubitable interest of a
political discussion straight from
Time.
COTC was In the dark.. Only the
navy and the air force had definite
information on what was to happen to their charges.
What happened? Had weakness
finally appeared among the servants of the government? Were
the "Horrors of Hastings Street"
really human?
FRUSTRATION
Finally the NSS itself was contacted. "Could they please tell
just what was - - -" "Just a minute, I'll connect you witfl someone else." I'd like to find - - -"
"I'm sorry, I'll put you through to
- - -", "Hello, could you" "No,
just a minute". "Could you - - -"
Click, click! "Hello, could- - - "
"One moment". "What happened
to the UBC students who were - -
- -" Tm sorry, I can't tell you
now, the board is still considering
the case!"
There you have it. For four
months the awful unknown has
been pondering on the horrible
things It would do to the students
when it got them. Now it isn't
even sure it wants them.
The terror of the campus turn*
out to be a mild-mannered and
somewhat befuddled St. Bernard.
The holders of the BAC (bounced
at Christmas) degree are still alive
end out of jail. Their fate Is still
before them. What will happen?
Will anyone come to claim them,
or must they wait for the NSS for
ever?
Canadian
Club Essay
Contest On
• A PRIZE of one hundred dollars given in its
entirety or divided among
two or three contestants will
be awarded this year for the
best short story or stories
submitted to the Women's
Canadian Club of Toronto,
it was recently announced in
a letter received by the
Ubyssey.
The contest is open to both nonprofessional and professional writers throughout the dominion and
must develope some aspect of
piesent-day Canadian life or
thought. Additional rules are that
the manuscript must be approximately 2500 words in length.
Stories which have already been
produced or published will not be
accepted and contestants who havo
previously received the Club prize
shall not be eligible.
Three typewritten copies shall
be required and each must be
signed with the writers pseudonym. The name and address of
the writer shall be enclosed ln
separate sealed envelopes on tho
outside of which shall appear the
writers pseudonym. A further rule
i.s that the uppearance of the
writer's name or other Identification marks on the manuscript will
disqualify  it.
Manuscripts should be addressed
to the Secretary-Treasurer of the
Women's Canadian Club of Toronto, 69 Bloor Street East. Stories must be submitted by February 16.
If the judges feel that no entry
merits a prize awards will not be
given.
Guest Speakers To
Attend Religious
Conference Here
•   TWO OF THE FOUR guest speakers who will address
various groups during the discussion on Religion and
Life, to be held on the campus January 16 to January 19,
are Chancellor George P. Gilmour and Miss 'Gertrude L.
Rutherford.
Chancellor   Gilmour  serves  in
_-_—---—_»_--——»_-——-_-_ two capacities at McMaster University, as President and Chancellor. His appointment to the latter post was made in 1941. Descended from pioneer Baptist stock
in eastern Canada, he has served
for twelve years in the chair of
Church History at McMaster and
is renowned as a leader in Canadian Baptist Church educational
circles.
POPULAR
Dr. Gilmour is a graduate of McMaster, and has taken post-graduate studies at Oxford and Yale
Universities. His enviable record
in scholarship and public speaking
as well as his continued interest
in student activities has won for
him a wide popularity as a speaker at young people's conferences.
Miss Rutherford is the Principal
of the United Church of Canada
Training School for women leaders, having previously served as
assistant to the Dean of Women at
Victoria College of the University
of Toronto, her Alma Mater.
Her connection with Christian
Youth movements are widespread,
and she occupied the position of
associate general secretary of the
Student Christian Movement Besides post-graduate work in economics, she obtained a Bachelor of
Divinity degree from Yale Divinity
School.
MUCH TRAVELLED
Miss Rutherford's participation
in student conferences has led her
to visit all parts of the world, including India, Ceylon, China, Europe, and the United States. She
was a member of the team visiting
Queen's University last year during the Religion and Life week.
Information regarding Dr. Leslie
G. Kllborn and Bishop Remington,
the other two leaders, will be
printed in next Tuesday's Ubyssey,
and a complete program of discussions and other data will follow in Friday's issue.
Dr. P. Gilmour
Full Term
Planned
By Forum
•   AN  EXTENSIVE  program is planned by the
Parliamentary   Forum   for
the next two months.
Things start off with a bang during the third week in January
when the annual debate with Victoria CoUege will be held on the
campus.
Last year Victoria escaped- with
the sllverwear, but forumites are
confident that they will not bo
able to repeat the performance.
Tryouts for the two man team to
represent UBC will be held next
week.
MOCK PARLIAMENT II
Second feature on the forum
program Is a second mock parliament to be held on Tuesday,
February 1. The session will commence at 4:00 p.m.
The discussion on the speech
from the throne will last until six
o'clock when a recess will be held
until seven. The house will then
reconvene and the major bill of
the evening will be moved and
discussed.
The annual McGoun Cup debate
is the third item on the club
agenda. Plans for the debate are
not definitely decided as yet, but
the procedure will probably be the
same as last year. Date of the
contest is February 18.
At their regular meetings this
term the forum plans to discuss
student affairs. Topics under consideration include lengthening of
the school year and other subjects
of Interest to students.
"lolanthe"
Committees
Form Today
• COMMITTEES in charge
of costumes, props, scenery,
makeup and tickets for "lolanthe", the coming Musical
Society production, will be
formed today at a meeting
for all members of the Mus-
soc in Applied Science 100
at 12:30.
Everyone who has anything at
all to do with the coming production of "lolanthe" must attend.
Members who intend to act as
ushers must be on hand as well as
all members of the cast.
Rehearsals for the operetta will
Ten Social EventS definitely begin on Monday, Jan-
Srheduled Far uary 10- Details are P°sted on ^e
aJbficuutcM  M vi notice bofird_  Further information
January - February concerning the  Mussoc  Advertls-
The following calendar of social ing  banquet  and  dance  will  be
events has been approved by the published in the next Ubyssey.
Student's Council:
Jan. 10 Phrateres   Chapter   Dance sppnrATinw PHR
Jan. 13 Mus. Soc. Ticket Dance rn*n iCO i
Jan. 14 Phrateres Chapter Dance GRAD ISSUE
Jan. 16, 17, 18 Conference on Re-       Name   	
ligion and Life Year  Faculty 	
Jan. 27 Red Cross Ball Mailing Address   	
Jan. 29 W.A.A. Swimming'Meet 	
Jan. 31-Feb. 5 I.S.S. Week The Grad Issue will be distribu-
Feb. 10 Science Ball ted free to those students who fill
Feb. 22-26 Mus. Soc. Operetta out this form and return It to the
Fob. 29 W.U.S. Co-ed. AMS office. Friday, January 7, 1944 ■
THE   UBYSSEY
Page Two
• From The Editor s Pen «« » „«-•«!«.....
Grads Move In
Arrangements are being completed
between the Students' Council and the
Alumni Association whereby the laiter organization will take over the Men's Executive office in Brock Hall for a permanent
business office.
Files of all UBC graduates and all the
other business equipment with which they
carry on their business will be kept there,
and a secretary will be employed to carry
on the business.
This is felt to be the first step toward a
more closely integrated co-operation between past and present students at the university, fee value of the Alumni Association
has not been fully realized in the past and
with this new system it is hoped that both
the Association itself and the Alma Mater
Society will benefit.
The wages of the secretary will be paid
both by the'Alumni and by the Alma Mater
Society, with the understanding that a considerable part of her time will be spent in
assisting the secretary in the AMS office.
In this way, the co-operation between the
two societies will be increased.
The student government has expressed
the hope that in post-war years a graduate
manager will be appointed to promote the
activities of the AMS, in the same position
as the men already hired in many American
colleges for the purpose. The centralization
of student and graduate activities in this
manner will serve as a foundation for his
work when he is appointed.
Another scheme which is under the attention of Students' Council is the attempt
to consolidate the Summer Session Association with the other two organizations in the
AMS office. No definite news on this latest
move has been released as yet, but Council
is quite confident that arrangements will be
completed this year.
The valuable work which has been done
so far towards the future successes of the
university through the united efforts of the
three organizations demands the support of
incoming councils as well as tha^ one already in office. Only continued effort on
the part of students and graduates can
realize tiie ambitions for which they are
working.
• A Student's Opinion
• IN THE initial article it was pointed out
we would deal with the function of University in war time, democratic principles
as applicable to campus affairs, student
apathy, and the lack of a university spirit.
It seems that one particular project is now
up for discussion which takes all four of
these points into account. Some of the onus
seems to fall on Students' Council. What
do you think?
At the start of this school year the president of the debating club at tiie University
of Alberta was informed by the powers-that-
be in Alberta that his University would not
be able to travel in war time for competitive,
purposes, and hence the University which
donated the famed McGoun Cup was again
unable to compete for it.
But this did not daunt Mr. Don Cormie,
the president of the club. Since his University could not travel in war time for competitive purposes, why not organize a conference of the four western colleges along noncompetitive lines? He sold Manitoba on the
idea and had the University of Saskatchewan luke-warm. Probably thinking this was
enough he went ahead and drew up the arrangements, complete arrangements.
The conference on Post War Reconstruction was to be held in Saskatoon January 16 and 17, and each University was to
send six delegates. All expenses were to
be pooled. A very liberal itemized financial
estimate was prepared and distributed to
the four colleges for approval. The cost per
University was to be $300. Since that time
the number of delegates has been reduced
to four and the expenses to $200.
COMPLICATIONS AROSE
But there was a catch. The Students'
Council of the University of British Columbia temporarily ^helved it. A small item
appeared in the Ubyssey regarding it, cam-
pared to a full page in the Alberta paper.
No details were ever given because none
were available. Mr. Whyte has consented
to refute the Council's earlier decision to let
the conference go by the boards if enough
interest can be stirred up on this campus
about it.
Meanwhile another complication arises.
The University of Saskatchewan feels it can
not afford both the McGoun Cup and the
conference. It has communicated with UBC
regarding our decision on the matter and
has committed itself to doing whatever we
do. Alberta is definitely pro-conference by
necessity. At Manitoba the debating club
would naturally like to see the McGoun Cup
but the Students' Council very strongly endorses the idea of the Conference on Post
War Reconstruction.
The Parliamentary Forum of this University, with financial backing of Council-,
has telegraphed Saskatchewan informing
them that they will definitely go ahead with
the McGoun Cup on February 18. This is
perfectly justified from the Parliamentary
Forum point of view. But, this means Saskatchewan, if she lives up to her committments, will junk the conference, and a stalemate will follow, UBC and Saskatchewan
for the Cup, and Manitoba and Alberta for
the Conference. The Parliamentary Forum
has also telegraphed the Student's Council
at Manitoba trying to persuade them to
change their mind.
LEGITIMATE REASONS?
The students' Council feels that the
Conference would not justify our entering it
for several reasons. First, Mr. Whyte attended a conference of University presidents
this summer at Reno and it flopped. Second,
students are too immature to tackle such a
problem as Post War Reconstruction. Third,
difficulty would arise'in choosing candidates.
Fourth, money.
Mr. Whyte's conference was not of the
same nature as the proposed one and it was
held after school was closed. As for students
spilling a lot of hot-air and getting nothing
accomplished, this begs the whole question.
Is it not conceivable that thinking University
students would be able to conduct themselves admirably? It is time that youth had
a say in the future! What could be a better
way than a conference on post-war problems?  Surely not a formal debate.
The choosing of candidates would naturally entail a little work but that is hardly
an excuse. Anything worthwhile merits a
little work done on it. As for the money
angle of it, this seems most inexcusable. The
Students' Council up till the end of November was operating on last year's surplus,
according to the Junior Member! The $200
needed for the Conference (the exact sum
temporarily allocated to a proposed High
School basketball tournament which fell
through) is really not very hard to find.
What then is Council's justification of their
action?
They have one more argument. The
Conference does not justify the expense because it is not held out here and only four
people actually would get any benefit out
of it. This is reasonable but shows a very
conservative attitude.
WAR CONTRIBUTION
The' Conference could not be held out
here because the expense would naturally
make it impossible. It Is true only four
people from each University take part in
the conference, but more constructive
thought is bound to arise from a spontaneous
informal discussion than a formal debate.
Besides the very topic is of such importance
as to effectively limit the number of participants. Pamphlets regarding the findings of
the Conference could be published very
cheaply, and students going away could be
made to give a full discussion of what happened, when they returned, to the students
in a mass meeting held in the Auditorium.
Is it not possible that the amount of publicity
coming out of the conference for UBC would
far outstrip that coming out of a' formal
debate? It would show the people of Canada
that we are not letting them down.
This is the fifth year of the war. What
have the Universities of Canada contributed? Where is the spirit of freedom, of
initiative, of enterprise, of spontaneity, of
discussion, that should dominate the Universities? Why are we so apathetic, disinterested? '
Here is a real chance to prove ourselves
to the doubting public, to the public that
sends white feathers to the students. Let's
get militant and optimistic. Its no wonder
white feathers are sent!
DO YOU THINK UBC SHOULD
SEND DELEGATES TO THE WESTERN
UNIVERSITIES' CONFERENCE ON POST
WAR RECONSTRUCTION?
(MEMBER CUP.)
Issued twice weekly by the Students'  Publication  Board  of the
Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offices Brock HaU
Phone ALma 1624
For Advertising
Standard Publishing Co., Ltd.
2182 W. 41st KErr. 1811
Campus Subscriptions—$1.50
Mail Subscriptions—82.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MARGARET REID
Senior Editors
Tuesday Editor .... John Tom Scott
Friday Editor .... Virginia Hammltt
News Manager ... Marion Dundas
Sports Editor   Chuck Claridge
Grad. Issue Editor .. Denis Blunden
Staff Photographer  Art Jones
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Anne Dewdney, G r a h a m e
Thompson, Ken Weaver, Don Ferguson, Bruce Bewell.
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Nancy Macdonald, Diana Bamp-
lon, Marian Bal, Jehnl Green, Bill
Stewart.
ASSOCIATE SEPORTS EDITOR
Jim Schatz
Staff Cartoonist  Bun Walker
CUP Editor Cal Whitehead
Pub Secretary Anne Dewdney
• A Year Ago
• ONE HUNDRED and fifty
male students lost their draft exemptions because of their Christmas standing ... Dr. Sedgewick
denied that government was to
close the Faculty of Arts . . . Sororities were to begin bidding on
January 18 . . . Fusion of Canada
and United States was the subject
of the McGoun Cup debate . . .
ISS week planned for March 2 .. .
Hi-Jinx was to be built around an
"Arab" theme . . . Harlem Globe-
trotters played an exhibition game
at the gym an January 8.
Audit AMS Books;
Accounts In Order
• THE CUSTOMARY interim
audit of the Alma Mater Society's books haa now been completed. The accounts have been
found to be in order.
Several new accounting controls
which have long been lacking in
the society's books have lately
been instituted and have met
with favorable approval from the
auditors.
"Are you there for the duration?"
"No-juit till the Sweet Caps give out I"
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form in which tobacco can be smoked"
JOKE:
Harrold Curran got a pip.
Happy New Year,
Here's my New Year resolutions
RESOLVED that I will do my utmost during
1944 to help win the war quickly by keeping our
war plant* supplied with all the electricity they
need ... and to continue to do all in my power
to bring comfortable living to your homes.
And here's one YOU'LL want to make with
met Let's all buy more War Savings Certificates
and Victory Bonds in 1944.
%^f/&«>^
Your Electrical Servant.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   ELECTRIC. RAILWAY CO.
The University
OF
British Columbia
Last Day For Payment Of
Second Term Fees
JANUARY 10
All cheques must be certified and made payable
to the University of British Columbia.
Mailing cheques to the Bursar is recommended.
For regulations governing fees see pages 41-45,
inclusive. University Calendar.
BURSAR
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Late Fee Will Be Strictly Enforced After Jan. 10 Friday, January 7, 1944	
COTC News
Army Invents Pleasant
Games For COTC To Pla$
By HARRY CASTILLOU
•   AN OBSTACLE course has been completed and is ready
for use by the COTC. It is situated on the west side of
the armouries. .
THE   UBYSSEY
One  company  a  week  will   be
sent   over   this   course   and   all
cadets, N. C. O.'s and officers wdl
• be required to take part in  the
training.
Yon too
will purr,
sir.,.
*,4
/z.
*:?»"$•
o-Ai.   ** ■ *tftt&.ti}
THE silky strokes you
get from MIRADO'S
smooth lead will make
you purr like ft contented cat. You won't
be irritated by broken
points. MIRADO wlU
be off your mind and on
the job—always. It's
more than a pleasure, its
• real economy.
I« tech—lets In quantities
Certified with a money hack
guarantee in every dosen.
BARBED WIRE
Fair time for a trained man is
five minutes but all are not expected nor required to maintain
this standard. The impediments
are generously supplied with
barbed wire to catch the luckless
nnd the unwary.
A ten foot pole is the first obstacle. Then comes a barbed wiro
fence. Two balance poles of six
o r eight inches i n diameter
mounted on a four foot stand and
free to swing discouraglngly are
next.
Then comes a pair of crawl
boxes cheerfully painted green
and built close to the ground in
order to provide a pleasant way
of making khaki battle dress more
khaki in colour by the application
of good old mother earth.
SOUNDS EASY
These are followed by a ditch
and then another balance pole of
a different sort. Next a ramp with
barbed wire below Insures safe
foothold for cadets, then a solid
bed of wire under which all personnel crawl on hands and knees.
Now hand poles, a snake fence
and stepping poles. Finally come
a pair of ropes over which one
swings.
This sounds simple and easy but
when a cadet considers that a
large ditch filled with water it
directly underneath perhaps that
cadet will think more carefully
about releasing his grip.
Dr. Brooke In Bed
With Pneumonia
Dr. C.V. Brooks, head of the
Spanish Department, contracted
pneumonia this Christmas.
He ls still in the Hospital recuperating, but his condition ls
reported as favourable.
As yet no one is taking over
his lectures.
»*«*0Mr BACH
STOP PRESS
The Executive Head of the Overseas Service, Mr. John Kannawin
of the C. B. C, will speak on "The
Vocational Aspects of Radio." Tho
place, Brock stage room, the time,
Tuesday, 12:30; sponsors, Commerce Club.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to S pan.; Saturdays 9 ajn. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments
Alumni To
OpenOffice
In Brock
•IN THE near future the
Alumni Association,
under Bruce Robinson, president, will establish permanent offices in the Brock, announced Bob Whyte, AMS
president.
The Association will use the
Men's Executive Room as a council room, but most of the executive work will be done in the AMS
office.
CO-ORDINATE ACTIVITIES
The number of graduates is large
end some permanent organization
ia necessary to handle all the
work. Also this move will coordinate the activities of the Alumni
Association and the Alma Mater
Society. In the past a member
of the Alumni Association attended the council meetings and n
member of council attended the
alumni meetings,
tained to take care of the extra
A new secretary Is being ob-
work and also to help with the
AMS office work.
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
The Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
Admittedly the Xmas exams
were held under unusual circumstances this year, but I find that
many other people share with me
the opinion that steps should be
taken to remedy the conduct,
during examinations, of the students and of the invigilators.
It seems that, during these last
exams, cheating reached the point
where lt was almost a general
practise. The great bulk of the
students, who are not geniuses but
who work hard, are rather disgusted to find lazier, leas intelligent students are obtaining better
marks for no other reason than
that they apparently lack scruples.
Most educators agree that the examination system is, at best, far
from satisfactory. Can't our Faculty and Administration do something to keep it as fair as possible?
One rather hates to suggest that
the only way to stop these practices is to catch two or three
people and make examples of
them, if only for fear that those*
caught might be weak souls committing their first offense rather
than some af the hardened practitioners, yet it seems the only
solution.
As for the invigilators may I be
so rude as to suggest to certain
of them that their duty is to preserve order and quiet during the
examination, rather than to make
nuisances of themselves, disturbing the students by excessive
talking, unnecessary announcements, stumbling up and down
fctairs, and generally disturbing
the students. The conduct of
most invigilators leaves nothing to
be desired, but I can give anyone
who wishes them examples taken
from these last exams, of all tho
above thoughtless actions of the
invigilators.
J.P. McGeer
SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS
Students are requested to call
at the Registrar's Office for their
scholarship cards for the Second
Term, have them certified by their
instructors and turned in to the
Bursar's Office by Monday, January 10th, so that they may obtain
the second payment of scholarship
money.
CHARLES B. WOOD,
NOTICE: The Mathematics Club
will meet Monday, January 10, at
8 p.m. at the home of Dr. James,
3837 West 14th Ave.
Dr. Nowlan will speak on "Approximate solutions to Numerical
Equations."
NOTICE: The Royal Astrononm-
ical Society of Canada will meet
Tuesday, January 11, in Science
200, at 8:15 p.m.
Dr. J. G. Hooley will speak on
"Modern Telescopic Optical Glass".
All interested students are welcome to attend.
Shop
ping
with Mary Ann
• LYDIA Margaret Lawrence
wishes a bright and gay New Year
for evesyone and if the smart coed follows Miss Lawrence's advice, she will keep it bright with
colours that will help her to get
all the good things the New Year
holds ... no less than four Alpha
Phi's became pinned-up girls in
the holidays. Phrateres president
is wearing a Phi Kappa Pi pin; a
short blond sister has exchanged
* *
• TO   ENSURfe    a    foot-happy
New   Year,   Rae-Son's   Clever
Floor have just received a new
shipment of smart, exciting sport
shoes that,' represent the perfect
shoes for campus wear. They
combine a maximum of wearabil-
ityanri appearance at a minimum
of cost ... a brunette D.G. sophmore has the Alpha Delt pin of a
* •
• PASSING by the entrance to
the mystic Persian Arts and
Crafts shop, 507 Granville St., I
dropped in in time to overhear a
conversation between the manager
and a customer. It seems the customer had eight or nine odd earrings, fashioned from various metals, pat were of no use to her,
lie of the greatest selections
Ifque earrings from all over
prld collected in this shop
ferlng from a scarcity of
. the Editor-in-chief is
wearirig a beautiful solitaire on
her third finger, left hand, in addition to her Phi Kap sweetheart
Reports Of
All Clubs
Diie Jan. 14
• SEMI-ANNUAL reports
of all clubs under major
and ininor LSE must be
hande i in to the Alma Mater
office not later than January
14. *]hese reports should
outlim activities and give
the to al membership of the
organ! :ation.
Any club or organization falling
to submit their report will lose the
financial and moral support of the
Alma Jfater Society.
AU presidents of major and minor LSE must attend an important
meetlngj in the Double Committee
room elf the Brock Hall at 3:39
today. Consideration will be given
to outstanding students deserving
gold LJSE awards.
her D.U. pin for one from a tall,
dark Zete; another blond and slim
Alpha Phi has an Alpha Delt pin
from off the campus; and another
sister has the pin of a dark Sigma
Phoo . . . Easter is only three short
months away and If you intend to
join   the   Easter   parade   in  well
fitted style, visit Lydia Lawrence,
fashion   designer,   in   her   studio
located   in   the   Arts   and   Crafts
building, 576 Seymour St.
i   »
Players Clubber with an English
accent; another Alpha Delt soph,
dark and somewhat eccentric, has
parted with his pin for a slim,
dark Theta ... the sport shoes
have low heels in a laced oxford
style, with moccasin toe that h
so popular with any co-ed, and
they come at the standard Clever
Floor Price of $5.95.   Rae-Son's is
at 608 Granville Street.
*
pin; a tall popular freshette haa
broken her engagement to an off-
the-campus man ... the manager
exchanged the worthless earrings
for his own native Persian Jasmine flower oil, though the customer could have had her choice
out of 25 other flower oils. I
couldn't help thinking how lucky
she was, because the natural flower essence will .last her for twelve
months of the new year. Why
not surprise yourself and your
friends by a similar exciting adventure and hunt out all your unmatched earrings.
——————— Page Three.
NOTICE: The next meeting of
the Physical Society will be held
in Room 200, Monday, January 10,
at 4:30 p.m.
Speaker: Mr. T. Dauphinee.
Subject: "Geological applications
of nuclear physics."
"UHLLIC
JIDGLE
C0I1TEST
* ¥ ¥
First Prize
Merchandise certificate entitling the holder to receive
merchandise from the regular stock of "Willards
Apparel'*  to  the value  of
$25.00
Second Prize
Merchandise certificate entitling the holder to receive
merchandise from the regular stock of "Willards
Apparel''  to the value of
918.00
Third Prize
Merchandise certificate entitling the holder to receive
merchandise from the regular stock of "WUlards
Apparel'' to the value of
$8.00
• • •
Contest opens on publication
of the Issue of "Ubyssey*'
of Friday, January 14, 1944,
and doses at 6 pan. Monday,
January 31, 1944.
BE SURE TO SEE
UBYSSEY
NEXT FRIDAY
NOW   SHOWING
/ FAMOUS PLAYERS
/ DOWNTOWN    THFATRFS
Special student rate on presentation
of your student's past.
CAPITOL
Dorothy Lamour, Dick
Powell, Victor Moore,
"RIDING HIGH"
(in Technicolor)
phis Added Shorts
STRAND
Harry James, Lucille
BaU in
"BEST FOOT
FORWARD"
plus Added Feature
ORPHEUM
Mickey Rooney and
Judy Garland in
"GIRL CRAZY"
plus
Short Features
DOMINION
Betty Grable, Robert
Young, Adolphe
Menjou in
"SWEET ROSIE
O'GRADY"
You Show That
College Air
When You Wear
mm sweaters
NOTICE: Aggie, Science and
Arts pins are now available at the
Alma Mater Society Office.
CARDIGANS
$2-50
The "sloppy joes" you love made in soft
fleecy cetton you can hardly tell from
wool and in the same beloved styles. Long
torso types with classic necklines and long
sleeves. For hardy wear you can't beat
'em, chums. Have several to show off
every skirt. In soft, soft shades of pink,
blue, yellow and aqua.
Pullovers ty.M
'bshMftm Gbtttttatttt.
moo**orats* ait wet iera Page Four
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, January 7, 1944
Hoop League Starts Tomorrow at VAC
Varsity Meets
Combines At VAC
By LUKE MOYLS
• VARSITY'S THUNDERBIRD basketballers will be after
their first win in the new Inter-City League tomorrow night
when they meet Vancouver Combines at VAC gym in the
feature contest at 9 o'clock. Yesterday a meeting was held
in Victoria to straighten out the set-up and organize the
schedule of the four-team loop.
Rugger Team Has
Successful Holiday
By JIM SCHATZ
• TWO TEAMS FELT THE POWER of the Varsity Thunderbirds in the English rugby field during the month
of December, when the Miller Cup returned to the folds of
the campus and when the highly sung officer's team of the
Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy also felt the pains.
The  Thunderbirds  rolled   over ■
Harlem May Play Here Next Friday
the league-leading Ex-Britannia
crew 17 to nothing, to capture the
Miller Cup beyond a doubt. This
victory gives the student crew a
chance to take the Rounsfell Cup
from the Victoria Navy next
Saturday.
The Navy from Victoria won the
league title of the early season
ploy on the island and the winners of the Miller Cup over here
meet this year in Victoria to ploy
for the Rounsfell Cup.
The game is usually played later
on in the season, but this year the
army is in fear of losing its players in a few weeks to various
postings. Because the contest was
given next Saturday the McKechnie Cup and Tisdall Cup schedule
bas been slightly dlssarranged.
On Boxing Day Varsity downed
the officer's team of the Fleet
Air Arm of the Royal Navy 26 to
3   Doug Reld made 11 points for
the students by making a try and
four converts. Willie Oregarak,
John Hicks, Gordle Morrison, Jack
Sim, and Tom McCusker crossed
the end line of the .playing field
once apiece to bolster the top-
heavy score.
PO Rocke scored the lone try
for the Britishers and Sub. Lt.
Goodchilde failed to convert.
A practise game will be on this
'Saturday against this same Navy
ateam in the Stadium and attempts
are being made to lure Rowing
Club to face a second team.
In the case of Rowing Club or
any other team coming out to
face some opposition the Varsity
forces will be split Into upper and
lower Classmen teams. The Upper
Classmen to face the Navy and tho
Lower Classmen to face the other
Active, Busy Men
and Women
Wear
Challenger
Watches
^PENMBIUty
32.50 to 75.00
.   The Values
Challenge
Comparison.
0 FLASHY center of the Dominion Championship Thunderbirds of
two season's ago, Jim Scott has
been trying out regularly with the
Senior A's during the Christmas
workouts and Maury Van Vliet
has high hopes of signing him before today's deadline.
Should Scott return to the lineup it will give the Blue and Gold
some added strength In the strong
scoring section which the Birds
will need in the stiff competition
of the new league.
Harlemite
May Tangle
With Birfs
O VARSITY students ma^ get a
chance to see the worid famous Harlem Globe Trotters out
here In the campus gym nfext Friday noon. Harry Franklin, Men'3
Athletic Representative, is attempting to obtain the Darky Hoop
teum for an exhibition game with
the Varsity Thunderbirds.
The Globe Trotters will come to
Vancouver for games next Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Thursday night will be a big night for
the minor leagues at King Edward gym. An all-star team will
be picked from the Intermediate
A teams in the V and D League
to play the Harlemites.
LOST: Green CCC pin, flrs/t week
in November. Will finder j please
phone Charlie Senay, ALma 0694M.
•   •   *   •
NOTICE: New members *re being accepted for the Mamdoks as
of January 4, 1944, according to
their president, Bill Stewart, Those
who wish to join this club, i which
handles student publicity an the
campus, are requested to send in
their names immediately. The next
meeting will be held on Tuesday,
January 11.
Have a "Coke"« All the best
■ nstsii ■
. or how to win people in the West Indies
All the best, says the friendly Britisher in the West Indies
to wish you well. A gracious greeting—but no more cordial than the way the Canadian soldier says it. Have a "Coke",
says he, and he's as quickly understood in Jamaica as in
Alberta. 'Round the globe, Coca-Cola stands for the pause
that refreshes—has become the high-sign of friendliness.
iff"
<%«
VANCOUVER. B.C.
•the global
high-sign
666_
0 WHILE THE VARSITY team
is over on the invasion cruise
the "home front" will feature a
stiff competition between UBC and
Pro Rec Maple Leafs at McBride
Park. This game will get the
starting whistle at 2:30 tomorrow
afternoon.
This game is the first of a new
schedule for the new year. The
pre-Christmas schedule finished
up with UBC firmly in the third
slot and promising to attain higher
nnd sounder footing if the season
had been any longer.
Soccerites
Travel To
V. Island
• AT LAST the Varsity
Soccer team has obtained the long sought-after trip
when they travel to the
Island this week end to
tackle one of the leading
roundball teams in the
Capital City.
The boys have been clamouring
for the jaunt for a long time and
when the Thunderbird hoopsters
went Islandward just over a
month ago they put the pressure
on.
So the Men's Athletic Directorate satisfied them and have forwarded the necessary funds to
travel.
Ex-manager and centre-forward
player of last year, Gordy Johnson, now Lt. G.J. Johnson of the
Canadian Armoured Corps is in
town on leave and he plans to
make the crossing in true commando style.
FAREWELL JAMES
This game will be a farewell appearance for one of the team'3
star players, Jimmy Morton, who
has had to drop out of the lineup
because of a timetable clash which
has forced him to take military
training Saturday afternoons.
Previous to Christmas he was
OK, but now he has Bac. 10 on
Wednesday afternoons, so he cannot take the parade that afternoon,
thus he will have to switch to
Tuesday and Saturday.
So we bid farewell to Jimmy
Morton. Poor Horatio!
Intramural
Hoopsters
Starts Tues
• INTRAMURAL play for
the new year is already
under way with the final
volleyball game scheduled
for today at noon. The two
league winners, Kappa Sigs
and the DU's will tangle for
the championship. The DU's
won the bye to the final
series by downing the Zetes
on Wednesday noon and will
be out to stop the high flying
Kappa Sig crew.
Next week will see the beginning of the Basketball league
which this year is being staged in
a double knockout affair in each
of two divisions, the Blue and the
Gold. This was thought to be a
better arrangement than having a
round-robin series which would
carry the play on to the end of
March, following which the playoffs would have to be held.
The two Leagues for the hoop
play, which begins next Tuesday,
are the Blue League. Alpha Delts,
Gamma, Phi Delts, Mu Phi, DU,
Kappa Sigs, Sigma Phoo, and
Zetes,—and the Gold League; Phi
Kappa Pi, Lambda, Phi Kappa Sigma, Engieers, Zeta Beta Tau, Psi
U, Fiji's and Beta's.
The schedule for the play will be
posted outside Maury Van Vliet's
office and team representatives
should be sure they see a copy
and note the time of their games.
The next program planned is
the swimming event which is
hoped will be held two weeks from
today at the YMCA pool. In previous years this has been one of
the best events in the Intramural
program and should continue in
that position this year.
Soon to be staged is the one
night knockout Table Tennis
Tournament, which will be held
on a Wednesday night in the gym.
Each Intramural team may enter
a three-man team composing of
a singles player and two others
for a double team.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
our Specialty
INVITATIONS, 'AT HOME'
LETTERHEADS and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
e
GEHRKE'S
566 Seymour St.
The league will probably open
in Victoria as well as here tomorrow night with the two Island teams playing at the Victoria .
High School gym which has been
obtained for the league games to
be played in Victoria.
Pat Bay Gremlins and Victoria
Army from Vancouver Island and
Vancouver Combines and Varsity
Thunderbirds from the Mainland
will make up the league. However, Lauries are still trying to
get into the set-up and thus the
loop may yet be comprised of five
teams.
CHAMPS STILL PAT BAY
As for the teams, Pat Bay are
last year's Dominion Champs and
have let It be known that they
aim to keep the title by their two
showings this season ln Vancouver.
Victoria Army is somewhat of a
mystery team, but it is expected
to make a good showing. The
Vancouver Combines have developed into a well-rounded squad
since their amalgamation in November.
Varsity contrary to the general
belief, have not been slouching,
since the folding of the V and D
League. They took a rest for
exams, and all of them came
through unscathed. During the
holidays, however, the Thunderbirds went to work. They had four
tough practices in this period, and
immediately on returning they had
three more; on Monday, Tuesday
and Thursday.
FOURTEEN AT WORKOUT
Monday's workout was very successful according to coach Maury
Van Vliet. Fourteen hoopsters
turned out: last years squad plus
Jim Scott, Bud McLeod, Don Livingston, and Harry Kermode.
Harry is on leave, having finished
I.T.S. at Edmonton, and has been
practising regularly with the
Thunderbirds.
Gordy Sykes, star centre, was
released voluntarily last month,
but he intends to remain with the
Senior A's. Bud McLeod was signed to fill out the team's quota of
11 players. Unfortunately, Don
Livingstone is unable to make the
team due to pressure of studies.
Jim Scott Is the man in the news
today. Since the start of this season he has been thinking seriously
of returning to the Thunderbirds
after a two-season period of absence. He has been starring with
the Senior B's ln the minor hoop.
His presence with the club would
make them a title threat team.
For your
PRINTING
or
ENGRAVING
Stationery Eup^lies
Fountain Pens
Slide Rules
Scales, etc.,
for the present term
SEE
ti Clarke & Stuart
Co. LIMITED
550 Seymour St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone PAcifi> 7311

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