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The Ubyssey Nov 30, 1954

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 THE UB YSSE Y
Vol. 37
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1954
5 CENTS
No. 29
Council To Discuss  Pools
ERNEST WINCH TO SPEAK
lOR CCF WEDNESDAY NOON
Campus CCF'ers will present Ernest Winch, MLA,
on Wednesday, at noon in Arts 100. His talk will deal
with the drug addiction problem on the Lower Mainland.
Mr. Winch, senior member of the CCF father and
son team of Ernest and Harold, recently celebrated his
twenty-first anniversary in public life, and is a pioneer in
many forms of social legislation.	
EUS Mum on Blotz
Kidnapping, Gun
By PAT RUSSELL
Are tht Engineers becoming atheists? Have they wilfully
abandoned their god? And if so, just where did Joe blow?
One theory regarding the current orphaned state of the EUS
tin can (bow three times to the
east and repeat "Salomle, Sa-
lomie, Balony . . . ") is that the
Godiva followers have become
so Interested in Home Economics
they have lost faith in their god-
of-ages-past.
Perhaps their lethargic acceptance ls the result of the pressurized persuasion issued by this
year's Frosh Class. It could be
that EUS has finally been forced to acknowledge an official
opposition.
Of course, EUS could not be'
so naive as to believe that they
would eternally escape punishment for their refusal to return
the Ubyssey shot-gun, borrowed under unusual circumstances
last year.
We leave the issue up to EUS
to explain how six daring Frosh
entered the Engineering Office
during the EUS-Home Ec. Ball,
skirted off with the four-foot
high mascot, and escaped unnoticed in a building "lousy" with
Red-Shirts. Joe Blotz is still in
their captivity.
We ask EUS: Is not the Blotz
Religion worth fighting for, or
has the adversity become so
strong that Blotz believers are
too intimidated to publicize the
recent loss of their idol?
Joe Blots
Pubsters
Make Siren
Survey
In a discrimination survey
conducted by thc Ubyssey Monday, afternoon in the Library,
it was revealed that twenty percent of UBC students are practising discrimination.
A mixed couple (composed of
one mixed-up columnist and one
mixed-up alumni) entered the
Library basement, set up a portable fire siren, and pressed the
button. Upstairs, a crew of
trained observers noted the results, and interviewed twenty-
five students to determine their
reaction.
Of these interviewed, five
successfully discriminated between the siren, and the regular fire bell.
• Said one discriminatory student, Millicent Maidenform, Arts
III: "Relax, there's no fire;
everyone knows that the fire
alarm is a bell, not a siren."
Four other students were
also successful in discriminating
between the false siren and the
real bell.
Negative reactions were recorded from twenty other students. Three COTC types were
completely fooled; they produced crowbars and truncheons in
a trice, and began smashing
doors and throwing books
around, narrowly missing Miss
Lanning, the Main Desk custodian.
THOSE LITTLE BOOKS
ARE STILL AVAILABLE
For the umpteenth time, the
Ubyssey reminds students that
the little blue student Handbooks are .still on sale at the
AMS office.
They contain names and addresses of everyone on campus,
much, much more information,
both pertinent and impertinent.
Cost   is   onlv   Hoc.
IHA House
Site Still
Unchanged
Construction plans have not
been changed for the new International House in spite of the
Student Council's veto last week
of the proposed buildnig site.
Club president, Dick Mundell.
said Monday the final location
of the International House must
be decided by the Board of
Governors.
The planned site for the new
building is the playing fields
behind Brock Hall. The council
objected to this because it feels
the extra space is needed to
expand student sport activities.
The Rotary Club is financing
the construction of the International Club.
Fifty percent of the members
in the new student residence are
to be from Canada and fifty
percent from abroad. The Canadian members of the club are
expected to function as a welcoming and orientation committee, Mundell explained.
The basic purpose of this international representation, he
said, is to strengthen ties between nations by giving students an opportunity to meet
each other and exchange ideas.
Duchess of Malfi
Players Club will present a
reading of Webster's "Duchess
of Malfi" in the Frederic Wood
Theatre Thursday  noon.
It   is directed by Joy Coghill.
No admission will be charged.
CRI8TMAS EXAMS are getting as close as a Peter Dyke
haircut. Here, Dave Lane, who was responsible for pulling
the curtain in the My Dog Has Fleas Revue, gets the wool
pulled from over his eyes by the genial Mr. Dyke. The
book indicates that Dave is studying.       —MAZE PHOTO
Two Surveys Launched
By Campus Committee
r?5N^4d0iit»urvey» to determine student financial needs
were Initiated by a UBC National Federation of Canadian
University Students Committee Monday.
The   surveys  are   concerned
with a comparison of resident
and tuition costs in relation to
students earning and the number of high school students barred from the university for financial reasons.
University of Toronto exchange scholar Lillian Forgreve
Is handling the former survey.
She will obtain information
from the PersoneJl Office, Dean
Walter Gage and Fort and Aca-
dia„Camps.
Ernest Wiens, Teacher Train-*
ing, in conducting the hijh
school survey, plans to circulate
questionairee to provincial high
schools.
He will seek the following
data: High school enrollment
figures, number taking university entrance, number enrolling
in university.
Results of the two surveys are
expected by January. A brief
for presentation to the Provincial Government will be prepared from the results.
Campus NFCUS organizer,
Jim Craig, has set up an eleven-
man committee to coordinate
and popularize the survey. Miss
Forgreve and Wiens are members of the committee.
UBC's activity is part of
NFCUS' national campaign for
more government scholarships
and aid to Canadian university
students'.
Killeen
Rejects
Rejection
In spite of Student Council's
refusal Monday to ratify the
recently revised Undergraduate
Society Constitution, USC will
not retract the controversial
clause which caused the rejection.
Council maintains that the
clause, which virtually gives
more authority to USC than to
the AMS, is unconstitutional. According to Jim Killeen, Undergrad chairman, the rejected
clause is not one of those revised; it is one of the items included in all previous constitutions.
Killeen has submitted this fact
to the council for further study.
He hopes to have the constitution finalized at the next AMS
meeting today.
Special Events presents a
panel, discussion on "The
Future of Television." Wednesday noon in the Auditorium. Panelists are Lister
Sinclair, Marce Munroe, Jack
Wasserman and Eric Nicol.
Students   To   Have
Final Say On Move
Student Council will consider the proposal to build a second swimming pool on the campus at a special meetihg at nooD
today.
Both swimming pool committee and the student council subcommittee on swimming pools
have recommended that a second
pool be built.
No matter what action council takes at today's meeting, tiie
final decision will rest with the
student body. The student body
motion, passed at the 1084
spring general meeting, pro*
vides funds only for roofing
Empire Pool. The students will
either have tb sanction the voted
funds being transferred to the
construction of a second pool or
refuse to do so.
OCTOBER
At the October 28 meeting of
the Swimming Pool committee
which was also attended by the
President's committee on build*
ings and grounds a motion was
passed to. the effect that: "that
the committee approve in principle the Idea of a second pool
subject to sueeeesful financial
arrangements on both sides and
to confirming evidence of de*
sirablllty from further study."!*
At the meeting Mr. C. J.
Thompson of the firm of Sharp
and Thompson, Berwlck,Pratt
Unlveuity architects presented
a report on the two proposed
schemes.
ENCLOSED
The report on enclosing the
present pool contained four major points.
1. The height of the ten meter
diving tower governs the height
of the building over the pool. ■
2. To enable the pool to be
partially open during the summer months, the whole of the
South side of the building is
planned to have high glazed
sliding doors.
3. It would be necessary to
suitably landscape, pave and
enclose the ground on the South
side to allow spectators to watch
the pool.
The capital cost of carrying
out these developments would
be not less than $298,000. The
cost of maintalnance per annum
was estimated at $20,000.
SMALL POOL
The small pool would be 42
feet by 75 feet and would have
bleacher seats accommodating
900 people. The south end of
the pool would have glazed
sliding doors and dressing rooms
and toilets and showers would
be provided. The existing filter
room would operate the second
pool.
The capital cost of constructing the smaller pool would be
$210,000. The cost of maintenance per annum would be $12,-
300.
After this meeting student's
council set up a sub-committee
of their own to investigate all
areas of the problem.
(Continued on Page 3)
See   POOL
'fwttn deist*
Filmsoc Stages
Brock Roof raiser
UBC riLM SOCIETY presents
a special Brock roof-raising rifttr
today at 3:45, 6:00 and 8:45 ity
the Auditorium. The full length
feature attraction will be "Tight
Little Island."
¥     ¥     ¥
VISUAL ARTS CLUB sponsors   Jack   Mills  speaking   on'
"Good and Bad in Modern Art"
noon today in Physics 202.
¥     ¥     ¥
JAZZ SOCIETY meets today
noon in HM1 for • panel discussion on Modern Jau.
¥     ¥     ¥
UBC HISTORICAL ASSOC!-
ation meeting today  12:80. Ml
Arts 203. All memberi reflu«st«(*
to attend-important business.
tf,     tt     -iff.'.
ritOSH   UNDERQRAD   BO»
ciety will not meet today. The
next meeting will be held aft»>
the holidays, -'■_...
♦      ¥      ¥
THERE WILL BE a meeting
in HM 2 at 12:30 Tuseday of e\\
those Greeks who want to g|t
into the Mardi Gras chorus
line. Talent ie not necessary tnjt
would be a welcome surprise.
¥■     ¥      ¥
AN AUCTION BALE of home
cooking will be held Thursday,
December 2 at 12:30 in Aggie
100 by the Women's Agricultural Undergraduate Society. 'A
Chrslmtas carol singing session
will also be held on Wednesday,
December 1 in the Aggie main
hall at noon. Proceeds from
both will go to prepare Christ-
hampers for needy families.
V *r *r
NFCUS SCLOLARSHIP COM*
mittee will hold a meeting in
the Phrateres room in Brock Hall
upstairs, today at noon.
¥ ¥ ¥
VCF presents Rev. Stander-
wlck speaking on "The Christ*
ion in relation to Society." Wednesday* noon in Physics 201.
e
i * -  -■
UBC, Normal
May  Unite
Amalgamation of UBC's teacher training department arid
Vancouver Normal School is bof
ing considered, officials report.
The plan calls for the abolishment of the present Normal
school system and the establishment of a School of Education
here at UBC.
Members of the faculty are)
meeting with representatives
from the Provincial Government
and Department of Education officials to formulate the amalgamation.
PRESIDENT   SAYS:
Far Eastern Department Coming
Establishment of a Far Eastern Department at UBC depends on the acquisition of
funds and competent instructors.
"Unless financial aid is
forthcoming the plan cannot
go into effect," said Dr. N. A.
M.  McKenzie Monday.
The second problem is to
obtain a suitable staff. Men
with a thorough knowledge
and understanding of the Far
East and its peoples are hard
to come by, the president said.
A University committee was
formed four years ago to organize a Far Eastern department.
Courses available at the
University in this field now
include: History, International
Studies, Political Science, Slavonic  Studies.
Tiie proposed new department would further integrate
these subjects and offer more
courses dealing with the history, economy, politics and
culture   of   the   Far  East,  ex
plained  Dr.   MacKenzie.
He cited two basic reasons
for the necessity of instituting
such a department.
"Our situation on the edge
of the Pacific forces us to
look across the ocean to the
Far and Central East for our
greatest trading markets.
Therefore it is essential to understand the econmy and principal needs of these countries,"
the President said.
"The losses sustained in
Korea and the growing tense
ness of the Far Eastern situation increases our dangers of
being attacked by a hostile nation. If we are to fight the
spread of communism and
strengthen our ties with neutral countries it is necessary to
study their language and the
political organization of their
governments," he said.
The university committee
working on plans for the proposed Far Eastern Department
includes members of the faculty involved in this field of
study. Page Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 30, 1954
THE UBYSSEY       hoots       (t/fiit iu  dtand
MEMBER. CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS   ' . W
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRISS
Authorized as second class mall, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
lyW^subswlptienrfa.UO per year. Published in Vancouver throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
Atotia Mater Socfcty, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed .herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
tM University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 12S0
'" or Alma 1231. Advertising Manager is Geoff Conway.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
News Editor—Pal Carney
Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Anoeiale Editor—Stan Beck      Executive Editor—Geoff Conway
Senior Editor this iisue—Guess Again
Reporters: Dolores Banerd, Dave Morgan, Marie Stephens,
Frank Eisner, Hilary Silversides, Jean Whiteside.
Spprts: Neil McDonald, Peter Worthington, Maurice Gibbons.
ttfefttfinfl Editor—Ray Logie
§VP Editor—Pete Paterson
ristmas
Well, Christmas time is upon us and something should
be written on the subject of "good will to men."
Everyone at the university is full of it; we have carol
songfests and religious play periods ad infinitum. Why, we
k|ve parties where we all kiss each other's girl.
Proves it, doesn't it?
We all know) that the coming generation is the hope of
cittd, all the politicians, educators and captains of in-
itry tell us so, especially on occasions like graduation or
iristmas eve.
And we live up to these heavy responsibilities which
hjve been thrust upon our youthful shoulders, don't we?
: Sororities each have a philanthropy, the campus internationalists collect oid clothes for the Korean kiddies and when
tkf Commercemen canvass for the March of Dimes why we
collect almost $300 every year. Of course, that's not much,
but then we all know just how poor students are.
Of course, it's discouraging to wander through the skid-
roid and see all those people who somehow just don't im-
fintve when we offer them the chance.
V   'They stay dirty even when the Community Chest distributes soap,'and their children go on becoming juvenile
lents  evert when we set up neighborhood houses
»?e they can spend their spare time on constructive work
Educational ,games.
$ut then there are people who will always be like that;
all the soap and public health pamphlets in the world cant
Hgfp them from becoming degenerates.
: That's why we're so proud to saluate Christmas and the
ijttfrit of good will to men that fills us alt this joyous festive
f|p«on.
Or maybe we're all just full of it.
Cynics
Some of the United Nations' most powerful and prominent supporters are at present expressing justified concern
^Hr the future of the organization. The UN is falling into
ejgguse. It seems to be withering away.
More and more, global difficulties are being settled—or
ignored—outside the UN. The organization is being regarded
With increasing cynicism. Nations argue the UN is "ineffective" and by-pass it because of convenience or even actual
guilt.
Examples can be found with respect to Formosa, the
African Colonies, Indo-Cinha, Geneva and Trieste agreements and Guatemala.
The UN is the best world organization we have been
able to establish to date. Its sole inherent defect is its lack
of supra-national authority and this defect is not one which
is criticized by those ignoring the UN.
Whatever else may be wrong is the direct result of neglect
or spurning by member nations. The UN is only as good as
wt make it.
The UN was established to allow member nations to
rrtore effectively improve the world's social, econmic and
ttpecially political relations; its existence is necessary to
remove anarchy and power politics from international aft-
fairs.
It follows that international action or inaction outside
the sphere of the UN is almost ipso facto a manifestation of
power politics and anarchy.
The world is once again becoming too cynical for its
own good.
GUEST   EDITORIAL
Means   Or   End ?
It is agreed that the NFCUS should look to the economic
interests of students if it wishes to maintain its present level
of popularity on the campus; but it would not be, that fighting for student rights, and acmpaigning for student demands,
and providing services for students is the reason of being of
our national student association. The impression that may
have been given by two recen editorials on the NFCUS is
that it is.
With all respect for The Ubyssey, such activities are
means firstly and not ends. The ends, the reasons for forming a national organization, to express the thought none too
well, are that it should promote national unity, give students
an official national voice, and make the student a force in
the national life. These are intangible values but society
might be much disturbed if it were to hear that students
were no longer idealistic; that if the thing doesn't bark, bite,
smell, or occupy space it is not worth having. Yet that conclusion must follow if the ends towards which the NFCUS
directs itself are considered less important than its specific
activities.
Fees, fares, financial aid and housing are within the
scope of a national union but aro not  its justfication.
J. Craig, NFCUS, UBC
in hell
By PETER SYPNOWICH
For   this   day,   a   childish
larder of curses:
I wish there wasn't so much
fuss
About a drunk man on a bus.
Cursed on. streets for being inebriated,
Aboard a bus he's celebrated.
Preaching on Wednesday is
okey-dokey,
But dancing on Sunday can
land you in pokey.
I don't see why we should revere
Drabness with our glass of beer
Yet no singing, minors, music
here,
Is public law in our places of
cheer.
Is there anything wrong in me
discerning
That liquor barred from a place
of learning,
Is just as shameful as comic
burning?
Even when it's dreadfully
punny,
A professor's joke is always
funny.
Or, for argument to take a
crack at
College men in tweedy jacket.
With dads in upper income
bracket!
But I lack it. . .
Frats are all for brotherhood
Because they know that it is
good.
They welcome either goyem or
kike,
But make them brothers separate-like.
Tell me, pretty little co-ed,
Got no husband in your tow
yet?
We go to college
To gain some knowledge
And not to win a degree.
So all this cramming
Is plainly shamming;
Does the system need damning,
Or me?
Christmas brings a holy lesson
That should cleanse our tarnished hearts.
So we count our Cristmas blessings'
—And then our Christmas
cards.
Preachers peeved at Christmas
drinking
Want a different festival;
It's Christ's birthday to their
thinking,
Which should be feted first of
all.
But it's no birthday celebration
Said the nonbeliever with a
wink,
When the guy that's being feted
Ain't around to buy a drink.
I hope you hove a happy New
Year
In spite of all things thermonuclear.
FOR SALE
FURNISHED TRAILER IN
good condition. Phone Mr.
Christie   UBC   Trailer   Camp,
AL. 0038.
* *      *
PAIR MEN'S TYROL SKI
boots, size 11, used only two
years, excellent condition. Ph.
Paul Weston, AL. 1211 M.
* *     *
PAIR OF AUSTRIAN SKI
boots, brand new, size 9M>,
price $48.00. Must be seen to
be appreciated. Contact John
Banfield, KE. 1894.
* *      *
LOST
WOULD PERSON WHO Accidentally took the wrong navy
blue raincoat from Rindington
Reference Room on Fri. Nov.
26 please exchange it for his
own at the Ridington loan desk.
* *      *
BUS STOP COFFEE SHOP
brown brief case, finder please
phone  Mike,  AL.   13t)5  Y.
* +      #
BRAND NEW CALCULUS
text (smail) between HMS and
Physics 200, via chem. 300.
Arthur: DE. 6372 L.
* *      *
IN OR AROUND WESBROOK
a maroon Schaeffer Snorkel
fountain pen. Finder please
phone  AL.   0428   and   ask  for
Nikki.
* )[i >|t
PLEASE RETURN EVERY-
thtng and I will forget everything—I have seen you around
and on Monday 2 weeks ajjo
upstairs.   E.K.M.
Education
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The lead editorial in last
Friday's Ubyssey raises an interesting problem. As the
writer points out, the dilemma
of higher education needs to be
faced realistically, but after
stating his intention he fails
to live by it.
It is pointed out that the
Bachelor of Arts degree has
become discredited because
there are now more people
holding BA's than ever before.
Dots this necessarily follow?
The C.A. has not become discredited nor has the Ph.D. and
yet there are more people holding these degrees in our society than ever before. It seems
more logical to ascribe this
drop in prestige to the fact that
the degree represents a minimum of accomplishment. It is
true that a small minority of
Bachelor of Arts degree holders
have acquired distinction in
their studies but the low standing of the degree generally is
surely more embarrassing to
them than it is to those who
have barely passed.
On the other hand, this decline in reputation should not
be attributed to the so-called -
"traditionalist academicians"
who have tried to resist the
tendency in our society to provide more of everything for
more people. The standards
maintained by a university, especially those of a state university, are directly tied to the
products of the schools system
for it cannot present a blank
wall to those seeking an education just because they have not
been properly prepared to accept the aoademic challenge of
a university. The state may not
owe its citizens a living but it
surely owes them the capacity
to acquire a higher education.
The editorial presupposes
that it is desirable to have more
people with letters after their
names. But in accepting this
supposition, it should be clear
that we may succeed in cutting off the nose of sooiety to
spite its face. If a B.A. of today
indicates the same level of education- as was provided by mat-
trioulation twenty years ago,
the expansion of higher education has accomplished very
little.
Then the editorial goes on to
say, "if anyone needs a university education, it is the person
with lower intelligence." This
suggests if you pay your tuition and register for four years
you should be entitled to receive a degree. In other words
there should be no discrimina- _
tion of any kind. The writer '
seems to be using the word "intelligence" as a synonym for*
"education". Throughout the
school system there exists a
challenge to the teacher to create the desire for education in
his pupils.
He will have all degrees of
intelligence before him and his
visible success is directly
measured by the examinations.
In the majority of cases it is
not the less intelligent who do
not reach the university but
those have not been given the
desire for a higher education.
The schools provide the tools
and the universities provide the
fields of knowledge but little
can be acquired by a student
who is not equipped for the
task.
The challenge is not to the
university but to the school
system in general.
Maurice Copithorne.
Shay
Editor, The Ubyssey;
Re: Miss Freda- Messer-
schmldt's recent survey of
downtown beer parlours. Of the
35 pubs visited she states she
was refused service in five. As
the normal practice is to serve,
two glasses immediately upon
entrance, we have no alternative but to assume that the service was rightly refused in the
last five pubs. Although 40
(forty) glasses is just a few
more than the average limit.
Really now Freda—you are
not living up to the standards
of this C.L.U. (Clean Living
University!)
Signed,
Teetotaler.
More Action
Editor, The Ubyssey;
Many students have contacted Civil Liberties Union
expressing their disapproval of
racial discrimination in downtown hotels and beverage
rooms, and their desire to help
remove this discrimination. We
suggest that they show their
support by writing letters to
the B.C. Hotels Association and
the Beverage Dispensers Union,
and by asking their clubs and
fraternal organizations to pass
resolutions to that effect.
The Council of Jewish Wo-
en is trying to have City Hall
pass a bylaw which would
make it illegal to refuse 'service
to anyone in a public place on
the basis of race only. (English
courts recently upheld such a
law in the case of a West Indian cricketer.) Here Is your
opportunity«— students, religious and political clubs, friends
oi Ather Ali, and World Universtiy Service — to help improve human relations in your
community.
Civil Liberties Union,
Freda Messerschmidt
President.
Explanation
Editor, The Ubyssey;
I feel that there are a few
matters which hould be cleared
up concerning your article on
my letter of resignation published in the Ubyssey last
Thursday. Mr. Bray and I have
discussed the financial situation of the Varsity Revue, and
there is no controversy between Mr. Bray and myself
such as you intimated in your
article. Furthermore, my reason for resigning the position
of Chairman of the Varsity
Revue did not hinge on the
matter of finance, it came as
a result of the lack of support
I have received, mainly with
regard to the submission of
scripts for the Revue. Since
the whole idea of the Revue is
based on student participate >
I felt that a lack of such participation left me no choice but
to submit my resignation.
In closing I would like to
commend you on the creative
ability shown by the reporter
who wrote the article; I would
also like to add that it is the
purpose of a newspaper to report the news, not create it.
Sincerely,
Alan  Thackray.
CLASSIFIED
WANTED
TYPING AND MIMEOGRAPH-
Ing electric typewriter. Carbon
paper and ribbons generously
used. Accurate work. Mrs. F.
M. Gow, 4458 West 10th Ave.
AL. 3682.
ONE RIDER WANTED LEAVE,
from 18th and Cambie proceed'
along 16th or 25th. 8:30's Mon.-
Sat. (also for Saturday only) to
continue next term. Phone EM.
7200. Gordon.
LEAVING FOR EDMONTON
by car. Dec. 13th or 14th. If
interested contact F. F. Paw-
lowski at Law Library or Ph.
AL. 1693 L.
FILMSOC
\dS_l\ For Students And Stmt Only;
TO-DAY
3i45, 6:00, 111}
SPECIAL ATTRACTION
A BROCK ROOF
RAISING SHOW . . .
lifhtintU
... all Proceeds go to
the Brock Roof Fund.
AUDITORIUM 38c
JUST PUBLISHED
•YWALT KIUY
Vet, Oyei, here's the bread
new book on the hilariooi
•talwaru of the Okefenokee
swampland. It's not batter
than, "Po|o'\ "I*o Pogo".
"The Pogo Papers17 or 'The
Pogo Stepmother Goose" just
newer. Be prepared for more
wonderfully enjoyable episodes
from the same little people who
are making the same, and
more, big people happier.
At all bookstores $1.35
Tti* MVSSON BOOK COM f ANT Ul.
Far AH Yaw Clothing Needs
•& Cashmere   Lambswool   Sweaters—for
women.
men
and
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•fe Imported Sports Jackets
ir Viyella Shirts
ir Ladies' Gloves from France and Italy.
FRED   HOLMES   LTD.
Vancouver's Uptown British Importers
2845 Granville (between 12th and 13th) CH. 9240
CelUfe  £hcp
Open 11:30 to 1:30—Monday to Friday
Main Floor, North wing of Brock Hall (next to AMS)
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Ski   Sweaters,   College   Sweaters
Assorted Christinas Cards, Wrapping Paper, Stickers,
Chocolates
UBC Mugs, Pins, Crests, and Pennants Tuesday, November 30, 1054
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Three,
Playwrites
Extend
Thanks
We wish to extend our sincere thanks to those people
who helped make last week's
My Dog Has Fleas Revue the
success that it was.
To Carol Irwin, Sheila McAllister, Barbie Stevenson,
Alade Akesode, Nancy Seed,
Vic Adams, the Campus Coolsters, Edie Needier, Janie
Wright, The Mambo Masters,
Helen Donnelly and her tro'upe
of dancers, Denny Ottowell
and his Engineers, Bruce Mc-
Wiliams and his Zetes, Doug
and Al Rae, Margaret Samson
and her dog, Dru Broke, Ernie Ledgerman and his troupe
of sign-painters, the Vancouver Fire Department, Brian Guns, the Llquot Control
Board, Gordie ' the janitor,
Barbara Echwenk, Margie McNeill, Walt Your*, the Student's Council.
Anyone else we forgot to
mention, we wish to express
our sincere thanks for helping
to make last week's My Dog
Has Fleas Revue the success
that it was.
Wasn't it?
—Rod Smith and Sandy Ross
Alum  Meet
To  Be  Held
Election of the Executive
Council of Convocation will be
the main issue of the Alumni
Annual Meeting and Convocation tonight at the Faculty Club.
The banquet and Installation
of officers will be presided over
by chairman G. Dudley Darling
and Chancellor Emeritus Hamber. Annual reports will be presented, as will fund reports and
presentations.
Two addresses will follow the
installation; one by guest speaker, Mrs. Phyllis G. Ross, the
final one by Dr. N.A.M. MacKenzie, president of the university.
PUBLIC   WORKS   MINISTER
TO  APPEAR   ON  CAMPUS
UBC plays host today to Public Works Minister, the
Honorable P. A. Gaglardi, who is making a speaking appearance on the campus.
Mr. Gaglardi will address students at a noon meeting
in Physics 200.
The meeting sponsored by the Social Credit Club
is open to a general discussion of the Social Credit program.
Composer   Pentland
To   Attend   Premier
Chalk up another "first night"
for Barbara Pentland. The university of British Columbia music instructor, also one of Canada's best known modern composers, who will be attending
the fourth 1954 premiere of her
own work, when the Cassenti
Players present a concert performance of her "Octet for Wind
Instruments" at 8:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 4, in the Vancouver
Art Gallery.
The Octet was written for
CBC in 1948 and is scored for
flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon,
two horns, trumpet and trombone. The Cassenti Players are
a group of first desk woodwind
and horn players from the Vancouver Symphony orchestra.
Their Saturday concert of modern works, including those of
Albert Roussel, Darius Miihaud,
Francois Poulenc and Paul Hin-
demuth, is presented in connection with the Guggenheim exhibition of modern art.
fTHE LAKE
- Miss Pentland's chameer opera, "The Lake," was premiered
over CBC in March, Colin Slim,
former student of Miss Pentland
at the University participated in
the first performance of her
"Two Piano Sonata" at Harvard
University in May. Slim is now
doing graduate work at Harvard.
The Leightan Lucas orchestra
presented Miss Pentland's second
symphony over BBC's third program in June.
PIANO RECITAL
A Pentland piano recital of
her own works is scheduled for
February 7 at the Art Gallery
under the auspices of the Community Arts Council. She has
also been asked to do a concert
in Brussels in May, but doubts
that her teaching schedule will
permit her time to leave.
YTC  Entry
Deadline
Approaches
Deadline for enrollment in
UBC's Youth Training School,
to be held January 10 to March
. is only three weeks away,
Principal Allan DesChamps announced today.
The School courses for men
and women in farm management, sewing, weaving, agricultural engineering, child development, poultry husbandry and
other related courses.
Total expense for the two
month period is only $20—$10
for room and board, and a maximum of $10 for travel expense.
The School is primarily designed for students in rural
areas.
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA
Applications an invited from high-ranking
Graduate  and
Undergraduate Students
Interested in
FULL TIME and SUMMER WORK
in
ENGINEERING and SCIENCE
in the following fields
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING    ELECTRONICS
BIOCHEMISTRY
BIOLOGY
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CHEMISTRY
CIVIL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
PHYSICS
RADIOPHYSICS
STATISTICS
Positions are available at Ottawa, Saskatoon
and Halifax
Standard starting  rates  for 1955  graduates  appointed  to  continuing   positions  will be:  Ph.D.—$4950, M.Sc—$4200, B.Sc—$3750 per  annum.
Information on full time openings is available  in your Placement Office
and in your Department.
Application forms may be obtained from your Placement Officer and should
be forwarded   to  the  Employment   Officer,  National  Research  Council,
Ottawa, early  in December, for consideration  in January.
POOL
(Continued from Page 1)
At its meeting the committee
passed tiie following motion:
"that  in  fact  of  the  weight
of evidence re: instructional,
recreational  and  competitive
swimming, if is recommended
. that a second pool would he
built—even in consideration of
all costs being equal.
The meeting of the sub-corn-
.nittee which was attended by
.he student members, Bob Brady,
John Stringr, Ron Bray and Bob
Hutchinson. Max Howell, Jack
Pomfret and Dick Mitchell attended for the Physical Education staff.
The members of the Physical
Education staff pointed out that
for instructional purposes, the
large pool is not good, and that
a smaller pool would be of much
more benefit.
The committee also felt that
the proposed small pool would
be more than ample to accommodate student needs during the
winter term.
The committee further reported that all competitive intercollegiate swimming and nearly
all other competitive swimming
is done in 25 yard pools in
Canada and therefore the small
pool would be necessary for
competitive swimming and training.
SHIRTS
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Vancouver Branch Office: 402 West Pender Street.
Eric V. Chown, LL.B., C.L.U., Branch Manager.
Vancouver • Interior B.C. • Yukon Branch Office:
Stock Exchange Building. 457 Howe Street,
H. C. Webber, C.L.U.. Branch Manager.
New Westminster - Fraser Valley Branch Office: Zeller Buildiw,
804 Columbia Street. New Westminster. n-
Fred B. G'froerer. Branch Manager. , •')
Victoria Branch Office: 201 Scollard Building. ' -
Robt. M. Moore, C.L.U.. Branch Manager. ; <
Nelson Branch Office - 450 Baker Street.
W. L. Hall. C.L.U., Branch Manager. .
- » »_■»_-*.___..__-_■-._■»»-■*_■_ _-h      Ann       *._•__*._»      * _s -*»J*k *^
INCORPORATED 2*9  MAY 1670.
For Christmas Parties
x  Wear A Dress Thai
J Makes You Sparkle!
It's wonderful the way a gay new
party dress can catch the sparkle
of the season and put it in your
eyes, your personality. See our collection at HBC — exciting festive
flattery is sewn into every seam. Choose from
a myriad of romantic fabrics, crisp or diaphanous, whirling enchantingly from nipped-in
waists, and gently molded, dramatically styled bodices.
Colours range from fiery reds to whispering pastels. Each
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figure — and they're sensibly priced. Sizes 12-18, 16V2-22V2.'
19.95 to 39.95
HBC Popular Priced Dresses, Third  Floor
A Page Four
THE    UBTSSET
Tuesday, November 30, 1954
Rugger Scene All Righty
As All 3 Teams Conquer
UP AND IN GOES the ball pushed by UBC center Jim
Carter. lite irate Gladiator checking him is PLC star Phil
Nordquist. Gladiators won the Totem tournament by nip-
ping JBlrds 50-49 in a ragged game. —Maze Photo
Columns   Unlimited
Glads
Take  Totem
Narrow  Win
UBC 62 • EILERS 48
PLC 90 - UBC 49
Pacific Lutheran Gladiators took the Totem Trophy Saturday night when they defeated the UBC Thijnderbirds 50-49.
In Friday's opener, P. L. C
beat Western 02-53 to get into
the final. In the second game
that night, UBC took at 32-18
half time lead to coast to an
easy 62-48 win over Eilers.   .
McLEOD AGAIN
John McLeod turned in his usual good game for Varsity as he
collected 15 points.
Jim Carter, Bird's rookie center,  was second  for  individual
Birds  Nip
Legion  As
Chiefs Lose
BIRJDS 1-LEQION 0
ATHLETICS 1-CHIEFS 0
By NEIL MACDONALD
Varsity sank Grandview Legion 1 to 0 at Templeton Park,
while South Main Athletics sank
UBC 3 to 0 in a controversial
game which saw the Chiefs in
worse form than they ever have
been this year.
Sven Sigurdson guarding the
nets for Grandview Legion, held
off the onrushing Varsity forwards until Stan Glasgow pumped home the lone goal. Varsity
played an aerial game because
of the muddy, sloppy field
which slowed the game down
no end.
KUYT WHITEWASHES
Old reliable Ernie Kuyt came
up with another shutout to con-)
tinue to lead all "B" division
goaltenders. Frederickson and
Butterfield played well in front
of the Varsity goaltender and
turned  in  fine games.
UBC Chiefs managed to score
two of their three goals against'
themselves. It seems the Chiefs
defense was pulled back to
guard the UBC nets; this resulted
in the forwards not getting any
passes and failing to score.
HEADS UP]
Varsity will have to improve
immensely if they expect to beat
any of the "A" Division team.^
in further cup play. Grandview
Legion, just another team in the
V and D League had Varsity
worried several times during the
Same.
honors as he grabbed 14 points
while holding the Eiler's John
Forsyth to 10.
In Saturday night's main
eventer, the black and gold Lutes
took an early lead over the blue
and gold Birds and it looked like
another easy win for Pacific
Lutheran.
However, Varsity managed to
hang on. At the half they had
closed the gap to 28-22.
LAST DITCH <
Midway through the final
period, the Birds grabbed a one-
point advantage but the Lutes
darted ahead once more. Despite
a last ditch effort by McLeod
which made the score 50-49,
UBC failed to score again.
After the final whistle, Bus
Phillips presents the Totem Trophy to Phil Nordquist, captain
of the Pacific Lutheran team.
Big number 44 was high man
again Saturday night as he
scored 22 points for Varsity.
WILD STARS
Another outstanding number
Birds was 12. That's Ed Wild.
In Friday's game he got 12 points
and Saturday night added 10
more.
A good crowd was on hand
for a change both nights.
The one-point defeat was the
closest UBC has come to winning the Totem Tournament in
its five year history.
No Sex, No Nothin
We're Cleaning Up
BITS of this and that and a hell of a lot of nothing.
Free steaks, now that the football season is over, have come
off the awards list. But it could be they could be put into circulation and would be well used.
The awards would go to the little man, one of the twenty or
so people who watched the rugger game in the stadium Saturday,
who tried to borrow another man's privilege card so he woludn't
have to pay the admission sum of 25 cents.
The last of the big spenders was outfoxed by wily Chick Siew,
the watchdog of the treasury.
JOHNNY DOES IT AGAIN
. Don't say I was bribed or anything, but the man of the week
award goes to trainer, and man about the athletic department,
Johnny Owen. He found my lost brief case.
One of the more unheralded athletic figures on the campus is
Ernie Kuyt, who performs in goal for the soccer Birds. His 8 goals
against total is by far the lowest in the league, and the way the
Birds have been playing, sometimes it seems he's the only man on
the club.
Little bits of chaff occasionally drift down the drain and the
latest bit of gossip is the word that some of the coaches of the
lesser teams are making semi-public pronouncements against the
bigger paying sports.
Remember that word paying, chaps, because football is what
pays for UBC's minor sports, which is something it does at most
other unvierslties, especially Toronto.
CRAZY MIXED-UP KID
One stewed prune goes to the UBC sports fan, the most mis-
understandable joker in humanity (if my English prof ever spotted that word . . . ) The blue and gold fan is the apple-knocker
who trots out to see his football team lose steadily, then won't
show his face to watch the rugger team trounce the opposition,
just as steadily.
Cheer up, Albert, yur Innings will come. Oxford-Cambridge
will bring a mixed side here in March. It might be the UCLA
Bruins, bolstered by a few members from the number one college
football team, will be digging divots out at Owen's emporium.
And Just so we finish on a cheery note, look for those same
rugby teams to raise hell locally after Christmas. Chiefs, sometimes known as Thunderbirds, should win the McKechnie Cup
and the misnamed World Cup.
Maxie Howell's Braves will win the Bell-Irving cup, probably
having to beat the Tommies in a playoff to do it.
The Christmas list comes Thursday.  Look for it.
Bill  Whyte   Dislocates
Shoulder To Mar Sweep
CHIEF 20 • MERALOMAS 6
BRAVES 22 • NORTH SHORE 3
TOMAHAWKS 12 - EX-BRITS 0
By KEN LAMB
All three of UBC's English Rugby teams scored lop-sided
victories Saturday to give the Alma Mater its first grand slam
weekend. '
Tomahawks, the team that has
Chiefs Clobbered
By   Cloverdale
CLOVERDALE 63-UBC 46
The Jayvee basketball team
after getting off to a strong
start in the intercity league and
looking like they would be second only to the Eilers, slowed
up and fell before the Clover-
dale club 63-46 Thursday night
at  King   Ed.
Mike Fraser was high man
for the Chiefs, picking up 14
points. Harry Drummond made
the little light flash 9 times.
Varsity   Grass   Hockey
Team  Moves  Into  Lead
Varsity 3 • India 0
UBC 0 • Vancouver 2
Varsity dropped India 3 to 0, on a hat-trick by Bhawaut
Jawanda, to move into undisputed possession of first place;
while UBC Chiefs were nosed out in the second half 2 to 0 by
Vancouver to fall into the cellar in grasshockey action over
the weekend.
Jawauda scored all three
goals for Varsity on good passes
from Dave Hallett and Granville
DaCosta. The win moved Varsity
into first place, three points
ahead of India. Such Singh,
scored another shutout between
the pipes for Varsity.
Bombers
Trounce
Sad  Birds
SEATTLE  10-UBC 1
This »d worth 5% discount
on university activities orders
at
WEST POINT PRINTERS
& STATIONERS
"Programs a Specialty"
ALma 1245 4514 W. 10th
Dick Mitchell's hockey club
made the long jaunt to Seattle
Sunday and discovered there "1!
no wrath like that of a home
team.
Seattle Bombers, leaders of
the Northwest Amateur League
(nee Vancouver Commercial League), and invincible on home
ice, played their little heads
off before a large and appreciative Seattle crowd and beat the
Birds 10-1.
Meanwhile, league wheel Joe
McPhee has unofficially offered
a special student rate in an effort to drag the non-existent
Bird supporters out to the Wednesday night brawls at the Forum.
CHIEFS SCORELESS
The Chiefs failed to score on
Vancouver as the thug-city boys
won their first game. It was a
closely played game with both
teams getting plenty of chance
to score.
CAMPBELL
CLEANERS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2460
Discount for Students
For All Your Bakery Needs
see us at the
University Bakery
10th at Sasamat        Al. 0500
B.C. Matriculation and Science School
—Since 1914—
High Grade Tuition and Reasonable Fees
Senior and Junior Matriculation
Tuition in University Subjects
Languages - Mathematics - Chemistry - Physics
4349 W. 10th Ave. ALma .1248
been spoiling Varsity's record
the past few weeks by narrow
losses, shellacked Ex-Britannia
seconds 12-0 at False Creek Park
to make it a perfect day for the
English code lads.
STILL WINNING
Chiefs continued on their winning way as they trounced an
inept Meraloma club 20-6 at the
stadium.
Braves walloped North Shore
22-3 on the Aggie field.
UBC fullback Bill Whyte, who
doubles as a pitcher in the baseball season, suffered a dislocated shoulder and was taken to
hospital. He may also have picked up a fracture.
WRONG ARM
Fortunately for the baseball
team it was southpaw Bill's
right arm that was injured.
Meraloma's Lionel Jinks received a broken hand.
Dave Morley made his first
apearance this year for »the
Chiefs and carried all the kicking load. He scored three difficult penalty goals and a convert to pick up 11 points on the
afternoon.
Lionel Feeney was the only
effective man for the Lomas,
scoring a try and a penalty goal.
LAIRD OPENED IT  •
Al Laird opened the scoring
for Chiefs as he climaxed a three-
line run. Ross Wright and Bob
Bartlett scored the other UBC
majors, both on spectacular
plays!
Wright scored on a beautiful
60-yard run which left his would-
be tacklers laying on either side
of the runway babbling incoherently about "number of that
truck."
TRICKY CHAP
Bartlett caught the Meraloma
squad flat-footed when he intercepted a Loma pass and hopped
twenty yards unmolested.
Tomahawks, the Cinderella
boys for the week, blanked the
tough ex-Brit squad to score
their first win on twin tries by
Tommy Kendall and a try and
penalty by Marc Bell.
The third team worked extremely well together and showed signs of a turning tide.
MORE AND MORE
Braves, who are winning so
often and so well it's almost
monotonous, carried out another
whitewashing by walking over
a heavier North Shore All-Blacks
team 22-3.
Second teams pattern playing
was too much for the foothills
kids. Don Legge with 2, Henry
Walters, Mike Chambers, Tom
Anthony, Bruno Gandossi were
the touchdown scorers.
Jawn Mulberry kicked two
converts to complete the rout.
Public
btthce
EVERY SATURDAY
Wallie Peters' Orchestra
ALMA HALL
Broadway at Alma Road
^Admission 50c        Op«n 9-12/
FRANCES MURPHY
DANCE SCHOOL
BAyvlew 3425
Private Instruction
Rhumba • Tango • Samba
Fox Trot - Waltz. Jive
Old Time
Beginners • Brush Up
Advanced Courses
If no answer CEdar 6878
Alma Hall, 3679 W. Broadway
Is   Your    Future    Properly   and
Adequately   Planned ?
You can very easily determine and plan your future
through the scientific procedures now widely accepted
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DON'T BE MISGUIDED—CONSULT
JOHN W. A.  FLEURY
Personnel Consultant Industrial Psychologist
606 Stock Exchange Bldg. TAtlow 7748
ti
Christmas Cards and Gilts
• Abundant Magazine Selection
All at Your ONLY Campus Drug Store
from 9:00 a.m. till 10:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LTD.
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400 Career Positions Offered in . . .
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Medical Science
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Economics
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... in the Public Service of Canada
800 Summe7 Positions for Students in
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Ask for descriptive circulars available
University of British Columbia
Personnel Office
or write to
The Civil Service Commission,  Ottawa
ACT NOW—FOR MOST POSITIONS APPLICATIONS
SHOULD BE FILED  IN JANUARY, 1955

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