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The Daily Ubyssey Oct 31, 1947

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 Y18STO   VJiAC   3H*'
SUA'
Vol. XXX
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1947
"» '      i'i|iii,il|.j'|i
No. 23
»*•
:^^'-~-'
Martin Scores Communist.
fr'' * ;•'■ ' ■-.■'• v**-d ,,*
<l|y*> ' .1 •' ' ■ ' -%'"XiXiJ-y
Socialist, Fascist  Groups
Minister Attacks Tory Opposition
Failure in Social Welfare Field
Communists, Socialists and Fascists are all alike in their
suppression of liberty—according to Hon. Paul Martin, Dominion Minister of Health and Welfare. "Political and civil liberty go hand in hand," he said. "Without one there cannot be
the other."
 3'    "No one has any quarrel with the
basic  principles  of  the  Socialists  or
the Marxists,'' he continued. "But we
do not know enough about political
science  to  be  able  to  give  political
freedom    with    complete    economic
security."
HJTS OPPOSITION
In answer to what he termed 'the
fast-disappearing Tory Opposition,"
Mr. Martin said, "The Conservatives
(either under that name or any of
the names they have adopted from
time to time to hide themselves)
have never, put through a single
social security measure whereas the
Liberal Family Allowance scheme and
Unemployment Insurance Flan are
amongst the most advanced social
security measures in  the world."
Questioned as to the dollar crises.
he replied, "We have long been considering the problem and soon there
will be results which will startle
many."
Explaining the Citizenship Bill
which he sponsored, Mr. Martin said,
"The idea came to me when I saw a
Canadian  War  cemetery   in  Dieppe,"
INSPIRATION
"There, on the crosses, were names
of Anglo-Saxons, Frenchmen, central
Europeans and almost every nationality imaginable. But all had called
themselves Canadians. I thought all
of us should be able to call ourselves
Canadians."
Replying to further questions on
Liberal policy in the event of a depression and the possible raising of
Veteran's Allowances he declared,
"As soon as we get the cooperation
of the Provincial Governments we
will enact legislation which will do
much towards ensuring full employment.
NO STATEMENT
I cannot tell you about the Veteran's
Allowances. If the Minister of Veteran's Affairs started announcing the
policy of the Minister of Health and
Welfare, I would be most put out. He
doesn't and I won't announce his
policy either."
"Unless the allowances are raised
there will be little health and no
welfare," retorted a veteran from the
rear of the house.
Florence Coardy, American
contralto, will present a student
concert today at 12:30 p.m. in
the auditorium. (See Story on
Page 3*).
COLDWELL
RECEPTION
A reception for M. J.. Caldwell,
CCF House of Commons leader
will be held in the Mildred Brock
Room on Saturday at 11:30 a.m.
All executive members of Major
and Minor Clubs are invited to
attend.
STILL GOING STRONG
Ottawa Bencher
Gives Lecture
Judge John E. Read of Ottawa, first
Canadian ever elected to the International Court of Justice, will arrive
in Vancouver on November 8 to deliver a series- of four addresses at
UBC beginning November 10.
He follows B. K. Sandwell, editor
of Toronto "Saturday Night", in delivering the Hewitt Bostock Memorial
Lecture series at this university.
Judge Read is an oustanding world
authority in law, and until his election to the International Court during
the first session of the United Nations
Assembly in London in January 1946,
he was legal advisor to the Department of External Affairs, holding
ambassadorial rank.
He attended Oxford as a Rhodes
scholar upon graduating from the
Dalhousie Law School, and after service in the first World War he became a professor at Dalhousie. Later
he became clean of the law school, a
position he held until he joined the
Department of External Affairs in
1929.
The Hewiit Bostock Lectureship
was established to honor the late
Senator Hewitt Bostock, and provides for a public lecture at least once
in three years by a speaker of national or international reputation on
a subject of educational importance.
Ball Tickets Go
On Sale Monday
Ralph Huene, chairman of the Fall
Ball Committee, announced today that
tickets for the annual fall event will
go on sale Monday, November 3, in
the Quad and the Alma Mater Society
offices.
Two votes in the campus Queen
contest as well as a buffet supper
will be included in the admission
price of $3.00. Dancing will be from
9 p.m. till 1 a.m. Table reservations
may  be  made  at  the  AMS  office.
Another feature of the dance will
be a drawing for 12 prizes donated
by Vancouver merchants. The tickets
for the draw may be purchased at
the AMS office or from any member j
of the Undergraduate Societies Committee.
Tickets will sell for ten cents each
and the prizes will be on display
outside the AMS office in Brock
Hall, Monday, November 3. A special
prize will be awarded to the person
selling the most tickets.
—uutiy   oujiasc.,   * .
ONCE UBC—NOW VGH NURSES HOME, the Fairview
shacks are still going strong and likely to last "years and years"
according to the nurses who make their homes in the old lecture
rooms. The university was housed in these frame buildings al
the time of the great trek in 1922 when the students, protesting
against inadequate facilities here, were successful in their
campaign to move UBC to Point Grey.
Original 1922 Trek Spirit
9KBT.V.
Prevails At Silver Banquet
Enthusiasm and Hilarity
Mark 25th Celebration
It takes more than 25 years to dim the spirit of the classes
of 1922—the great trekkers. . ;
This was the impression left with nearly 200 trekke^ and
guests who gathered, Wednesday night, in the Banquet Room
of Hotel Vancouver, to sing the old campaign songs and shout
the old campaign yells of 1922.
The occasion was the Twentv-flfth» ..
anniversary to the day of the great
student Trek from the old Fairview
shacks,   through   the   city,    to   the
Point Grey site.
REMINDER
Trekkers, many of whom are now
prominent lawyers, businessmen, and
school teachers, were reminded by
President N. A. M. MacKenzie and
President emeritis Dr. L. S. Klinck,
that it was through the efforts of the
student campaign that the University
was established on its present site.
President MacKenzie was greeted
with cheers and cries of "Good old
Larry.'
When the band broke into a true
1922 version of "For Me and My Gal"
the "originals" left their seats and
danced "ragtime" between the banquet tables.
TRADITION
Grant Livingstone, AMS President
representing the present student body,
told the Trekkers that they had
established much more than the
Cairn and the Point Grey site—they
had "left a tradition of student spirit
that had become the objective and
inspiration of all following classes."
Minor Arts versus Science battles
broke out from time to time when
the Engineers sang "We are, we are
Each trekker was presented a silver
pin, a miniature replica of UBC's
cairn,  commemorating  the  evening.
WITCHES AND <?QBLINS
SPOIL RADSOC PARTY
Traditional Halloween witches have combined with the
Street Railwaymen's Union to cause the cancellation of the
University Radio Society's initiation party.
With tho B.C. Electric temporarily indisposed, and fear
of Halloween pranks causing damage to private autos, it
was found impossible to provide transportation for most of
tho 175 persons who would have attended.
President Ernie Perrault commented that, "goblins
willing", the party would be held at a later dale, when
transportation ills have been cured.
Student Cites
Discrimination
Several cases of discrimination against Japanese-Canadian
veterans in the coast region,
were cited by Sus Tababa, Japanese-Canadian Art student at
the Tuesday meeting of the
Civil Liberties Union.
He stated that a number of his
fellow Japanese have been refused
fishing licenses and others, including
Chinese-Canadians, have failed to
secure employment in coast saw mills
and Crown properties because of
their race.
Civil Liberties Union members
have decided to form a committee
to investigate the situation and publish recommendations on the Japanese-Canadian  problem  in  its entirety.
Tho Union plans to place resolutions
before tlie student body regarding
problems and the Canadian Native
Indian  situation.
Tlie Union urges all students,inter-
esleel in the promotion of the civil
rights of Canadian Japanese and
Indian people, to attend the next
club meeting on Monday, November
3,  at 12:30 p.m.   in Arts 103.
RUMOR DENIED
"There Is absolutely no foundation In the rumor that classes
will bc cancelled on Saturday for
Homecoming activities," the president's office stated when queried
by The Daily Ubyssey yesterday.
"Classes will  go  on  as  usual."
Richards Sends
Cairn Message
Dr. A. E. "Ab" Richards,
president of the Alma Mater
Society in, 1922-23 and chairman of the now famous student
Campaign* Committee, was unable to attend the silver anniversary celebration Wednesday
but he sent an encouraging
message from Geneva.
Secretary of the Canada Food Board,
Dr. Richards is in Switzerland witli
the Canadian delegation to the second
session of the Preparatory Committee
of the United Nations Conference on
Trade and Employment.
ENTHUSIASM
"It seems incredible that all of us
have grown twenty-five years older
since the day of our Point Grey pilgrimage,"  he writes.
"I am still amazed at the amount of
energy, enthusiasm and hard work
that the whole student body packed
into those few campaign weeks following the opening of the fall term in
1922 and its accomplishments".
"It was a lot of fun too and we
now have the satisfaction of knowing
that we were right in persuading the
government to 'Build'the Universtiy'.
They did a beautiful job.
IMPRESSED
"I walked over the campus one
Sunday evening in summer seven or
eight years ago. It gave me quite a
thrill to think that the student body
of our day had some part in building
our university.
"Switzerland and the Mediterranean
are beautiful but the setting of UBC,
wih its view of Howe Sound and the
snow-capped peaks beyond, surpasses
anything 1 have seen.
"1 am terribly disappointed that
I shall miss this opportunity to sec
you and other old fricicls again. How
about arranging a date with the old
campaigners 25 years  hence?"
Bagnall Compl
Homecoming Plans
Football And Basketball
Mark Annual Festivities
Final arrangements have been completed for the largest
Homecoming in the history of the University of British Columbia, reports Bob Bagnall, chairman of the Homecoming Committee. *	
Open house in the morning with
specially conducted tours will start
i day  crowded with events.
LUNCHEON AND GAME
The Big Block annual luncheon at
12:30 p.m. is to be followed by the
athletic highlight of the day—the football game between UBC Thunderbirds and the Pioneers from Lewis
and  Clark  College.
An Alumni tea will also be held
in the afternoon from 4:30 to 5:45 p.m.
in Brock Hall followed by a Grad
Banquet at 6:30 p.m.
In the evening the Literary and
Scientific Executive and Players
Club join forces to present the traditional Potlatch in the auditorium
at 8 o'clock.
BASKETBALL
A basketball game between an
alumni team, composed largely of
the 1946-47 champion Vancouver Hornets and the UBC Thunderbirds starts
at 8 p.m. in Varsity Gym.
Two dances will wind up the busy
day. One is to be held in Brock Hall
for Grads and the other in the Armories for students and alumni.
Booths will be installed about the
campus to give information to wandering alumni and their friends .
Speaks . . .
M. J. Coldwell. national
CCF leader, speaking under
the auspices of the University
Socialist Club, will address an
6|>en meeting of K*$t|itefe|pts* %n
the auditorium on SatiiMay,
November 1, at 12:30 p. m.
(Story, Page 3).
Arrangements Completed
For Aggie Fall Banquet
Final arrangements for the 28th Annual Fall Banquet on
Monday, November 3, of the Agriculture Faculty have been
completed, according to Ian Greenwood, Aggie Undergrad
president.
.The banquet will start at 6:30 p.m.
at the Commodore Cabaret.
Slight changes in plans include the
option of formal or informal dress
for ladies. The change was made to
accommodate students unable to procure formal attire. Greenwood hopes
to have a record turnout for the affair.
PROGRAM
A gala program has been arranged
to include former Canadian Army
Show star singer Gwynn Price, who
will make a guest appearance at the
banquet. Tom Whitehead is preparing
the traditional freshman skit.
The Deputy Minister of Mines and
Resources, Mr. George Melrose, will
be the guest speaker. Other head
table dignitaries include Dr. and Mrs.
L. S. Klinck, Dr. and Mrs. A. E. D.
Grauer, President and Mrs. Norman
MacKenzie, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley,
Dean F. M. Clement and Mr. Grant
Livingstone.
LANCING
An evening of dancing to George
Calangis' thirteen-piece orchestra is
to follow the banquet.
Greenwood reminded Aggies that
the cost of the banquet is being
shared by the AMS, Aggie students
receiving a  special  price  of $1.00.
Students needing transportation to
the Commodore Cabaret and those
in a position to supply it are asked
to sign the sheets on the notice board
in the main hall of the Aggie building.
Legion Executive
Names Committee
Don Lanskail, Dave Brousson and
Ray Dewar were named to the War
Memorial Gymnasium Planning Committee by the executive of University Branch Canadian Legion on
Wednesday.
The new members will be charged
with the responsibility of planning
ihe physical and memorial aspects
of   tlie   proposed   building.
Two   motions   passed   at   the  Legion
meeting   provided   that   names   of   all
British    Columbia    men
seas    during    the
entered  into  a  memorial   book   to  be , influence
Shakeup Due In
Election System
Elections committee officials
are searching for new methods
to conduct the annual Students
Council elections, according to
Taddy Knapp^ AMS > secretary
and chairman oltfie Elections
Committee.
Letters have been circulated to all
Canadian universities regarding election   systems,   and    their   policies
concerning eligibility, publicity, and
balloting.
The present election system of the
University of B.C. as outlined in the
Tillicum handbook has been criticized
by many campus groups, and students
are invited to contribute suggestions
to Miss Knapp in  the AMS office.
Press 'Prostituted'
Claim Debators
Toronto, Oct. 28-r(CUP)—A motion
'that in the opinion of the house-
in Canada 'freedom of the press' is
being prostituted" was upheld recently by a vote of 70 to 47 in the
opening Hart House debate of the
'47-'48  season.
Through two hours and fifteen minutes of energetic debating, speakers
hurled arguments back and forth
across the Debates Room floor1 concerning the degrees of efficiency; existing in the press of Canada as compared to that of other nations such
as the United States, Great Britain
and Russia.
placed in the gym.
Supporters of the resolution charged that the influences exerted by outside forces affect the presentation
of news and  opinion  in  Canada.
One   speaker   suggested   that   newspapers   in   Canada    were   semi-mon-
killed   over- j opolistic   ,n   character   and    that   big
war    were    to    be j department,   stores    wield    "no    little
newspapers
over
wha t
print." PAGE 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
.Friday, October 31, 1947
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University  Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail,, Post Office  Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions — (2.50 per year
Published throughout the university year by  the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia
• • «
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial   staff  of  The   Daily   Ubyssey   and   not  necessarily
those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone: ALma 1624
I
For display advertising phone KErrisdale 1311
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF    ....    DONALD FERGUSON
MANAGING EDITOR   ....   LAURIE DYER
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Ron Haggart; News Editor,   Tore   Larssen;   Features   Editor,   Geoige  Robertson,
Photography Director, Bob Cave; Sports Editor, Chick Turner,
CITY EDITOR THIS ISSUE: HAL PINCHIN
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: DON ROBERTSON, MICKEY FYNN
RX FOR XXX
LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
Campus Call
by Jack McCaugherty
There has evidentally been a degree of
misunderstanding surrounding the recent
council ruling on article 11 of the AMS code
—the article covering consumption of intoxicating liquors.
In the interests of full understanding on
the question it might be advisable to quota
the article in full:
"Drinking of intoxicating liquors on
the University campus or at any University function is prohibited  and  any
person appearing on the University campus or at any University function while
showing any evidence of having consumed intoxicating liquor shall be subject to
penalty."
The penalty that might be imposed by
the Discipline Committee would likely include: confiscation of the liquor, a maximum
fine of five dollars, and confiscation of the
AMS pass.
The Daily Ubyssey has received a number of letters to the editor suggesting that
the Fall Ball will be held in the parking lot
rather than the Armories . . . the inference
being that students faced with a prohibition
ruling in the Armories will take their bottles
—evidentally a necessity—to their cars.
There is little doubt that many student';
feel that the prohibition ruling was brought
down as a consequence of the fact that the-
Ball is to be held on the campus . . . where
liquor restrictions are considered to be more
stringent than elsewhere,
This supposition is altogether inaccurate-.
The council ruling clearly states that tho
tightener clauses apply at all functions both
on and off the campus, and would, therefore
be enforced as strongly in the Commodore
and the parking lot as anywhere else.
Rosemary Hodgins, chairman of the
Undergraduate Societies Committee and administrator of the Discipline Committee, has
been directed by council, to ensure that the
ruling is enforced . . . even at the Mardi
Gras next spring.
We await with some interest the outcome
of the Discipline Committee's activities on the
night of the Fall Ball.
food (or thought
By HAROLD DEAN
Non-partisanship like long skirts seems
to be the fashion this year on the campus.
They both serve the purpose of a cloak and
sometimes I don't blame some people for
desiring either one of them—they've got so
much to cover up.
Last Saturday I heard Mr. John Bracken,
Progressive-Conservative leader, deliver an
address at the University. When someone
asked him a question on price controls he
deplored the fact that the question should be
asked as up until then his address had been
non-partisan and this question had interjected a partisan note. The notes that were
coming my way from Mr. Bracken were part
of the song the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association is singing and to which chorus
the conservatives are in complete harmony. I
didn't expect Mr. Bracken to eulogize Communism; but then I didn't expect him to be
non-partisan! In the usual manner of self-
styled non-partisans he attacked Communism
and anything leading to it.
ENVIRONMENT
The fact of the matter is that what a
person does and what a person thinks and
usually what a person says is the result cf
the environment in which he has been in.
Your environment includes your economic
and social standing in society, the books
you've read, the people you've met and the
experiences you've had, From these things
people work out philosophies and economic
theories and they give expression to their
ideas in one way or another even in spite of
themselves.
Anyone who is politically conscious and
who takes any of the social sciences will, in
the course of a term, or of the first lecture,
categorize his professor politically. For the
professor will voluntarily or involuntarily
reveal his convictions.
ACCUSATION
Last year the Social Problems Club was
accused of being partisan when they wanted
to bring Tim Buck out to the campus. It was
said they were only presenting one kind of
political speaker. And yet the Social Problems Club had presented such speakers as
Mr. Diefenbaker, a Conservative, and were
trying to get Mr. Winch to come out at that
time.  On the other hand  the International
Relations Club has not presented one speaker
that I know of who is a Communist. In a
world today, in which one person out of
every 20 is organized into a Communist partv
and in a world in which Marxist ideas are
growing and spreading it behooves students
of the International Relations to familiarize
themselves with such ideas. I am pointing
this out by way of comparison for I feel that
the members of the IRC as well as any other
club should be able to get what speakers they
prefer. They need no thought control police
nor any special AMS amendments to protect
their tender minds.
CITY COUNCIL
In Vancouver we have a so-called nonpartisan city council. By a strange coincidence there are no left wingers whatsoever
in the ranks of the Non-Partisans—they're all
Conservatives and Liberals. Does anyone believe that these men who are right wingers
would change their outlook once they got in
the council chambers as Non-partisans?
Would they not, for instance, legislate to
place more of the burden of taxation on the
backs of the big property owners rather than
as it is now on the small home owner, if they
were truly non-partisan?
What a person or a party or an organization is called is not always of the greatest
importance, but what is important is what
they do. When you look closely at those who
call themselves non-partisan you usually find
they are quite partisan.
BLOOD
The students council's attention should
be brought to the latest type of infiltration.
Some well known Reds have been seen
giving their blood to the Red Cross. Hospitals
are non-partisan about accepting Red blood
and some of it may insidiously get into the
veins of the blue-bloods.
This is a very serious problem which
faces our students council. How are they
going to tell who is partisan and so protect
our student body? There have been no machines as yet invented, which will look into a
man's mind and tell whether he is nonpartisan or not. As non-partisans themselves
they will have to stick to the old tried and
true method of declaring partisan thase who
disagree with them.
Tuumours, et al
The  Editor,
The Daily Ubyssey
Sir:
For an institution comprised of
men and women of allegedly superior
intellect we certainly have some lulus
amongst us. Most recent exhibition of
ludicrousness was the letter by the
radio fan who chooses 'and we
sympathize with him) to conceal his
identity under the pseudonym of
"O.K. Tummest".
If this ardent rooter for the dear
old Alma Mammy would tear him-
; self away from his crystal set and
come to a football game in person,
he might notice, now that it has
been pointed out to him. that the
broadcasting is done from a booth
which more or less cuts off outside
noises.
Also he would find, if he can read,
that the UBC yells are distributed
amongst the spectators on mimeographed sheets. As for his suggestion
that we begin our lectures with Ziss
Boom Bah ! ! ! (Why Clarence, how
CAN you be so inconsiderate ! ! !)
One person's stupidity would not
warrant such a literary gem on our
part but as he says, there must be
many more like him.
May they Drop Dead , . ,
Mose,   Male,   Murph   et  al
P.S.
Saturday's   game   against   Whitman
was the best yet from every point of
view,  Including the yell department,
so  nuts  to  you  Tuumourhead.
R. G. L. Moase
D. E. Malcolm
New Figures
The  Editor,
The Daily Ubyssey
Sir:
In his PLAIN TALK, Daily Ubyssey, October 28, 1947, Mr. Lipson
pointed out certain omissions made
by the B.C. Electric in their recent
advertisement in the paper regarding
the current local street railwaymen's
strike. Although Mr. Lipson's analysis
was in content correct, the "highly
critical student" will, no doubt, have
observed that Mr. Lipson, also, is
guilty of the omission of certain
important   observations.
Using the cost-of-living index of
139.4 as compared to the prewar index
of 100, the prewar equivalent of $47.15
—today's rate—for a 46 a hour week
would be 33.82 for a 46 hour week.
Using this as a basis, we find that the
rate demanded, $52.90, is 156.4 per cent
of the prewar rate.
If the cost-of-living index 139.4 is
correct, and we are to assume that
today's rate of $47.15 is unduly low,
we must assume by inference that a
prewar wage of $33.82 for a 46 hour
week was also low. I, personally,
hesitate to make such an assumption,
since such a wage was then considered
a good wage and compares favorably
with the B.C. Electric wage rate at
that time.
If we are to justify an increase of
wages on the basis of a rise in the cost
of living, we find that in order to
justify a wage of $52.90 a week, the
cost of living must have risen to 156.4
percent of the prewar cost of living.
All this is, of course, ignoring the
additional demand for a 40 hour week,
a decrease of 6 hours a week on the
average.
1 do not contend to dispute the
rights of the striking union in question, but if an analysis is to be made
on the basis of cost of living increases, it is important to consider all
aspects, not only a few.
"Highly Critical"
FOR SALE
WHIZZER MOTOR on balloon tire
bike, carrier, speedometer, etc. 2549
Cambridge St.  Phone HA 416L after
7:30 p.m.
., * *
BLACK AND BROWN pure-bred
cocker spaniel pups. $10 each. Phone
AL 0403.
LOST
NOTICES
ONE MOTORCYCLE CHAIN in the . ESSAY THESES TYPED-Reasonablo
vicinity   of   the   employment   office,; charge.    B'A 5513L.
Monday evening. Please get  in  touch , HOWARD   ABBOTT   please   contact
with   W.   J.  Gi'.mour,  KE  6157L. j J.   E'lundoll    in   regard   to   sociology
•        *        * book.
BROWN   SIIAEFFKR   PENCIL   with! *        *       *
sold   tip   on   October   21.   Leave   al   WOULD JIMMY  SCOONE'S brother
AMS. ! call at AMS office for his coat.
Re Whoop Dee Doo—
The Editor,
The Daily Ubyssey
Dear Sir:
The letter in Wednesday's paper
stating, and I quote, "It is evident
that the Fall Ball will be held in the
parking lot this year" is undoubtedly
the funniest true story I have heard
in a long time.
One thing I would like to add to
that—Hope it isn't raining—Won't it
be fun!
Sincerely,
K.B.J.
iNlTiATTOM   DAV   ArJ
THE   TOKERS
SA.l_l.ieD   FOHrTHX^o'
Caught Knapping—
The Editor
The   Dally   Ubyssey
Dear Sir:
Does the purchase of a wire recorder mean that the Council can
dispense with the services of its
secretary, or will this enable Taddy
lo Knapp?
Ah, the good old days when one
Council member had to be awake at
the meetings.
Clueless
"These first classes are a
little disorganized,
aren't they?"
.Egbert isn't really worried about those
early-term "snafus" ... but one thing he isn't
risking is disorganization in his personal
finances. He knows there's nothing more
embarrassing than those "no dough" wires
to Dad.
Egbert also knows the best way to avoid
them is to substitute "MY BANK" saving for
"leaky pocket" spending.
Follow Egbert's example and
op£n a B of M savings account
today.
You'll enjoy that "rich-as-
Rockefeller" feeling.
U2-2
Bank of Montreal
working   with  Canadians   in every   wolk  of life  since   1817
48 HOUR
SERVICE
ON
SHIRTS
..Perfectly Laundered
3 for 51c
NeV
SPOTLESS
4390 W 10
SKI CENTRE
Early Arrivals in Equipment
JANTZEN TOTEM SWEATER
$9.50
WOMENS RUBBER HIKING
BOOTS
$2.49
MENS HIKING BOOTS
$2.95   and  $4.50
U.S.   ARMY   SKI   GOGGLES
95c
Ski Boots at 1946 Prices
will be $16.00 later
ladies & mens sizes $12.50
Steel Edges attached to skis $6.50
Season Guarantee Friday, October 31,1947
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGES
SIGNBOARD
MEETINGS
SCM GENERAL MEETING will be
held in Arts 204, Monday at 12:30.
Speaker will be Rev. Bernard Ennals
speaking on "Contemporary Christian Thought."
*        •        •
THE GEOGRAPHY CLUB will meet
in HM 16 at 12:30 p.m. Friday, November 31. Guest speaker will be
Mr. V. Mahadevan of Travancore,
India.
TRADE UNION DISCUSSION Group
of the SPC will hold organization
meeting Thursday in Arts 103 at
12:30. All interested students and
former Trade Union members welcome.
+       *       *
THE MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
will present "Tlie Gayne Suit" by
Katchaturiam Irman in the Double
Committee Room in Brock Hall today at 12:30 p.m.
* *       *
SPC WILL PRESENT Dr. George
Davidson, Vancouver psychiatrist,
Friday, 12:30 in Arts 100 speaking
on the first of a series, "Psychology
and Education."
* *       *
"FEELING OF REJECTION," a Psychology film will be shown in the
Auditorium,   Thursday,   October   30,
by  the Psychology  Club.
#      <      *
ARTHUR C. WHITNEY will lecture
on "Christian Science: A Religion
of Answered Prayer" in the Auditorium, Tuesday, November 4 at 12:30.
FOR SALE
1941  NORTON 500 CC. Good  condition. Call Bill 4586 W. 6th (side door).
* * •
1934 BUICK SEDAN. Good condition.
Mechanical inspection invited, $875
cash.  Phone BA 6872R.
•       *       *
FOR SALE: Miscellaneous drafting
equipment. Including board, instruments and scale. Phone BA 1974M
after 6 p.m. on Friday night.
Coldwell Speaks
At Student Meet
M. J. Coldwell, CCF. Parliamentary leader, speaking under the auspices of the UBC Socialist Club, will
address an open meeting of students
in the auditorium, at 12:30 p.m, Saturday, November 1,
Mr. Coldwell is a graduate of University College, Exeter, England. He
came to Canada in 1910 and entered
public life as alderman in Regina in
1922. He was elected president of the
Canadian Teachers Federation in 1927.
The English-born Socialist has been
a member of the Canadian House of
Commons since 1935. He took over
the Parliamentary leadership of the
CCF. on the retirement of J. S.
Woodsworth in 1942.
Mr. Coldwell was a member of the
Canadian delegation to the United
Nations Organization at San Francisco in 1945.
WANTED
4 RIDERS FROM NORTH VAN
for 8:30 lectures. Phone North 1058Y.
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOM, twin beds, to two
male students. One block from university   gates.   $12.50  each.   Call  AL.
1508-L.
*       *       *
ROOM FOR RENT—Accomodation for
2 persons in double room with den.
Phone ALma 1873. Mrs. Gustavson,
2976 Blanca.
LOST
PAIR OF FUR MITTS, grey-backed
in   Auditorium,   October  27.    Please
•return to AMS.
* *       *
WILL FINDER OF GREY Watermans
pencil   please   phone   Timmie,   BA
6250. Reward, valued as a gift.
* * *
GREY PLASTIC UMBRELLA with
green  trimming,  in  Brock  Hall  one
week ago.   Return to AMS office.
* « •
WOULD THE FINDER of a black
loose leaf and a MacMillan's Log
Tables please phone BA 6725Y or
W. 390Y.
Alberta President
Attacks Soviet
Edmonton, Oct. 30—(CUP)—In a
direct hard-hitting speech, Dr. Robert
Newton, president of the University
of Alberta, attacked the Communist
partition of the world today, The
occasion of the address was U of A's
annual Fall Convention during which
186 students received degrees.
Speaking on "Education in the
Atomic Era", Dr. Newton stated, "We
are forced to adjust ourselves to living
in two worlds though the machine
age has physically made us one world.
Obviously if we desire peace we must
prove Lenin . . . false and learn to
live side by side. But we can't mix.
The Soviet states clearly that it will
not tolerate within its borders any
opposition to communism, official or
unofficial."
Dr. Newton went on to say that,
"Firmness is the only policy that will
gain respect and have a chance of
succeeding, in seeking an understanding between east and west."
"To adjust our thinking and acting
to the new situation created by the
harnessing of atomic energy three
obvious problems must be met.
"First we must realize that the only
effective defence against the atomic
bomb is peace. Secondly, urbaniza
tion has made depression more
dangerous, more costly and more
difficult to rise from. The third prob
lem has to do with labor and its
right to a living wage and proper
working conditions.
RESEARCH SPEAKER
ADDRESSES  MEET
President of the National Research
Council, Dr. C. J. MacKenzie, will be
speaker at an open meeting of the
Vancouver Institute In the new University of B.C. Physics building, Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
The address will be presented fol-
lowihg a two-day symposium on
physics being held at the university
following the official opening of the
building Wednesday.
Contralto Gives
Concert Today
Florence Coardy, nationally known
concert contralto will give a concert
at 12:30 p.m. today in the auditorium.
Miss Coardy has been a prominent
figure in the musical circles of America for many years. She began her
singing career at the age of sixteen
and her versatile contralto voice has
placed her in the highest esteem of
critic and layman alike.
During the war Miss Coardy served
with the Special Service Branch of
the Army Service forces and while
with that organization directed morale programs, sang, and was co-author
and producer of the musical comedy
"As You Were."
Miss Coardy's program will include
a variety of classics, folk songs, and i
unpublished  works  of some  prominent  modern   American   composers.
The concert is a free pass feature
sponsored by the Special Events
Committee.
Speakers- Class
Hears Coghill
In an address to the junior speakers'
class of the Parliamentary Forum on
Tuesday, Miss Joy Coghill emphasized j
tlie  importance  to   the  individual  of
being able to speak fluently in public.
She indicated the anomaly existing
in university training whereby years
are spent learning a profession and
the speaking element necessary to
success is neglected.
The speakers' class meets in Arts
204 on Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m. and
provides an opportunity for beginners
to learn public speaking in an informal atmosphere.
PUB MEET
All reporters arc cordially commanded to attend an important
meeting in the Publications office
at 3:30 p.m. today.
UBC Grad Relates Latin
American Experiences
By PAT HENDERSON
Prominent among the extra-curricular activities of Latin-
American students are assassinations and revolutions, according
to a University of B.C. graduate in geology who worked for
some years as a mining geologist in Bolivia.
Alistair Drysdale graduated in 1941 ^
and left Vancouver for Bolivia in the
fall of 1943. He was engaged by Siglo
Veinte (20th Century) mine at Llal-
lagua, Bolivia, owned by world tin-
king Don  Simone  Patio.
REVOLUTION
Tlie highlight of his experiences in
South America was the popular revolution on July 21, 1946, in which
native workers and university students took part in the overthrow of
the government of President Villar-
roel.
Bolivia, like other Latin American
countries, says Drysdale, suffers continually from perpetual political unrest, due to the characteristically
unstable and explosive nature of the
Latins.
LA PAZ
Tlie revolution he witnessed took
place in La Pa/., the Bolivian capital.
Villarroel's government had granted
special concession^) to native workers.
The workers had responded by forming an all-powerful labor federation,
and threatened to overthrow Villar-
roel and his cabinet, who ruled mainly through the support of the national
army.
On the night of July 22, enraged
workers and revolutionary students
from the University of La Paz stormed the President's Palace and shot
Villarroel, thrusting his body from
a high window to the street below.
Villarroel's lifeless body was hanged,
along with those of four of his cabinet
members, in the plaza in front of the
Palace.
—Ubyssey Photo by Bob Steiner
ALISTAIR DRYSDALE
Phrateres Coed
Tickets On Sale
Dance programs for "Autumn Nocturne", the Phrateres formal Coed to
be held November 4 in Brock Hall,
go on sale at the Phrateres board
today at 11:30 a.m.
Members are required to present
their membership cards to obtain
tickets, according to Phrateres* executives.
Arrangements for the dance are in
charge of Marion Dow. Nonie McGregor, Margaret Scott, and Betty
Lowes are assisting.
Scholarships
Announced
Scholarships valued from $500 to
\ $1,200 for scientific research in a
number of fields are available
through the Ontario Research Commission, the University of B.C. Committee on scholarships and awards
has announced.
The scholarships are designed to
enable students who have shown evidence of capacity for original research to continue scientific study
with a view to advancing it or applying it to Canadian industry.
They arc open to men and women,
not more than 30 years old on March
31 of year of application, except war
veterans, and will be awarded on
merits of evidence submitted to the
commission. Applicants must be graduates of a university or college in
which special attention is given to
scientific study, or with equivalent
training from a properly qualified
and  equipped  institution.
Applicants must be British subjects
resident in Canada. Qualifying departments of science include: Agriculture, Biology, Bio-Chemistry,
Chemistry, Engineering, Forestry,
Geography, Geology, Mathematics,
Metallurgy, Minerology and Physics.
Othr.*} departments may also be
approved.
Application for scholarships must
be made to the Ontario Research
Commission, enclosing a recommendation from the heads of the scientific
departments under which the candidate has studied, not later than February 1 of each year.
Further information can be obtained from Professor Walter Gage.
MISLAID(?)
Will the girls wh have taken batons
from the Mamooks Room In the
Brock south basement please return
them as the batons are urgently
needed for the Homecoming Day display.
<  ~
\pwmL
Fashion favorite
of the week ..
by MAXINE
Sing a song of taffeta,
Pretty as can be,
Each and every co-ed's
Need for varsity.
Comely as our model —
Entrancing MARION BRUCE.
Rustling black or cinnamon
Suits "Homecoming" use.
(Fashion Floor - $16.95)
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED nuw
■* JiAC ®m
UBC Takes
Ice
In Opener
Student hockey enthusiasts
were treated to a smooth puck •
chasing exhibition Wednesdas
evening, when UBC's re-vamped hockey squad walked all
over a high-rated Vancouver
Indians in the opening game of
the 1947-48 season.
Paced by Haas Young and Wags
Wagner, Coach Frederickson's icemen lived up to their pre-season fanfare by trouching the hard fighting
Indians 6-3.
The opening period was a little
sticky for the campus-men, as Indians fired in two markers while
UBC's Reid made the score 2-1.
Hugh Berry tied it up in the second
period and Haas Young put the Birds
ahead for the first time. Indians came
right back and tied up the score at the
end of the period.
It took almost half of the third
period for the students to get rolling,
but Bob Saunders finally hit the nets
for the winning score and Wags Wagner paired up with Walt Wilde and
Mel Hughes for two goals making
the final tally 6-3.
m,
,v   M<to..*C xt&bn
;>»i-;<*^;  h^v&u,*     2j
r* !*■'_]■■  )i
*****
FOOTBALL HOCKEY—That's what Shaughnessy Military paraplegics call their own version
of wheelchair sport. They'll be in action tomorrow night at the Gym.
PAGE 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31, 1947
Lord to Miss
Grid Crucial
UBC's oft-crippled Thunderbirds were dealt another paralyzing blow yesterday when
X-rays revealed that frosh fullback sensation, Don Lord, has
two fractured ribs.
Lord is 4h« third key man ewhow
not be In action in tomorrow's Homecoming gridfest. Joe Fairleigh and
George Sainas, injured earlier, will
also be absent when the win-hungry
Thunderbirds take to the field against
Lewis and Clark Pioneers.
One bright spot, however, is the
fact that Bill Sainas, first string end
who has been benched for two games
with a leg injury, is again in shape
and will play tomorrow.
Bob Murphy will be back in the
fullback slot after a week at tackle
as a result of Lord's injury, with Al
Lamb and Herb Capozzi starring as
tackles.
Lewis and Clark, travelling for the
first time in PNC American football
company, are just a few'Sfn^U pre-
cjentage points above tjhe cellar-
dwelling 'Birds in conference standings. Both clubs are winless to date
this year and go into the fray rated
as equals.
The Thunderbirds wfll have art
added incentive to win tomorrow,
however, for upwards of 4000 Homecoming spectators wijl be on hand
to cheer the Kabatmen to victory.
Lewis and Clark competed as an
independent club last year, picking
up three wins, three losses and one
draw.
Main Pioneer scoring threat is halfback Harold Ellmers who last year
rolled up 36 points via the touchdown
for the Orange and Black.
Thunderbirds, Grads Clash In
4HemeaHMrK) Hoop Contest
LAURIE DYER, Acting Sports Editor
EDITOR THIS ISSUE: Hal Murphy
REPORTERS: Jack Melville, Bruce Saunders, Sheila McAwley
Basketball will be getting its share of the Sportl
gala card scheduled for the Homecoming crowd onj
tomorrow* The contest will mark the first perfc
new 'Bird sagad^but^ardly a fijst showing fog
will be Hie of^osit!|n/      , *  ^X^-—i.—#i
ght in the
campus
ie of the
Jrads who
BAJUS, ESPLIN IN
FINAL ROUND OF
GOLF TOURNEY
Doug Bajus, six-foot five-inch Varsity team golf star and Sophomore
Bob Esplin will meet In the 36-holc
final of the UBC match play golf
championship Saturday at the University golf course.
Bajus, one of the best amateurs
in the province who competed In the
U. S. Amateur championships at
Pebble Beach this summer, is the
favorite because of his tournament
experience. Esplin, however, will be
no walkover, as he has played tlie
hottest golf of the tournament so far.
Tee-off time of the morning round
will be at 10 a.m.
ravel
To North Shore
Varsity Ruggermen leave the city tomorrow and journey
across Lions Gate Bridge to the home of the North Shore All-
Blacks for the fifth game of the Miller Cup Series. Having
trounced every other fifteen in the Rugger league the Blue
and Gold are expecting an easy game against the cellar dwelling
All-Blacks.
tHBC, brother squad ot the chamo-
ion Varsity ■ fifteen, will be fighting
hard to keep out of the cellar when
it tackles South Burnaby in the other
game of the weekend. Currently trailing the Burnaby lads, Al Leithe-
waite's campus-men are prepping for
what may be their first victory. Two
draws and two losses give them their
present position one step out of the
basement.
IMPORTANT GAME
First McKechnie cup feature will
be played November 11, when an all-
star Thunderbird rugger team will
tackle Vancouver All-stars at Brockton Oval. A return* to the old system
of playing the four McKechnie games
on holidays through the year has
been decided on this season.
Other games of the series will be
played on Boxing day and in the
Spring. Thunderbirds will make the
annual invasion trip against Victoria
Crimson Tide about the end of February if all goes well with present
plans.
SOCCER GAMES SAT.
Varsity, tied for second place with
North Burnaby, meets the league-
leading South Hill squad at East
Memorial Park Saturday.
UBC, minus star centre forward
Wiggens, who is playing goal for the
Thunderbird hockey artists, will meet
a rough but weak Girodis team at
North Templeton Park. Game time
in both cases is 3:00 p.m.
TYPEWRITING
Essays,   Theses,   Manuscripts,   e*.c.
Rates Moderate
MRS. A. O. ROBINSON
4180 West 11th Ave.      ALma 0915R
EXPORT
CANADA   S   FINtST
CIGARETTE
The youniw 'Birdmen will.be depending on their speed and practice
to outrun the wily Grads, but with all
the experience that the oldsters have
behind them, a great game is predicted.
STARTERS
Although it is not definite, the
starting lineup for the student squad
will probably see Bob Haas starting
in the pivot spot, Pat McGeer and
Harry Kermocte at forward, and Nev
Munro and Bob Scarr in the guard
positions,
The half-time program will provide something new for basketball
fans. For the first time in the game's
history, the public will see a game of
"wheel chair football" when a team
of paraplegics from Shaughnessy Military Hospital plays a quintet of
UBC's physical training instructors.
RECEIPTS SPLIT
Gate reecipts from the contest will
be split between the Canadian Paraplegic Association and the UBC War
Memorial Gymnasium Fund. All tickets will cost 50 cents and will be
available at the gate.
Game time is 8:00 pm.
STARTING LINEUPS
THUNDERBIRDS
24
Gray
LE
Baisch
33
Capozzi
LT
Nemyre
18
Hogarth
LG
Sweet
39
Joplin
C
Beima
17
Pearson
RG
Holmes
25
Lamb
RT
Stender
58
Chisholm
RE
Blair
13
Brewer
Q
Todd
21
Mark
RH
Bell
38
Reid
LH
Ellmers
31
Murphy
F
Husband
Coach, Greg Kabat
LEWIS AND CLARK
18
27
20
25
13
22
19
15
26
1
16
Joe Huston, Coach
Radsoc, Amateurs
Air Trade Meet
UBC students will be able to heai-
a running resume of the Intermural
cross-country when the event is
staged next Wednesday. TO^llSdsoC
in conjunction with the University
Amateur Radio Society has arrahged
to follow the race with the1 use of
walkie-talkies, and the commentary
will be broadcast tru-oMjh loud*
speakers set up in the swptirn.
MAMOOKS HELP
Mamooks are also co|gfM$ting in
this under-taking by eifcfcg a sign
in front of the stadiiun'Siihloh, ^ill
bear the route and an|pp|||bt«htinformation   concerning>*^ie*.»|(^C|6.   '
Four main broadcast pofcts e^have,
been selected. They Aire: $«st W»\\
at University Boulevard; $£ain Mall
at cutoff to Marine Drive; West-
brook at University Boulevard; and
Union College at Chancellor Boulevard.
All parties concerned in this venture should be warmly congratulated.
This is the first time such an attempt
has been made, and it should prove
highly successful.
MEN'S BIG BLOCK
There will be a meeting of the Men's
Big Block Club at 12:30 Friday October 31 in the Stage Room, Brock
South. t
MEN'S SWIM CLASSES
For the duration of the street car
tie up all Men's Swim classes will be
held at 2M at the Crystal Pool.'
INTRAMURAL SCHEDULE
VOLLEYBALL
MONDAY .NOVEMBER 3-
12:30 pm—JCappa Sigma vs. Delta Upsilon A
Phi Delta Theta A vs. Alpha Delta Phi
Psi Upsilon vs. Zeta Beta Tau
TUESDAY,  NOVEMBER 4-
12:30 pm—Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Phi Kappa Pi A
Pharmacy vs. Kats
Agriculture vs. Legion
WEDNESDAY.  NOVEMBER  5—
No games due to cross-country
THURSDAY.  NOVEMBER fi—
12:30 pm—Termites   vs,   Jokers
Sciencemen vs. Phys. Ed, C
Mad Hatters  vs.  Pre-Med.
FRIDAY.  NOVEMBER 7-
12:30 pm—Brixits vs. Delta Upsilon C
Norvans vs. Beta Chi
Phys. Ed   D vs. Beta Theta Pi B
Campus Corner
AT THE GABLES
Opening Sat Nov. 1 and Forever
AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON
FOW IpATURING:
GENUINE )>ome-$tyle food ot campus prices.
FREE dancing noon to midnight (except Sunday) in a gay,
;ff HEM I AN atmosphere.
THE CORNERS" program: By students FOR students
n
Don't Believe It?
Try it once-YOU'LL BE SOLD FOREVER !
HOCKEY
Practice!*'lire   being    held    every
Wednesdj&y   at 3:30 for enthus|i«te'''Of
Men's dta'fe Hockey.   Scene dj^jtiirk-
outs at parent is the field behiruf'tfte*
Brock.
STATE
Starts Sunday Midnite
November 2pd
— 3 DAYS ONLY —
SOMETHING  TO   Sfff —
lUilU'S naST  Alia ••   F(4!U«I
AUTKINO
A   Breath   Taking   Pageant    ol'
the   16   Soviet   Republics.
Ask for it either ivay . . . both
COCA   COLA   LTD.   -   VAN. trade-marks mean the same thin

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