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The Ubyssey Jan 8, 1925

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 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Vol
ume
VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, JANUARY 8th, 1925
No. 10
FIRST SOCCER
VICTORIA
JttE
Pigskin Regatta Splashily
Contested
The Varsity first soccer team tattled and paddled with the far-famed
Victoria Wests to a two-all draw at
RoyaT-SlTilefic" Park, at the Capital
City, last Saturday. At least to be
more correct, the teams played on
that part of the Royal Athletic Park
that was above water. It was a hard
fought game, as the score indicates,
and the collegians had an edge on the
play until the Wests made a great
come-back at the end and evened up
the count after the Blue and Gold held
a two-goal lead.
Play started briskly in the first
stanza, and Emery jumped on his gondola and centered to Jackson, who
was fortunate enough to be on an
island at that time, and the Varsity
eaptain gave Shandley no chance to
save when he crashed the ball into
the rigging before the Victoria custodian had made up his mind which
was the best way to dive.
Eb. Crute decided to be a landlubber
and did not take the part in the soccer encounter a la water polo. Tommy Wilkinson played at full back.
He played a whale of a game at all
stages, and he certainly got the Wests'
Jonah, but as in Bible he gave them
(Continued on Page 2)
Contest Arranged
oWith Saskatchewan
Try-outs To Be Held Soon—
Subject of Vital Interest
Although it is hardly possible to
equal the events of last term those
active in debating circles are busy arranging oratorical contests for the
near future. The first of these will
probably be the debate with the representatives of the" University of Saskatchewan. The subject is timely and
interesting:—"Resolved that this meeting approves the Protocol of the
League of Nations as a practical step
towards the establishment of permanent peace." The U. B. C. students
will uphold the negative side in the
controversy.
Material for the debate will be
found in the articles of current magazines. Speeches in the tryout will be
limited to five minutes, and three
men will be chosen. Those wishing
to compete will hand in their names
to the Debates Manager, James Craig.
Efforts are also being made to arrange an encounter with the Oregon
State Agriculture College, in which
the feminine members of the University will do battle. It will be a dual
debate, which means that a team of
fair participants must journey from
each College. There is nothing in the
way of definite details as yet, but
should arrangements be made, it is
very likely that the subject chosen
will deal with the Japanese Immigration Laws. This would be appropriate, since both countries are vitally interested in this problem.
Campaign For
vJL S. R. Planned
Tag Day Next Wednesday—
Contributions Requested
Wednesday, January 14, will be tag-
day for E. S. R.—European Student
Relief. "
""Since 1920 over $2,000,000 has been
raised by the students of 36 nations
and applied to the relief of students
in 19 counties of Central Europe,
where the destitution caused by the
war was g -eldest.
Although conditions in Europe have
greatly improved, poverty and unemployment still prevail, and, particularly among the intellectual classes and
university students does actual physical suffering persist. Emergency relief is still an urgent need among the
refugee student population of Central
Europe, the more so because some of
the governments are now withdrawing
the financial aid that they have been
granting to refugees. Books and
equipment are scarce, and food and
clothing are needed. Nothing els 3
can arrest the terrible plague of disease—the tragic aftermath of war and
hardships. It is in Russia that the
need is most appalling One out of
every five Russian students is suffering from anaemia, tuberculosis, or
heart disease, for lack of nourishing
food.
The organization of the European
Student Relief by the General Committee of the World's Student Christian Federation has not only gone far
to meet the material needs of the
students of Europe, through constructive self-help schemes, but it has
created a feeling of international goodwill among students that will not be
without result. It has created a Student League of Nations.
The budget set this year is $175,000.
Canada's share, through the Student
Friendship Fund, is $5,000. How imich
will the students of U. B. C. send?
Contributions from students, faculty and. friends will be received next
week by Miss H. Milne, Agric. '27, or
by any member of the S. C. M. executive. At least let everyone buy a tag
on Wednesday.
Spring Play
Now Chosen
J^Ybu and 1" an Entertaining
.     Comedy is Selected
Work on the Spring Play is actually
under way, the first try-outs being
held on Wednesday afternoon. An enlarged body of judges, numbering
eight people, passed upon the merits
of the forty-five candidates for the
seven roles. The Players' Club is singularly fortunate in securing the rights
not available last year to the Harvard
prize play, "You and I." It ran over
six months in the Belmont Theatre,
New York, and also played on the
road all last season in a few of the
larger eastern cities. Up till now it
has not been played in Canada, save
in Toronto, so that the Players' Club
has the distinction of giving the firdt
western performance. It may be of
interest to students of the University
to know that, once a year, the students in Professor Baker's famous
play-writing course, English 47, at
Harvard, are permitted to enter a contest conducted by a New York theatre manager for the best full evening play. Mr. Philip Barry, the author
of "You and I," has written the most
successful play submitted during the
ten years of the competition- It is a
delightfully human comedy, written in
a wholesome and refreshing way, and
full of whimsical and smart dialogue.
The verdict of all who have read it,
both staff and students, is that it is a
very attractive piece of work.
NOTICE!
The Varsity Intermediate "A"
Basketball team now stands second in
their city league and have an excellent chance of winning in their division. They are now fresh after their
win over the Falcons at Victoria and
are ready to meet the Normal Intermediates on Saturday, 10th, at 7 p.m.
A good crowd should turn out and
encourage the boys. The team this
year consists of—R. Robinson,, B.
Thomson, J. Legg, N. MacDonald, H.
King, O. Aune and F. B. Taylor.
VARSITY WINS
ISLANDGAMES
Rugby, Rowing and Basketball
Captured by U. B. C.
Varsity's Sea Hawks took Victoria
by storm at the close of the Christmas holidays, and returned from the
Island City laden with athletic honors. The ruggers added another victory to their credit in the McKechnie
Cup race, and the rowers-carried off
supreme honors in their contests. The
soccer men tied the Victoria Wests,
the basketballers took the majority of
the games, the Badminton stars defeated Victoria and were defeated by
Duncan, the hockey teams and swimmers lost, and the poker games broke
almost even, according to the budgets
being made by the men.
These contests were the high lights
of the trip when the collegians, 170
strong, landed in front of the Parliament Buildings to tell the island
that Varsity had some fine athlets.
There were other small forays and
skirmishes where the individuals of
the attacking forces made little contests of their own. Almost every one
of the Varsity men took part in these
heartbreaking  episodes.
When Brit Brock and Pug Greggor
led the Varsity rugby team into the
sea of mud at the Willows, the men
were well groomed with nice new
sweaters, stockings and shorts. After
rolling for more than an hour in their
beauty clay, the teams decided that
they had had enough of Victoria's
"more mud and less heat," and returned to the hotel, where they warmed up with hot coffee or other beverages, according to taste. The mud
on the rugby field was not more than
a foot deep at any spot and not less
than two inches in any other. There
were several lakes on the field, into
which the men dived frequently to
wash the "goo" from their sweaters.
It was a pretty contest.  —
George Ledingham and one of his
opponents of the soccer field had an
unique experience when they both
kicked at the ball at once. The pigskin became buried in the mud and
each thought the other had it and ran
off to follow up the play. But neither
had secured the ball, so they returned to look for it. They got a great
laugh from the sidelines when they
started kicking each little bump on
their part of the field to find the ball.
This sounds like a fish story, but it
is a fact. The soccerites say that the
clay has not improved their looks.
The grass hockey girls had their
experience with mud also, and returned from their contest of digging clams
covered with the soil of the hockey
field.
Besides getting a great thrill from
seeing their friends and foes rolling
in the muddy lakes of Victoria, the
rooters gave plenty of pep to the
whole trip with their new songs and
the college yells- The Varsity Song
Sheet made its first appearance on
the Victoria trip, and if it continues
in popularity the University will have
to establish printing departments to
take care of the demands for the
songs. There are several new ones
which have plenty of life. Most cf
the voyagers were decidedly happy
(Continued on Page 2)
(WL THE   UBYSSEY
January 8th, 1925
The Discomfort
of Tired Feet
becomes a thing of the past when
you get fitted with a pair of
Dr. Locke's
Cushion Sole Boot.
This boot has established an enviable reputation for wear, service,
and comfort. Made in brown or
black kid, or black calf, on a
broad, easy-fiiting round-toe last,
with light or medium weig'ht soles
and  rubber heels. Dr.   Locke's
thick    wrinkleless    cushion    inner
soles in every pair.
All sizes at	
Black kid only, with leather lining
and full double soles.
Per pair	
$6.85
leather lining
$7.85
je>
David Spencer
Limited
LUNCH      TEA      SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nora Scotia
^Victdria Soccer Game
j /(Continued from Page 1)
back their Jonah in the last half, and
tl>ey tied the count. Buckley got a
kick in the ankle and travelled steerage lor the rest of the trip. Roy King
was called upon to make some brilliant saves just before the half-time
.vhistle went.
Upon resumption of play "Varsity
pressed and splashed continuously,
and Auchinvale sent in a hot shot
that the Wests' net minder could not
save with his overhand crawl. Had
he resorted to the breast stroke he
would   have   been   successful.
With only twenty minutes to go,
and Varsity exhausted by their efforts
and no land in sight, the Capital City
men came up for air and scored twice
in rapid succession, through Wadding-
ton and Muir. Referee Strokes received much applause from the stands,
especially when he bravely ran out
on the diving board to look for the
ball which was lost. Emery had had
it last, but his gondola had capsized
when he failed to port his helm.
Sparks said it was no place for him
and refused to be put out on the line.
The best man on the Victoria Wests
was Noah; he seemed to be in his element and was head and shoulders
above the others at all stages- Varsity almost won the odd count in the
dying moments of the game, when
Rex Cameron sent in a scorcher and
the Wests' net minder had no sails
up, but the effort went a little too far
to the starboard, however, and just
grazed the masthead. Phillips proved
to be a shock at center half back.
£
Victoria Trip
jE Continued from Page 1)
when they found that "In those dear
old college days" had been left out.
The Empress Hotel dance was the
feature social event, although the. basketball dance Friday was well attended. Several of the students arranged
small banquets to celebrate their victories, but the majority of the rooters
did their celebrating on the streets in
an effort to learn why the birds go
to Victoria.
"Have any of your childhood ambitions been realized?"
"Yes, when my mother used to cut
my hair .1 always wished I hadn't
any."
Come and watch Varsity play St.
Andrews at Athletic Park, 2.30 Saturday-
Brushed Wool
Coat Sweaters
The coat of real snap. Pure selected wool, in
a wide range of plain colors, heather or lovat
mixtures as well as the extremely popular check
fronts.    All sizes and a range of styles priced
atf
rom as
littl
e as
$3.50 to $8.50
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
45-47-49  HASTINGS  STREET,  EAST
Fir^t Rugby Wins
From Victoria Rep.
The first rugby team took a firmer
grip on the cup last Saturday, when
they swam through a sea of mud and
water for a 3—0 win over Victoria
Rep. The game was fought to a finish
on both sides, although the state of
the field prevented any back field
play worthy of the name. With a
muddy field Varsity expected to have
the edge on the game by using their
heavy scrum, but Victoria sprang a
surprise by showing a distinct edge in
this direction. Several times during
the game they broke away, and on
one occasion crossed the Varsity line
twice in a few minutes. Two-bit
kicks relieved each time. But only
the heavy going prevented the Varsity
men from being scored on.
The game started with a rush, and
for almost the whole first half the two
teams struggled around center. Deep
mud and water prevented any brilliant play, and many of the warriors
had their eyes filled with mud, slowing them up considerably. This half
was featured by brilliant kicking on
the part of the rival fullbacks, Boss
Johnson and Domoney. The second
half was played at full speed all the
way, play changing from end to end
with bewildering speed. Warren used
his speed well on several occasions by
running down Victoria men, before
they could clear after long Varsity
kicks. About fifteen minutes from the
end, Boss Johnson made his only mis-
kick after Warren had rushed him.
Lange snatched up the ball and although well tackled, just managed to
place it over the line. The game ended with Victoria pressing hard.
IA/BA
VICTORIA/BASKETBALL
Baskettall lovers got an eye-full in
Victoria when they saw some of the
best basketball games dished up since
the Victoria trips began. In the two
men's games last Friday night the
Varsity Senior "A" triumphed over
the First—PresbytertHns by a 35—13
count. Arkley was the star of the
game and he seemed to have his
shooting eye functioning at all times
as he rained in the baskets from all
angles.
There once was a sceptical Creole,
Who  doubted  the  Biblical  Sheol;
Coming home in the dark,
He was won't to remark,
"Now where'n the H— is the key'ole?"
There was a young fellow of Lympne,
Who said of his mean Uncle Jymne,
"When I have to borrow,
I find to my sorrow
I can't get a penny from hympne."
A Puritan maid of Madrid
Had made up her mind as a hid
That when she'd the chance
She'd go to a dance
To shock the old man.   And she did.
There is an old man in Berlin
Whose face is as dirty as sin,
And all that he hath
He would give for a bath,
But he doesn't know how to begin.
There    once    was    a    maiden    named
Cholmondeley,
A girl undeniably colmondeley,
But thought was a strain
Too much for her brain,
So she gazed at the universe dolmon-
deley.
I tried my best to make a pie:
I'm not much of a baker.
Ma wasn't home, and that was why
I tried my best to make a pie.
The neighbours came to watch me die,
And  said,  "What  undertaker?"
[ tried my best to make a pie:
I'm not much of a baker.
(G. B. R.)
Well Used!
' I 'HIS space is well used
*    if it conveys our very
best wishes for a Happy and
PROGRESSIVE   NEW
YEAR to all who read and
enjoy the "Ubyssey."
VWTE thank you for your
" patronage during
1924. We shall endeavor
to earn still greater approval during 1925.
GEHRKE'S ^
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS.
SOCIAL AND OFFICE
STATIONERS
65 I  SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GRANTHAAfS
IRealFruitJuiceI
party punch
PURE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C. GRANTHAM & CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue Weat
VANCOUVER. B.C.
B.C. Public Stenographers
  FOR 	
ACCURACY AND INTELLIGENT WORK
115 Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Phone, Sey. 2696 602 Hastings St., W.
Midway ^
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EYERSHARP PENCILS     '
KODAKS
SONG PRACTICE
Come unto the Auditorium at noon
all ye that labor and are heavy laden!
Join in the first general song practice of the season. Bert Smith, the
warbler-in-chief, will be there with
all last year's favorite Varsity songs
and he may introduce some new pieces
which came to his notice during the
holidays. If you have any real live
songs you wish tried out bring them
along. Come and sing with the rest
of the fellers in the Auditorium, Friday noon. January 8th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
Overcoat Sale !
We are cleaning up the balance of our
Overcoats at practically manufacturers' cost. This is an opportunity
you get once a year.    Don't miss it!
TURPIN BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST
COLLEGE INN
752 ROBSON ST.
Just West of Granville.
COSY AND SELECT
Club Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners
50c. up
Also, A la Carte.
PARTIES SPECIALLY CATERED
FOR.
8 a.m. to midnight.   Open on Sundays
Phone, Sey. 8096
DRINK—
"SQUEEZE"
Grape, Lemon,
Lime and Orange
X
Bottled by
THORPES'
«.*
THE LESTER
Dancing Academy
SATURDAY   EVENING   SOCIAL
DANCE (by Invitation)
Instruction by Appointment
LESTER COURT
Seymour J 689
•*•••••••••••••-•-••••*••«•> »«***0<
'-•-•-•-•••••••-•-•-•-•^
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
WE STOCK
Varsity and Science
Pennants
SWEATERS made to order in
any color or design, at specially
low prices to students.
SKATES        SKATING BOOTS
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653      718 ROBSON ST.
*..-..
*....,
SPORT NEWS
,...$,
CRUCIAL SOCCER
\ GAME SATURDAY
The soccer tit-bit for the coming
Saturday appears to be the clash between Varsity and St. Andrews at
Athletic Park at 2:30.
St. Andrews have always had a
great football team. They are renowned for their neat passing game,
the forward line usually working with
the nicety of a smoothly running
machine. Their shooting, moreover,
is deadly and for this Roy King will
be answerable on Saturday. The
halves are known to distribute the
play properly while the fullbacks are
heavy kickers and uncanny on defence.
The Varsity first team, its members
fresh from their mud bath at Victoria where they achieved the creditable distinction of tying the Victoria
Wests, are ready to play their best
game. They will be greatly weakened by the loss of their centre forward for whom mass has already been
said, dirges sung, and panegyrics written by those of his brother clergy who
officiate daily in the common room
and halls. Huestis or Wilkinson will
probably play in the pivot position
with Jackson and Emery on the left,
Butler and Cameron on the right.
The defense is intact.
Varsity is anxious to advance from
fourth place at the expense of the
Saints who now occupy second. They
admit the difficulty of their task but
point to their other great victories
achieved through superior speed and
fighting spirit. The great criticism of
the team offered around town is their
inability to shoot but the players are
trying hard to become more proficient in this respect. It is of coarse
needless to point out that all students
are enjoined to refrain from attending, as pink tea will not be served.
HERE AND THERE IN
SPORT
Varsity soccer men are up against
one of the toughest obstacles that they
have met with so far when they lock
horns with the fast stepping Saint Andrews eleven at Athletic Park next
Saturday. The Saints are a formidable aggregation near the top of the
league standing and, Varsity is minus
the services of their star center forward who left at Christmas. The team
needs lots of support, come out and
do your stuff.
 O	
Everyone who went to Victoria this
year claims that it was the best yet
and certainly the teams did well. Although the rugby and soccer fields
were unplayable, the close> scores at
the McKechnie Cup and soccer encounters kept up the interest. Basketball took a very prominent place in
the program of sports and it is gratifying to see the great headway made
in the last two or three years in this
splendid indoor pastime at Varsity.
-O-
The Freshmen rugby team has
established an altogether extraordinary record this term, they have not
lost a game in their league, and ttill
more wonderful, they are all here
after the Christmas rush. They have
a crucial game next Saturday when
they meet their old rivals the ex-King
George, and a good turn-out of rooters
is looked for by the members of the
squad, and they are certainly worthy
of support.
SPORT EDITORIAL
Amongst all the Christmas graduates the departure of the star athletes
is most talked of, because they are
better known and because they are
athletes. The unfortunate result is
that athletics gets a black eye. Harry
goes home and says to his Dad, "Well
Dad, Smith and Jones of the McKechnie Cup fifteen and Brown of the first
soccer eleven got their marching orders." His dad says, "Well that's too
bad, but let that be a lesson to you,
don't take part in athletics at college."
And Willie, Harry's younger brother,
who is a potential star at rugby or
soccer at high school, is warned by
anxious parents not to be an athlete
at U. B. C. when he comes here.
Taking part in athletics is not the
reason for failure to make the grade
at Christmas. It might be one of
many reasons certainly, but most of
our best athletes have a good academic standing.
The reason that most of our athletes do not fail in their exams, is
that they have sense enough to deny
themselves the pleasure of taking part
in too many other student activities
as well as sport. Those who play in
several different branches of sport,
belong to umpteen societies and clubs
and try to be a he-man, a shiek and a
good fellow at the same time are almost certain to be a disappointment
to their fond parents, profs and friends
alike at examination time.
If the student is naturally slow in
assimilating knowledge then most certainly he would be wiser not to take
part in sports much. But allowing
for a few extenuating circumstances,
such as sickness there is no excuse
for a man or women failing in first
year Arts. And it is unfair to blame
it on the sports that they took part
in. The truth is that either they
didn't work or they are dumb.
There are not too many sports at
Varsity; the trouble is that there are
too few athletes and consequently
they get called on to do too much,
while the majority dont take any part
at all in a recreation that would give
themselves bodily health and physique
as well as reflecting credit on their
Alma Mater and themselves.
:£/H0<
ICE-HOCKEY
The Son^s of Canada fast stepping
hockey team trimmed the Varsity
puckchasers by a five to nothing count.
The play was not nearly so one sided
as the score would indicate however,
the Collegians being well up on the
play at all stages; but the brilliant
goal-tending of Alex Straith of the
Victoria squad was responsible for
their failure to tally. Time after lime
the students' forwards tested Straith
with difficult shots from all angles but
the Victoria star was equal to all occasions. Glazen and Temple sagged
the hemp for the Capitals in the first
stanza.
In the second frame Fitzsimn.ons
and Smith scored after some brilliant
combined efforts. Both Demidoff and
Selman were injured during the
fracus but gamely continued to play.
Hewer put the cap on the scoring in
the last canto when he beat McKechnie
with a hard shot from a difficult angle
and the score ended with the Son's
enjoying a five goal lead.
Mrs. Noah—"Noah, dear, what can
be the matter with that camel?"
Noah—"I'll bet he has both fleas on
him."
\
:/
All of our
Tricotine
and Poiret
Twill
Dresses
are now
On Sale at
January
Clearance
Prices
Third Floor.
-i^
LIMITED
575 Granville St.
VTTTTTTV*H<VV'lt'rv4l<i
POLLIN'Pin
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
<JM$H$H^MJ«"^t-^l tfr tfr »fr I$H$M$HJ
LISLE
FRASER
HAS
IT
AT THE
LOWEST
PRICE!
The widest range
of Sporting Goods
assembled in the
Province is listed
in our Catalogue.
And—come in and
get one.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1A«A   GRANVILLE
1UZU STREET (/
4	
Slip IhUBBPlJ
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued  every  Thursday  by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural  Subscription,  $2.00 per
Session.
For Advertising  Rates, apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDXTORIAX, STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange  Editor John  Grace
Literary Editor Miss  Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy   Editor     Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden. Francis Stevens, Robert
Wright G. W. Ashworth, James Dunn,
Dave Taylor, T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dim-
mick, Peter  Palmer.
BUSINESS   STAFF
Business  Manager H.  A.  Thompson
Circulation   Manager E.   J.  Eades
Business Assistants....!!.  G.  McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F.  McCulloch
EDITOR   FOR   THE   WEEK
Sadie  Boyles	
CHRISTAflAs GRADSn
jU In past years ohe of_ the-ifibst pain-
0 ful features of University life at this
period of the year has been the large
number of Christrras graduates, chiefly
recruited from the first year's of Arts
and Applied Science. Fewer students
have been dismissed this year than
ever before. It is possible that
the examinations may have been
easier, but the admission of this by
the students would not be forthcoming in any case, such an admission
being considered the rankest heresy
by most of us who conscientiously
iraintain that exams are always difficult and usually unfair.
The real reason for the satisfactory
results of these Christmas examinations is the fact that the students as
a whole studied last fall as they never
studied before. The seating space, or
lack of it, in the library, is as good a
criterion as can be found, and from
the beginning of the term the reading
room was crowded every day. Students who come here merely to play
must have found the studious atmosphere predominant last fall very discouraging.
The students have taken studies
seriously for one term, and the results are plainly evident in a higher
general scholastic standard.
^ RESOLU riONS
New Year's Day is past, and doubtless many excellent resolutions have
been made and broken since then.
Nevertheless, we are sure that it is
never too late to suggest a few more
resolutions that really count, and that
students of the University would do
well to observe. For instance, the
playful Freshmen, and even Sophomores, might pledge themselves to a-jt
somewhat more circumspectly in the
halls, when they know that some lonir-
suffering instructor is attempting to
pound knowledge into the skulls of
some of their brethren. All and sundry might do well to resolve to cast
their old papers, chocolate bar wrappers, etc., into the bins placed about
for that purpose, instead of cluttering
up the buildings and grounds. Gentlemen who insist upon pushing in
crowded halls, might swear off their
rugby practices except on the fields,
provided for such. "Pole-cats" and
spat addicts should recall the solemn
warnings of Messrs. Quigley and Wrig-
ley, and renounce these vices forever.
And finally, those who make it their
business to slam the efforts of others,
whether in athletic or literary linos,
should restrain themselves until they
are certain that they can do better.
But it is useless to wish for a perfect
University world.
THE   UBYSSEY
January 8th, 1925
A3
Vancouver Institute
/Program of Lectures
The following syllabus of lectures
conducted under the auspices of the
Vancouver Institute is a fine programme for the spring season. The
lectures, which are presented regularly every Thursday night at 8.15 p.
m., in the Physics Building, are open
to the general public and attendance
does not impose financial obligation
on anyone interested.
Jan. 15th—Alpine Club. "Mount Garibaldi"   (illustrated)   	
 Rev. A. H. Sovereign, F.R.G.S.
Jan. 22nd—Women's University Club.
"Picturesque   Bavaria"   (illustrated)
 Professor   Isabel   Maclnnes
Jan. 29th—Institute. "Some Famous
Observatories and Their Work" (illustrated)    W.  E.  Harper, M.A.,
F.R.S.C. (Astrophysical Observatory
Feb. 5th—Art, Historical and Scientific Society-    "Athens, the Glory that
was Greece"  (illustrated)	
....Rev.  J.  Williams  Ogden,  F.R.G.S.
Feb.   12th—Institute.      "Forests    and
Water  Supply"   (illustrated)   	
 Professor   H.   R.   Christie
Feb. 19th—Vancouver Musical Council.    "British Music"  (illustrated) ...
 Mrs.   Walter   Coulthard
Feb. 26th—Academy of Sciences. "Life
in  Inland Waters"   (illustrated)	
 W.  A.   Clemens,  Ph.D.
(Biological Station, Departure Bay)
March     5th—Institute.       "The    New
Wordsworth"   	
 Professor  G.  G.   Sedgewick
March 12th—Canadian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy. "The Production  of  Sulphur"   (illustrated)	
 F. W. Guernsey, Esq., M.E.
March  19th—Vancouver  Natural  History Society.    "Plant Diseases"  (illustrated)..Professor Frank Dickson
March  26th—Institute.    "The  History
and Romance of Verse Forms"	
 Professor H.  H. Gowan, D.D.
(Seattle).
April 3rd—Institute.    "Public Opinion
and   Education"   	
 Professor G. M. Weir
V      52-STORY UNIVERSITY
All the departments of higher learning will be fostered in the new 52
storey building now being erected to
house the University of Pittsburg.
No venerable examples of Tudor architecture, such as are being built at
Point Grey, will grace the Pittsburgh
campus. The up-to-date eastern students will inhabit a skyscraper towering 680 feet above the ground, and
fitted with 16 high speed elevators
for 9 o'clock lectures. The building
will cost $10,000,000 and is intended to
accommodate 12,000 students.
HEIFITZ COMING MONDAY
Jascha Heifitz will give one recital
at the Orpheum, Monday, Jan. 12th
at  8.20.
The New York Times says: "You
saw thousands of inspired faces at
the concert yesterday; old men and
women, the years lifted from them
by the power of music; earnest young
students, grateful for a chance to
stand through the afternoon, unconscious of fatigue.
"Whence comes the power displayed by the Russian Jewish child in
infancy, barely three years old? If
'acquired characteristics,' as some
scientists say be not inherited, what
taught that child to handle the violin
at ten years of age, so irarvellously
that old and talented players, hearing
him at a concert in Berlin, said: 'We
might as well go home and break our
violins. That child does now what we
shall never be able to do.' "
Advt.
Come and watch Varsity play St.
Andrews at Athletic Park, 2.30 Saturday.
of
^rtifeij (Etflraniria
Information to Students
FEES
Second Term Fees are now due, the last
day   for  payment being  January   19th,
1925.
After this date an additional fee of $2.00
will be exacted of all students in default.
To avoid congestion students are requested
not to leave payment of fees until the last
day.
Pay your fees at the Fee Wicket from
9:30 a.m. to 1 2:00 noon.
1:15 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturdays : 9:30 a.m to 1 2:00 noon.
BOOK STORE
will be open daily.
F. DALLAS, Bursar. January 8th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
POPULAR
FOOTWEAR
For U. B. C. Students
Men's Brogues,
Black or Brown,
Dancing Oxfords
or Pumps,
Ladies' Brogues
and Sport Oxfords,
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Satin, Patent, Suede,
Gold and Silver,    -
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UP
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UP
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$4.95
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Prices Right
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WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
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We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us be/ore ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
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Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and all Accommodation.
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j    Correspondence     j
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"TJbyssey" does not assume responsibility   for   any   of  the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following   Thursday.
GRADUATE SOCIETY
Vancouver, Jan. 3, 1925.
The Editor,
"Ubyssey".
Dear Sir: —
The organization of several new
clubs this session surely indicates a
very real interest in certain branches
of study at this University, and it
seems regrettable that this active interest should be dropped after graduation. Could not the officers of these
organizations, Letters Club, French
Club, History and Economics Club, etc.
jointly consider the advisability of
forming a central club for their graduates and more especially, for non-
University people similarly interested?
Vancouver is not too well supplied
with such institutions, there being only
the Little Theatre, Shakespeare Club
and Poetry Club, all of which are
restricted to their own particular field.
It seems to me that the University of
British Columbia would clearly prove
its rightful place in the intellectual
life of the city by the establishment
of a central institution for the consideration and discussion of the current trend of ideas in Literature,
Social Science, and Philosophy,
Thanking you for the use of your
column,
Yours truly,
H. B. C.
Stanford Comments
On Chivalry's Decay
TV 	
I Whatever charm one time attached
to the atmosphere of school is somehow disappearing now. Colleges are
too democratic, too much like great
office buildings- One sees other workers every day, and recognizes them,
but one does not speak to them.
And there has passed one custom
that seemed to us a charming and
gentle one, of which last kind there
were ever too few. That is the custom of lifting one's hat to a professor.
In the old days, young men were
taught to tip their hats to professional
men of standing in the same manner
they were told to lift their hats to
women. . Nowadays, young men never
tip their hats to doctors or judges or
bishops or professors. We shall exclude here all mention of how they
greet women.
But it seems to us that with our
growing democracy in everything we
have lost a courtesy, a touch of gentleness that has robbed our actions of
a charm that once they had. One
walks across the campus here and
meets one's professor, and speaks to
him, if one minds and is not too busy
looking at the girl on the other walk.
What it amounts to is that nowadays we do not tave so much respect for learning. Teachers and other
professional men are the living embodiments of the wisdom of the ages.
When we show a respect for them
we respect not only the men but the
learning they represent and carry.
One of the members of the Provincial Legislature, in touring the new
site at Point Grey, was very little interested in the new buildings until he
entered the Science Building; then,
turning to Hon. Mr. Sutherland, he
said: Say, think of all the hay they
can stow in here!"
Flippant Farmers
^    Fix Fine Function
/ ■	
Fostering Furious  Fox-Trotting,
Fussing, Feasting and Fun
Quality and not quantity will be the
watchword at the coming Annual
Aggie Dance to be held at Lester
Court, Wednesday, January 21st. To
ensure that all dancers shall enjoy
themselves to the utmost the ticket
sale will be limited to 175 tickets. As
in past years the tickets will be distributed to Aggie Students first and the
remainder will be sold at the Student's Council Offices, Tuesday noon,
January 13. George Challenger who
is in charge of ticket sales is making
preparations to handle the crowd
which will doubtless be on hand due
to the curtailment in the number of
tickets to be sold and the increasing
popularity of the Aggie Dance. As in
past years the Aggies will specialize
on their genuine home-made, all-
chicken sandwiches and Spud Murphy
who is in charge of refreshments
makes the emphatic declaration that
they will contain more chicken than
ever this year. Kenny Caple is in
charge of decorations and as a result
of his efforts a number of novel lighting and decorating effects will be
presented. In past years it has been
the ambition of the Aggies to put on
the best dance of the year and those
who have attended their Annual affair have noted that no mean success
has attended their efforts. This year
it is the object of the committee in
charge to outdo all previous dances
regardless of cost or labor necessary,
and from the manner in which each
and every Aggie is doing his part,
renewed success is assured. The committee in charge of the Dance is as
follows:—
Convenor—Art Laing.
Refreshments—Spud Murphy, Fred
Newcombe, Dick Asher.
Decorations—Ken. Caple, George
Martin, Bill Gaugh.
Ticket Sales—George Challenger.
Invitations—Helen Milne.
Music—Fred Newcombe.
CarraUV^fkins to Give
Course in Drama
Mr. and Mrs. Carrall Aikins, of the
Little Theatre in" Naramata, will be
in Vancouver during the next few
weeks, and are giving a four weeks'
course in voice, pantomine, and dramatic technique. There will be two
series of classes—one from 4 to 6 in
the afternoon, the other from 8 to 10
in the evening. Anyone who wishes
to take advantage of the opportunity
of instruction from these famous Canadian exponents of the dramatic art,
should see Mr. F. G. C. Wood as soon
as possible.
Come and watch Varsity play St.
Andrews at Athletic Park, 2.30 Saturday-
Table Gramophones
Regular, $13.75
Sale Price, $10.95
This is the best Gramophone
value ever offered in this city.
Well made, nicely finished,
fitted with good motor, and
plays all makes of disc records.
lOOonlyinthe Jan- flHfl Qr
uary Clearance Sale OIUl WW
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver, B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
-OF-
C0MMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
p, __._ t Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
rnoI,e* I Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
Varsity Senior "B"
The Varsity Senior^ "IT took the
short :end"oTa 31—Zb "count when they
met the Falcons. It was a hard fought
game and the Issue was in doubt right
up to the final toot of the whistle;
but the Capital City quintette had a
slight edge on the play and fully deserved their victory.
Yell Leader Brick McLeod kept a
large gallery of fans pepped up with
songs and yells during the intervals.
In the Saturday morning contest,
Varsity Intermediates trimmed the
V-hrtoTtaT College   by   a   35—18   score.
AMBASSADOR  CAFE
610 Seymour Street
  Headquarter* for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and  Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING - - 9:00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m
*fe= THE   UBYSSEY
January 8th, 1925
Loose-Leaf Ring Books
and Refills
Fountain Pens
Drawing Instruments
and
Drawing Materials
Slide Rules
THE
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Co., Ltd.
Stationers, Printers, &c,
550 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE, SEYMOUR 3000
£)
Phone Sey. 4000
FOR A
Phones ; Fair. 77,   Fair. 5660-R
*
j WILLOW HftLL
I 806 17th AVENUE, WEST
j One Block West of Heather Street
1 	
•
• This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
! Private Parties.
f   For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
I Proprietor.
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
3Tunrral Sirrrtoro
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE. FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
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Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
*...
CO-ED ATHLETICS
7
Ht»»»t»|->»«»t..|..tMt.^«»^|..|»>««M>-<«
-•~«..«.«H$»
BASKETBALL
The Women's Basketball Club won
a well-earned victory in the game
against the Victory Clutx^Fidelis, when
the score was 15-12. Both sides fought
hard, and the game proved speedy and
exciting. The team consisted of:
Isabel Russell, Doris Shorney, Flora
Musgrave, Grace Swenciski, Winona
Straight.
On Saturday morning the Senior B
team was not as successful being de-
feated by Victoria-College 23-8. Those
playing on the Varsity team were:
Alda Moffatt, Marjorie Leeming, Mary
Higginbotham, Doris Woods, D. Allen,
E. Patterson.
c/BAI
DMINTON
The Varsity Badminton Club, on the
whole, won the greatest number of
games in the contest with V-icierra-
and Duncan, being victorious in 9 out
of ltf matches. The results of the
ladies' games are as follows:
Ladies Doubles vs. Victoria—V.
Milliner and J. Hallamore defeated
by Misses Campbell and Miller 15-11,
10-15, 15-12. J. Creer and H. Math-
eson defeated by Miss Lawson and
Mrs. Gillespie 15-8, 11-15, 15-11.
Ladies Doubles vs. Duncan—V.
Milliner and J. Hallamore lost to G.
and L. Rice. J. Creer and H. Math-
eson lost to Misses Rice and Wright
15-9, 16-17, 15-9.
-O-
i/SWIMMING CLUB
Training of teams to compete in
the inter-class meet to take place on
Jan. 28, is beginning already. Would-
be competitors should apply to their
athletic representative of their year
for instructions.
Classes are being held as follows:—
Wednesday, 3.30 to 4.30—Lifesav-
ing. All members are urged to take
advantage of this class and gain the
bronze medal and the Award of Merit
o" the Royal Liferaving Society.
Wednesday, 4.30 to 5.30—General
practice and expert coaching in speed
swimming and water polo.
Wednesday, 5.30 to 6.30—Coaching
for beginners. Also diving and plunging.
Friday, 3.30 to 4.30—Lifesaving and
general practice. Athletic representatives bring their class teams for
training.
In spite of the fact that the Women's
Swimming- -Glub was defeated by 9
points this year at Victoria, a good
exhibition of swimming and diving
was given. At the close of the Meet,
the points stood at 41, 32.
The winners of the different events
are as follows:
40 Yards (Free)—
K. Wellburn, Victoria.
M. Wilkinson, Varsity.
D. Jones, Victoria.
R. Barker, Varsity.
40 Yards (Back)—
Mrs. Steele, Victoria.
G.  Wellburn,  Victoria.
F. Gignac, Varsity.
100 Yards (Free) —
G. Wellburn, Victoria.
S. Thrupp, Varsity.
H. Boyce, Victoria.
M. Higginbotham, Varsity.
40 Yards (Breast)—
S. Thrupp, Varsity.
Mrs. Steele, Victoria.
G.  Wellburn,  Victoria.
L. Mowatt, Varsity.
Fancy Diving—
Mrs. Steele, Victoria.
M. Chapman, Varsity.
Mrs. Hibberson, Victoria.
F. Gignac, Varsity.
B
LITERARY CORNER!
^^fVIOLLY.
Molly is a nature's child,
She is young and she is wild,
In  the  summer  time  she  goes
Where   the   huckleberry  grows,
And  with  girlish  fingers  there,
Makes a garland for her hair.
Or upon a ruffled lake,
Where the  water-lilies  shake,
She  will  dip her arm  for  hours,
Plucking white and yellow flowers.
She  will  snatch a butterfly
From a pink, and with a cry
Full  of  sheer  delight,  O  rare,
She will fling it in the air.
Molly is a girl I know,
And  we  two  together go
Through the hidden trails, and we
See  what  others  never, se^.
v/—Eric F.
Victoria Results
Rugby, McKechnie Cup—Varsity 3,
Victoria 0.
Rugby, Intermediate—Freshmen 15,
Victoria College 0.
Soccer—Varsity 2, Victoria Wests 2.
Basketball—Varsity Senior Girls 15,
Fidelis 12; Victoria College Ladies
19, Varsity 9; Varsity Senior A 35,
First Presbyterians 13; Falcons, Victoria, 31, Varsity Senior B 26; Varsity Intermediates 35, Victoria College 18.
Rowing — Varsity won both races
from J. B. A. A.
Ice- Hockey—Sons of Canada 5, Varsity 0.
Grass Hockey—Victoria Ladies 6,
Varsity 0.
Badminton—Varsity won 6 matches,
Victoria  won  2.
Swimming—Victoria 87 points Varsity 58.
BADMINTON
Billy" Argues' huskies gave the y_iit_
toria__shuttlecock chasers an artistic
Trimming in the badminton tournament at Victoria last Saturday afternoon. The collegians won six matches
and the capitals took the short end of
the count only having two matches
to their credit. The Duncan team
however, demonstrated their class by
winning 5-3 in a close and lively game
which was characterized by close
checking throughout. Norman Hincks
scintillated for the Blue and Gold and
the Victoria papers were tickled to
death to find that he was a Victoria
man.
2nd TEAM SOCCER
Since the last issueoTThlPubyssey
the second soccer team has played
two games. One was a 3-2 defeat
from Malkins in which Varsity was
only able fo~field nine men. The other
was a 2 all draw with the fast Army
and—Navy eleven, Varsity playing ten
men in this encounter. The team has
made a creditable showing thus far
and its position in the league standing is largely due to the comparatively few games it has played.
Plunge for Distance—
M. Chapman, Varsity.
Mrs. Hibberson, Victoria.
S. Thrupp, Varsity.
Mrs. Steele, Victoria.
80 Yards Relay—
1st—Victoria:
D. Jones.
B. Robertson.
G. Wellburn.
K. Wellburn.
2nd—Varsity:
R. Barker.
G. Dowsley.
M. Wilkenson.
M. Higginbotham.
nsiYtently   f%d
Doubling
every fifth year
since    commencing business 1892
Business-in-force,
o  1923    $351,402,105
Assets,
1923
56,235,142
l^reeii-West
Nothing conveys thoughtfulness
and cheer like
A CHRISTMAS PORTRAIT
x
Charlton $ Raibbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
X
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ENGINEERING and
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
Canadian Distributors for
A. W. Faber Pencils
Carl Zeiss Binoculars
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Hughes Owens Co. ltd.
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Superior Service
Popular Prices
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Iblechanical Pencils January 8th, 1925
THE   TJBYSSEY
J. W. Foster Ltd.
?^5 Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See US Before Buying'
SHELLY'S
Bread and Cakes
are baked according
to modern standards
of quality, flavor and
purity.
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
\
AT THE ORPHEUM
Four of the most famous actresses
in the country are to appear in one
big act at the Orpheum Theatre this
week. They are Jennie, Roxie, Lena
and Julie, the Powers' dancing elephants, which have been features of
the New York Hippodrome since its
opening day. They are officially valued at $250,000, but they are not for
sale at any price. The war scene, the
barber shop scene and the baseball
scene, in which Powers' elephants are
letter perfect, are veritable masterpieces of animal training.
Paul Gerard Smith has written another masterpiece called "The Lucky
Stiff," which is serving for a starring
vehicle for Dave Ferguson, the well-
known character comedian. The eminent European concert pianist, Bruno
Steinbach, is in America for a short
concert tour in vaudeville. Lew Brice
of the hair-pin physique and remarkable dancing, is back in vaudeville after a fling at the movies, in which
this comic proved most adept. The
Three Orontos offer a balancing routine that is nothing short of amazing.
Aesop's Fables, Topics of the Day, the
Orpheum Concert Orchestra and two
other big novelty acts make up a very
attractive programme.
Advt.
i
STRAW FROM THE STACKS
*jf*»<
HARD-BOILED
Two negroes were lying behind a
packing case on the docks at Brest
taking the labor out of the alleged
Labor Battalion.   Said one boastfully:
"Boy, Ah comes f'um a tough breed:
Mah ole man done cut his nails wif
a ax an' brash his teef wif a file.'
"Huh, ain't so tough.    Mah ole man
am a plumber an' twice a week he
done shave himself with a blow torch."
—American Legion Weekly.
A pretty young girl in a fury
Took her case to a court and a jury.
She said that trolly E
Had injured her knee;
But the jury  said, "We're from Missouri."- -Ex.
As In a Glass Darkly
The absent-minded professor surveyed himself in the hairbrush. "My!
but I need a shave!" he mused.
"Sun Dodger."
Office Bqy—"I want a little time off
to get a hair-cut."
Boss—"What, get a hair cut on
company time?"
Office Boy—"Sure, it grew on company time, didn't it?"
Prof.—Where is the capital of United States?
Little Boy—Most of it is loaned to
foreign countries.
••-••<§>••-•■
Flapper—Who is that fellow with
the long hair?
Lounge Lizzard—Smith from Yale.
Flapper—Oh, those are the Yale
locks we've heard of.
The   Senior  stood   on   the   railroad
track—
The  train  was  coming  fast;
The train got off the railroad track
And let the Senior go past.
—Kansas Wesleyan Advance.
Telling the truth saves time—you
don't have to remember what you said.
Grad.—I want your daughter for my
wife.
Father—Tell your wife she can't
have my daughter.
Bill—"May 1 kiss you good-night?"
Mary—"No,   Bill,   it's   my   principle
never to kiss anyone goodnight.'
Bill—"Well, let's drop the principle
and show some interest."
First Stew—"What's all that splashing?"
Second Stew—"Sh-h, the gold-fish
has the croup."
■>■'•■ §*-*
The Connolly twins certainly get
along well without a mirror in their
room; just face each other to comb
their hair. —Ex.
*••••«§>••-•«
One of the professors said that he
wished the sophomores would get their
pipes broken in, so a few more of
them could come to classes. Ex.
Freshman — I'd like to see something cheap in a fall hat.
Clerk—Try this one. The mirror is
at your left.
"Our idea of hard luck is when a
man works for his board and then
loses his appetite."
>••••••••••••••••••••••.••.•-•■••"•»•••••••■••••••••■*}»
TRAGIC REVELATIONS
Here comes the frosh. Good Night!
Everybody registering gloom? Graduating? Nope. They can't all be on
the withdrawal list. Let's interview
this one, his face is longer than the
rest.
"What's the matter sonny? Still
suffering from too much Christmas?"
No answer. He stands with lowered
head. When at last he slowly raises
it, we see to our honor the ravages that
only bitter disillusionment could have
written there.
We step back, not wishing to intrude upon his grief, but still he
stands, his eyes fixed and glassy. Then
entirely of his own volition he
speaks, and his voice is that of a man
in a trance:—
"It happened on Christmas Eve," he
intoned.
"I had noticed earlier in the evening that my father and mother seemed rather preoccupied and that there
was a certain tenseness in the air. I
had tried to brush aside the senst of
impending evil and had all but succeeded when I observed my father
nodding significantly to my mother.
Then they both drew their chairs
nearer mine, and my fears rushed
back a hundredfold. Father cleared
his throat and began.
"We feel, your mother and I, that
the time has come for you to know,
to know ".
Here the Freshman stops, his hands
clench and his face works with emotion.
"Go on" we cry, "What did he tell
you?"
"He told me, Oh! He told me there
was no Santa Claus."
Lizzie and Izzie
Have Dizzie Time
My Dear Izzie:—
Just a little epistle to tell you about
the most important event during the
Victoria migration, that is, of course,
the hop in the ballroom at the Empress. To begin with, both day and
night were wet. The wetness came
from the heavens during the day and
from the cellar at night. There were
no casualities, however, in the daytime—so all were on hand at the evening   session.
The ballroom was decorated appropriately for the season, with ivy, evergreen, and rose lights. Eaton's eight-
piece orchestra supplied the most gorgeous music. The room was so crowded that it was impossible for anyone,
even the professionals, to strut their
stuff. However, that was a small
thing—there were lots of diversions.
One of these occurred when the pianist announced Vancouver's victory
over Victoria in ice hockey. Another,
still more noisy, was caused by the
laughter of a certain Malcolm Lange.
The rose lights flickered and the ceiling undulated in large ripples at the
impact of the huge sound waves. We
could have stood anything, however,
after the way Malcolm scored for us
at the mud-bath in the afternoon.
After the dance the immensity of
the line of boys waiting for their coats
gave one a good idea of the crowd.
The line seemed to stretch for blocks.
Cyrus was right at the end, and by
the time we reached our temporary
abode, the sleepy milkmen were driving their slumbering steeds over the
well-beaten track. At least, I think
that's all we did.
Your  own
LIZZIE.
P.S.—Victoria  IS  awake—"some  time
of the night."
ALL
OVERCOATS
REDUCED
l/3
"The Values Are Great"
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
Dr. L. F.MARSHALL
DENTIST
CONVENIENT TO THE UNIVERSITY
WORK CAN BE ARRANGED
IN STUDY PERIODS
BETWEEN CLASSES
AND IN THE EVENINGS
2520 LAUREL (Cor. Broadway)
Phone. Fair. 896-Y
^=
Today's Lessons in Optimism
No matter how tough the steak, you
can   always   stick   your   fork   in   the
gravy.
If the  coat doesn't fit,  you can always sew the sleeves into the vest-
No matter how high the awning, it's
always a shade higher than the sidewalk.
..-..§,..-«
"Have you ever been married?"
asked the judge.
"Ye-es", stammered the prisoner.
"To whom?"
"A woman."
"Of course it was a woman," snapped the judge, "did you ever hear of
anyone marrying a man."
"Yes, sir," said the prisoner brightly, "my sister did."
Whereupon he got life.—Evergreen.
He (teaching her to drive)—In case
of emergency, the first thing you want
to do is put on the brakes.
She—Why, I thought they came with
the car.
A murder a day keeps the dullness
away.
"What a splendid fit," said Mr. Doo-
ley as he carried the epileptic out of
the tailor shop.
—Technican.
NOTICE
Mr. Hacking reports that the following have not returned their proofs.
This must be immediately attended
to—
Misses Louise Morrison, Jessie
Fisher, Helen Milne, Gwen Newcombe.
Messrs. M. Hunter, H. Moore, L. Mc-
Killop, C. Dougan, C. Cox, T. J. Keen-
an, G. Abernethy, F. Painter, T. W.
Brown-
Also, the group photographs of athletic teams must be taken next week.
Teams must see Doris Shorney or
Tommy Wilkinson for instructions regarding this before they go to Hackings. THE   UBYSSBY
January 8th, 1925
r^Vx trade jr$§>
DID IT EVER STRIKE
YOU
How much better your game is
if you  are  properly equipped
for it ?
SPALDINCS'
EQUIP YOU FOR EVERY
SPORT
UNIFORMS, SHOES, STOCKINGS,
SNAPPY
BADMINTON SWEATERS
" The Choice of Champions"
YOU CAN DO NO BETTER !
* * OF CANADA Al MITE a
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER, B. C
WE HAVE THE BEST
Adjustable Clamp Lamp
ON THE MARKET.
Can be attached anywhere.      Movable
Shade.   Indispensable to every student.
Price, $2.50 only
including six feet of cord.
For sale only at the
GREAT WEST SALES CO.
Room 309, 315 PENDER ST., W.
Say you saw it in the "Ubyswy"
BAGGAGE
TO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
The World's Worst Cross-Word Puzzle
DANCING
x
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
 —A
Portraits can be made
at any
time from the
GRADUATION
PHOTOGRAPHS
1 >/1
. Qj*J^ STUDIOS
w°
'           553 Granville St.
 JJ
Horizontal—
are   just   recovering
1. What   we
from.
10. Tennis fiends' heaven.
11. Neither he nor she.
13. Prepositiion   meaning   "not   ab
sent."
14. A threesome.
15. Favorite female answer.
16. Pedantic form of "explain."
20. Two-thirds of a donkey.
21. Shifts or changes.
22. The most important word in my
vocabulary.
23. Harold Teen's Queen.
25. The   class   gambles   before   the
class gambols.
26. A youthful island.
27. The   most   used   letter   in   the
alphabet.
28. Screen vampire's last name.
29. Society in opposition to the devil
worshippers (abbr.)
32. Pertaining to Gregory.
33. The Student Body (abbr.)
34. Dative cases of Latin adjective
meaning nothing.
35. What the king might call  the
Prince of Wales.
37. Person having a defective sense
of touch.
42. The people who perpretated this
puzzle.
Vertical—
1. Latin for a favorite conjunction
of amateur speakers.
2. Old   Greek   sculptured   wooden
images.
3. Instruments     of    mortality     a-
mongst jay-walkers.
4. Masculine abbreviation to which
all youths aspire.
5. Adjective describing our big de
bates.
6. Game Bird (Duck).
7. Advocate of independence of ac
tion.
8. Abbreviation for the first part of
a best seller.
9. Australian   pronunciation   of   a
favorite interjection.
12. The Honor Student's bete noire.
17. Canadian Esquimau Nanaimo Ry.
(Abbrev.)
18. An   open   space   (spelled   back
wards).
19. A reformed tool of a bricklayer.
23. The blessed station which most
of us will change.
29. North   America's   Siamese    Twin,
(abbr.)
30. Surgeon's degree.
31. What budding authors get back
(s).
36. Tariff receipts (abbr.)
38. Product   of   dredging   in   False
Creek (Initials).
39. First part of an infinitive.
40. Not out.
41. Professional    Sawbones    Union
(abbr.)
J^ROSH RUGBY
The Varsity Freshmen retained
their spotless record when they defeated a picked Victoria team at tne
Capital City last Saturday. The gaiae
was played in a sea of mud, and developed into a farce towards the end.
During the first talf Victoria played
well, holding their opponents scoreless, and pressing on several occasions. Varsity always tightened up in
the pinches, however. The second
half was productive of some very good
and some very bad rugby. The Victoria men seemed to go to pieces, and
the Freshmen ran wild, scoring five
unconverted tries without response.
One of the prettiest efforts of the day
was the try by Eaton, the Varsity captain. Gathering up a kick by one of
the Victoria men while going at full
speed, he ran right around their three-
quarter line for a touch. Varsity
pressed all the way, and for the whole
second half penned Victoria up in
their own two-bit line.
t LIMITSP^^^
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
JANUARY WE
CLEAR OUR
STOCKS
A time when we have a
tremendous clearance of
seasonablo merchandise at
drastically reduced prices.
Reductions have been made
and the Sale is now in pro"
gress.
An immediate clearance is
desired to make room for
new goods which will
arrive.
Buy what you need at a
fraction of its original price,
Buy during this Sale.
AND NOW-
FOR
Vaughn Moore
AND
Some New Dance Steps.
Private Lessons
Little Expense
Wonderful Results
LET'S GO !
VAUGHN MOORE
— FOR —
Better Dance Instruction
518 HASTINGS ST., W. Seymour 707
"Look for the Electric Sign."
WOMEN'S HOCKEY
In the grass hockey game against
the Victoria ladies, the Varsity Hockey Club was defeated 6—0. As the
field was in a very bad condition fast
play was impossible. The team consisted of Jennie Wilkinson, May Cornwall, Lourde Gard, Alda Moffatt, Amelia Ramsey, Winona Straight, Doris
Woods, Margaret Taylor, Ruth Barker,
Dorothy Russell, Kathleen Clark.
What Is The Acreage of YOUR Feet ?
Do your feet seem to be all over the floor when you dance ? Are
you completely at sea when you get on the floor ? Do you bump into
all the other dancers ? Because, if you do any of these things it's a sure
sign that you haven't taken lessons at the
Broadway Dancing Academy
1400 BROADWAY, W. (One Block East of Granville St.)
Phone, Bay. 5834 Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead
BALLROOM DANCING "EVERYONE DANCES NOW
I

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