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The Ubyssey Oct 13, 1955

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 luravubxrr or
UTUHCOLUmU
Os
Fund
$250,000 Fund Vote
To Go Before AMS.
By VAL HAIG-BROWN
Student Council Tuesday night approved a motion which
will provide approximately $250,000 for the proposed Brock
extension. **   ♦  • •
The motion, which will be 'tWtn clotltf \
The fate of the infamous "cup of caf coffee" is being decided by these happy coffee tasters. The tests of brews, blends and brands will be continued during the next few weeks by
a select committee under the watchful eye of the Ubyssey Kitchen Staff.
The
UB YSSE Y
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 193J
S7   MILLION   NEEDED
NFCUS Hears Bursary Plan
EDMONTON, CUP—A noted
Canadian educator Monday
said the Federal Government
should institute a seven million
dollar scholarship and bursary
plan to equalize educational
opportunity across the nation.
Doctor M. E. Lazerte, former University of Alberta Dean
of Education, told the opening
banquet of the National Federation of Canadian University
Students that there was a definite need for a scholarship
and bursary plan.
He told the seventy-five delegates and observers that
many high school graduates to-
FRIDAY DEADLINE SET
FOR AMS PICTURES
Last chance for all you
lovelies to have your likenesses preserved on an AMS
privilege card is Friday noon
till 2 p.m. in the double-
committee room at the
Brock. All other cards are
now available at Brock.
(Seems that anyone who
really can't stand his snap
can have a redo at the same
place.)
day do not attend university
simply because they cannot afford to. Doctor Lazerte, now
research director for the Canadian School Trustees Association, continued that the scheme
should be increased to eleven
million, five-hundred thousand
dollars in the next ten years.
The best plan would be for
the provinces to pay a certain
percentage of the educational
cost, with the Federal Government paying supplemental
benefits varying from province
to province to equalize money
spent per student. Doctor Lazerte said the percentages could
be worked out in meetings between Federal and Provincial
officials.
presented at the AMS meeting
on October 20, provides for the
continuation of the five dollar
per student levy for not longer
than seven years.
At present this money goes
to pay off the Memorial Gymnasium debt. This debt will be
retired in September. The
money would then be put into
a Brock extension fund. Present architect's sketches provide for one wing at an approximate cost of one thousand
dollars. '
CLUB SPACE
-The proposed wing would
provide space for most of the
existing campus clubs. Members of the Brock Extension
Committee, chaired by Coordinator of Activities Don McCallum, feel that a second
wing is advisable.
The second wing, if approved
would also be financed from
the five dollar per year fee.
Additional facilities which
might be contained in this wing
would include billiard tables,
ping-pong tables, cardroom,
craft shop, small lounges, a
browsing library and a record
room.
LIVING ROOM     '
McCallum said, "The student
union building should be the
living room of the campus and
open from early morning till
ten or so at night."
The first wing would include
as well as club space, rooms
for the alumni association.
The committee felt that the
alumni deserved space since it
is through them that many
contributions to scholarships
and buildings are received and
these offices should be with
the students and not lost in the
administration buildings. 11
was also pointed out that the
alumni association pays rent
for its offices.
The architect's sketches will
be in the Double Committee
Room of the Brock this afternoon and those interested
should call there or in the Student Council offices at any
time.
Blood
Beats
Battle
luota
Follow  The   Birds
To Bellingham Bash
Cloudy Thursday morning,
changing to rain by afternoon.
High 52: Low 44. Little
change in temperature.
Once more the Hotel Leopold in Bellingham will be
levelled when loyal University
students follow their team
.south. Birds meet Western
Washington Vikings this Saturday night at eight p.m. For
all eager students wishing to
cheer their team on to victory,
a   bus   will   be   provided,   aud
will depart from the Brock at
five p.m., leaving plenty of
time to rouse spirits.
Fare will bo a mere Hollar
seventy-five return, plus bottle.
Tickets can be purchased in
the AMS office any time before Friday noon. Returning
time  is  ivudnite.
The clanging of the Armory
doors at 4:30 Friday afternoon
sounded the final gong on the
blood battle of last week.
Co-sponsors of the drive,
Nurses and Engineers, say that
in the final analysis, 11 lr,; of
their quota was reached. A
total of 2202 UBC donors supplied the whole province with
a week's worth of blood.
Anglican Theological College walked away with the
highest faculty percentage —-
100"; . In the two bleeding
competitions, IVteds placed over
Teacher Training students, 85
to 65: and Pharmacy beat out
Home Ec. 51 to 45.
See TOTALS on Page 3
'Catholicism' Topic
At Newman Mission
CATHOLIC STUDENT Mission continues with Rev. Fr,
E. B. Allen C.B.S. speaking on
"What Is a Catholic Student?"
today noon in Physics 200. Tho
mission closes with masses on
Friday at 7:20 and 12:30. Mis*
sion exercises open to all.
*r *r Tr
EXECUTIVE   MEETING  of
the Liberal Club today at noon
in the Clubroom behind tht
Brock.
op t|l mp
CRITICS' CIRCLE will hold
the first discussion meeting at
the home of Dean G. C. An»
dtew, 1750 Knox Road, at 8:00
tonight. Topic: George Orwell
and "Animal Farm."
# *     » "*l
MR.   B.   C.   BINNING   will
conduct a tour of the Lawren
Harris exhibit of paintings in
the Art Gallery at noon today.
9p 9f 9ft
GERMAN CLUB first general meeting Thursday at noon
in Arts 102. All members and
interested please attend.        ..
ip ip ep
A GENERAL MEETING of
the Cercle Francais will be
held in Arts 102. All members
and those interested welcome.
ep ip sjp
STUDENT TALK on Biological Photography at 12:30 today in B. 100.
*P ip ep
SWIMMERS AND DIVERS,
veteran or otherwise, pleas*
meet in Gym Room 211 at 2:30
today.
ip ip ep
ARCHAEOLOGY   CLUB
meets on Friday noon in Arts
106: a discussion of artifact
types found locally. This will
be very useful for all members
who wish to participate in field
trips. On Saturday Dr. Borden
will conduct a tour of Vancouver sites. Come to the Archaeology Lab, Arts basement
at 1:45 sharp.
ff.9f.tf,
FILMSOC PRESENTS Walt
Disney's cartoon triumph ftIch-
abod and Mr. Toad," today
noon in the Auditorium. 35c
to students and staff only.
* *      #
UN DAY is October 24th.
All UN Club members interested in taking part in the Model
Assembly please attend the
meeting in Arts 100 at noon
Friday,
ff,      if.      if.
UN CLUB presents Jane Ban-
field, national secretaary of
World University Service in
Arts 100 Friday at noon. Miss
Banfield leads a study tour in
the West Indies this summer.
ff.ff.ff.
LPP presents Maurice Rush
speaking on "Geneva, Key to
World Peace" at noon Friday
in FG 100.
(Continued   on   Page   3)
See    CLASSES THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1955
THE VBTSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included ln AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.00 per year. 8ingle copies five cents. Published
In Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
oi the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters, to the Editor
should not be more than ISO words. The Ubyssey reserves the right
-to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received.
EDITQR*«r*CHIEr STANLEY BECK
Managing Editor--Rod Smith        City Editor Sandy Ross
Teelure Edtter.-.MIiw Ames       Sports Editor.-Mike Olaspte
OVP Miser, Jean Whlies.de
NEWS EDITOR  Clement B. Lambert
Reporters and Desk: Julie Bossons, Val Haig-Brown, Rosemary
Kent-Barber, Al Forrest, Fred Hill, Caroline Forbes, Marie Gallagher, Kathy Archibald, Dave Ferry.
BENIOR EDITOR BOB JOHANNES
Offices In Brock Hall For Display Advertising
Phone ALma 1624 Phone  ALma   1260
Wacky Bennett
•
Premier W. A. C. Bennett needs a lesson in geography. He
apparently is .ignorant of the fact that Canada extends considerably beyond the Rocky Mountains. That is the inescapable
Impression left by the Premier's remarks at the conclusion of
iastw eek's Dominion-provincial conference in Ottawa.
"A fiasco," was Mr. Bennett's weighty and considered
opinion of the conference attended by Canada's 10 provincial
Premiers, their retinue of economic experts, Prime Minister
Louis St. Laurent, the federal cabinet and their retinue of experts. Why was the conference "a fiasco" according to Mr.
Bennett? Because no definite agreements were arrived at and
because British Columbia was not offered enough money.
Mr. Bennett's first complaint about no definte agreement
being arrived at is incredibly naive. Surely he did not expect
Canada's leaders, some of whom represent 'wealthy provinces,
some moderately well-off provinces, some poor provinces and
pne Who represents a province that believes almost any financial arrangement would be a contravention of the terms under
.which it entered Confederation, could sit down and within four
days work out financial relations satisfactory and beneficial
to all?
The present tax-rental agreements do not expire until
1957 occassioning no rush for a new agreement. The conference
was called so that the federal government could hear the proposals of the provinces and vice-versa. It was also necessary
4hat the discussions be conducted with any eye to including
Quebec, which for Mr. Bennett's information forms a rather
large and important part of Canada, in any financial arrangement. The consensus of opinion among the Premiers other
than Mr. Bennett was that the Conference was useful in laying
the foundation for future discussions and eventual agreement.
Most important of all, however, was Quebec's reaction.
For a change Quebec did not say an emphatic "No" tt> everything the federal government suggested. It now appears likely
that a plan that will be acceptable to Quebec will be worked
out in the near future—a most significant event in Canadian
history.
But to Mr. Bennett the whole thing was a fiasco—not
enough was accomplished.
.Mr. Bennett's second complaint, that of B.C. not being
pffered enough money, was, aside from being near-sighted,
designed exclusively for the electorate of this province.
Under the tax-rental agreement now in effect B.C. receives more per capita than any other province in Canada.
But at the same time B.C., by accident of geography, is one
of Canada's "rich" provinces. In other words we here in B.C.
are far better off, and have higher standards of everything
there is to have standards of, than the majority of Canada's
other provinces.
In addition to this Mr. Bennett has been consistenly demanding more federal funds for such provincial works as
the P.G.E. ever since he took office. Mr. Bennett wants to
have his cake and eat it too without regard for the economic
position of the rest of Canada.
But, maybe we are wrong in suggesting that Mr. Bennett
does not know his Canadian geography. Maybe his statements
show that he is acutely aware that Ottawa is the nation's
capital and that it is a more desirable place for a politician
to reside than Victoria.
CAMPUS
gcuhdihf
By AL FORREST
Ood is not the exclusive patron saint of any one political
party, Campus Social Credit*
ers admit. Refreshing news.
Violent attacks against
columnists are not uncommon
and Communist Jim MacFar-
lan's attack against statements
In this column is not surprising, considering the party he
represents.
Again, the LPP club does,
hold small clandestine meet*
tags downtown, behind closed
doors.
Small ii right.
The LPP club's claim Of 18
fellow travellers Is fantastic
and ridiculous.
Itnown campus Commies
can be counted on the fingers
of one hand.
The writer of this column
challenges the leader Of the
LPP club to name his 18 Moscow-lovers or admit his mem*
bership total is two.
Laughed myself silly over
MacFarlan's proud boast that
only his political club holds
study groups on Marxian liter-
tture. If that's an exclusive, he
can have it.
Speaking of exclusives—Be
it now known that B.C.'s most
controversial politician will
speak on the campus October
21. None other than Rod
Young.
Moving into less controversial fields, political club members applaud the election of
non-partisan Laurie Brahan
as President of Parliamentary
Forum. The experienced debater may revive a club that
was reeling on the ropes and
almost destroyed when leaders
let political differences boil into executive meeting debates.
Rivalry was so bitter last term
a Liberal moved a vote of censure against the club treasurer-
a Socred. Censure motion was
later withdrawn.
One jarring note is the election of a Conservative to chair
the vital steering committee in
charge of mock parliaments.
With one member from each
party on the committee, would
have been wise and tactful to
choose a non-partisan here too.
Other parties are complaining,
besides the LPP, which seems
to be against everything on
general principles.
Debating committee will be
headed by John Spencer, a capable debater in his own right
and a certain McGoun,cup candidate.
SHORTS FOR SIZE
Campus engineers are taking a more active interest In
political issues, joining the
four political clubs. Parliamentary Forum, and Civil
Liberties Union in larger
numbers than eve* before.
Campus nurses are telling
the one about the near-sighted doctor who picked up a
frosh. shook him up and
down and muttered "Here's
a fine looking specimen."
Campus professors are being invited to Join, as members, the clubs of their
choice, political clubs included.
STUPID
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
A student once tried to en*
ter this building by pushing
quite hard on the door. He was
getting quite mad, so he pushed
and he pushed till he dropped
all his books on the floor. He
stood looking around in a dumb
kind of way. Me said this has
sure got me fooled, but he
would have got ln quite easy
if he had quit pushing and
pulled.
Janitor.
tint
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I have Just finished reading
your article 'Seers and Tears"
and I feel like getting drunk.
What kind of emotional bunk
4s this? I fail to see any moral
issue in the drinking of beer,
and I think this Is the root of
tile problem.
Certain organizations in our
society regard the casual
drinker with Just as much hor*
ror as the "alkie."
Let us regard the pros and
cons  of drinking.
1. Beer is a nutritious beverage.
2. Beer is a good social gatherer—most people like to meet
and talk over a few beers.
3. I like beer.
4. Probably you like beer.
Should we refuse our children all this?
As for the cons, the only
one that comes to mind is that
by the consumation of too much
beer one could become an alcoholic. Let me point out here
that it takes one helluva lot
of beer to reach this point.
Seriously I suggest the problem lies at home. Parents who
refuse to recognize beer, wine
and liquor as fit to drink are
only courting trouble. The kids
will get it somehow and first
thing there'll be one more
rubby for the Sally Ann's to
feed. A sane practical approach
in the home is the only answer
to prevent such trash as Beer
and Tears from appearing in
print.
Yours for more wor'fly
pleasures,
John L. Labatt.
"I could
If you used
the right pencil
for the right job."
•oyi
-HordBoilsd Horry"
(#w Omwa ftremine As***)
and
P'Oy#o <""•     0$# !*»•*
_*on ' "Wo0d. *
VINUS PINCH COMPANY, IIMITIO
T0I0MT0 14, ONTAIIO
JANZEN'S SHELL SERVICE
"SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS"
Weekdays 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
4314 W. 10th Ave. (at Discovery)
AL. 1707-0048
Professional Occupational Counselling
Career Planning
gohtL Ul. Ci. JJbuVuf.
Industrial Psychologist - Personnel Consultant
Rm. 606 * 475 Howe Street TA. 7748
The Lutheran Student's Association
Presents
The Track Event of the Century
Friday, October 14th at 8 p.m.
3271 WEST 35TH
EVERYONE WELCOME
To This Real Get Acquainted Party DR.   TILLYAftD   LAUDS -BAM)
"Shakespeare far
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1055
II
m
ROSEMARY KENTBARBCR
"What remains for most
people is not Shakespeare's
Plays, but the imagery of
these Plays," declared Dr. E.
M. W. Tillyard, speaking to a
large and appreciative audience on "What do we really
get out of Shakespeare?" Wednesday in Physics 200.
Dr. Tillyard said most people
tend to -regard Shakespeare's
plays in terms of units; that of
the word, the phrase, the
speech, the scene and finally
the play itself.
While the word and phrase
have enriched the English
language and most individual's
vocabularies, Dr. Tillyard said,
the quality of an entire play
can rest upon a few dramatic
scenes.
Dr. Tillyard stated that more
and more people are studying
Shakespeare plays in terms of
the unit of the entire play. This
is due, he said, not only to the
modern tendency to produce
Shakespeare's plays Without
awkward breaks between acts
but also to the continuity of
imagery to be found in each
play.
International   House
Fetes  Friendliness
International House members will steal Phratere's thunder Friday night when they go all out to be known as "famous
for friendliness."
CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
MAMOOKS general meeting
will be held noon Friday In the
clubroom in the South Brock
basement. Purpose of the meeting is a general election.
ep ip ip
HIGH   SCHOOL   CONFER-
ence will hold the first organizational meeting Friday noon
in Physics 303. All former delegates, committee members and
anyone else interested are requested to attend. Willing
workers, especially freshmen,
will be welcome.
9f *f 9ft
HILLEL presents Larry Freeman, Law 1, speaking on his
year in Israel at the Hebrew
University of Tomorrow on Friday at noon. Everybody welcome.
*r*       v       **r
HISTORY  CLUB  will hold
an organizational meeting Friday noon ih Arts 208.
ip ip ip
WUS will hold a Barn Dance
October 21 in Brock Hall at
8:00. Admission, 50 cents.
Harry Summerville will be
caller. Refreshments will be
served.
*P ip ip
LUTHERAN STUDENTS Association will have a get-acquainted party Friday, October
14 at 8:00 at 3271 W. 35th.
Everyone welcome.
CLU.   Board
Reinforced
Two executive members at
large were elected at Civil
Liberties Union general meeting Friday.
Elected were Ashe Davis,
Arts 2, and Kathy Archibald,
Arts 2.
Both will serve on the CLU's
nine-man executive. Other positions were filled at the club's
final meeting last term.
Committee heads also selected at the meeting were Joyce
Winch, speakers, Barbara Marriott, publicity, Darrell Anderson, banquet, and Rolf Knight,
special events committee.
CLU also established a social and discussion committee
to arrange for informal meetings of club members—a new
innovation of the group.
Mike Palmer, program director for the club, says the
new program, known as Program Friendship, is designed
to give club members a chance
to meet and exchange ideas
with Canadians on the campus.
The program gets underway
tonight, commencing with a
discussion period "where International House members will
be able to find out about fraternities and sororities. This
will be followed by refreshments and dancing.
Tbe remainder of the fall
program will include talks by
Dean Chant (October 28) on
Japan, Dean Andrew (November 25) on Western Europe and
a meeting with the UBC Alumni Association (November 4)
with slides on South America.
Shakespeare, he said, be*
longs to everyone, whether
they are in academic circles
or not.
"Encirclements and Iron
Curtains do not and never will
apply to Shakespeare," he de*
dared.
Dr. Tillyard, a Master at
Jesus College, Cambridge University, England, was brought
to the campus by the University Lectures Committee.
An outstanding authority on
Shakespeare and the Elizabethan stage, he Is the author
of the well-known book "Elizabethan World Picture".
BLOOD TOTALS
(Continued from Page 1)
Complete faculty standings
are ,as follows: Anglican Theological College, 100%; Nurses,
88%; Medicine, 8,5%; Union,
70%; Teacher's Training, 65%;
Forestry, 98%; Pharmacy,
91%; Arts, 48%; Engineers,
48%; Aggies, 48%; Home Ec,
49%; Commerce, 42%; Law,
37%; Phys Ed., 84.4%; Architecture, i23%; Graduate Studies, 19%; Social Work, 15%;
Pre-Med., 13%; FrOsh, 9%.
ep ep op
The final score on sororities
came out as follows: Alpha
Delta Pi, 100%; Alpha Phi,
100%; Gamma Phi Beta, 100%;
Kappa Alpha Theta, 92%;
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 90%;
Alpha Gamma Delta, 86%;
Delta Gamma, 80%; Alpha
Omicron Pi, 61%; Delta Phi
Epsilon, 31%.
On fraternities: Phi Kappa
Sigma, 100%; Phi Kappa Epsilon, 100%; Zeta Psi, 96%;
Phi Gamma Delta, 86%; Phi
Alpha Theta, 81%.
WANTED
Typing and Mimeographing.
Accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Florence Gow, 4496 W.
10th. Phone AL. 8682.
Op Op Op
Essays typed: Mrs. Georgia
McCullough, 4976 Camosun
Street, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Telephone KE. 7928-L, 20 cents
per page.
9r V V
Riders wanted along * 41st
Avenue, Marine Drive, for 8:30
lectures, 6 days weekly. Call
"Dean", FRaser 8729.
*P op op
Riders wanted — Mon.-Fri.,
8:30, leaving 41st & Victoria,
via any route. FR. 7282.
v v V
Typing done at home. Neat
accurate work. MArine 7004.
op op op
Wanted—Textbook of Zoology Parker. T. J. and W. A.
Haswell 1940, Vol. 1, 8th Edit.
Will pay good price. Please
contact Dave Green. CH. 1306.
LOST *'
A Keuffel & Esser Slid*
Rule. Reward. Call Glen at
YO. 8520.
op op op (
e
Royal Alexandra Hospital
graduate nurses' gold pin, lost
between Wesbrook, Engineer
Building and Armoury. En*
graved on back 1420 • D. tt.
Vinge. Finder please phont
KE. 6428-L. Reward.
* T T
FOR SALE
1954 James 98 C.C., Motor*
cycle in top condition. 2300
miles at 190-160 miles/gallon.
Very easy to care for. $190. or
best offer. Phone KE. 0806-R.
epP sjp tWp
For Sale — Four-door '35
Chev. One-family ownership.
Good engine, tires and radio.
Reasonable price. Phone ALma
0310-M.
m\    tf>    *y i
ROOM AND BOARD
Room and board near Blanca)
bus loop to female student In
exchange for light duties. AI*
0304.
1956 Arts and Applied Science Graduates—Make an
Appointment Right Now for your Official Grad Portrait
!••••
NO APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY FOR
_   Bu»lne»« and Professional
PUBLICITY PORTRAITS
Ample Proof*    —    Quick Service
• TV
*>MOT06*al»MI
9«t   GAANVILLE
All under one roof
A branch of a chartered bank is much more than the best place to
keep your savings. It is an all-round banking service-centre that
provides services useful to everyone in the community.
In every one of 4,000 branches in Canada, people are using
all sorts of banking services. They make deposits, cash
cheques, arrange loans, rent safety deposit boxes, transfer money'
buy and sell foreign exchange.
Only in a branch of a chartered bank are all these and many
Other convenient banking services provided under one roof.
A visit to the bank is the way to handle all your banking needs
w$imply, safely, easily.
SEE THE BANK
ABOUT IT
Only a chartered bank
offers a full range of
banking services, including!
Savings Accounts
Current Accounts
Joint Accounts
Personal Loam
Commercial Loams
Farm Improvement Loans
N.H.A. Mortgage Loans
Home Improvement Loans
Foreign Trade and Market
Information
Buying and Selling of
Foreign Exchange
Commercial Collections
Money Transfers
Money Orders and Bank
Drafts
Travellers Cheques
Letters of Credit
Safety Deposit Boxes
Credit Information
Purchase and Sale of
Securities
Custody oj Securities
and other valuables
Banking by Mast
THE  CHARTERED  BANKS  SERVING  YOUR  COMMUNITY Mil
Hurt UBC
r1       By MIKE GLASPIE
"We made too many mistakes" is the simple explana-
, tion coach Frank Gnup offers
lor the Thunderbirds 12-0 loss
to Eastern Washington In rain-
drenched UBC Stadium last
Saturday.
' Losing the pigskin five times
on fumbles while the opposition fumbles only once doesn't
win many games, especially
when you have the offense of
the Birds, which may pick up
a touchdown yet.
Added Gnup, "that was the
game   we   should   have   won.
Lack of speed hurt us, and that
r   '   offense." Then across the desk
to   assistant   Bob   Hindmarch,
• "Hey. Bob, think we can teach
' the boys  an offense in three
!     ' days?"
The Bird mentor will have
j       his Answer  Saturday evening
1       in Bellingham after the game
' with Western Washington.
Gnup would not blame Ian
Stewart for some questionable
signal-calling, although he did
f      wonder why some of the plays
I        that had  been going  well  in
practice sessions were not used.
As a result Gnup has,  "for
the first time in my coaching
career,"   handed   out   mimeographed copies of all the plays
to his squad.
Of the Bird defense against
Eastern, Gnup had nothing but
praise, being very pleased with
his boys' gutty goal,line stands.
"Those gflys didn't know when
to quit," Gnup said of what
may well be the best defense
in Thunderbird history. Jerry
O'Flanagan turned in another
great performance which led
the Bird braintrust to aay of
him, "best lineman in the Conference."
With Don Spence due back
; In   the   line-up'  and   possibly
j Jerry Nestman, Gnup promises
! a good showing by his Birds in
Bellingham on Saturday.
YARDSTICK
UBC Eastern
122 Net Yardage 205
107 Yards Rushing 256
20 Yards Passing 2
2 First Downs 7
11 Passes Attempted 9
3 Passes Completed 1
1 Passes Intercepted By 1
5 Fumbles 1
5 Fumbles Lost 1
7 Punts 7
186 Punt Yardage 225
26.6 Punt Average 32.1
40 Yards Penalized 80
THE. UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1955
RELAXING in a driving rain on the Bird bench three
Gnupmen watch their team handed a 12-0 loss by Eastern.
Washington last Sautrday. It was the second league loss
for the Birds.
Basketball
Organizes
The first official meeting for
Thunderbird, Jayvee, and
Braves' basketball teams will
be held at noon today at 12:30
in the War Memorial Gym. All
prospective players are asked
to attend.
Seven home games will be
televised locally this season.
The season opener for the
Birds is November 12 against
Alberni Athletics.
Only Jim Carter is missing
this year from the starting Bird
five but Coaches Pomfret and
Mullins must uncover some
bench strength to replace Ernie Nyhaug, Buzz Hudson,
l^ogan Tait, and Gary Taylor.
Dick Penn should have the
strongest Jayvee squad in
years, while "Bob Hindmarch
and Buzz Hudson have hopes
about their Braves.
MIKE GLASPIE-SPORTS EDITOR
J&tC&L
A late flash from Bellingham reports that nine Western
Washington first stringers will
be out of action this Saturday
against UBC.
Viking officials sayt these
players suffered severe lime
burns in the rain last week-end
in taking a 20-0 loss from College of Puget Sound.
This appears to be a crippling blow to an already weak
Viking squad and may provide
invading UBC students with an
unexpected source of "cheer."
However, it seems unlikely
that lime burns could put so
many players out of action, all
first stringers by coincidence,
and it is possible this is Viking
propaganda.
All rugger games lost decisions to the weather last weekend and will attempt again, this
weekend to get their season
underway on all three fronts.
9p 9p 9f
The all-weather soccer boys
both sloshed to draws last
week. Varsity edged out a draw
with Army and Navy on Frank
Seely's last minute goal. The
Chiefs battled to 2-2 tie with
Household Appliances in a
game that was incorrectly reported as a Chief loss in all
downtown papers.
9ft 9f. 9ft
Following the intramural
swimming meet at noon today
Empire Pool will be closed for
the winter;
FILMSOC
■l\ For Studcnts And Staff Onlv;
Presents
Double  Breasted  Suits
Converted into New
Single Breasted Models
Satisfaction  Guaranteed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville PA. 4649
Today, 12:30 to 2:30
Auditorium,  35c
EYES EXAMINED
J. J. Abramson
I. F. Hollenberg
Optometrists
Vancouver Block
MA. 0928 MA.  2948
Student Rentals
Largest stock of late model portable and standard typewriters   for   rent.   3   months   $12.50.   Rental   applied   on
purchase price.
BROWNLEE OFFICE OUTFITTERS LTD.
329 W. Pender
TAtlow 3331
FULL  CLASSROOM   SUPPLIES
COMPLETE DORM SUPPLIES
ABUNDAN TMAGAZINE SELECTION
All at vour ONLY Campus Drug Store
from 9:0 a.m, till 10:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LTD.
Pa Blocks East of Empire Pool ALma 0339
McGill Mail Thanks
To   President
In a letter to President Mo*
Kenzie, McGill football Cap*
tain Bob Hutcheson wrote in
part, "Thank you so much for
the kind hospitality you ex*
tended to the McGill team dur*
ing our stay in Vancouver.
Needless to say we all enjoyed
our stay immensely, and our
only regret is that we couldn't
score even one point against
your determined Thunder*
birds."
Dr.  John  B.  Rosebdrough
DENTIST
2130 Western Parkway
.Behind the Canadian Bank oi
Commerce
University Boulevard
Phone ALma 3910
DEAN'S
Foods
MeHow Whip
Ice Cream
10th and Sasamat
ALma 2596
38
***   YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA, <■
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
0..'lN,c!Lrk /STATIOMIRY AND
0 /   PRINTING CO. LTD.*
, ,  I , I'MOM t        p/y ,
STUDENT MONEY SAVING RATES
52 •   TIME    $3.25
ISSUES    •    LIFE.  $4.25
0F        •    SPORTS ILLUSTRATED  $4.00
Arhuthnot, Cassidy mid Cassidy ltd.
REPRESENTING OVER 4000 PUBLISHERS
1687 West Broadway CHerry 3194
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-Leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned mid Operated hy
The University of B.C
AUSTIN SALES AND SERVICE CENTRE
TENTH end ALMA ST,      CEdar 8105

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