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The Ubyssey Feb 26, 1925

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 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 26th, 1925
No. 17
SHOULD JAPS
^E EXCLUDED?
Crack Corvallis Co-eds to be
Heard on Vital Topic
Tuesday evening the lastr"oT~th«1 big
debates of the year will be held.
"Should all Japanese be excluded?"
A hot discussion is anticipated. Everybody has, or should have, some
opinion. Come and be convinced. TJ.
B. C. will be represented in Vancouver by Miss Vera Mather, '25, and
Miss Jean Tolmie, '28. Opposing them
will be debaters having a wide and
successful previous experience. The
team will consist of Miss Emma Berg
and Miss Dorthy L. Bush. Both are
members of this year's graduating
class in Vocational Education. Both
have their Zeta Kappa Psi key, representing the highest forensic honor obtainable in the United States. Miss
Bush, who is also woman's forensic
manager at Oregon, is a joint holder
of the Fawcette Cup, awarded for the
freshman-sophomore debates. For
three years in succession she has represented her university in debates.
Miss Berg, her colleague, is a winner
of the Lewis Cup, awarded for junior-
senior debates. For two successive
years she has been a Varsity debater.
She is also President of the Oregon
Y. W. C. A., holds a Zeta Kappa key,
and is a member of Phi Kappa Phi.
A record crowd is anticipated, not
only on account of the unprecedently
high standard of the debaters, but
also.on account -of the subject—total
exclusion of Japanese immigration.
(Continued on Page 2)      /
Profs. Will Play
For Dill Pickles
\ 	
Profs, Co-eds and Eds to Mix
in Last Basketball Feature
On Wednesday, March 5, the last
Basketball Dance of the season will
be held in Normal Gym., under the
auspices of the Basketball Club. The
evening's entertainment promises to
be the best offered this season. First
on the programme will be a basketball game between the senior "A"
women and the Senior "B" men; the
latter, however, will be garbed in costumes and in combinations of costumes never yet seen by human beings.
The losing team has promised to
provide a dill-pickle party for the winning team and as dill pickles are enticing to all basketball players a keen
match is promised. The feature of
the evening will be the annual game
between the Faculty and the Students'
Council. Whether a pot of pickles is
at stake in this match is not known,
but pickles or no pickles, it is going
to be a superb exhibition of basketball. Among others it is rumored that
Dr. Boggs is going to appear again in
"ice-cream" pants.    What joy!
After the fights, further entertainment will take place in the form of an
informal dance. The gymnasium holds
only a limited number, so come early
if you wish a good laugh. The fare
for the evening is only 50c—pay as
you enter.   First game starts at 7 p.m.
PUG GREGGOR
Pug is captain of the McKechnie
squad—one of the most consistent of
forwards—always on the ball; his 185
pounds are felt in the scrum.
CLARE DOMONEY
Varsity's premier full-back. Clare
has a pair of sure hands, and a very
powerful kick. This is Clare's fourth
year in McKechnie rugby.
VARSITY ALL SET FOR GREAT GAME
c/
[EDITORIAL]
Saturday, the 28th day of February,
1925, will long be remembered, either
with joy or with sorrow, by the student body of the University. On that
day our senior rugby team and the
Vancouver Rep. meet in a game
that will decide the resting place of
the McKechnie Cup for the coming
year. Ever since Varsity entered the
series, the battered trophy has proudly reposed in our cup case, a splendid
tribute to the playing prowess of our
rugby men. Most of us here remember the battles of the past two or three
years in which the Varsity has been
forced to meet the most serious kind of
opposition. Time and again a stand-
full of rooters and the fighting spirit
that has made our teams famous, has
snatched the game from the enemy at
the last moment. But this year we
are faced with more dangerous obstacles than ever before. The splendid team that played the All-Blacks,
although completely outclassed by
those wizards, was nevertheless the
most proficient English rugby team
ever got together in this city. Bar
two men, that is exactly the same
team that our team has to defeat if
the Cup is to remain here.
The Varsity players have done their
bit. Morning after morning they have
turned out at 6:30, an hour and a half
before most of us, and have done their
level best to be in the pink of condition when they are called upon to
uphold the honor of their Alma Mater.
But the players themselves are not
the only factors in the retention of
the cup. Again and again in past
years the old cry, "Hold 'em, Varsity,"
has inspired our teams with a renewed
vigour and determination—and saved
the game. Will that cry be lacking, or
only faintly heard on the 28th? Will
the grandstand be bare of University
supporters? Will the spirit of Varsity loyalty, the most marked feature
for years of our miserably-housed students, prove a myth? These questions
can only be answered by the whole
student body, and we are confident
that they will be answered in the
most effective manner possible—by
twelve hundred rooters who will
throw their moral support into the
struggle, and once more help a
Varsity team sweep to victory. We
must retain the cup.
MAINLAND CUP
JWTHJNREACH
First Soccer Men Win From
I. L. A. and Enter Semi-finals
"Oh, here we are, Oh, here we are
again!" chortled the Varsity first soccer men as they won their way into
the semi-finals of the Mainland Cup
at the expense of their old cup rivals
the I.L.A. last Saturday at Jones'
Park. The students scored three times
in the last period and got no response
from the dockers. "The old Varsit-y
—they Aint what they used to be"
sang out a waterfront man in a mac-
kinaw coat, who doubtless cherished
unpleasant memories of last year
when on a similar occasion Varsity
blanked the dockers by a 2-0 score,
and encouraged the efforts of the
Freshie Band whose varied programme
consisted of "The I.L.A., they aint
what they used to be," and something
that sounded like "Last Night On the
Back Porch' as accompanied by a
couple of torn cats.
It was a stirring encounter and a
muddy one. The collegians have never been seen to better advantage this
year. They set too fast a pace for the
longshoremen who seldom entered into the picture and lacked the condition
of the blue and gold squad.
The dockers held the collegians
scoreless, however, until the interval,
but Robinson, the losers net minder,
was given some anxious moments by
Varsity shapshooters, whilst Roy King-
had little to do at the other end of
the field.
After the oranges the students began to force the issue and had Robin-
(Continued on Page 2)
Caution Money For
Development Drive
Ottawa Will Aid if Training
Corps Instituted Here
A well attended campaign meeting
was held Friday noon, in the Auditorium.
Dal Grauer opened the meeting by
outlining the way matters stood with
regard to the playing ffelds. He said
that the Provincial Government had at
first emphatically refused to do anything either in the way of draining the
land it had granted or putting up any
athletic equipment. The Dominion
Government, however, had lately offered an annual giant of $3,300 to the
Provincial Government for this equipment on condition that the University
organize an officers' training corps.
Mr. Grauer asked the meeting for an
expression of opinion as to the feas-
ability of forming such a corps. A
very large majority of the meeting supported the idea and Victoria will be
immediately pressed to accept Ottawa's offer and begin work on the
playing fields.
Johnny Oliver, who is in charge of
the campaign, then spoke. He praised the campaign as carried on last
year under Ken Carlisle from which
$7,800 was raised and referred briefly
to the work accomplished last summer
(Continued on Page  6 ( THE   UBYSSEY
Men's and
Young Men's
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You can choose your new spring
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603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nova Scotia
Decay of Gentle
Custom Deplored
Contemporary Scores Modern
Attitude
Whatever charm one time attached
to the atmosphere of school is somehow disappearing now. Colleges are
too democratic, too much like great
office buildings. One sees other workers every day and recognizes them,
but does not speak to them.
And there has passed one custom
that seemed to us a charming and
gentle one, of which last kind there
were ever too few. That is the custom of lifting one's hat to a professor.
In the old days, young men were
taught to tip their hats to professional
men of standing in the same manner
they were told to lift their hats to
women. Nowadays, young men never
tip their hats to doctors or judges or
bishops or professors. We shall exclude here all mention of how they
greet women.
But it seems to us that with our
growing democracy in everything we
have lost a courtesy, a touch of gentleness that has robbed our actions of
a charm that once they had. One
walks across the campus here and
meets one's professor and speaks to
him, if one minds and is not too busy
looking at the girl on the other walk.
What it amounts to is that nowadays we do not have so much respect for learning. Teachers and other
professional men are the living embodiments of the wisdom of the ages.
When we show a respect for them
we respect not only the men but the
learning they represent and carry.—
Ex.
' The Co-ed Debate
(Continued from Page 1)
Oregon Agricultural College has
piled up quite a record in debating.
On only four occasions have they ever
been defeated in a women's debate.
Their men have an equally good record. They employ five full-time instructors in Public Speaking and Dramatics, and four assistants who take
charge of the instructional and coaching work. They debate regularly with
such institutions as the Universities
of Washington, California, Southern
California, and Willamette. A win for
U. B. C. would be a great triumph.
Let's all go and give our debaters our
hearty support. An enthusiastic audience will give our women great confidence.
ENGLISH ■
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February 26th, 1925
PLAYING SATURDa
HARRY PURDY
President of the Rugby Club
Harry is a consistent three-quarter
whose sureness of tackle has often
saved the Varsity line. Plays a heady
game, and has a powerful kick.
First Soccer Win
(Continued from Page 1)
son, Charlie Cameron and Butchart
working overtime to keep them out.
Their efforts were finally rewarded
when Rex Cameron sent in a beautiful
shot on a left-wing cross that had
Robinson beaten to a standstill. Ten
minutes later Wilkinson bulged the
net when he took a free kick just outside the penalty area which Ingram
obligingly deflected into the net in attempting to clear. Max Evans scored
his first goal about fifteen minutes
from time and so completed the scoring for the afternoon.
The Varsity defence worked well.
Eb Crute played left half in Leding-
ham's absence while Tommy Wilkinson and Lorry Baker were impressive at left and right full back. Huestis and Rex Cameron switched places,
and the change seemed to be very effective, the diminutive Varsity forward played a hangup game in the
pivot position and should give opposing net minders a lot of trouble in
the near future.
Varsity's chances of winning the
Mainland Cup look good this year.
Varsity.-—King, Baker, Wilkinson,
Buckley, Phillips, Crute, Emery,
Evans, Cameron, Jackson and Huestis.
What's Next?
That's up to you. We
are ready for anything.
You may need
NOTE PAPER
A FOUNTAIN PEN
AN EVERSHARP
DANCE PROGRAMMES
BRIDGE SCORES
FAVORS
Many other nice things here, too.
Why not make a point of coming
in one day soon?
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OUTDOORS CLUB
Owing to unfavorable weather conditions last week, the trip to Seymour
Mountain was postponed, but with a
friendly weather man, we will make
the trip this Sunday, March 1st, by
the 7.40 a.m. North Vancouver ferry.
However, watch the notice board for
further developments.
Any member wishing prints of pictures taken on Club hikes can obtain
the negatives at the kodak department of D. Spencer, Ltd., where we
now have a special box for all Outdoors Club negatives. February 26th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
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,   SPORT NEWS  |
SECOND YEAR RELAY FLASHES WIN
ARTS '20 RACE IN RECORD TIME
\s 	
The sophomores won the sixth annual Arts '20 relay race in record
time over the seven mile course from
Point Grey last Wednesday when they
nosed out Arts 25 by about fifty yards.
Science '27 and Arts '26 held down
third and fourth places respectively,
whilst the Freshies, an all star Science '26—'25 team, the Aggies, and
Science '28 came fifth, sixth, seventh
and eighth in the order named.
Prom the outset it was apparent
that it was a battle between the Arts
seniors and sophomores for premier
honors. Evans Wasson of the '25
squad set a terrific pace in the first
lap but was nosed out by Frank Elliott of '27 who uncorked a marvellous sprint and finished the lap several yards ahead of Wasson in the record time of 5 min. 20 sees. Shannon
of Sc. '27 beat out Verchere of '26 for
third place.
The second lap is the longest of the
race and is moreover of historic importance because of the great races
run there in the past by Varsity's
premier distance men. There was a
formidable array of talent this year
and McWilliams of '27 did well to increase the sophs lead when he finished well ahead in seven minutes flat.
I. Balmer of Arts 26 ran a wonderful
race passing both Kerslake and Jimmy Craig.
J. Mackay still kept '27 in the lead
on the third and Stan Arkley stepped
on the gas and brought the seniors
into second place, passing up Catteral
of '26 who finished third, while Elley
of Sc. '27 held down fourth place, the
time of the lap being 4 min. 5 sec-
Parmley almost set the road on fire
in the fourth, when he finished with a
good lead over Smith of '25 in the
fast time of 3 min. 33 sees. Potter of
'26 and Elley of Sc. '27 grabbed third
and fourth places. Receiving a good
lead from his team-mate, McKirmon
won the fifth leg of the race in comparatively slow time according to the
watches, which clocked him at 4 min.
15 sees. Lex McKillop was hot on
his heels, and Lees of Science '27
nosed out Smith of '26, and by so doing brought his team into third place,
which position the "Brown" horses
held till the end.
The sixth lap was a humdinger and
the neck and neck race staged by
Don Mackay of Arts '25 and Dave
Sturdy of Arts '27 will   live   in the
memory of U.B.C. track enthusiasts as
one of the most thrilling finishes in
the history of the annual classic. Don
Mackay deserves to be ranked with
Eddie Mulhern as a star of the race.
He ate up a fifty foot lead enjoyed by
Sturdy of '27 and after passing and repassing each other about six times the
'27 man was bound to acknowledge
defeat to the '25 speed merchant by
about three yards in the marvellous
time of 4 minutes flat. Sturdy as well
as Mackay ran a magnificent race but
the '25 man was, of course, exceptional; '25's chances looked good at the
beginning of the seventh.
Eric Forster, who won the crucial
lap for the 25 aggregation last year,
was beaten in it this time not because
he wasn't as good as ever, but because Eddie Mulhern was better. The
'25 man set a terrific pace but Mulhern dogged him until near the end
when the Track Club secretary left
him like a Montreal Flyer would a
P.G.E. freight train. The '27 were
slightly the better team and all contributed to their win but Mulhern
gave them the lead when they most
needed it and ensured the "sophs" of
victory by handing Charlie Mottley a
fifty yard lead at the end of his lap.
Arkley made a great effort to catch
the '27 President and gained slightly
on him but both of these two track
stars were too evenly matched for
either to gain or lose fifty yards. Rex
Srown of Science 27 brought his cohorts in third and if ever a class deserved to make a place Science '27
did, because of their intensive training over a period of months. Arts '26
did well to come fourth, Vincent
bringing  the   Juniors   into   place.
Arts '27 deserve a lot of credit for
their win because they took nearly a
minute off the old record of 36 min. 23
sees, held by Science '24. The sophs
negotiated the distance in 35 min.
29 4-5 sees, held by Science '24. The
sophs negotiated the distance in 35
min. 29 4-5 sees. Arts '25 also made
a great showing, since they arrived, at
the end of a seven-mile race, only
forty yards behind the record-breakers.
A great deal of the success of the
race this year is due to the efforts of
the Track Executive and to the officials of the race, Drs. Boving, Davidson, Logan, and Jack Buchanan and
Hugh Russell.
Second Soccerites
Defeat Militarists
Saturday at Marpole the_ Blue and
Gold performed the notable feat of
holding not only the Army but also
the Navy to a 3-3 tie. With a few
more Tiorseshoes Varsity would have
won as the equalizer came in the last
two minutes.
From the start Varsity looked dangerous and the opposing goalie was
forced to save in sensational fashion.
In one conglomeratioin their left back
handled in the sacred precincts. Cant
put the schoolboys one goal ahead on
the resultant penalty. The realization that their reputation was at
stake urged the army to a vigorous
offensive, in which their outside left
evened the score, fullback Crees
obligingly deflecting it into the net,
far  from  Sutherland's  greedy  hands.
After the melons, play resumed in a
very strenuous fashion and some good
soccer resulted. From a melee in
front of the Varsity goal the A. and N.
emerged one ahead but after some
hard work the score was tied by Cant-
Dynes scored on a rebound from a
hard shot by Robertson. Near the
close Sutherland saved a hot shot but
let the rebound into the net. The
game closed 3-all.
Debaters Win Easily
■' Varsity debaters added two much-
needed points to their string of victories in the Vancouver Debating
League, on Monday last, when they
defeated the Ex-King Edward team.
Varsity was representecl by T. J.
Keenan, E. Dunn, E. J. Lane. Local
supporters attribute the victory to the
arguments of Lane, the delicious,
delightful delivery of Dunn and
the tremendous, terrifying, tactics
of Keenan. Unbiased observers however, attribute the victory to the fact
that Ex-King Edward's team was unable to appear and they took the debate by default. The subject was to
have been something about the British Navy.
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UMITED
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1 AOA GRANVILLE
±\J^\J  STREET THE   UBYSSEY
February 26th, 1925
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued every  Thursday  by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural Subscription,  $2.00 per
Session.
For Advertising Rates,  apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EBITOBIAX. STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange Editor John  Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris  McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy  Editor    Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Copy Reporter  Eric Dunn
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald GillinKham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, G. W.
Ashworth, James Dunn, Dave Taylor,
T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmick, Alice
Weaver.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager H. A.  Thompson
Circulation  Manager E.   J.  Eades
Business  Assistants....!!.  G.  McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
R.  R.  Fletcher
EDITOR   FOB   THE   WEEK
Earle   Birney
WOMEN ON THE COUNCIL
This is in anticipation of a fight, and
is to be distinctly understood as being
written in a controversial spirit. The
recent amendment to the Constitution
has been the source of a new argument for limiting the executive scope
of the women students, on the ground
that the Council being smaller, the
number of women members should be
reduced.
As regards numbers, the men students are to the women students as
four to three; on the Council the men's
representatives are to the women's as
three to one. There are two offices
always held by women—the presidencies of the Women's Undergrad and
of Women's Athletics. For the last
four years a woman has held the office of secretary, with the result that
with the three offices held by them,
the men on the Council have been to
the women on the Council as three to
one. Should the women, in the coming election, win three seats, the men
on the Council (the Council being now
reduced to nine) will be to the women
on the Council as two to one. Let us
bring these ratios to a common denominator. The proportion of women
students to men students is three to
four; the proportion of women's representatives on the Council to men's
is two to four.
The women are never heard to begrudge the men their over-representation (for in all honesty that is what
it amounts to), but nothing could be
more unjust than a proposal to restrict further their representation.
(Yes, we know this makes the fifth
time, but there is no suitable synonym for "representation." We've
looked.) There is an obvious disparity now. In fairness the already existing inequality should not be increased. We have even met people
with the Audacity to suggest that the
women should be discriminated
against because they are not interested in public affairs—neither were
the working classes in England to any
extent till 1884, when they were enfranchised, but who can say that, once
the opportunity was opened to them,
they did not avail themselves of it?
Of course, this is a matter mainly
of concern to the women. Yet we
think it only right that the men
should understand just what an eagerness for office in their ranks may involve. Custom demands that we end
this appeal with "tuum est." (Patient
Pythagoras! it's a mercy we don't
have to write these mathematical editorials more than once a year.)
Senior "A" Continue
Winning Streak
Varsity Basketers Defeat
Rowing Club, 22-14
The Varsity Senior A baskelball continued their upward climb to the
championship of the Vancouver and
District League last Saturday evening when they defeated the-Rowing
Club 22-14 after one of the roughest
games of the season. Referee Wiggins officiated quite leniently, allowing much to pass unseen.
The game opened with a rush, Varsity scoring four points through Grauer
before the Club found the basket. The
first half was very even; the Rowers
were leading by one point a minute
before half time when Tommy Wilkinson notched a couple of free throws
and placed Varsity in the lead 12-11.
The second half was featured with
hard checking. Arkley and Wilkinson
of Varsity both retired from the game
on account of injuries and Johnson of
the Rowing Club received a nasty blow
in the mouth. In this half Varsity was
taking exceptionally good advantage
of their breaks. They worked together well and passed quickly to the
man under the basket.
The win places Varsity just two
points behind the league leading Y.
M. C. A. team. If they continue their
present pace they should succeed in
copping the honors.
The Team—Grauer 6, Peck 2, Buchanan 5, A. Henderson 4, Newcombe,
Wilkinson 3, H. Henderson, H. Arkley
2, Dad Hartley.
VOTING AS IT
SHOULD BE DONE
/
Student Elections at Alberta
With the time of the Student Elections again approaching, it should be
the business of every active person
who does not take an active part in
promoting the interests of one particular candidate to inform himself
as much as possible as to the merits
and proposed policies of those who are
seeking election so as to be able to
cas^an intelligent vote when the time
comes.
There was a good deal of complaint
last year because certain neutral parties suffered their ballots to be marked
for them by more enthusiastic partisans. Granted that this is an evil
the remedy for it does not lie in
quarantining the members of the electorate while marking their ballots,
but in making sure beforehand that
they are too well informed about the
candidates to want to give their votes
away.
The worst feature of the Student
Elections the last year or two has
been the manner in which colleges
have divided up and supported their
own men quite regardless of their
merits. It is not really a compliment
to a candidate to urge that he deserves election simply on the strength
of the college he happens to belong
to, and we cannot claim to have a
very intelligent electorate here so
long as arguments of that description
carry weight with it. Canvassing of
such a description simply reduces
election to a farce and gives office to
him who has the most impudent supporters.
The best opportunity that candidates for election have of conducting
a campaign along orthodox lines is
at the mass meeting which precedes
the elections, and students cannot be
urged too strongly to attend this, and
form opinions of the men and their
policies. Those who fail to do this
would be well advised not to vote at
all.—The Sheaf.
Badminton Club
\y     Has Busy Week
Finals, Cups, Fox-trots
and Aces
The last few days have been a busy
period for the Badminton Club members.
On Tuesday, 17th February, the
finals of the tournament were played
in King Edward Gymn. Some excellent games were seen, notably in the
Men's Singles, when Hincks beat
Argue and the Ladies' Singles when
Miss V. Milliner defeated Joan Creer
after three hard games.
At the conclusion of play spectators
and players adjourned to Laurel Tennis
Club where the prizes were presented-
Mr. Bentham of Messrs A. G. Spauld-
ing presented the cup given by his
firm for the mixed doubles. This latest addition to the club's challenge
trophies is an exceedingly handsome
cup, standing some eighteen inches
high. Messrs. Spalding, have also
given two individual cups to be kept by
the winners. Mr. J. Allardyce then
presented the remaining cups which
took him somewhat longer than last
year as this time no winners went unrewarded. Refreshments were then
served. Subsequently, with Dick Davidson and Ralph Argue at the piano,
the company present indulged in an
informal dance.
On Monday last the club held a
bridge evening in the Auditorium when
some sixty members and friends gathered to discover whether the ace of
trumps was still good for a trick.
There were also one or two tables of
Mah Jongg. Prizes presented by Mrs.
Hockin were drawn for from the top
players at each table. Miss Irwin performed the rite of drawing the winners from the hat and showed uncanny
skill by producing her own name first-
Miss E. Rilance and C. Townsend
secured the second prize. Mrs. Hockin, Mrs. Schofield and Mrs. Allardyce
were patronesses.
The affair was voted a success even
by those heroic members who stayed
to straighten things out when it was
all  over.
the Varsity Clothes
Shop of Young Wen
Make this store your Headquarters when you are down
town (or any information you
want about clothes.
You are always welcome
to our showing service.
THE SHOP OF
fashion Craft
Thos, Foster Mo,, Ltd
ONE STORE ONLY
608 Granville Street
J
Oratorical Contest
To-night at 8 p.m., the Men's Oratorical Contest takes place. The
speakers will be James Craig, who
will address the audience on the Problem of World Peace and the League
of Nations as a possible solution.
Eric Dunn, who will speak on Democracy as a Government Institution.
S. Maikawa, who will speak on Immigration Exclusion, and Education.
Ralph Norman of Arts '26 will speak
on the "Necessity for Suppressing
Women." David A. Sturdy, Arts '27,
of Relay and Vancouver Debating
League fame will speak on "The Racial Menace, European or Asiatic?"
The Varsity Senior A Basketball
squad will play the league-leading
Y.M.C.A. team at the Normal Gym
tonight. If Varsity wins they will tie
for the LEAGUE LEADERSHIP.
Let's go.
Safer
Streets
T IGHTER streets are safer streets—
safer   from  accidents   and   from
holdups.
Notice the new lighting on Granville
Street South, Vancouver, which is
now one of the best lighted streets in
this part of the country.
Good street lighting pays for itself
in the business it brings. Current
today is so cheap that good lighting is
within the reach of everyone.
British Columbia ® ELECTRictoirarCo.
HEAD OFFICE
VANCOUVER^, B.C.
71
%3]jMiEiEJEJEIEISlBJ!M February 26th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
"VARSITY"
Outstanding Styles
In Young Men's
OXFORDS
Scotch Grain Calf.
Black and New Shade Tan.
Toes—Square, Plain,
No Box.
Soles—Oak Leather, Crepe.
PRICED
$8.50
WILSOKS
TWIN SHOE STORE
157.159  Ha.ting. St., W.
4|k*)«»»«»i
. .*..«M*««M*.^~»~*.*«..«~«~»~«**«"«~({t
Home Cooking.
Entire Staff Canadian Women.
Phone, Seymour 8403
KRGYLE TEK ROOM
717 DUNSMUIR STREET
Just around the corner from Drysdale' s
Mrs. Agrnes Orr Robinson, Proprietress
BREAKFAST
25c. up.
AFTERNOON TEA
25c. up.
LUNCH, 40c up.     DINNER, 40c. up.
Evans & Hastings
-:-     -:-      PIONEER      -:-     -:-
BETTER QUALITY. PRINTERS
Prices Right
c®
i    34-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL    BUSINESS    CAREER
IN    VANCOUVER    PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE  ARE    FAVORED   MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING PUBLIC
WHEN   THEY    DESIRE   THEIR
MONEY'S WORTH.
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
3024 Beach Ave.    Phone, Sey. 9032
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and all Accommodation.
. = ^= N
Portraits can be made
at
any
time from the
GRADUATION
PHOTOGRAPHS
(EAJt^      STUDIOS
v>	
1a
'         553 Granville St.
           '
Correspondence
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility   for   any   of the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words In length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following   Thursday.
\ AN OPEN  LETTER.
Dear Dal: —
I wish to make a full confession of
a banquet and theatre party held last
Thursday night when the boys of the
Arts '27 and Arts '25 relay teams and
their trainers got together to celebrate
the breaking of the record in the
Arts 20 race.
Everyone was at the banquet except Charlie Mottley who said he
would not go unless he could take a
girl. He said he was tired of petting
Mulhern.
We went to McLeods Cafe, you
know that place where you go downstairs and spend ten. Some of us had
the turkey dinner and some had pork
tenderloin or sirloin tip roasts. Bert
Smith, who holds an office on the Students' Council that will not be there
next year, insisted that since it was
a stag party he should have venison.
I was ashamed of the way he acted.
After we had eaten as much as we
could afford to pay lor we smoked one
another's fags for a while and when
our consciences said we should not
hold our seats too long we beat it.
We went to a drug store where we
saw Charlie Mottley. He was in the
dispensing department and Heily Arkley asked him if he was going to dispense drinks.    He didn't.
We wasted time until we were
ready for the show.
That was the feature event. Eddie
Eades arranged the theatre and we
all sneaked in without paying. It was
at the Strand. Pola Negri was taking
part in the picture and was so thrilling that Lex McKillop insisted upon
going behind the screen to make a
date with her after the show.
When we had seen the picture and
found it was impossible to take Pola
home we broke up into parties of one
and two. Some went home. Lex and
I went out together but it is none of
your business what took place after
the party was officially over.
Yours truly,
K.A.S.
British Music Is
Institute Subject
"British Music" was the theme of a
delightfully informative address presented at the Vancouver InstijfeUte last
Thursday by Mrs. Walter jZoulthard,
a prominent member of the Vancouver
Musical Society.
Several accomplished artists contributed to the programme, which was
arranged to illustrate the work of
leading British composers, both past
and present.
Modern British music is built up on
the traditions of four great men
whose names stand out with distinction: William Byrd, Henry Purcell,
Thomas Arne, and Sir Edward Elgar.
The presiding artists rendered some
very humorous selections from Gay's
"Beggar's Opera," an 18th century
production, which is being revived
with great enthusiasm by music lovers of Britain.
The speaker concluded by paying
tribute to the achievements of some
of the ultra-modern artists, among
them worthy of special mention being Bax, Delius, Holet, Grossens,
Vaughn Williams, Ireland, Scott,
Boughton and Dame Ethel Smyth.
THOSE IN RACE
FOR ^RESIDENCY
Monday next is nomination day and
the following Monday is election day
for president of the Alma Mater. It
can be now fairly definitely stated that
there will be three candidates,
i.e., Messrs. Harry_Bt__Pjjrdy, Arts
'26; M^_C. Taylor, Arts '26; .Th°> G-
Wilkinson," ^Agric. '26, although the
last named is as yet a doubtful starter.
However, this is about all that can
be definitely stated "without fear of
successful contradiction."
Everything points to a most successful election. The landslides of
last year will not be repeated this
year. It is still absolutely impossible
to pick a winner or eliminate one of
the three candidates from the running.
Added to this, the introduction of the
transferable ballot system still further complicates matters. All three
candidates, from a merit point of view,
are fairly equal. In a plurality election, therefore, the candidate with the
largest single element supporting him
would probably be elected.
Wilkinson is an Aggie, and the Aggies always vote in a bloc. Therefore, with a 56 vote lead before the
votes of the more or less uncomprom-
ised sections of the student body are
counted, Wilkinson could afford to
poll about 28% of the other nine hundred odd students and still be elected.
All of which would make the lot of
the election prophet simpler and con-
sirerably easier.
But the transferable ballot spoils all
this. To be elected a candidate now
needs a clear majority. And 56 votes
as a start is a mere drop in the
bucket when you are seeking a majority and not a plurality. The result is,
therefore, that whoever gets elected
he will have to obtain a majority in at
least two out of the three faculties.
He will then be "the best man for the
job."
But which of the three men is the
best man for the job is hard to find
out at this early state. I have spoken
to supporters of all three candidates
and each has convinced me that the
other two are hopeless. In the circumstances, I shall probably run myself—X. McG.
The Varsity Senior A Basketball
squad will play the league-leading
Y.M.C.A. team at the Normalv Gym
tonight. If Varsity wins they will tie
for the LEAGUE LEADERSHIP.
Let's go.
ANNOUNCING A
10-DAY
Sale of Books
COMMENCING
Thursday, Feb. 26th
Offering Exceptional Bargains in Books
and Poetry by such famous authors as
E. B. Browning, Sir Walter Scott, John
Keats and other noted writers.
Regular $1.00 Values
for 59 Cents
Stationery Department
Main Floor
% ^ojaJaft ^aiitijane %
VANCOUVER, B.C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
-OF-
C0MMERCE and TELECRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming. M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can b* of any service to you,
give us a call.
pl___.) Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
rnone8 1 Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
Oh Boy, DID I DANCE ?"
Ask .  Say,  we   never  missed   a  dance.    I never
enjoyed myself so much ! "You know," he said, "I often
read your advertisement about learning to dance in two
or three lessons.    I didn't believe it, but say, I LEARNED
MORE HERE than 1 ever believed  possible, and J ,
he danced the Collegian Walk and those New Spins to
pe/fection. - Private lessons anytime. The cost is half
what you think it is.
Vaughan Moore Private Dancing School
518 Hastings Street, West, Opposite David Spencer's
PHONE: Sey. 707
AMBASSADOR CAFE
610 Seymour Street
Headquarters for Service
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing. Entertainment
EVERY EVENING
9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. THE   UBYSSEY
February 26th, 1925
Rivals the beauty of
the Scarlet Yanager
Point
Guaranteed if
not mistreated
for 25 years'
wear
Duofold Takes
Longer to Fill
Because of Its
Over-size Ink
Capacity. Press
the Button, release and count
10, before you
withdraw the
Penfromtheink.
Remember
This Pen's
Record
Has Never Been Equalled
When You're Offered a Pen
"as good as the Duofold"
REMEMBER the four expert
- train dispatchers who have
written at a gruelling pace with
Parker Duofold, 8 hours a day
for about two years.
Or the business executive who
signed his name to 1067checks in
an hour and 30 minutes, without refilling his Duofold once.
Or the 31,000 hotel guests who
registered with a Duofold that
still writes as if only one hand
had ever used it.
Yes, the Duofold's super-
smooth point has a speedy gait
on paper, and no style of writing can distort it.
And this black-tipped lacquer-
red beauty will ever flash your
eye its friendly reminder not to
leave your pen behind when
you lay it down.
Sold by Stationery, Jewelry,
Drug and Department Stores
The Parker Fountain Per Co., Limited
Factory and General Offices
Toronto Ontario
Parker Duofold Pencils
to match the pen, $3.50; Oversize $4
Varh
[If Oar Feint
Duofold Jr. ?5 Lady Duofold J5
Same except for size With ring for chatelaine
Is total exclusion of Japanese better
than restriction on a quota basis?
Come and hear an interesting discussion of this pressing question. Tuesday evening, King Edward Auditorium,
8  p.m.
I CO-ED ATHLETICS
-l«i-|l«|H»-»"»l
y   SWIMMING
The annual swimming meet staged
by Varsity and the V.A.S.C. was held
on February 18th in the Canadian
Memorial tank. The competition was
keen, and Varsity lost by a small margin   of   points.
Winners of the different events
were as  follows:
50 yards, free style.—R. Tingley,
V.A.S.C; M. Dye, V.A.S.C; L. Green,
Varsity.
100 yards, free style.—R. Tingley,
V.A.S.C;   S. Thrupp, Varsity.
Plunge.—J. Gilley, Varsity; M. Dye,
V.A.S.C;   M.   Chapman, Varsity.
200 yards, free style.—R. Tingley,
V.A.S.C;   S. Thrupp, Varsity.
50 yards, back stroke.—R. Tingley,
V.A.S.C; F. Gignac, Varsity.
Diving.—L. Green, Varsity.
100 yards, breast stroke.—IS. Thrupp,
Varsity; F. James, Varsity; M. Stod-
dart, V.A.S.C.
Relay.—1st, V.A.S.C—R. Tingley,
M. Dye, M. Stoddart. 2nd Varsity—
L. Green, M. Wilkinson, M. Chapman,
L. Mowatt.
Caution Money
(Continued from Page 1)
under the supervision of Hedley and
Buckley. The grounds have been partially drained and a temporary field
on the ridge of 700x300 feet has been
levelled. But all the money is gone; in
fact the campaign is $80 in debt. Mr.
Oliver then stated that as well as a
fence and grandstand a quarter-mile
track and a 220 yard straightaway are
immediately necessary. These will
cost no small sum of money, for the
track itself will protably amount to
three or four hundred dollars. It was
too late, he said, for a vigorous campaign and he made a plea to the
students for their caution money to
be collected in the same way as last
year. If this is done the University
will have a most potential argument
to place before the Provincial Government- He ended by recalling the
struggling days of the Point Grey
emancipatory movement and with the
dream now almost a reality, he begged the students not to cease till the
task was finished.
Bert Smith initiated the meeting
into the intricacies of the proposed
transfer vote in the coming election.
Bert's mathematical erudition stood
him in good stead when he was manipulating the A's and B's but even he
seemed joyous when he managed to
substitute an x in his solution. This
system is to apply only to the election
of the president.
Mr. Wilkinson on behalf of the athletic organizations asked support for
coming games mentioning the soccer
team, the McKechnie game and the
Senior A basketball. This latter he
referred to particularly, praising the
work of coach Ross Bryson and asking the students to help the team in
its fight for provincial honors.
At the close of the meeting a vote
was taken and the suggested transfer
vote system adopted.
BASKETBALL
Bothrif'Varsity's Intermediate men's
basketball teams were successful in
their games last week at the Normal
Gymn. The Intermediate B team
swamped Normal i$~ 58-8, while the Intermediate A crew won from the Normals A 24-17 in a hard-fought struggle.
The Intermediate B fixture was a
walk away for the Varsity boys. Ernie
Lee, the find of the season notched 26
points for his team. The Intermediate
A contest was closely contested and
at times rough. Twenty-two personals
were handed out by referee Riley
B
LITERARY CORNER
^/TO THE UNKNOWN GOD.
(From the German of Friedrick
Nietzsche.)
Ere yet I cast a glance before,
Ere I go further, now once more,
Once more I raise my hands to Thee,
To Whom I now deserted flee,
To Whom, deep down within my heart,
Are solemn altars set apart,
So that whatever might befall,
Thy' voice again to me might call.
And  thereon, deeply carven, glows,
The  word,   "To  God  Whom  No  One
Knows."
For I am Ris, though I remain
Till now in pleasure's wanton train.
Yes, I am His, His toils I know
That in the battle dragged me low;
Vainly I strive his bonds to flee,
To his own service binding me.
Thee would I know, O thou Unknown,
Who, where my soul is hidden deepest,
Holdest it fast, and stormlike sweep-
est
Through all my life, Who still must
be
Intangible—yet kin to me.
Thee would I know and serve alone.
SPRING PLAY HAS
COMPETENT CAST
In view of the fact that much interest has been aroused by the choice
of the Players' Club for the annual
spring play, a brief review of the
stage experience of the various members of the cast may be appreciated.
The one to make the first appearance
on the U. B. C stage is Mr. Kenny
Caple, who played in "The Maker of
Dreams" in his freshman year. Later,
in 1923, he filled the part of the
charming young gallant in "The Romancers," and now again we find him
as the youthful lover in "You and I."
Mr. Harry Warren made his debut
here also in 1921, when he took the
part of the butler in "The Twelve
Pound Look." The following Christmas performance he appeared in "Rococo." In 1923 he played in "The Romancers," and in the last private
plays was seen in "The Dollar."
Another well-known member of the
cast is Mr. Tommy Taylor, the Varsity Marshal. He is the only one who
has before appeared in a Spring Play,
taking a part, as he did, in last year's
production, "The World and His
Wife." In addition to this, Mr. Taylor
played in "The Romancers" in 1923.
Mr. Peter Price of Sc. '25 also is no
stranger to University audiences, having been seen in "The Ghost Story,"
and more recently, in "Figureheads."
In this year's production, he is taking
one of the leading parts, that of
Matey.
In "You and I" the three feminine
roles are all held by members of the
Club who have had but little previous
experience in University dramatics.
Miss Avis Pumphrey played a minor
part in last year's performance, "The
World and His Wife," and also appeared in "Figureheads." As Mrs.
Dowey, in "The Old Lady Shows Her
Medals," Miss Bice Clegg made a decidedly favorable impression last
Christmas, and all who saw her very
fine piece of acting on that occasion
are confident that she will make an
equal success of her role as Nancy.
But the unknown quantity as yet of
the play, is Miss Oenone Baillie, the
leading lady in "You and I." So far,
she has not appeared in any of the
club's productions, so that her election to an important role as that of
Ronny speaks well for her dramatic
ability.
We Cive 10   Off To Students
VARSITY SHIRTS
With collars attached in the
new plain colors. Materials of
English Soissette, Bombay and
Tricoline.
PK $2.25 to $5.00
NEXT TO CASTLE HOTEL
GRANVILLE
We Cive 10% Off To Students
ENGINEERING and
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
Canadian Distributors for
A. W. Faber Pencils
Carl Zeiss Binoculars
Icacameras
Hughes Owens Co. Ltd.
Gait Building
WINNIPE6  -   -   Manitoba
THE ONE GIFT
That Straightens Friendship
That is Always Appreciated
That Never Requires an Occasion
YOUR PHOTOGRAPH
Make an Appointment To-day
X
CHARLTON fi RATH BIN:
PHOTOGRAPHERS
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hastings St., E.
(Juit E..I of B. C. E. Rly. and Crr.ll Si.)
Phone, Seymour jj6g
We  have a large
variety of
Beautiful Playing Cards
Loose-Leaf Books and
Refills
Fountain Pens
Propelling Pencils
Drawing Instruments
and Materials
THE
Clarke & Stuart
Co., Ltd.
-:- Educational Supplies -:-
550 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE, SEYMOUR 3000 February 26th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster Ltd.
j^5 Hastings Sheet,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See US Before Buying
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
Jfunrral BtmiorB
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE. FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
Phones : Fair. 77, Fair. g66o-R
WILLOW HftLL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties. |
  •
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,   \
Proprietor. j
t
No Charge for Extra Passengers
5   Can Ride for the
Price of One.
PHONE
SEYMOUR
4000
Ode to Nuxated Iron.
Curfew  shall  not  ring  tonight.
(I think they'll have to scrap her.)
For father had to have his iron
And he went and et the clapper.
Ex. —BIG BROTHER.
First Cullud Lady: Dat baby of
yourn 's sho' a pufflc image ob his
daddy.
Second Cullud Lady: Yas, a regular carbon  copy, yo'might  say.—Ex.
Prof.: "You should put a copy of
your essay in the library."
Honor Stude: "Too late. There's
one there already."—Gateway.
A man in a mental hospital sat handling a stick with a piece of string
attached over a flower bed. A visitor
approached, and wishing to be affable,
remarked:
"How many have you caught?"
"You're'the ninth," was the reply.—
As she stifled a yawn, she asked
sweetly, "Is your watch going,
George ?"
"Yep," answered George.
"How  soon?"—Ex.
Rif: "Why do cigarettes have oriental names?"
Raff: "Because they have good
shapes and thin wrappers."
—Technique.
Mistaken   Kindness.
The sad story is told of a kind lady
who, seeing a poor dog nearly freezing took it in from the cold.    Now it
is a hot dog.—Ex.
"How I love dogs!  the maiden cried,
And then her suitor softly sighed
I wish I were a dog, you know;
"Oh, well," she  said, "perhaps you'll
grow!" —Ex.
"Did you notice that insolent conductor looking at you as if you hadn't
paid your fare?"
"Yes, and did you notice me looking at him as if I had?"—Ex.
"Hey, buddie, got some ivory soap?"
a voice from the bathroom said.
"Sure," answered buddy liberal,
"you wanta wash your head?"—Ex.
He told her he had a great big, new,
yellow car. It was all shiny and bright
and spiffy. He said it had cost a fortune, too. He told her he was learning to run the car by driving it eight
hours every day up and down through
the busy streets of the town.
He told her all this.
She believed him.
And it was true.
He was the new motorman for the
street car company.—Ex.
Ancient History.
Claude Laws took his wife and
baby to see the Pan this week, but
before they had seen the first act
through Mr. Laws Junior started hitting static, with the result that one of
the ushers came down and said: "Sir,
if that baby cries again I'll have to
ask you to step into the box office and
get your money back." Ten minutes
before the close of the show Claude
passed his tie pin to his wife. "Mother," said he; "quick, stick it into the
baby." —Ex.
The last debate of the year, Tuesday, March 3, at 8 p.m., King Edward
Auditorium. "Resolved that the restriction of Japanese immigration on
a quota basis is better than total exclusion."    Everybody out!
Diagnosed
"Are you sure it is really and truly
love?" she asked.
"Positive," answered the practical
young man who had just proposed.
"You see I doctored myself for two
weeks for indigestion before deciding
just what the symptoms meant. Oh,
it's love all right."—Ex.
Cynthia (at Hallowe'en carnival):
Oh, you're Titus Andronicus, are you,
Hugh?
Hugh: I dunno who this guy Andronicus is, but if he's any tighter
than I am, I'd like to see him.—Ex.
Hair Cure.
"Will this surely grow hair?"
"Will it!    I spilled some on the oilcloth  last night  and this  morning it
was a rug!"—Ex.
Fair Maid: I wonder what causes
the flight of time?
Brilliant Young Man: It is probably urged on by the spur of the moment.—Ex.
What is a pedestrian?
Sir, a pedestrian is the raw material for accidents.—Ex.
"Ah, Mary, you are just as beautiful
as ever and I have never forgotten
you."
"And Sandy, you are just as big a
liar as ever and I believed you just
the   same."—Ex.
Wife: Didn't I hear the clock
strike two as you came in last night?"
Other Half: "You did. It started
to strike eleven an' I stopped it so's
not to waken you."—Ex.
Recipe for curing bunions, calf love,
sleeping sickness or that tired feeling:
Stick your head into a barrel of
water three times, and pull it out
twice.—Ex.
••-••^.•■^»
Him: "Darling, I'm going to marry
you."
Her:    "Have you seen Ma."
Him:     "Yes,   but  she's  too  old."—
Ex.
<s»>.>*-....".......>>.".»..4........».>.-«>*».......-^>....~^4»
!  The Week's Events j
i i
Thursday, February 26—To-night—
Oratorical Contest in Auditorium.
Friday,   February  27—
Arts '25 Class Party in Auditorium.
Senior  A  vs.  Y.M.C.A.,  Basketball,
Normal Gym.
Saturday,  February 28—
McKechnie Cup Rugby at Brockton
Point, Varsity vs. Vancouver Rep.
Arts '26 Hike to McKechnie game
and Park Pavilion.
Rugby   at   Athletic   Park,   Varsity
Seniors vs. Kerrisdale.
Soccer—Varsity   Seconds   vs.   Mal-
kins, Marpole, 2.30 p.m.
Sunday, March 1—
Outdoors Club, Seymour Peak.
Monday, March 2—
Nominations for President of A. M.
S.
8 p.m. — Pianist Club.   Paper, Chin-
•   ■ ese Music, Mr. F. English. Classics
Club, Prof. Logan, 7856 Heather St.
Tuesday,  March 3—
Debate in King Ed. Auditorium, U.
B. C. vs. Corvallis, Everybody out!
Wednesday, March 4—
Faculty   Women's    Club   Entertain
Arts '27 at Tea in Cafeteria from
4 to  6 o'clock.
Council   vs.   Faculty  Basketball   at
Normal.
The
Wonder Weave
Fabric
Comes in a nice fawn shade, made
up in a smart Young Man's 1-button
suit.
$34.50
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
m COMMERCIAL
and Secretarial School
INDIVIDUAL COURSES
709 GEORGIA STREET, W.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
BOOKS
All Kinds of Books
Usual and Unusual.
LANG'S
Old Original Bookstore
1184 Granville St.
Phone, Seymour 1013
After the Show	
Visit Our
Soda Fountain
.«~«^>*^.
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
\Jhe largest selling
quality pencil
in the world
17
black
degrees
3
copying
Superlative in quality,
the world-famous
V
ENUS,
PENCILS
give best service and
longest wear.
Plain ends, per doz.        $1.25
Rubber ends, per doz.    $1.75
oAt all dealers
American Lead Pencil Co.
v        220 Fifth Ave., N. Y. THE   UBYSSEY
February 26th, 1925
WE HAVE THE BEST
Adjustable Clamp Lamp
ON THE MARKET.
Can be attached anywhere.     Movable
Shade.   Indispensable to every student.
Price, $2.50 only
including six feet of cord.
For sale only at the
GREAT WEST SALES CO.
Room 309, 315 PENDER ST., W.
Say you saw it in the "Ubyssey"
BAGGAGE
XO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY. 6
DANCING
a;
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
I
James Peter Fergusson
TEACHER OF
Elocution, Public Speaking, Dramatic
Art, Acting and Interpretation.
Second place obtained in B. C. Musical
Festival, 1924.
Pupils Coached for 1925 Festival.
Studii
For terms apply :
-   -   70 Fairfield Building
} Phone, Seymour 2734
1    Residence  -   1504- 14th Ave., W.
Phone, Bayview 4101-R
IN ACTION SATURDAY
BRIT.
Brit played on the all-star Mainland
team. He is everything that a forward should be—has a good tackle,
is a fast dribbler, and is on the ball
every minute.
AL^BUCHANAN
Buck will be there on Saturday to
give Varsity the benefit of his experience, rugby brains, and pep that
lasts every minute of the game. He
will play at inside three-quarter.
ARTS '28 NOTES
A big rugby pep meeting, organized
by the men and women of Arts '28, is
scheduled to take place in the Auditorium at noon tomorrow. Although
a considerable time will be devoted
to yells and speeches for the crucial
McKechnie game at Brockton Point on
Saturday afternoon, the Freshmen
have arranged for an attractive musical   and   vaudeville   program.
Tickets for the Arts '28 Class Party
at Lester Court on March 6, will be
given to the girls only on Monday at
3 o'clock and on Tuesday at 12 o'clock
in the Students' Council Office. One
ticket admits one couple to the dance,
and if the boys are anxious to take
charge of the "identification cards,"
they must immediately communicate
with their partners.
The executive of Arts '28 has accepted the proposal of the Players'
Club to remove a great burden from
the shoulders of the Club's business
managers by purchasing two hundred
and seventy-eight tickets for the second balcony of the Orpheum Theatre
on the night of March 16, when the
students present P. Barry's play, "You
and I." The reserved section in the
balcony is one of the best locations
in the theatre. All students who are
anxious to secure tickets for this miniature frosh theatre party are requested to get in touch with the sub-marshals immediately.   Tickets are 75c.
At 3.30 p.m. next Wednesday, in the
Auditorium of the Aberdeen School,
the Freshmen debating team, composed of Mr. Masterman and Mr. Wright,
will take the affirmative side of the
subject, "Resolved that the expenditure of public funds to secure immigration is in the best interests of
Canada," in the debate against King
George High School. Arts '28! Turn
out and support your men.
Freshmen! Are you busy to-morrow at 12 o'clock? Turn out to the
Rugby Pep Meeting organized by Arts
'28. An eleven-piece orchestra will be
in attendance.
WANTED—1400 students to hear
the first women's dual debate in the
history of U. B. C. Tuesday evening,
March 3, at 8 p.m.
Smwm&rb,
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
"Somnter's Purple Stripe"
Full-Fashioned
Silk Stockings
$2.00 A Pair
Generous full length stocking,
sizes 8}4 to 10. All new colors.
Now we can equal in value
and price similar stockings sold
in any American city. Pure
thread silk, free from foreign
substances. Made on a new
type machine, permitting sufficient elasticity to fit any size
limb. Foot has narrow sole
splicings and short toe to suit
present style low shoes.
Equal to any $3.00 hose sold
in the city.
WEAR   A   MANN'S   SHIRT
Just Arrived!
Aeroplane
Lineen Shirts
In Cream and Plain White
with Silk Stripes, Soft
Collars to match, very
smart with a new Swiss
Silk Tie.
$3.00
Three Sleeve Lengths
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
Shirt Specialist
TWO   STORES:
411 and 474 Granville St.
WEAR   A  MANN'S SHIRT
WHOOJA GET . . .
FOR THE CLASS DANCE ?
However that really matters very little. The main thing is how will
you dance? Will you be numbered among the wallflowers, or the
triumphant ones ? It costs so little to be among the latter, but you
cannot delay—see us now
Broadway Dancing School
1400 BROADWAY, W. (One Block East of Granville St.)
Phone, Bay. 5834 "We Correct All Faults."
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead
^•A'WlVWlVvA'VVAVWiWlWlVv/i'WiVtyj^vy'Vvyj;'
FYFRYROHY AT RROfETON—SATURDAY   2-4£

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