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The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1936

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 INITIATION DATES
Rtgilii worn Sept. 28-Oet.   8
Frsihette tea Sept. 28
Freshette dinner  Oct.   1
Froih smoker  Oct.   1
Frosh Reception  Oct.   8
A.M.S. DATES
Class elections  Sept. 30
A.M.U.S. elections Oct.   1
Intramurals begin Oct.   5
Song and yell Sept. 30
First stadium game Oct.   3
Published Twice
Publications Board of the
Weekly by the
University of British Columbia
Vol. XIV
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY; SEPTEMBER 29, 1936
No. 2
COUNCIL SETS
PARTY DATES
The tentative  social program for the coming season
was ratified by Council last
night after a lengthy discussion, and the suggested dates
are as follows:
' October 8—Froah Reception
October 80—Hi-Jinx
Nov. 6—Senior Class Party
Nov. 7—Home-coming  and  Tea
Dance
Nov. 19—Arts-Aggie Ball
Nov. 27—Science Class Party
Nov. 26-27-28—Christmas Plays
Jan. 20—Nurses' Ball
Jan, 28—Junior Prom
Feb. 4—Arts 40 Class Party
Feb. 11—Science Ball
Feb. 17-18-19-20—Spring Playa
Feb. 26—Co-ed
Mar. 8-4-6-«—Spring Plays
The date for the Arts 89 Class
Party has not yet been settled.
The appointment of Dick Slaon,
veteran pubster, to the position of
Sports Editor on the Publications
Board was ratified by Council.
Timetables for clubs desiring the
use of the Gym will be arranged by
a Oym Committee consisting of
Beth Evans and Dave Carey. Athletic Organisations are asked to
communicate with the committee at
once.
As a result of the Frosh-Sopho-
more fights which threatened damage to the auditorium and surroundings yesterday noon, a motion was
passed advocating that the Big
Block Club should be made responsible for discipline on such occasions during the remainder of the
year.
Permission was granted the Rugby Club to hold a Pep Meeting in
the Auditorium Friday noon.
The date for the Fall meeting of
the Alma Mater Society was announced for Wednesday noon, October 7.
Exchange Studcnti
Cirmustantial proof that Easterners are smoothies and hypocrites is this snap of three exchange students studying a page
of ads and registering interest and approval. They are, left
to right, James Rigby, from Toronto Varsity; Stewart Calvert,
University of Western Ontario, and Richard "Digby" Lynch,
from Dalhousie.
Behave Like Humans
Says Horwood
FYeshettes who turned out in
large numbers to the Woman's Undergraduate meeting Monday noon
received a special welcome from
Audrey Horwood, President of the
Society.
"You have already had a rather
extensive course of lectures from
members of faculty on how to -behave, how to study and how to get
the most out of your University
career," she said. "My message to
you is simply this: "Behave like
human beings."
After stressing the need for
friendliness on the campus, the
president outlined activities planned for freshettes. These include
the Freshette Supper in the Cafeteria Thursday, Oct. 1st, and the
Firesides arranged by Phrateres
for Oct. 4. Following the firesides
a service for all University students will be held in the Canadian
Memorial Chapel. The Frosh Reception, Oct. 8, winds up the initiation period.
To assist in plans for the last
entertainment five freshettes were
nominated: Phyllis McEwan, Marion Reed, Mary Coventon, Helene
Debusay and Effle Morris.
The new edict of a "pigtail secured by a clothespin" was explained by the freshettes' chairman
to the warm aplpause of Uper-
classwomen.
The new executive declared its
policy as follows:
1. To promote a spirit of good fellowship among students on the
campus.
2. To contribute to the fund for
the Brock Memorial Building by
means of the regular functions
of the W. U. S.
3. To place unstinted effort behind
every project which the society
sees fit to undertake.
4. To encourage and stimulate interest in the new department of
physical education.
5. To attempt to improve the existing programme for the women students.
The executive consists of Peggy
Fox, vice-president; Marjory Jessup, secretary; Joe Dickie, treasurer; Madge Neill, president of Phrateres, and Ethel Rolston, president
of nursing.
Dean Bollert, honorary president,
then addressed the women, expressing her wish that during the year
they might expand broadly and
generally along intellectual and
spiritual lines.
New "Prosperity Certificate"
No Good at Alberta I)
Province of Alberta Savings Certificates
Will Be Accepted, However
By LARRY ALEXANDER
UNIVERSITY OP ALBERTA, Edmonton (WIPU)—Holders of Alberta "Prosperity Certificates" or "scrips" as It Is
popularly called, will be out of luck as far as the Alberta
University is concerned. Prosperity certificates will definitely not be accepted in payment of fees, room or board, and
in fact, are completely useless for making any payments
whatever around the University.
The University of Alberta will,
Discipline
Committee
Takes Action
Song Meeting Yesterday
Termed a "Riot"
According to advice re*
ceived jutt oefore going to
press, the Discipline Committee has already taken
aotion and damped down
on offenders at yesterday's
noon meet.
however, accept Province of Alberta Savings Certificates ln payment of students' fees, it was announced yesterday by A. West, Bursar of the University. For several
years the provincial government
operated a savings branch, Issuing
savings certificates payable to depositors on demand, or after periods of three or Ave years.
Last year, owing to a feeling of
uncertainty as tto the outcome of
the provincial election, constant
withdrawals of money from the
Savings department caused government officials considerable worry.
Late in the summer these withdrawals developed into a "run" on the department and the U. F. A. government which was then in power, suspended payment on the certificates.
So far the Social Credit government has been unable to resume
payment. It is estimated that
about 19,000,000 is tied up ln the
savings certificates. The provincial
government has been paying out
money ln some needy cases, and
last year the University announced
that would-be students holding certificates might present them in payment of tees. This year's announcement is in line with the policy
which was adopted last winter.
Class Elections
Tomorrow
Good Turnout Desired
Nominations for the executives of the various arts and
science classes will be held on
Wednesday at 12.15. It is
very important that all the
members of the classes should
turn out, according to John
Witbeck, Men's Undergrad
representative.
Nominations for class presidents
must be in the hands of Mr. Horn
in the Council Office before o'clock
on Tuesday. They must be signed
by at least ten members of the
class.
Other members of the executives
will be nominated from the floor.
Meetings will be held on Wednes-
da at 12.15.
Meeting places are—Arts '39:
Arts 100; Arts *38: Aggie 100;
Arts '37: Sc. 200; Sc. '40: Ap. Sc.
208; Sc. '39; Ap. Sc. 212; Sc. '38:
Ap. Sc. 210; Sc. '37: Mechanics 210.
Arts '40 will not hold its elections
till after Christmas.
Frosh Headgear
Admired Here
The most comely and ad-
aptible freshman hats designed in recent years, capping the throngs that stream
up and down stairways and
cluster In the Quad, have
brought new verve and colour
to the campus this past week.
Worn at every conceivable
angle and with every degree
of feverish imagination, the
freshette bonnets in particular have been a source of
scenic ecstasy.
Unlike the lovely gob*hat ot past
seasons, the Dutch-milkmaid-poke
bonnet ends Itself to variety. It
is worn forward, and backward, and
sideways, and with a list to port or
starboard, tucked, tied, clipped and
decorated. Some are worn backside foremost with the ties gathered into an airplane propeller effect on the brow. Others are put
on sideways and become a perfect
nightmare of points and peaks and
flapping bows. One has a jewelled
clip. Others have varied embellishments, floral, vegetable and feathered.
The freshman Glengarry Is net
as versatile a Headpiece In that
4its architecture permits Its being
worn only forward or baokward
on. Ribbons on the forehead have
a refreshingly aerial effect. No
freshman has shown the original*
Ity of wearing kilts to complete
his sartorial exoticism, although
green shirts and ties are there In
dutiful plenty.
The funniest hats are those
which are worn squarely and solidly on the top of the head, displaying
no sense of humour or imagination
whatsoever.
"Good clean fun may be all
right, but riots in the Auditorium must cease," stated
John Witbeck, Discipline
Committee head, speaking to
the Ubyssey after the frosh-
soph fight Monday noon.
Witbeck was standing in the
Auditorium surveying the mass of
papers, fruit skins and other materials which littered the floor.
"We'll have to call off the Friday
meeting," he stated. "It seems aa
if the students can't be trusted to
respect other people's property."
A row of seats was broken during
the fights, while dozens of freshmen lost their lnslgnlas. Contents
of waste baskets which had been
emptied from the gallery added to
the confused appearance of the
room.
It Is likely that reverberations
of the Monday fight will be heard
from university authorities. Future student use of the Auditorium may be denied, It is stated.
At any rate, freshman initiation
affairs will of necessity quieten
down, under pressure of Student
Council. It is not known whether
official action will be taken against
any of the offenders.
Work Advances on Co-Op
House-Elections Soon
Student Control Extends Only to Regulation
Of Own Affairs So Far
Almost more than filled to capacity, Salisbury Lodge is
seen as the germ from which may some day spring a student's co-operative boarding-house.
It is not yet a complete co-operative by any means for
the forty or more in residence have no power over the
housekeeping part of the show.
Their control extends only to the
LESS PEP
SAY PEPPERS
Activities May Be
Curtailed
Members of the Pep Club,
an organization which has
performed innumerable services on the campus in past
years, are moving to have the
club's activities considerably
curtailed.
It is possible that this action may
mean the end of any organised
student effort to create a university
spirit among the student body. The
Pep Club has had as its duty the
handling of publicity for games and
meetings, the preparation of pep
meets in noon hours, and the direction of cheering at major games.
The indifferent success of their
efforts in the past is probably one
reason for the present announce'
ment of the club members that
they will do less this year. It is
not known as yet to what extent
the Pep Club will continue to
operate.
As the International Relations'
Club begins its sixth year at U.
B.C. it finds itself open for applications for membership. Please
place the same ln the Arts Men's
Letter Rack. This club, which is
one of 751 in Universities all over
the world, fills the need for an outlet of combined student discussion
and thought on current international affairs.
ADULT EDUCATION AND
DEMOCRACY   INSEPARABLE
Robert England New Director
Of Extension Work
By MONTY FOTHERINQHAM
"Adult education is inseparably tied up with democracy," stated Mr. Robt. England, newly appointed director
of Adult Extension work, today, in discussing the importance
of that work in the social and political life of the province.
This decision was reached after
a summer spent in Europe and
Canada studying university extension activities.
"Democracy breaks down when
we leave it to the other fellow," he
continued. "If those who have had
the benefit of University training
accept the responsibility of leadership, possibility of a dictatorship
in Canada is remote. Group study
and discuslon are good correctives
for intellectual arrogance and
crowd susceptibility.' '
Need for adult education was
noted by Mr. England, who added
that university departments are not
Innovation, English and American
insltutlons using this way of reaching the working people.
"Adult education In all democratic countries has become an
urgent matter and the universities are becoming increasingly
aware of the complex character
of the difficulties caused by the
speed of social change, the director said.
One of the objectives of this work
is "the destruction of inferiority
complexes that inhibit adult learning, cultivation of the simplicity,
enthusiasm and spirit of the child,
without which it is impossible to
gain the kingdom—the power to
enjoy and control one's environment."
IMPORTANT TO UNIVER8ITY
Mr. England also stressed Importance of extension work to the
life of the university, mentioning
that although primarily a teaching
body, yet without research and extension it becomes an undermined
skyscraper of instruction. Conditions would become similar to those
in the tenth century when Greek
scholars become mere pedants in*
capable of thought and action.
Notable Canadian achievements
in the field of extension work were
mentioned by the director, who
pointed especially to Cape Breton
Island,  Alberta and Ontario.
Union Building
Fund $45,000
John R. Gould, president of Students' Council, announces that the
fund for the Students' Union Building has reached a total of $4,000.
This, with additional sums which
have been promised, will be sufficient to erect the first unit of the
proposed structure. Construction
of this unit should be completed
during the summer of 1937.
Of the $45,000, over $10,000 was
raised through the efforts of the
students themselves, $9,000 by the
Women's Undergraduate Society
previous to the campiagn, and $10,-
000 was the proceeds of a loan
voted by the undergraduates
through the Alma Mater Society.
Lost: Orange Waterman ever-
sharp last Thursday. Finder please
communicate with E. Yatabe via
Arts Letter Rack.
"In Cape Breton a Catholic university, St. Francois Xavler, is transforming the social and economic
life of a whole area by a forceful
programme, stressing the study
group and using it as a weapon to
build literally a new world."
EXPERIMENTS  NEEDED
Experiments must be made in the
future in different mediums of carrying on Extension work, including
visual aid, study groups, guidance
to leaders, printed bulletins, lectures and co-operation with existing adult education agencies.
Tribute to Prof. Todd, last year's
head of the department, and his
staff, was paid by Mr. England, who
was impressed with the way lectures were planned and carried out
without disrupting work of the University.
Details aa to courses and centres
of study are not yet completed, but
will be announced later.
recreational, social and educational
activities and the making of rules
to regulate their own affairs. Nevertheless it is hoped that the experience gained may be put to use in
the future when, Providence and
funds allowing, a full co-operative
is established. Meanwhile the inmates have the benefits of low
board and a measure of self-government.
GOULD HOPEFUL
"It is hoped that the project will
not only provide board at a reasonable rate for students, but will also
fill a much-felt need for a men's
dormitory on the campus," deolared
Jay Gould when questioned on the
matter.
The majority of the boarders
share a room with a partner. If
they are fortunate enough to occupy a room close to the heating
plant, they have hot water in the
morning. If they are unlucky, they
don't. Again, that highly important
measure of a boarding-house's
worth, the material provided for
human consumption, is both good
and fairly plentiful. There are
two choices at both lunch and dinner on weekdays.
ELECTIONS POSTPONED
Election of an executive has been
postponed till Thursday next. At
the same meeting rules and penalties will be discussed. At present
it is decreed that silence must reign
after 7.30 p.m. to a time extended
to 8 a.m. after an inmate made
some remarks about yelling in the
hall at seven in the morning.
The project of a co-op. was studied by a commission appointed by
the Alma Mater Society last year.
The Council had doubts as to its
practicability and the matter was
taken up by the Service Committee
of the S. C. M. who planned the
present scheme. The S. C. M. will
hand over control of the undertaking to the executive of the
Lodge when it is elected.
Co-Ed Awarded
Bronze Medal
Echo of Narrow
Escae in Summer
Barbara Beney, 1841 Trafalgar Street, Vancouver, a
student of the University, has
been awarded the bronze
medal of the Royal Canadian
Humane Association for outstanding heroism in helping
to prevent what might have
been a triple drowning near
§echelt last August.
Barbara set out from Sechelt for
Trial Island in a small boat with an
outboard engine, he was accompanied by two companions, Dorothy
Walker and Dorothy Yelland, both
of Vancouver. A choppy sea was
running, and about three miles
from shore the boat capsized.
The girls clung, exhausted ,to
their upturned boat, and were being carried out to sea by the tide.
Barbara saw the SS. Lady Palm
leaving Sechelt, and swam out to
attract the attention of the steamer. Mr. Owen-Jones heard her cries
for help, gave the alarm, and dived
in to help Miss Beney, while a boat
went out to pick up her companions.
NOTICE
Frosh Smoker at Moose Hall, 8
o'clock Thursday, October 1st. Free
pipes, tobacco, cheese and crackers
for all freshmen who wear Insignia.
Varied program arranged. 25c admission to anyone without Insignia, Two
THE     UBYSSEY
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY: Dorwin Baird
SPORTS EDITOR
Dick Elson
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Ken Grant Dorothy Cumminos
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Dave Smith Bill Sibley
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Stewart Calvert
Frank Turner
Peggy Higgs
Advertising Office)
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:  Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited.
EDUCATION
So the freshmen have seen set an example. And what a
fine example. They have learnt that University students are
very similar to street cleaners for they have a strong afflnty
for garbage. But even street cleaners take no delight in
throwing refuse all over themselves and their neighbors.
Yesterday's deplorable exhibition in the auditorium
clearly showed the need for some disciplinarian force in
student government. A force that would not only discipline
but could direct the energy used throwing rotten tomatoes
to some more desirable efforts. Since the sophs and frosh
apparently feel unquenchable urges to combat with each
other why not send them back to their public school days
and let them spend their noon hours in tug-of-war or
"The Queen
Defends Her
Rights
By "THI CHANCILLOR"
It was funny, my meeting HER
after all these years.
I first noticed her in the caf the
other day, sitting with a group of
freshettes who were painting each
other's nails with that insidious
green polish. I passed by, not believing my eyes. After all, she had
vowed never to come to this campus, although all who knew her
thought she should.
But here she was in the Univer-
ity caf, and here was I at the same
table talking over a cup of tomato
juice. We chatted of high school
days and tried, as people do, to
trace the lives of many we both
knew years ago. Such subjects have
limitations though. It wasn't long
before I popped the usual question:
"What do you think of university
life?"
WHAT AN ANSWER
Now I always knew that the
"Queen," as we called her, was no
dumb blond. She had ideas and
she had the ability of expression.
In fact, she once captured an amateur debating trophy back in those
days at high school. But I wasn't
prepared for a comprehensive answer to my casual query.
Most of you know what a freshette thinks of varsity because you
have either been one, or been in
love with one. But the Queen
passed lightly over the usual stuff,
sneered a little at the quality of
the freshmen and then, pausing for
rest, took up the bulky first issue
of the Ubyssey and pointed to an
article.
"Pass system to be brought Forward at A. M. S. Meeting," the
headline read.
With the glint of a fighting Amazon in her eyes, the Queen snapped,
"Do you know what that would
mean to female rights?"
To tell the truth, I replied, I
hadn't given the matter much
thought in that direction. Anyway,
she didn't give me time to answer.
BACK TO DARK AGE
"You, being a mere male, probably wouldn't realize that if the Pass
System were adopted on this campus we women would lose the last
vestige of our Victorian dependence."
"Why? Well, look at it this way.
Every student will get passes to all
major functions and some minor
ones. That will mean the girls, too.
From now on we could go to any
dance or game we wanted, and pick
and choose our partner—if any.
"We would no longer be dependent on the campus males. Think of
it!"
I did.
And the more I did, the better it
seemed to me.
"Look here," I pointed out, *'for
two or three decades the women of
the world have striven for their
rights. The trend has been towards
freedom. That men and women have
equal rights, and all that line of
talk has been peddlod. What's come
over you? You want to go back to
the Dark Age?"
CHIVALRY QOINQ
"You darn rights we do," shot
back the Queen. "Especially when
this 'enlightened age' reaches the
state where we can't win a man's
affections through his pocketbook.
Why, we wouldn't be respected by
the boys any more if they didn't
have to pay through the nose for
a date. Do you realize that the
Pass System might save my boyfriend $10. It's not right."
She left it at that because the
10 o'clock bell rudely stopped the
argument.
Of course, the Pass System had
always appeared as the Absolute
Ultimate in campus affairs for me.
Gould advocated it, and so did a lot
of important people. Even the
Ubyssey slyly suggested that it
might, not be a bad idea. So, with
nothing but favorable impressions
in the past, I was prejudiced.
Now I'm wondering if there was
not a good deal of truth in those
fighting words of the Queen. Maybe the Pass System would mean
the end of chivalry, or perhaps it
would herald an age where man
would be dependant on woman.
Yes, anything might happen if
that wicked measure were intro-
introduced. We males must rise to
heights never before attained, and
with one accord defeat this legislation that would not only lower us
in the eyes of our women-folk, but
save us $10.
The Queen was right.
OUTDOOR CLUB
There will be a meting on Thursday, 12.15, in Ap. Sc. 23? for all old
and prospective members.
WANTED — Transportation for
three from 12th and Maple every
morning. Pete Higashi, Arts Letter Rack.
ED ARMSTRONG REGISTER8
Ed Armstrong, well known Province basketball player, is registered
at U.B.C. Armstrong states, however, that he will not play on the
Varsity team.
NO SMOKING IN GYMN
Physical    Director    Van    Villet
states that the  No  Smoking rule
will be strictly enforced this year
in the Gymnasium.
LOST
Green Parker pen.   Please return
to Mr. Horn's office.
WANTED—Three students, preferably Sciencemen, to transport to
U. B. C. from 41st and Dunbar.
Phone Kerr. 3677.
"Fraternity Jewellery a Specialty"
FIRBANK & LANGE
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY. 2088
PERSONAL JEWELLERS TO EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
The first impulse of the
budding columnist, having finally decided on a name for his
masterpiece, is to flind a victim on whom he can use his
new weapon with impunity.
And at this time of year the
obvious choice is the long-
suffering freshman.
Unfortunately this year's crop offers very few grounds for complaint, unless you object to their
time-honored custom of standing in
a herd on the quad, presumably an
Instinct dating back to the wicked
old days when to wander off alone
clad in the green symbols of youth
meant sure and sudden death. Today the sight of this verdant mob
has no significance whatever, except to suggest Victory Square on
a fine April afternoon, or Science-
men at a dance. It is certainly a
visible argument for a Union Building. Meanwhile it is a golden opportunity for somebody with initiative to make a fortune renting
deck-chairs.
The sight of so many bright and
trustings faces never falls to leave
the full-blooded Senior with a feeling of sadness when he recalls the
bitter years of anguish and disillusion that He between the Prosh and
the achievement of that serenity of
bouI that comes only to Seniors and
columnists. Who can ever forget
that crushing moment when he first
heard himself denounced as a
"grubby, little, middle-class Purl-
tan" by an English protessor, or
that dark hour when he first learned
that the warm, spiritual glow that
organ music and certain preachers
can produce is not your soul at all,
but only your pineal gland functioning? Small wonder, then, that
within a year these cherubic freshmen, who today have not a care
in the world beyond the latest
"handy" or "knock-knock," will
have become wicked, cynical sophomore, memorizing things like
"Love Is the Illusion that one woman differs from another," and
singing songs about sturgeons, and
one barrel of beer among the four
of us. The best we can hope is that
they will have the originality to
discover some other place besides
the Tavern, the sophomore haunt
for so many years.
PAGE SHERLOCK HOLMES
Turning to a less depressing topic, summer jobs, we wonder if
you've heard about the student who
answered an ad for a private detective. The assignment was to shadow a supposedly errant husband,
but the second night our sleuth lost
the scent and after four hours'
fruitless searching he returned to
the life of a scholar and a gentleman, without even bothering to collect his carfare.
COMMUNISTS AGAIN
You may recall reading in a
widely popular, but locally deplored
magazine an article entitled "The
Red Menace in Canadian Colleges,"
which charged the S.C.M. and V.C.
U. with being Communist organizations. Most of us were inclined to
treat the matter lightly, but it was
my unfortunate lot last summer to
unearth some Incriminating evidence which cannot, in all fairness
to the freshmen, be ignored if they
are to be preserved from the subversive influences of these revolutionaries.
Being employed ln a logging
camp, I shared a bunk-house with
an S.C.M. member and six sturdy
sons of the great Northwoods. One
night my slumber was disturbed by
confused mutterings across the
room, and there sat the SC.M.er,
squatting ln the middle of his bunk,
lighting matches with one hand,
making jabbing motions under the
blankets with the other, and every
now and then jumping and slapping
himself with the suddenness of a
robot blowing a fuse.
DENOUEMENT
My civil enquiry as to what the
trouble was met with an outburst
of anarchism, rank heresy, and high
treason to His Majesty's government such as I have never heard.
It was a denunciation of the Capitalist employer that would have
won the heart of Karl Marx himself. In the end It transpired that
he had merely inherited a few bedbugs, which, being common to royal
palace and peasant hut alike, can
hardly be considered justification
for such sentiments as he expressed
that night. Deeply grieved by (his
revelation of his true nature, 1 refused to let him crawl In with me,
and went back to sleep. When his
matches ran out I believe he went
for a walk.
Tuesday, September 29, 1936
PUTTING ON
THE DOG
Corpus Cavernosa Is
Quite Rhomboid
The dog has been called man's
best friend. As to the reason for
this, your guess is as good as mine.
The dog's fuselage is based on
four protuberances known as legs.
It also has a head, tail, legs, etc.
Although It has an obese stereois-
omerlc hyoglossus, the corpus cavernosa is quite rhomboid. If you
get me.
The dog has a large mouth, and
too many teeth. These are used for
biting people, eating, biting people,
chewing up slippers, rugs, etc., biting people, and biting people. Mostly for biting people.
SALIVA TILL IT DIB8
The animal has an apparently unlimited supply of saliva, coupled
with an explicable desire to distribute it via the tongue over the
hands, face, or any other exposed
portion of any human within reach.
During the months of April and
May the dog arts very strangely.
If he rushes at you ferociously,
shout, "Whelp! Whelp!" and the
dog will either go away or keep on
running at you, During the months
of June, July, August, September,
October, November, December,
January, February and March, the
dog also acts very strangely. Nothing apparently can be done about
this.
It you hear a dog howling under
your window at night, it is a sign
of death, if you can get your shotgun in time.
Registrar Warns
Of Irregularities
It has been called to the attention of the Registrar that several
students have selected for themselves courses that are not in conformity wtth Calendar regulations.
The rules in reference to the courses open to students in the different years are clear, and students
must choose their oourses en their
own responsibility and In aooord-
anoe with the requirements of the
faoulty In which they are registered. If any student is in doubt,
all possible information and assistance will be given to him on request.
A complete list of courses for
First and Second Year students,
Arts and Science, is given on Pages
62 and 63 of the Calendar, and the
regulations in regard to these are
set forth on Pages 63 and 64; no
other courses are open to First and
Second Year students. A full statement of the requirements in reference to required subjects and in regard to the selection of options ln
the General Course in Third and
Fourth Years is given on Pages 64
and 65, and the regulations ln regard to "Examinations and Advancement" on Pages 85 to 88.
(These regulations govern students
registered i nthe Faculty of Arts
and Science; corresponding regulations governing students of other
Faculties appear in their respective
portions of the Calendar.)
A FEW STUDENTS whose applications for registration have been
accepted HAVE NOT FILLED IN
THEIR REGISTRATION BOOKLETS. To avoid penalty of LATE
FEE, these students must complete
their registration at once.
Registration High
At Alberta
By LARRY ALEXANDER
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Sept. 24 (WIPU)—With
registration for the 1936-37 term
well into its second day it appeared
that this year's enrolment at the
University of Alberta might set a
new record. Up till 3.30 this afternoon the figures stood at about 350,
registrations so far being only first
year students. Senior students will
commence registration tomorrow
and will continue on Thursday.
Last year's winter session registration was about 1,650, while the
total enrolment, Including summer
school students, was 1,985. With
a large increase ln the number who
attended the summer session this
summer, and the prospect of a winter enrolment which may surpass
last year's It Is fully expected that
final figures will be over 2000.
NOTICE
Through the agency of the Musical Society students of the University will again be given the opportunity of attending the two final
rehearsals of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra free of charge.
The final rehearsal of the first
program will be held in the Strand
Theatre on Saturday, Oct. 3rd, at
8.30 a.m.
Passes may be obtained from the
secretary of the Musical Society,
Miss Marjorie Findlay, in Aud. 207,
on Wednesday and Thursday between the hours of 12 and 1.30.
CORRECT JEWELLERY
AND STATIONERY FOR
EVERY FRATERNITY
ON THE CAMPUS.
S. M. II. S.
Well I guess the gang's all
rounded up again and ready to give
her hell for another seven months
(till Xmas anyway). A few faces
are missing, the gown-ed ones of
last spring and a few more who are
going to hit the ball away from the
red-draped hall of learning for a
year or so, But look what took
their place, 162 Science '40's. A
record for Science, a tough break
for the Faculty, and 162 R.S.P.
(red-shirt power) to add to our
growing fame. "Welcome," say
the upper classmen, with a dirty
look in the eye that spells initiation.
Remember the elections of the
elaia txeeutlvts takes place on
Wednesday. That It all, but the
Second years' and theirs will fellow soon.
And if uninitiated engineers see
a notice on the Science Building
Blackboards within the next day or
so, and it says "SUMUS MEETING
in Sc. 100," it means that you are
expected to be there.
They say that the Science Banquet is coming off about the middle
of October.
And, Hell, all my jokes were
learned in a mining camp in the
Yukon. They don't look good on
paper, and they might polute the
minds of the freshmen.
A Scienceman must carry himself with dignity, and he must pursue his daily tasks with respect to
all his Faculty and with complete
ignorance to all Artsmen.
Out of Towners
Entertained
Women from all parts ot the
province met Friday and Eaturday
afternoons when Dean Bollert was
at home to out-of-town co-eds.
The president of the Women's
Undergraduate Society, Audrey
Horwood, assisted the hostess in
receiving the guests.
Presiding at the tea tables both
afternoons were women members of
faculty, aided by Madge Neill,
Peggy Fox, Beth Evans, Helen
Crosby and Marjorie Jessup, members of the W. U. S. executive, as
servlteurs.
THE ADVERTISERS REPRESENTED IN THE UBYSSEY
make possible tbe size of your
student newspaper. Tbe% will
appreciate your patronage.
The Nearest Bank is
The Canadian
Bank of
Commerce
T'nth and Sasamat Branch
A general banking business is transacted and  accounts  of  the  Faculty
and   Students   of   the   University   of
British Columbia are welcomed.
Bankers to the
Alma Mater
Society
C. R. MYERS, Managar
WE SAW YOUR
FIRST ISSUE-
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PRINTING
of the best. Let us
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The CLARKE &
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Stationers and Printers
550  SEYMOUR   ST.
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Phone  Trinity  1341
Ifargatfot iflnt
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Dear Sirs:
Will you please answer the following questions:
What is the correct width of trousers at the cuff and knee5
What is the correct trouser length on a business suit and on slacks?
Are trousers 22" at the bottom bei-ig worn'
Tha cornet width of trousers is 24" at tha knee and 19" at the cuff.
Suit trousers and odd slacks should break slightly over tha instep.
Trousers over 19'/a" at the bottom ara navar worn by well-dressed
man.
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"Distinctive Clothes"
1005 GRANVILLE STREET SEYMOUR 2507
DANCING LESSONS —
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Telephone Bayview 5306 or 5333 R.
GRACE MacDONALD
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"Let me serve your car, and your car will serve you."
"FRANK" F1CKK
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service — Complete Repair Facilities
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY 53 Tuesday, September 29, 1936
THE     UBYSSEY
Three
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Twenty-five years of tailoring history is the Tip Top
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Thus you will find in your Tip Top clothes the very style
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immediately have won popular acceptance.
You'll like the style of your Tip
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637 GRANVILLE STREET
A Senior Confesses
Beware the Smiles of Frosh
Lured by a provocative smile, I
have committed the unpardonable
sin. I know my sad story is a secret no more—this is the confession of an outcast. No more a "HI-
ya kid" greets my entry into the
lockers—my fellow seniors avoid
me—I am a pariah. But why must
I pay such a price for my weakness? Why must I suffer for those
mad, delirious moments of joy and
happiness? Even as I write these
words my hand grows shaky and I
know all will soon be over—I must
pay the price for my offense.
It was but a small mistake that
led to my fall—but like an avalanche it gathered force till It tossed me up before the gaze of all,
bruise dand broken. Deep in study
I did not hear the fatal lecture bell.
Then a sudden realization of my
tardiness—a mad dash for the lecture room—the deep stillness that
greets a late entry, and there I was
—seating myself behind a charming young wench ln scarlet. Suddenly I awoke to the fact everything was wrong, those leering
faces around mo were green frosh,
I was in the wrong lecture room.
Leaning over I whispered to the
symphony in rot' (here at least waa
a friend), "Is this Geography 3?"
Her answer on a strap of paper:
"This is History I."
Ten minutes later I had reached
the note passing stage of complimenting her on her vivid ensemble.
Half an hour later I had reached
the poetry stage.
"A red rose in a sea of green
Such  beauty shall not bloom unseen,
Geography can never hold for me
The charm and grace of History."
Her answering note: "Are you
always so nice?"
Here, Indeed, was progress. -A
warm glow of victory swept over
me, and then in my moment of triumph I noticed it. Her fingernails
were green! I—a senior—had been
exchanging notes with a freshette.
I had broken the unwritten law of
centuries of university tradition.
She (ever the treacherous female) had taken advantage of the
few hours still remaining to the
"wearin' o' the green" deadline and
had tempted and lured me to my
doom.
What can I do. Daily I grow paler
and weaker. Shunned by my former comrades I waste away the
hours in study. I know my end
draws nigh and so I inscribe this
warning to all seniors to beware
the dangers that lurk behind a
freshette's smile.
MATHEMATICS CLUB
The Mathematics Club is open to
students ln Maths, of the 3rd and
4th years. It gives its members an
opportunity fo hear and present
papers on Mathematical subjects
outside the curriculum. An announcement In regard to applications will be made later on.
SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS
Scholarship cards are ready at
tho Registrar's Office and students
are requested to call for them as
soon as possible,
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
The Psychology Club Is now receiving applications for membership. Any person desirous of applying must have completed Psychology 1, and must be Intending
to honour, major, or minor in Psychology. AH applications shoud be
addressed to the president, lMr.
Chris Loat, c/o the Arts Letter
Rack, before 12 noon, October 4th.
A Line On
Freshies
More hope these freshmen have!
The '36 crop turned up with a measly three phone numbers on the
backs of freshettes but this this
year! The net increase for freshettes only piles up to an odd hundred but every other freshman has
engraved In large letters the neces-
sary details for "calling him up."
It seems a shame that freshettes
will have to be chaperoned by an
austere senior at the Prosh this
year when such glowing opportunities have come to the fore.
Ed  Flower  at   P.  O.   348L  and
Buzzy , North 1S7L, surely
"personality men," will not want a
big sister tagging along.
Definitely handsome Is the very
fresh Prank Dickson, Bay. 9648R.
In the line of freshettes, Lottie
Pout, chubby and dimpled, may be
found at Marpole 2945L, and Kay
Keenleyslde, a petite blonde, will
answer at Kerr. 2680.
W. A. Kerr Acting
Albert! President
Announcement of Hon. J.
W. Hugill Pending Appointment of Permanent
President
By LARRY ALEXANDER
UNIVERSITY OP ALBERTA,
Edmonton (WIPU)—W. A. R. Kerr,
for 22 years Dean of the Faculty
of Arts ot this university, was
named by the provincial government as acting president of the University of Alberta. The announcement was made by Hon. J. W. Hugill, Attorney-general, In the absence ot Premier William Aberhart
who is ln Vancouver. Dean Kerr
is carrying on as president pending
official appointment ot a permanent
president.
A graduate of Toronto and Harvard, Dean Kerr first came to the
University of Alberta in 1909, a
year after the opening of the Institution, as professor ot modern languages. He became Dean ot the
Faculty ot Arts and Science ln 1914
and served as acting president of
the university from 1917 to 1919,
during the absence in Europe of
H. M. Tory, then president of the
university.
Mrs. John T McCay Turns
Her Kaleidoscope
By Charles Stansfeld Jones
Never since Sir William Brewster invented the kaleidoscope has the idea, or rather the ideal back of it, been put to
better use than by Mrs. John T. McCay of Vancouver. The
name kaleidoscope implies an instrument whereby we may
become aware of beautiful forms. Mrs. John T. McCay sees
and produces beautiful forms everywhere.
Long before she first showed to
the people ot Vancouver a glimpse
of the colourful interblending ot
the artistry of many nations on the
memorable occasion of the opening
of the Folk-craft Art Exhibition ln
1933, she had been directing her
own gaze through a mental kaleidoscope wherein people of all nationalities are seen, like vari-coloured
pieces of choice glass, through
which shines the great White Light
of the Supreme and Universal Artist Himself. With her inner eye
fixed on Ood she had learned to
see all creatures, and especially her
fellow men, ln a true light and in
their right proportions and proper
interrelations — no longer as a
jumbled mass of colours and classes but as a beautiful variegated and
ever-changing design; a true social
world order.
Without the magic vision given
by the use of this kaleidoscope we
perhaps look upon world-events;
the changes in national boundaries,
the differences due to colour among
peoples; their rivalries in trade
and commerce, and other conflicting elements leading to wars and
revolutions and unknown horrors,
with dread and foreboding. Mrs.
John McCay see things quite differently. Keeping her spiritual eye
on the Light above which streams
through all men and events, she
sees in them nothing but beauty—
that which gives pleasure by its
mere presence ln conselousness —
and, because in all things she Is
practical, and not merely a dreamer
and world-gazer, three times already she has given us in concrete
form—ln living reality—the fruits
of her vision; when she gathered
representatives ot many nations together harmoniously to display
their treasures of art and craft for
the pleasure of the people of Vancouver during previous Folk Festivals.
And now, in this year of Vancouver's Golden Jubilee, she has,
through a fresh turn of her kaleidoscope, seen a yet more glorious,
a greater and more harmonious
vision than ever before; a picture
that is to be made real for us, vibrant with light and colour and exotic charm, at the Fourth Annual
Polk Song and Dance estlval which
will be held amid fairy like sur
rouudlngs in an entirely transformed Crystal Ballroom at the
Hotel Vancouver on October the
14th, 15th, 16th and 17th.
We must remember to hold open
those dates, for each day there will
be given to the kaleidoscope a new
turn, and each day and night another unexpected and delightful
vision of beauty will for us, by the
practical magic of Mrs. John T. McCay, become a reality—a soul-sat-
isying reality; for we shall have
learned, without cavil of doubt,
that on the plane ot artistic manifestation, that of the arts and crafts,
men of all nations can meet together ln perfect harmony, finding
the keenest pleasure in the very
fact that they, their work, and
place in the world order are different. Were it not for variety
where would be the true beauty of
the world?
Mrs". McCay, by means of her
kaleidoscope, has seen how the living variety of all the peoples of
the world and of their special arts
and crafts, far from being a cause
of dlssentlon, strife and lnharmony,
can be gathered up, arranged and
ordered—like a great bouquet of
flowers ln the vase of the Crystal
Ball Room—and be made to produce  happiness  and   good   feeling
Bayview 2208-L
LITTIRS CLUi
There are two vacancies for male
members to the Letters Club as
well as several Asociate Memberships. Those who are interested,
please apply to Miss Betty Street
via the Arts Letter Rack.
We took you in your
infancy . . . Let us take
you now, in the year of
your majority!
BRIDGMAN'S Studio
•*#•*•*••••••«•••••«••*•••
Dr. C. M. Whitworth
Dentist
Telephone Elliot 1766
Hours: 9 to 6
Saturday 9 to I
Cor. lOfh and Sasamat St
MATHEMATICS CLUI
The Mathematics Club is open
to students in mathematics of the
third and fourth years. It gives
members an opportunity to hear
and present papers on mathematical subjects out side the curriculum. Application for membership
may be made to the secretary, Miss
Audrey Hamilton, care Arts Letter
Rack.
Above is a good illustration
of the freshette of today in
all their regalia, sweetness,
loveliness and green fingernails.
Young Men's
Clothing
Specialists
SUITS and OVERCOATS
Stock or Made-to-Measure
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See ut for your Tuxedo
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We can remodel your old fur
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3783 W. 10th Art.   Bay. 2179
The Accounts
of the
Faculty and
Students
of tha University of
British Columbia
»n welcomed.
MNKOF
MONTREAL
Established 18x7
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4458 10th Avenue West
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Total Assets in Excess of $800,000,000
Start your college year right;
Let ANDERSON PRINTING COMPANY LIMITED
take over your printing responsibilities.
—Wf.,"".prh' ,Byri',',9 hm * D•"e• Tlck,r *° *w *""«•' *••' «ook.
455 Hamilton Street Phoi|- Ufmut 340Q
NOTICE
The first general meeting of the
Musical Society will be held ln Ap.
Sc. 100 on Friday, at 12.15.
All applicants for membership ln
the Society are asked to attend this
meeting.
among all  who take part in the
Festival.
"And," says Mrs. McCay, "what
can be done on a small scale ln
Vancouver and other cities, can be
done on a world-scale among the
nations; if they will but see one
another, through the kaleidoscope,
as Integral parts of a true World
Order back of which the One Light
of the Universal Sun is always
shining.
htm
La Fonda
has no fan dancer, but a whale
of a hot orchestra.
4th at ALMA ROAD
•
Phones.-   Day: Bayview 866
Night: Bayview 1728
Minimum  Charge,   Week  Nights
35c.
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f
Corsages  *   *   *  75cand$l-oo
We are just as near as your Free delivery within City
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Ritchie Bros, m G,.„vm. street Sey. 2045
UNIVERSITY
BOOK  STORE
HOURS, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.    Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
LOOSE-LEAF    NOTE    BOOKS,    EXERCISE    BOOKS   AND   SCRIBBLERS
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Vancouver, B. C.
She Hmucrsitu
of 1 ritish Columbia
LAST DAY  FOR  PAYMENT OF
FIRST TERM  FEES
OCTOBER 6th,  1936
All cheques must be certified and made payable to
The University of British Columbia.
Mailing certified cheques to the Bursar is
recommended.
For Regulations governing fees see Calendar,
•    pages 32 to 36 inclusive
BURSAR, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
J Tuesday, September 29, 1936
Hitchins Coaches
Soccer Team
Club Loses Wolfe But Gains
Bish Thurbtr
With very few losses through
graduation, the outlook for Soccer,
as with other major sports Is exceedingly bright for the coming
year.
Acordlng to Dave Ijfato, new Be-
nelor Soccer Manager, Bish Thurber, last year's captain, will return
in time for the first game on Oct
3. The team however, will miss
the veteran soccerman, Bill Wolfe.
The position of coach will again
be filled by Hutching, one of the
finest soccer coaches ln Vancouver.
The* Junior eleven will be as
strong as last year's team due to
the fact that there have been no
losses. Along with the new fresh*
men players, will be last year's
stars, Moodle, Logan and Kirkpat-
rick.
All freshmen who have had any
previous soccer experience are asked
to get in touch with the coach or
managers Immediately. Every one
will have an equal opportunity to
get a team position. There will be
practices on Tuesday and Thursday
at noon and a chalk talk on Friday
at noon in Arts 102.
Artona
* PORTRAIT STUDIO
833 Granville Street
Sey. 5737 «
V<» VOICE PRODUCTION
A    Special rales for beginners.
RFrec auditions by wolntment.
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£ HORTHY
TAILOR and DRY CLEANER
Your Old Friend
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4433—10th AVE. WEST
ILL 1540
ALMA SERVICE
STATION
24-Hour Garage Service
Broadway at Alma
Bayview 74
Jutt about all you could aik for . . .
Aristocratic Hamburgers
Limited
Kingsway at Fraier   —   Tenth at Alma
Vancouver, B. C.
Fairmont 106 Bayview 4441
"Take Some Home"
STANDARD
SHOE
REPAIR
Your good shoes demand
quality  shoe  repairing."
4437 WEST 10th AVENUE
Phone: Point Grey 608
Students'
Valet Service
BAY CLEANERS,
DYERS b TAILORS
2594 Sasamat, Cor. 10th Ave.
BUS and CAR TERMINUS
Opposite Vancouver Drug
PHONE: PT. GREY 118
MAJOR SPORT MANAGERS
WANT LARGER TURNOUTS
200 Men and One Cowbell Enthusiastic
At First MAA. Meeting
With a large number of males ln attendance at the first
meeting last Friday—plus on very active cowbell—the Men's
Athletic Association started
U. B. C. sport conscious.
Dave Carey, the M.A.A. president, opened the enthusiastic meeting by drawing attention to the deplorable lack of support given the
various sports on the campus. He
made an earnest request that every
class get behind their Athleic Rep.
and make a real contest of the
Intra-Mural games, which were
scheduled to begin Monday, Sep
tember 28th. He also urged that
more support be given Mr. Van
Vliet's offer to coach or otherwise
help the 'men in sports, and was
given a reassurnig reply by the 200
men and spirited cowbell present.
WILSON VICI-PRISIDINT
Bob Wilson was elected Vice-
President, and Dvae Lewis re-elect*
ed Secretary, both unanimously.
Following the elections, sudent
managers outlined the plans and
desires of their respective organisations, and appealed for more
support both as to players and
junior mlnagers.
Senior Manager Oord Grant of
the Canadian Footballers invited
all potential gridmen to turn out
to the early morning practices. He
also outlined the club activities for
the year, stating that two teams
will be entered in local leagues.
The Senior team will perform in
the Big Four Loop, and the second
team in the Junior League. The
Hardy Cup contested by Western
Canadian Colleges, may or may
not be competed for by the Pigskin-
ners, depending on the result of the
first game on October 10th.
Basketballor Art taatham was
the eeeond speaker who addressed the gathering. Opening his
brief oration, he stated that there
were several managers needed
for the Hoop sport, and asked all
Interested to see him Immediately — Freshmen Included. Announcing that three teams will
again be entered this year, Art
closed by assuring the greentope
that many First year men have
placed on all the squads In past
years.
RUGBY OPTIMISTIC
Upon the absence of Sid Walker,
manager of Captain Dobbie's Miller Cup, champions, Strip Manager
Ted Madeley spoke for the club.
Recalling last year's successes, Ted
optimistically looked forward to
even greater achievements in the
coming season.
Soccer was the next major sport
to gain a hearing, with Senior Manager Dave Kato doing the honours.
Kato, after the customary appeal
to the Frosh, mentioned the possibility of entering more than the
usual two teams in the V. & D.
loop, one enior and two Junior
elevens.
Remarking that it was early to
start talking track, the Head man
of the cinder paths—Joe Rita—felt
sure that some minor meets would
be held during the fall term, and
hoped that all track-minded undergrads would see Maury Van Vliet
for training routines. —TURNER.
on Its anual drive to make
Swim Club Organizes
The Captain of the Swimming
Club, Archie Byers, reports that a
a large amount of outstanding talent Is available to the U.B.C. swimming team this year, providing all
the enrolled splashers display
enough interest to turn out and represent the University. In past
yearB the swmming club has had
great dlffculty in persuading possible material to display enthusiasm, but last year excellent support
was given by most of the good
men. However, the women fell
down pitifully in this respect.
All men and women, particularly
greenles, are urged to call on their
latent Varsity spirit and attend a
meeting to be held today at 12.30
p.m. ln Arts 106 for the purpose of
electing a new executive and discussing plans for the coming year.
With an aggregation of stellar
material, U. B. C. should enjoy a
big year In swimming and should
give the Southern teams which it
will meet a bitter flght, especially
with the confidence engendered by
the close battle with Washington
last spring, with a much weaker
team than is hoped for this year.
*      Sey. 9151
STAR CABS *
Manager: Bob Strain, '38
A CAPTAIN RETURNS
Bish Thurber, last year's
captain of the Varsity Senior Soccer team, who, according to Manager Kato is
returning in time to play
for the first game on October 3. Thurber plans to
continue his work in Geology towards a M.A. degree.
Minor Sports Plan
Future Activities
Gym Classes Bagin —
Hockey Team to Maat
Washington
High hopes for a successful year
are held by the past year's enthusiasts of minor and sub-major sports.
Most of the clubs in that category
are laying plans for future activities, and meetings are being held to
renew their executive organizations.
Many of the past season's ace-
high contenders will be missing
from the roster of players in most
of the clubs, so that freshmen are
asked to attend the meetings of the
sports in which they are interested.
All those interested in ice hockey
are asked to meet in Arts 104 at
12.30 on Wednesday. Although it
will be difficult this year to get ice
in view of the Arena fire, every
effort will be made to renew competition with the University of
Washington.
QYM CLAIMS
Mr. Van Vliet has announced
that there will be a complete reorganization in the handling of the
gym classes this year, and he requests that he be given support in
his endeavours to organize successful gym classes.
CANADIAN RUGBY
More freshmen are needed to fill
the positions of Junior Managers
of the Canadian Rugby club. Hand
in applications to Gordon Orant
through the Arts Letter Rack.
I GET MY CLOTHES ai
FURNISHINGS
from
CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
IHIItlHIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIItllilltHIIIIIIHIIIHtlllllllltlHItlltHIIIHIIIHHtllHIIIIHHIIIIIHIIIIIMHHHil
RUGBY TEAM
TO BATTLE
GRADS
Blue and Gold Team Has
Unknown Strength
After the merry seslon of fumbles, haywire booting and generally
wasted energy that resulted in a
14- 8wln tor the Rowing Club over
the Ocaslonals on Saturday, things
look much better for Varsity's
chances against the Occasionals at
the end of this week—that Is, if
our stalwarts can learn to control
their work a triflle better than the
starting teams have done.
Of course, there is always the
chance that the Orads are less
lousy than the others, so It behooves the Blue and Oold to look
well to their laurels, even In the
first game they play. With only
four teams in the league this year,
there is little leeway for even first
of the season losses if we intend to
keep the Miller Cup whre it so
proudly reposes now.
Little as yet is known about the
strength our Thunderbirds can put
on the field. It is fairly certain that
the first team will be chosen out ot
the group that Captain Dobbie has
asked to turn out for extra practice
at non today, but what the final
choice will be, none can say, probably not even the coach.
The group consists of Ron Andrews, Paddy Colthurst, Pyle, Stewart, Horner, Willoughby, V. Campbell, Bardsley, Bird, Ellis, Lecky-
Swing, Wilson, Leggatt, Billings,
Lumsden, Whittle, Hobson, R. Robertson, Watson, Housser, Day
Smith, Gross, Neary, Lowe and
Madely.
Of these, Andrews,
Colthurst, Pyle, Willoughby, Bird, Wilson,
Leggatt and Gross ought
to be pretty sure nominations for the finished
team. There will be
a sufficient sprinkling
of veterans to give it
and power, and inevitably a quota
of new men who have not played
ln the major league must also be
chosen. That these newcomers will
by no means necessarily be a dead
weight is amply proven by the past,
in which Varsity has always surprised by producing a crop of dark
horses out of the untried material.
There are several high school stars
in this batch that may turn out
unexpectedly well.
Saturday's go against the Grads
should provide a good measure of
the chances of our retaining the
Miller Cup this year. The Grads,
after the poor showing of the openers last week, may turn out to be
the clas o fthe opposition.
At any rate, any team that
comes out ahead of the Occasional
aggregation knows that it haa been
in a flght.
UNIVERSITY-
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
NORMAL and SCHOOL
BOOKS BOUGHT and
SOLD.
BUSY "BM
Book Store
♦ ♦
508 RICHARDS ST.
Leggatt
steadiness
OUR $1.75 STUDENTS DESK
LAMP IS A "MOOSE"
AT THE PRICE
HEWER'S HARDWARE
4459 West 10th
Phone ELLIOTT 1552
The   Sweetest   Congratulation!
C]fic%tia(k «*
faQv&M
,|m iKi.l A
;iviv x w
The FASHION-CRAFT Label adds
Distinction
to your wardrobe.
It means AN INVESTMENT IN GOOD APPEARANCE.
RICHARDSON-JARMAN LTD.
SEY. 8179
(Clothiers and Haberdashers)
523 GRANVILLE
Nan Ashmorth
GOWN and SPORTS SALON
Half Sixes a Specialty
3763—10th Avt. Wtit Bay. 520
Your Photographer
"The Latest in Portraiture"
3708 Wait Tenth Avenue Phone: Bayview 1398
ENGLISH RUGBY
WANTED: Three freshmen for
the positions of Junior managers
of the Rugby club. Apply immediately to Syd Walker and leave
applications in the Arts Letter
Rack. Associate managera are also wanted. These positions are
open to any upper classmen.
STANFORD CLAIMS GUDEWILL
Ed Gudewill, former English Rugby star who played last year for
the Rowing Club, left Saturday
morning for Stanford University.
The rugby club had hoped he would
play for the Blue and Oold fifteen.
SPUDS... leave your mouth fresh
f{
ass?*
CORK TIP er PLAIN. Abe, Spud Pine-cut Tobacco for rolling your
own, 10c tho package.
ROCK CITY TOBACCO COMPANY, LJMITED, QUEIEC
Canadian and Independent
■llllil«lll!lil!ill!lii!!lilil!l!iliffi
USED CARS
MAKE YOUR CAR PAY ITS OWN OPERAT-
ING COSTS BY TAKING OUT PASSENGERS
EACH MORNING.
HAVE some real snaps for Varsity
Students.
See
JIMMY DEE
Seymour 5224
at
A.  B.  Balderston Limited — 1190 West Georgia Street
Authorized ford Dealers
CANADIAN OFFICER'S TRAINING
CORPS
U. B. C. Contingent
Commanding Offictr:
LIEUT-COL H. F. G. LETSON, M.C., E.D.
The Officers Training Corps offers opportunities for
students who are interested in any of the following
activities:
(a) Infantry qualification for Lieutenant and Captain.
(b) Engineers qualification for Lieutenant.
(c) Rifle shooting:
(i)    Outdoor shooting.
(ii)   Indoor shooting.
(iii)  Inter-University rifle competition.
Aviation, Three years' training at Camp Borden, Ont.
(during summer vacation).
Signals.   Three years' training at Camp Borden, Ont.
(during summer vacation).
Camp at Victoria during Christmas vacation.
Further information may be obtained at the Orderly Room
(N.W. Corner of Arts Building basement, naar the Book Exchange)
The Orderly Room is open during the noon hour period.
(d
(e
(f
ifine
WE CANNOT SELL ALL THE GAS-
SO WE ONLY SELL THE BEST!
Trimble Service Garage
10th Avenue and Sasamat ELL. 1551
"WASTE TIME IS LOST TIME"
We pick up and deliver your car
while   you   are. at   your   classes.

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