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The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1953

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 CONTESTS BEG MAD FUS
Alphabet Soup Shatters Tradition
The Ubyssey's colossal precedent shattering alphabet sbup contest is today declared
open to all undergrad students on the campus.
The sensational contest makes a laughing-stock of downtown comic strip tangles.
This new fabulously simple contest begins immediately and closes at 12 noon Saturday, Oct. 31, when all entries must be in
the Ubyssey office in the Brock basement.
The contest is designed to improve student
knowledge of the many groups, titles, and
societies associated with UBC.
Numerous abbreviations such as MAD,
PhUS, LUS, and CUS must be listed, written
out in full, and defined according to nature
and function.
At no time during the contest will
students be asked lo unravel scrambled eggs
or tangled string.
Never again do students need to juggle
B.C. place names or compute sports results
or save stacks of one dollar bills or cut thc
paper to shreds attempting to find hidden
spelling errors or sell 67 subscriptions.
YES! In spite of threats from downtown
pressure groups, The Ubyssey has condemned lucky bucks and confused comics as symbols of a degenerate and misguided propaganda system.
Sensational rules of the contest were
worked out in a special secret laboratory test
conducted by The Ubyssey promotion department.
Sample students Nkk Neespeckcr and
Ole McBellow were subjected to an exhausting barrage of kitchen knives, bicycles, sub-
scription fortns, lucky bucks, and coronation
tickets in a rugged survival test to determine
contest rules.
Neespecker and McBellow were posthumously awarded five suscriptions to The
Ubyssey.
The martyred test students were buried
yesterday afternoon by a delegation of cheering reporters and columnists representing the
free press of Vancouver.
The contest is heralded across Canada as
the biggest and baddest ever to be foisted
on newspaper subscribers.
Two sensational Mystery Prizes will be
awarded to the winners of the contest
sample entry and rules
in   your   newspaper,   The
Now read the
printed   below
Ubyssey.
Example No. 1: U B C — University of
British Columbia, a place of learning whose
motto is tuum est. Apt definition: Union of
Batchelors and Co-eds.
Example No. 2: AUS—Arts Undergraduate Society, a faculty undergraduate society which has traditionally done nothing
for artsmen.   Apt Definition:  Acutely Unaware of Students.
Here are the rules:
(1) Object of the contest is to list all
abbreviations in current use on the campus,
with titles of each written out in full.
(2) Explanations of the titles, humorous
or otherwise, must be included and must be
based on an accurate knowledge of the functions of the organizations. ,
(3) Separate prizes, awarded on the basis
of completeness, accuracy, humor, and neat-
enss, will be given to the best freshmen
entry and the best undergrad entry.
(4) Entries, accompanied by name, faculty and year, must be submitted in neat list
form to the Ubyssey Contest Editor before
noon Saturday, Oct. 31.
(5) All undergrads with the exception of
Publications board staff and their families are
eligible to enter the contest.
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VOLUME XXXVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 19S3
Price 5c;   No. 10
Homecoming Queen Candidates
Betty Mowatt
#US
Lillian Marcussl
Teacher Training
Efiie Bouchla
Slavonic Circle
i-fM^^X   „ -*
Over $600.00 Collected
In Campus - Wide Blitz
>
AMS Past Presidents To Bo Lutky
Judges Of Homecoming Princess
Past AMS presidents Dave Brousson, Al Ainsworth and
Mrs. V. Lyon nee Nonie Donaldson will have a difficult
task in choosing a Homecoming Princess from the 15 comely
candidates shown alongside.
The crowning event for the 15 lovelies will take place
-at the'Hometoming Ball Saturday nite at 10:30 p.m. when
the queen of the Princesses will be announced.
Commercemen Invasion
'Highly Successful'
Janice Woodiworth
Pharmacy
.™-,»„i.^,^~^.-|;
Lloy Pountney
Frosh
Madge Pendray
Forestry
Homecoming Ball
Highlights Week
Only four hundred tickets for tbe Homecoming Ball Saturday night in thc Armories will go on sale today in the AMS
office.
Admission tickets for couples only will cost $3 and Howie
Beck, Homecoming chairman, »d- * ——■	
vises students to buy their tickets
Helen Christie
Aggie
Helen Donnelly
Publications
Lois Carlton
Pre-Med.
>".       r     $*. * *> 4   '
Audrey Butler
Commerce
Diane   Bray
Applied   Science
Sylvia Ledingham
VOC
between now and Saturday
morning.
Saturday's cabaret style Ball
will culminate a week of diverse
events including a parade on
Wednesday of tho Homecoming
Princesses and a football game
Thursday noon in the Stadium
between CUS and EUS.
Downtown Vancouver will see
its first HomecominK Parade for
quite a few years on Saturday
noon. Davie and Burrard Street
corner, where the. parade will
end, will be the jumping off
point for students going to the
football game at the Stadium between the Thunderbirds and the
Eastern Washington College
Savages.
Today's program features a
basketball game between thc
Frosh and Sophomores in thc
War Memorial Gym at noon.
Other campus activities will
be a flagraising ceremony at the
Centre Mall flag pole on Friday
noon and a golf tournament between students and alumni on
Saturday morning at 9:00.
LPP Club May
Change
Constitution
Constitution of the newly-
formed LPP club will face demands for a few revisions when
campus political leaders meet to
discuss the charter Thursday.
Ed Zilke, president of the
CCF club, stated that at the
Thursday meeting he will protest "the outside control that is
implied by the LPP constitution
and thc distribution of club
dues."
Under the LPP constitution
as it now stands, only 10% of
club dues would go to the campus organization, the rest going
to tho main LPP party.
With the ommission of these
points, Zilke said he would welcome the appearance of an LPP
club on campus. "It would
clear up thc confusion that CCF
is communist," he said.
Pat  Holmes
MmIhiiu'
Bpv.  Cook
I'hvs    I'M
Janet Daugherty
Home I'M,
COLLEGE SHOP; LOST and FOUND
OPEN IN NEW LOCATION ■ BROCK
The   AMS   college   shop   and > mugs and other goods.
Lost    and    Found    Department;     The majority of articles turn-
will open today in its new loca- ed  into thc  lost  and found  arc
tion next to the AMS office in   those  discovered  by janitors.
Brock Hall. |     If articles,  such    as    wallets,
The shop will be open from with the owner's address, arc
1.2.30 till 2.30 every day except' lurned in. thc AMS will notify
Saturday with Miss Audrey But- the owner by means of a post
ler in charge. card.
Besides the stock of faculty A charge of 10c will be levied
pins, crests and sweaters, which to the claimant of any article
the shop has carried in former to help defray the expense of
years, there    will    be    T-shirts,   tho   department.
MEN AT CAF
Men were also stationed at
the bus stop, quad, Brock Hall
and the caf.
A full report on the blitz
method of soliciting funds will
be submitted to USC by the undergraduate society. The report
will include the problem professors who do not co-operate.
THURSDAY
Thursday noon is the date of
the football game between the
Applied Science and Commerce,
proceeds of which wilt go to the
Red Feather drive.
Thanks to all students and professors for their co-operation and
support has been given by Commerce officials.
The Chest drive will be an annual event.
Community Chest is a combined charities effort to help support approximately 60 small organizations.
Ceremonies
To Be Held
Remembrance Day Ceremonies at UBC will be hold in
Memorial Gym November Ilth
at 1.55 p.m., in co-operation with
the 196th Western Universities
Battalion Association.
Members of thc Alumni Association, University Employees
Union, Alma Mater Society, University Naval Training Division,
Canadian Officers' Training
Corps and Reserve University
Squadron, RCAF, will take
part.
Rev William Deans, padre of
the 1.96th Association, and Rev.
Temple Kingston will offer
prayers during the ceremony
before the memorial plaques in
the gymnasium concourse,
'*w««n clouts
By MURRAY BRISKER
In their two-hour blitz on classes Monday, Commerce
students raised $602.72 for the Community Chest Red Feather
drive.
Their first attempt at a campus wide activity, the commercemen   termed   the   drive• •■ ■ ■■v^.»	
"highly successful."
3SMCN
Thirty-five men met in the Armouries at 8 a.m. Monday, armed
themselves with red feather tins,
then converged on the major
buildings on the campus.
"Invasions" lasted in each
room for only three to four
minutes, but two professors
threw thc Commercemen out of
their lectures.
Guest To Speak
On Race Outlook
SPECIAL EVENTS Committee presents Dr. T. B. Davie,
Principal and Vice-Chancellor
of the University of Capetown,
South Africa, who will lecture
on "The Racial Situation in
South Africa," today at noon in
Physics 200.
**       *
ALPHA OMEGA Society will
held a general meeting Wednesday noon, in Arts 102. All members must attend. Anyone interested in joining ihe society
is welcome.
tp tp tp
GEOGRAPHY    CLUB    will
hold its initial meeting Wednesday, 12.30 in FG 100. Two films
on cities of North Anjerica and
Europe will be shown.
tp tp qp
CHEER LEADERS CLUB
will hold practices in the Women's Gym today, tomorrow
and Friday at 12.30.
tp tp tp
FILM SOCIETY will present
Charles Dickens' classic "Oliver
Twist" on Thursday, Oct. 22, in
the Auditorium at 12.30. Admission is 25c to students and
staff.
fif» ¥p 9f*
FROSH wishing to participate
in the Homecoming Parade this
Saturday either as treckers or
float decorators should go to
A104 today at 12.45. All owners
of 1920-1032 model cars are also
urged to attend.
# *        #
CCF CLUB will present Jim
Bury at their weekly meeting
Wednesday, at 12.30 in Arts 100.
Topic of Mr. Bury's address will
be "International Labor."
V*        V*        ¥■
JAZZ SOCIETY presents Bob
Smith, Vancouver Disc Jockey
at its meeting today in the
Brock Stage Room at 1.2.30.
* *        >f
FILM SOCIETY'S free noon
show, "North and South of the
Niger," will be presented today
at noon in the Auditorium.
(Continued on page 3)
(See  'TWEEN CLASSES) PAGE TWO THE
the ubyssey
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa.
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail subscriptions $2 per year. Single copies five cents. Published in Vancouver throughout the
University year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of
the editorial staff of The Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater
Society or the University. Letters to the Editor should not be more than 150 words.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication
of all letters received.
Offices in Brock Hall For Display Advertising
Phone ALma 1824 Phone ALrnn 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  ALLAN FOTHERINGHAM
Managing Editor , Peter Sypnowlch
Executive Edior. Jarome Angel City Editor. Ed Parker
Women's Editor, Helen Donnelly Photo Editor, Bob Kendrlk
Senior Editor this issue      Charlie Watt
Staff Cartoonist, Howard Mitchell
Reporters: Mike Ames, Bob Bridge, Murray Brisker, Peter Krosby, Bruce
McWilliams, Pete f*ineo, Dick Dolman, Ken Lamb.
Deskmen: Bert Gordon, Rosemary Kent-Barber, Pat Barrett, Ray Logic
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 20, 1953
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
Students Come Second
The campus bookstore, owned and operated by the University of British Columbia,
is not serving UBC students as it should.
Students on this campus receive no direct
benefit from the profits made by the bookstore—profits made entirely through the sale
of books and supplies to the students.
On other campuses profits are returned
to the students. At McGill University, bookstore profits are turned, over to the Student
Society (McGill equivalent to the Alma Mater
Society). At the University of Washington
the profits are returned to the students
through a profit sharing plan. Other campuses have schemes comparable to these. At
UBC bookstore profits are given to the university administration.
Not only do UBC students provide funds
for the administration through the campus
bookstore, but they subsidize faculty mem
bers' book buying. Faculty members buy
books at a substantial discount, while students
pay much higher prices. If anyone is to get
books at reduced prices it should be the
students, who are often hard-pressed to meet
the high cost of a university education.
The discount given to faculty members is
about ten times as great as the reported net
profits of the bookstore. Thus faculty members get their books at much less than cost,
while the students, paying higher prices, make
up the difference.
With such a system of operation it can
hardly be claimed that the bookstore is operating to serve the students. It is serving the
faculty and administration primarily and
serving students second.
Or perhaps tbe administration doesn't
agree that a university bookstore should be
operated to the benefit of the students?
Congratulations Everyone
Congratulations are due both students
and the Commerce Undergraduate Society for
the Community Chest blitz drive on Monday.
With appeals of every type and description continually popping up, the trend is towards the short, effective campaign instead
of the longer, more passive appeal for funds.
Commerce students wisely realized this and
put all their efforts into a drive which netted
$5 every minute for the Community Chest.
Never noted for being loaded with the
green stuff, students showed that they will
gladly give to a worthwhile cause. The Community Chest drive can now be added to
such other worthwhile and notable efforts
as the March of Dimes drive and the Blood
drive.
Now if we could only wiruihat football
game on Saturday.
An Excellent Choice
The announcement by Homecoming
Week officials that Dean Walter Gage wijl
be presented with thc Great Trekker Award
has been greeted with enthusiastic approval
both on and off th? campus.
A tireless worker on behalf of the university, Dean Gag" has all the requirements
of a Great Trekker Award winner. He has
achieved eminence in his chosen field of
activity. He has made a worthy and special
contribution to his community. And he has
evidenced an especially keen and continued
interest in his Alma Mater and rendered
particular service to the undergraduate
students.
As head of Inter-Faculty and Administrative Affairs, Dean Gage has acted as an efficient liason officer between various faculties and generally has kept an eye on all campus activities.
Along vtfith his duties as a member of
the UBC Senate he has found lime to continue as a professor of mathematics. He is
also chairman of '.ha Bursary and Scholarship
Committee and has been organizing chairman
of    the    Freshman    Orientation    Committee
since 1934.
Always eager lo help and always reluctant to turn clown any student who needs
help, Dean Gage, in the opinion of the students, is an excellent choice for the 1953 Great
Trekker Award.
Power    Hungry
Tiie Aluminum Company of Canada invested 8500,000,000 in BC because they
figured that this province had the cheapest
potential electric power in the world.
Yes Vancouver electricity consumers pay
practically twice as much for their power as
do residents of Seattle.
The BCE would probably reply that the
US Pacific Northwest is a larger market than
BC. However, we need only look at the
power-hungry northwestern states of the US
lo see thai cheap power built those insatiable
markets.
Why, oh BC lOlectric, oh why, do Van-
c mvoriles have to pay $9.80 for 500 kilowatt
hours when Seattle residents only pay $5.24?
LETTERS TO  THE  EDITOR
WatM
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We of the Radio and 'television Society were indeed gratified to encounter in Oct. 9
issue of The Ubyssey a copious
quantity of free publicity and
assorted humor. We wish to extend our thanks lo the editorial
staff of this august news sheet,
for if we had been forced to
pay Cor this fine piece of promotion work it would have
taken approximately twice our
annual budget to do so (Al
oldsmith please note1.
We submit herewith tor vour
consideration the following
facts:
1. "UBC Digest" reaches
over 9.500 individual homes in
the Metropolitan area in a
single     day,
'-!. The Hadin Society continues to supply programs to
Canadian radio sta'ions during
tiie summer months when The
Ubyssey   has  ii is.o in 11 mini   pub-
licalion.
.'{. While The Ubyssey might
be able to claim that they are
the ears, eyes, nose, throat and
what have you of UBC, they
or no one else can not by any
stretch of the imagination lay
claim to the title the "Voice"
of UBC. unless of course the
shouting which goes on at
Students' Council meetings
reaches more ears than our
transmitters!
Though The Ubyssey may be
sent hitther and yon to many
ox-university individuals, and
campus groups, tho Radio Society is the only campus organization consistently bringing
the story of UBC to those thou-
.-.ands of people who have never had any direct connection
wilh   the   university.
.V.'.ain Mr Kditor. you say
that   The   Ubyssey   reaches   the
oilici-. of countless newspapers
ihromihout   the   Hntish     Com
monwealth and the U.S. Just
how much material from thc
pages of this illustrious sheet
ever appears in print elsewhere? Whereas the many
productions of the Radio Society are all hoard on the air
over our B.C. network exactly
the way we produce them here.
And as for your statement
Mr. Editor that "anything you
can do we can do better," let's
sec The Ubyssey perform any
more effectively the highly necessary functions of disturbing
Brock Loungers' bridge games
or annoying Professor Harry
Adaskin.
And so lo end. we hope, this
battle of wits ('.') remember -
"To each  his own."
(Kd. Note: - Not quite the
( nd lladsoc ol course realizes
that the above free publicity
is coming to students and our
millions of readers, courtesy oi
Tiie   I'bvssev,   not   Uadsoe.)
Communistic?
(This letter is written by an
Arts student who escaped from
Poland a year ago. He asks
that his name be withheld to
protect his family in Poland—
editor).
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wonder what is the meaning of SCM? If it is a student
communist movement then
arguing with them is of no use.
If it is a Christian movement
then I ask why they insist on
selling their name to the communist International Union of
Students (IUS) and forget their
Christian friends behind the
Iron Curtain who are persecuted by Red tyranny.
Has Ken Faris learned the
lesson* of the past? The lesson
was—how the human spirit
can bear up under the most
formidable burden of nazi and
communist tyranny and never
be vanquished — a lesson of
hope and Christian faith and
courage and trust in friends,
especially Christian friends.
Then why recognize tyrants
and be associated with them?
Just to enable them to enslave
more Christians?
Mr. Gibson's formula and
reasoning are echoes of Marxian dialectic and communist
strategy. We should know by
now how communist leaders
do not settle arguments by discussion, but rather, attempt to
achieve their ends by subversion and overthrowing the governments of their enemies
from within. In other words
the IUS wants to bind Canadian students' hands and shoot
them in the back of the head,
so that Endicot and his"cama-
rades" can easily destroy the
Canadian way of life.
— Name withheld.
Shot In The Head
Editor, The Ubyssey:
At the last AMS meeting the
motion for associate membership in IUS was voted down.
The CBC news on the morning
of October 2 reported it had
been opposed because 'IUS was
a communistic organization.'
Vancouver Sun headlines declared: "Students block Red
overtures." Repeated hints at
communistic affiliations and
party lines have been heard,
but little discussion on the
issues  actually  involved.
Certainly Canadian delegates
are not going to cause the
'conversion' of IUS members
or 'assure peace.' But thc only
alternative to contract is no
contract and the growth of misunderstanding and  prejudice.
The Canadian observers —
both NFCUS observer Chuch
Taylor,    and    SCM    observers
(1952) Shcalia     Mcdonough.
(1953) Barbara Grant and Bill
Wilmott urge participation in
NFCUS. A quote from the report of Shealia Mcdonough, a
graduate student at McGill re-
gerding its value, "the sudden
confrontation with an entirely
different way of life served to
make us aware of much of the
complacency of our society
and at thc same time gave us
insights into what is beginning
to happen in a society."
NFCUS will of course continue to send observers to IUS,
doubtlessly, as in the past,
some student studying or visiting in Europe, not returning to
Canada, with no official guidance offered by NFCUS.
DONETTA HENDERSON
3rd Arts.
CLASSIFIED
EXPERT TYPINC, PICKUP &
delivery service Sundays.
FR. 9591. (30)
DURING   THE   ABSENCE   OF
Mrs   A. O. Robinson, students
are asked to take their typing!
lo   Mrs.   Florence   Gow,   44f>81
West    10th,   AT..   3«82.       (V.|>;
HMO  AUSTIN     10    SEDAN   IN
good condition, new pain! and
>»Tder\,     cheap     to     operate.
Why   use   bus'.'      AL.   a 190-1.J
(John) or  West.  2753 (1?) i
RIDER   WANTED   SOUTH   OF'
3«th.   West  of  Macdonald.   six !
days,   R.30   lo   5.30,    !f)53   car, ]
$1.25   per   week    Phone   Maurice   KE.    1B59-L. (II''
REVIEW   OF  FRENCH   CRAM
mar by Mesnard. Phone I.vnne
at   AL.   0753-M. (10)
19311 FORI) DELUXE RADIO
and heater   Fraser 9421.    (10)
DOUBLE & SINGLE iiREAST
ed Tux. size 39 and tails, size
37, all in good condit ion lo lit
medium height Tclepho'ie
S 15. (let'em lor appoitiime.it
MArine  0191. - Im
World U. Service
Invites  Problems
Students from overseas are
invited to bring any problems
they may have to the World
University Service office in
Roojn 2A in the Arts Building.
WUSC, formerly the ISS, is
providing student and' faculty
members of the committee to
assist new students. Agnes Will-
fort, secretary of the WUSC,
says all students should feel free
to make use of this service.
Below is a list of counsellors
and times.
Dr. Margaret Ormsby, Tuesday, 11.30 to 12.30, and Thursday, same time; Mr. Vaughn
Lyon, Monday, 12.30 to 1.30;
Miss Joan McArthur, Tuesday
and Thursday, 12.30 to 1.30;
Miss' Lois Millington, Wed. and
Friday, 1.15 to 2.15; Mr. R. Far-
quharson, Tues. and Thurs.,
9.30 to 11.30, in Hut G5, Rm. 9.
Clubs Mutt Submit
Notices Earlier
Campus clubs seeking advance
publicity for their functions
must submit 'tween classes
forms to The Ubyssey not later
than 2 p.m. the day before the
notice is to appear.
Restricted to two issues a
week this year, The Ubyssey
cannot guarantee advance publicity to any campus club other
than through the 'tween classes
column.
'Tween classes forms are
available at the offices of The
Ubyssey in the Brock basement.
Notice Board Abustd;
Signs To Bt Removed
Students posting notices on
the quad notice board are abusing the ing the privilege reporting the privilege, reported Ger-
ry Hodges, Mamooks vice-president, Thursday.
Mamooks request that all clas-
sufied notices posted on the south
side of the notice board be removed.
Queen's Fans
Break Train
Windows
KINGSTON, Ont. (CUP» —
Queen's University students and
football team made their traditional invasion of Toronto e-
cently, but destruction done by
the invaders was reported to be
at a "new low."
Only three windows of their
special train were broken, and
Queen's students reduced to
fragments for souvenirs only
one Toronto goal post, Queen's
student newspaper reported.
University of Toronto defeated Queen's 16-7, but not without
suffering some damage at the
hands of the invaders.
The Queen's Journal reports
the invaders kept house detectives of two Toronto hotels "on
their toes" with various antics.
"But both hotels seemed to be
in fairly good shape afterwards," the newspaper modestly
stated.
University of Toronto newspaper said Kingston AMS officials would attempt to stop all
students from taking beer on the
special train.
However, it was reported that
one Kingston student tossed an
empty bottle out the train window. The bottle bounced'back
from a tie, and flew up to break
a window.
FORH6N BOOKS
We are specialists In the direct
import of teehnieal and scientific literature, manuals, text*
books, dictionaries, magaslnei,
etc., from Germany. Switzerland, Sweden, Austria, France,
Italy and Holland. Ask us for
any information about modern
books from these countries.
We can give you all details,
price — and we obtain your
books quickly!
Continental Book Cen'rc
The Home of the European
Book
914A W. PENDER
(opposite Hotel Abbotsford)
Phone PAcific 4711
LEARN TO DANCE
•    QUICKLY
•    EASILY
•    PRIVATELY
Frances Murphy
Dance School
Alma Hall 3679 W. Broadway
CE. 8878 — BA. 3425
37
YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE  UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ITS FRATERNITIES*
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD
TELEPHONE      PACIFIC   OI7I
i035 Seymour St.,
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A I good shops r\ci'\ \* lirrr. Tuesday, October 20, 1953
THE    UBYSSEY
Gymnasium
Debt Paid
In 6 Years
By MICHAEL AMES
Six years from now should be
the time for celebration, because
that is when the $210,000 Memorial Gymnasium debt is expected to be completely paid.
According to AMS Treasurer
Allan Goldsmith, at the present
levy of $5 per student, which
means about $2,500 a year, the
debt will be completely paid
witWh six yeats.
Students have been paying
the levy since 1947. Only
$89,000 is still owing on the
debt, $4,000 of it to university
architects.
Public subscription, government grants, and a $210,000 loan
from the Bank of Montreal,
which students are repaying,
have raised the $931,228 which
the gym has so far cost.
Once the present debt is retired further work will be done
on the, gym.
Accoustic plaster will be installed on the inside of the gym
roof, showers, washrooms and
small gymnasium completed,
and bowling alleys installed.
Of the $16 student fee which
you pay when registering at
UBC, $5 goes directly to the
gym retirement fund, $2.90 to
administration of student affairs, $3.10 to men's and 34c to
women's athletics, $1 for foreign exchange scholarships, 86c
to clubs and undergraduate societies, 89c for general activities
and funds, and 10c for depreciation of furnishings and fixtures.
Fifty cents of the $16 is reserved for a safety marghn.      j
USC Exterminates !
Undergrad Society
After 17 days of deliberation,
Student Council Monday night j
decided to allow the Arts Under- j
graduate Society to die. I
Council's decision developed I
after a three-man Undergraduate Society Committee reported
that USC had supported dissolu-;
tion at a meeting the same day. j
CLASSES
(Continued from page 1)
VARSITY Christian Fellowship
will present well-known evangelist from England and Jamaica, Mr. Harold Wildish, who
will speak on "What is the New
Birth?" Wednesday in Physics
201.
ff>        if*        *v
PARLIAMENTARY    FORUM;
Debate will discuss the controversial issue: "Will Higher Hemlines   Lower  Morals"  Thursday
noon, in Arts 100.
if1 *r *T*
PROGRESSIVE   Conservative
Club will meet today in Arts
206. New members are welcome.
if* **r *f*
UNITED    NATIONS*    CLUB
model general assembly will
discuss the resolution "Should
Communist China Be Admitted
to the UN.?" Friday, Oct. 23
at 8 p.m.
*T* *T* V
BIOLOGY CLUB presents
Dr. Ian McT. Cowan, head of
the Zoology department, who
will speak on the topic "Zoology
in Scotland and Finland" today,
at 8 p.m. in Biology 100. Everyone  welcome.
^p 3f* if*
DANCE CLUB'S program for
this week includes Folk Dancing:
today at noon: ballroom dancing1
Wednesday  noon;  square  dancing,  Wednesday    nt    6.30.     All;
meetings will be held in G4.
if*        if*        if*
FILM SOCIETY presents today its second feature technicolor film 'A Queen Is Crowned.' |
Performances will be held in
the Auditorium at 3.45, 6 and
8.15. j
>f, if. >f,
PSYCHOLOGY    CLUB   general
meeting will be  held  tomorrow
at noon in Ihe club room, HM3.
CIVIL     LIBERTIES    UNION
presents a speech on "Freedom
In Radio and Television" by Mr.
R. Baker of the English dept..
in Applied Science Building 202
today al noon.
PHRATERES Old Members'
banquet Wednesday at ~,.'A0 p.m.
in Brock dining room. Last
chance for I iekets,, todav, in the
I 'hi.ileir IJoom No I icUet-; ''old
al   door
nrw.
College Texts Cheaper j
At U.ofW. BookStore
By BOB BRIDGE
Students of the University of Washington get a break on
the tost of their text books and other academic supplies in the;
form of a ten percent rebate on their purchases throughout!
the year.
PAGE THREE
■smBS
*:...
i
News Item: "President
Suspected Revue Star."
Students save their sales slips
throughout the year and at the
end of the term hand them, into
the store jn an envelope which
is provided for the purpose.
Store employees check the slips
and if they are correct the student is. sent a check for the amount which Is due him.
Textbpoks form the main
source of revenue for the store
and a used book department it
set up along with the new book
department. Old texts are
bought back at the end of the
year, provlced that they can be
used in the following year. All
texts are sold by the self-serve
method, and all transactions are
strictly cash.
Filmsoc To Provide
Class For Students
Film Society is providing projectionist training classes for students who are interested in
learning the fundamentals of
operating projectionist equipment.
In announcing the new classes,
Filmsoc members also advise
campus organizations to contact
Filmsoc and obtain the free services of a registered projectionist, because, they explained, the
AMS refuses to be responsible
for damage to films and projectors operated by unauthorized
persons.
ORDER
the
'54
TOTEM
NOW!
»•
at the AMS- Office
Only 10
More Days
I M I! f     M A ft *
International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited
25 King Street West, Toronto PAGE FOUR
THE  UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 20, 1953
Penalties Prove Costly
As Loggers Down 'Birds
UBC Loses 80 Yards
In Penalty Setbacks
UBC Thunderbirds 26 • CPS Loggers 40
By RON SAPERA
TACOMA, Wash—(Special)— UBC Thunderbirds played
the finest game in their history here Friday afternoon although
they lost to the College of Puget Sound Loggers 40-26 before
a meager crowd of 200 persons.
It was the highest scoring and most wide-open game of
tho season in Evergreen Conference play.
-■■■■^— ^   The Blue and Gol(j c]ub got
Football Scores
EVERGREEN CONFERENCE
Whiteworth 7 • Central 2
Eastern 18 • PLC 13
CFS 40 - UBC 28
STANDINGS
Team       W L T
PF PAPts.
Whit. ... 8   0   0
77    18
6
East.  ... 2   10
86   78
4
CPS 110
47   84
2
Cent. ... 1   2   0
41   88
2
West. ... 1   1   0
27   42
2
PLC 12   0
27   28
2
UBC -- 0   2   0
28   73
0
THE YARDSTICK
UBC
CPS
Rushing Plays	
30
30
Yds. Gained	
187
315
Yards Lost	
7
26
Forwards Attempted
32
18
Forwards Completed
16
8
Forwards, Intercept.
1
1
Net Pasting Yds....
288
83
1st Downs, Rush...
6
11
1st Downs, Pass	
13
1
1st Downs, pen	
1
1
Total 1st Downs...
20
13
6
4
Yds. Lost, Pen	
80
40
•
2
4
2
Punt Yardage	
115
55
Kickoffs   	
5
7
Kickoff Yardage ..
250
301
Kickoffs Returned.
7
5
Yds. Kicks Return.
116
145
Soccer Clubs
Settle For
Sunday Draws
Varsity 3, Collingwood 3
Chiefs 3. General Hospital 3
The Thunderbird fitba' XI
continued their year long mastery over the league leading Collingwood Athletics as they
fought them to a 3-3 draw at
Killarney Park on Sunday.
A poor referee, an erratic defense and the slippery turf combined to deprive the 'Birds of
an upset victory.
UBC TAKES LEAD
Before the game was five
minutes old Varsity racked up
a 2-0 lead on a penalty kick by
Matthews and a long 25-footer
by Dobson. The startled Collies
quickly struck back and at the
half the score was knotted at
2-2.
The Collies, apparently spurred on by a half time tongue-
lashing, scored early in the third
quarter and managed to hold
the lead until the last ten minutes of the same when Rudge
tied it up for Varsity. Time ran
out with both clubs trying desperately for the winner.
V *r *r*
Meanwhile, not to be outdone
by the 'Birds, the UBC Chiefs
battled the strong General Hospital squad to an identical 3-3
draw. The draw leaves the
Chiefs record all even—a win,
a loss and a draw.
The Chiefs will practice at
noon Thursday and Varsity on
Friday al 3.30.
Intramural Skeds
TUESDAY—-Meds. 3 vs. S. A.
M : Eng. 3 vs. Eng. 4; Eng. 'D'
vs. Div. Grads; Chem. Eng. 'B'
vs. A. T. O. 'B'; Vies 'A' vs. Sigma Foo; Beta 'B' vs. Forestry
'B'.
off to a slow start and were trailing 14-0 before the first quarter
had ended. They got one back,
however, early in the second
stanza with left half Jack Hutchinson going over for the TD.
HUTCH SCORES THREE
Hutchinson scored three of
UBC's four majors and added a
convert, booted when punter
Norm Fieldgate was taken out
for a breather.
Most spectacular play of the
game was Gordie Flemon's pass
to Hutch from the UBC 18. The
speedy back gathered the toss in
on his own 37 and scampered
all the way for six points.
PENALTIES COSTLY
Penalties contributed a great
deal to the 'Birds loss as they
suffered 60 yards in setbacks in
the first half and 80 in the tilt.
Officiating of the game was
very poor as the referees called
illegel use of hands penalties
while overlooking cliping, slugging and pass interference by
both teams.
Coach   Don Coryell   assured
reporters,   "these   guys   would
never referee any more games
my team is playing in."
UBC PASSING GOOD
The Canadian team picked up
most of their yardage through
passing as they completed 16
of 32 for a total of 265 yards.
The loggers pulled in 8 of 18 for
83 yards.
Best play for the CPS squad
was an end around sweep which
completely baffled the 'Birds and
picked up huge gains for ■ the
home team.
QUICK KICKS: Captain Bob
Brady suffered a broken nose in
ihe game . . . Little Charlie James
was throw back for close to 15
yards when hit by a CPS blocker
. . . best block seen in a long
tune . . . UBC still could stand
some blocking and tackling,
would help them win a few more
games . . . CPS line was very
weak but backfield tremendous
. . . Next game is Saturday's
Homecoming tilt against Eastern
at the stadium.
Cross-Count'y
Taken By UBC
Doug Kyle and Pete Harris,
UBC's iron men of distance racing, once again provided the
needed spark to give the Blue
and Gold cross-country team a
narrow 23-22 decision over Vancouver Olympic Club Saturday.
COURSE SOAKED
Kyle waded through the rain-
soaked 4't< mile course at
Brockton in 22 minutes, 49.7
seconds, to beat out team mate,
and pacesetter, Pete Harris.
Adrien Vali, Olympic Club, finished third, and Bill Parnell,
Victoria 'Y' was fourth.
Minor accidents ruled the
afternoon because the course
was as slippery as an ice rink.
Harris was the first to fall, injuring his knee in attempting
to hurdle a fence.
APPLIED SCIENCE QUAKES
AT THOUGHT OF FOOTBALL
Move over, Thunderbirds—yon ain't seen nuttin' yet.
Campus Commercement have issued a statement that
will probably put football back 30 years. As part of Homecoming Week celebrations Applied Science students have
accepted the Commerce challenge to a football game at noon
Thursday in the Stadium.
Commercemen said .today that the Red Cross have
taken not only all the red corpuscles from the Applied
Science boys but also must have taken their nerve. The
challenge was accepted by Applied Science with one stipu-
lation-»-no body contact.   It will be touch football.
Braves Win Again
But Chiefs Lose
Edgett Stars With  Braves
As Ex-Tech Boys Swamped
Meralomas 5 • UBC Chiefs 3
UBC Braves 17 • Ex-Tech 0
Vindex 6 - UBC Tomahawks 0
By GEOFF CONWAY
Contrary to the idea expressed by an old proverb, lightening has struck UBC twice.
The victims were the three campus rugby fifteens who
duplicated their opening day efforts in last Saturday's contests. v >
For the second straight time
the first division Chiefs displayed a lack of finesse in bowing
out to the undefeated Merlomas.
The rampaging Braves racked
by a narrow two-point margin,
up their second straight shutout
in overwhelming Ex-Tech by a
17-0 count; and the Tomahawks
were again kept off the score-
sheet in their 6-0 loss to Vindex.
LOSS EXPECTED
Varsity hopes of a win Saturday had been dim due to their;
lack of practice and the Merlo-!
mas' powerful showing In their |
two previous victories. But the j
much-improved performance of
the  UBC  forwards,   who   have
taken Albert Laithwaite's warnings  to heart  and  are  rapidly
getting   themselves   into   condition, served to stem the vaunted
attack.
BACKFIELD POOR
However, the formerly-potent
Varsity backfield counteracted
this advantage with an inept display of play making that left
much to be desired. Although
the Varsity forwards managed
to control over half the play, the
backs were unable to get rolling
and UBC lost a golden chance
for a win.
Mien you pause...make it count...have a Coke
drink
V
C-3J
4 I
"Cefct" N e f gltf f «t fiwfo-mofk.
fadt An* tUttri Inm
COCA-COLA LTD.
ORLON and WOOL
JERSEY DRESSES
TRACK AND CROSS country
club will hold a meeting in
Room 211' of the new gym at
noon Wednesday to discuss
workouts and coming trips
Movies of, the 1950 BE Games
will be shown.
*f>        ff>        ff. ,
SWIM TEAM will hold a
meeting in the Board Room of
the new gym at noon today to
discuss forthcoming water practices.
"f* *T* *P
CURLING   ENTHUSIASTS
are asked to attend a meeting in
Arts 102 at noon Friday.
*        *        *
UBC TENNIS CLUB will hold
an    organizational    meeting    at
noon Friday in HM4.
14-18
• 80% orlon and 20% wool jersey
• dne-piece tailored, pleated skirts
They're budget-priced, pretty and washable. They're
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Sketched are just     two of the attractive styles to chc
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HBC Popular Priced Dresses, Third Floor
INCORPORATED   2?» MAY 1670.
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