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The Daily Ubyssey Sep 23, 1947

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 FIRST   CAMPUS  DAILY  TODAY
The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXi
xu
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1947
No. 1
Pub Sets Pace
With Four Weekly
Vancouver now has four daily newspapers with the publication this year of The Daily Ubyssey.
Previously published on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, this year's student newspaper will appear four times each
week, Tuesday through Friday, on the University of British
Columbia campus.
THREE IN CANADA
This brings to three the number of
Canadian universities with a daily
student organ. The others are McGill
and the University of Toronto, winner, last year of the Bracken Trophy
emblematic of the best college newspaper in Canada.
Four issuse per week Is classed
as "daily" by university standards.
An edition on Mondays is considered
impractical because it would necessitate work on Sundays because of
the samll number of students in attendance on that day.
"A daily newspaper is necessary to
keep pace with the activities of an
enlarged student body," declared Don
Ferguson, editor-in-chief of the Publications Board when he announced
the new program.
Started as a monthly in 1916 The
Ubyssey went bi-weekly in 1930.
Fourteen years later the paper expanded to a tri-weekly basis with an
editorial annuoncing that the move
"is first step toward the establishment of a daily paper".
PROCEbURE REVISED
This year's version of The Ubyssey
will be run on the same basis as a
regular daily newspaper with t*ie
operating procedure revised accordingly. Facilities of The Standard
Publishing Company, which prints
the paper, have also been increased
the handle the extra work.
Position of managing editor, newly
created in order to reduce the work
of the editor-in-chief, has ben filled
by Laurie Dyer, last year's sport's
editor. Individual editions will be in
the hands of Joan Grimmett, Val
Sears, Hal Pinchin and Jack Wasser-
man.
The new program and the close contact maintained by The Ubyssey with
other Vancouver papers will give any
student interested in journalism a
sound training on the Publications
Board, Editor Ferguson pointed out.
Dirty Eleven
Spend Summer
Cleaning
While the majority of the eight
thousand UBC students were
busy following the birds to Victoria this summer, members of
the new Alma Mater Society
Students Council were busy
scrubbing window ledges in preparation for their return this fall.
During the meetings held every
third we ek plans were discussed
for reorganization of the AMS
offices. Following details of a
report prepared during the summer by George Masters, office
manager at the Vancouver General Hospital, enlarging of the
staff from three to five members
has been undertaken.
Changes have also been made
in the arrangement of the office
"lay out.
Excavation behind Brock Hall
has begun as a result of the
Council's planning for extension
of the AMS offices and club
rooms.
Plans were also made to continue the campaign for funds for
the War Memorial Gymnasium.
NOTICE
All students—freshmen and up-
perclassmen—who are considering
the Student Publications Board as
their choice of campus activity
this year will be cordially welcomed at an Introductory gathering to be held in the Brock Hall
stage room, 12:30 Wednesday.
GREEN NAIL POLISH, pin curls, no make up, are the marks
of the freshette on the campus this year, More than 400
freshettes winced slightly Saturday morning as upperclass-
women gleefully administered briliant green nail pqlish. Complete with name placards and mismatched bobby \ socks, the
freshettes will be required to wear their regalia for the
remainder of the week. (See story on page 4.)
TRIUMPH blazes in the eyes of these students as they gain the
covetted position at first in line at the Registrar's office queue.
For many of the 8000 who fought the crowds to complete their
registration during the ten-day period this meant as much as
a five-hour wait.
It's T
rue
It's true.
The signature across the top of this page reads "The Daily
Ubyssey", and it's true.
On Saturday afternoons more than three decades ago the
founders of the original "Ubicee"'—mimeographed and tacked
to notice boards once weekly—used to push back their typewriters, put their feet up on the desk, and joke abbut UBC
someday having a daily student newspaper.
Well it's here.
you are too.
We of the Publications Board are proud of it and we hope
B.C.E.R. PLAYS GAME
COUNCIL'S WAY
Jammed transportation services to and from UBC will be
given a boost this year as results of the AMS special committee
on transportation begin to materialize.
A five point program has been pur
sued during the summer under tbe
direction of committee chairman, Ray
Dewar.
1. A regular Pacific Stages bus
service from New Westminster to the
campus.
2. B. C. Electric bus service from
Forty-first avenue and  Dunbar,
3. B. C. Electric bus service from
Fourth avenue and Alma.
4. Additional street cars down Oak
Street.
5. Additional street ci^.rs across
Broadway.
UNDERWAY MONDAY
The new scheme which got underway Monday morning brings special
streetcars from the Oak street terminus and from Sixteenth and Main to
the campus.
The schedule for the special student cars has not yet been announced
and the cars do not bear any distinctive marking.
One car will run north down Oak
and six will run across Broadway.
SURVEY  RESULTS
Meanwhile results of-the transportation survey taken during registration are being tabulated and when
complete will serve as a basis or
proceeding further with the scheduled
improvements,   Dewar   said.
The B. C. Motor Transportation,
operators of Pacific Stage Lines, disclose, however, that the planned, and
previously rnnounced, direct through
service between the UBC campus and
New Westminster has been temporarily postponed.
NO   THROUGH  BUS
The company conducted a survey
there earlier this summer, gaining
response from 130 students, but when
the price and timetable was announced only twenty student commuters   signified   their   intention   to
make  the  daily  trip.
The price was pegged at $16 per
month return  and  $10 single fare.
In the opinion of the committee
"the lack of interest may be due to
the fact that many students may
find the fare higher than anticipated."
STUDENT  DRIVERS
Dewar suggested earlier that student drivers be employed in an effort to reduce the price. 4
The two remaining bus lines—from
Forty-first and from Alma— are now
under consideration by the company.
The information compiled from the
forms filled ien during registration
will be used in these negotiations.
STUDENT APATHY
Dewar condemned student apathy,
complaining that "the success of the
poll was marred to some extent, because of the fact that many students
did not take the two minutes necessary to complete the form."
He urged all students who did not
file the form at the time of registration
to do so before the end of the week
at the AMS office.
The special number 15 street car on
Oak street will leave the Marpole
terminus daily at 7:17 and will arrive
at  Tenth  and Sasamat  by 8  a.m.
The line is designed to accomodate
student veterans living at Little
Mountain Camp.
NOTICE
Postwar ' Bubble7
Pops In Slack Year
The UBC postwar boom is over.
After three hectic years of jampacked lecture rooms and
skyrocketing registration, student numbers at the university
have hit the skids.
Registrar Charles B. Wood announced Monday there were
now 8,150 students at UBC. Last year at this time there Were
8300.
All students who have appointments for their medical
examinations on the afternoon of Monday, September
29, please report to the
Health Service Office, Hut
A2, immediately.
Next year, M. Wood predicted,
UBC will begin the expected postwar
nosedive as veterans who have swelled classes to all-time records, collect
caps and gowns. .
Late registration may boost the
figure for '47-'48 by several hundred,
but indications on the campus Monday were that UBC's frantic, circus-
like postwar "bubble" had finally
broken.
9,035 LAST YEAR
Total registration for last year, a
record which may not be equalled
at the university for years, stood at
9035, after all straggling late registrants had been tabulated.
"We expected registration to. be
about this figure," the Registrar said.
"The peak has been reached, and of
course there will be even fewer students next year."
An invasion of 5000 ex-servicemen
to the campus however, has set a new
record for veterans on the campus,
officials of the Department of Veteran's Affairs declared.
Although student numbers were
slightly lower than last fall, those
who had been through the all-day
line ups of previous years were
thankful for a faster, more efficient
system put into use this year by the
university administration.
PARTT1ME  JOBS
As students struggled with housing
and financial difficulties at the
launching of the new term, Maj. John
McLean veterans' councellor for the
university, announced that 250 part
time jobs had been found through
the  ex-servicemen's  bureau.
About 200 men and 50 women will
be able to add to their budget with
jobs ranging from baby sitting to truck
driving, he said.
Permanent registration numbers,
assigned to each student this year,
would speed up registration procedure
in future years, Mr. Wood predicted,
eliminating the snaking line-ups that
trailed over the campus earlier this
month.
Book Exchange
Breaks  Record
The Campus Book Exchange has
sold more books in one week this fall
than during all of last year.
So said book exchange manager
Don Russell Monday as long spaghetti-like lines of students strung
out from the improvised book store
in  the  UBC  Armouries.
A surplus of texts, especially those
for first year, still remain on the
shelves, he said, although commerce
and engineering books are in short
supply.
A student wishing any other than
first year books must fill out an order form and wait his turn to have
it filled which usually takes a day or
two, Russell said.
Profits made through the sale of
books will be donated to the International Student Service after operating expenses of the Exchange are
deducted.
Texts left for sale will be returned
to their owners if not sold by the
time the Exchange closes at the end
of October.
Situated in the southwest corner of
the Armouries, the Exchange is open
from 9 to 3 pm on weekdays and
from 9 to 1 pm on Saturdays.
Now or Never
For '47 Totem
All students holding receipts on
the 1946-47 TOTEM must present
them at the AMS office before
Tuesday, September 30 In order to
receive their copy of the yearbook.
At that date a public declaration
of Invalidity will be published and
receipts will no longer be honored.
If any students have lost their
receipts (die little blue cards presented at the time of sale last
September) they are advised to
call at the AMS office and have
an adjustment made.
Any TOTEMS remaining after
September 30 will be sold at the
standard rate o 93.50.
Since many students are anxious
to secure copies, a waiting list has
been prepared and students wishing copies should have their name
included Immediately.
Frosh Name
New Prexy
A precedent was set at the University last Friday when the Frosh
class elected a slate of officers to
carry On as Freshmean representatives. In the past, these elections
have often been delayed until November.
Peter Murphy, a seventeen-year-
old graduate of Vancouver College
was elected president of the Fresh
class. The vice-president is to be
Walter Sinclair and Phyllis Tobin
was named secretary. The sports representative will be Dave MacFarlane.
While at V.C., Murphy sat on Council as president of the 1946-47 session, and intends to take just as
active a part here on the campus. He
is very interested in student government.
It is very probable that Murphy
will see that the Frosh class is well
represented in atheletics for he himself is interested in basketball and
baseball.
One of the first duties of the newly
elected president will be to arrange
the Frosh party coming up next
Tuesday. He will also have a seat on
the Undergraduate Societies Committee.
Cairn Ceremony
To Honor Trek
An honored university tradition
will be recalled once again when
the annual Cairn Ceremony takes
place today at 12:30 pm on the main
Mall.
The ceremony holds special significance for freshman as it was the
freshman class of 1922 who initiated
the   trek.
President Norman A. M. Mackenzie, Grant Livingstone and Joseph F Brown, who was chairman
of the publicity committee in the or-
igial trek, will address the gathering.
The ceremony is held every year
to commemorate the trek of 1922
when students then at the Fairview
huts maxched out to Point Grey to
lay stones for the campaign for v.
new university campus.
A scroll, enclosed in the Cairn ha*
the names of the utsdents who made
the  trek. PAGE 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1947
T3he 'Daily Ubyssey
Authorized as Second Class Mail,  Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscription — $2.50 per year
Published by the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia.
» * *
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial  staff  of The  Daily  Ubyssey  and  not  necessarily
those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
* * »
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone: ALma 1624 For display advertising phone KErrisdale 1811
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF    -    -    -    -    DONALD FERGUSON
GENERAL STAFF: Managing Editor, Laurie Dyer; Copy Editor, Ron Haggart; News Editor, Tore Larssen; Features
Editor, George Robertson; Photography Director Danny  Wallace; Sports Editor, Chick Turner.
CITY EDITOR THIS ISSUE:    -    -    -    Jack Wasserman
OF FRESHMEN AND HAZING
Probably one of the main reasons that so
few freshmen ever see very much of the
Library during the first week of the fall
session is the fact that the Lily Pond is so
close to the great stone structure. To go unnecessary close would be to invite trouble,
or such is the rumour.
For say what you will, Frosh Orientation
is upon us again and the perennial week of
initiation will very probably go on as it has
in the past. Naturally, ideas on freshman
hazing have changed a great deal on the
campus during the last few years. No longer
should it be necessary to remind students
that harm can be done if some care is not
taken in this great demonstration of welcome.
The fact that hazing has been put in the
books as a "must not" shows that in the-past
something has gone wrong. There will always
be those who object simply on the grounds
that the whole thing is very childish. It would
seem that something is wrong about freshman
hazing.
At the same time, there appears to be
some great traditional force that rolls on year
after year to make the freshman's initiation
to college an unforgettable one. Somehow,
year after year, freshmen find themselves
shining an upperclassman's shoes, sitting on
the fountain in the Quad, singing songs to
attentive ears, reciting poems from Caf tables
and many other little things that might be
classed as quite mortifying and hard on the
prestige.
Actually, hazing isn't as prevalent or as
tough on the UBC campus as it has been in
other places. Undoubtedly, there will be
some. Probably the best thing for the freshman to do is to remember that the "Week of
Welcome" is only so long.
And then again, your turn will come next
year—let us pray.
CLOVER HILL
By GEORGE ROBERTSON
Carnegie Hell
Tradition has it that a columnist, for his
First Effort of the Year, explains the whys
and wherefores of his conduct and what he
stands for. "This column will always stand
foursquare against: cancer, the double standard," etc., to quote from Les Bewley of last
year. This column stands for nothing, including Anarchy.
Nevertheless, tradition also has it that the
First Effort should fill as much space as
possible. So I'll take this opportunity to pass
on some comments about a picture currently
playing a downtown theatre.
"Carnegie Hall" is one of these experimental works that Hollywood turns to putting
out now and then. As soon as it is released on
the market, everyone holds his breath for a
while until "Variety" has found out just
how much money the picture is losing or
makng across the country.
EXPERIMENT BE DAMNED
Actually there is nothing very experimental about "Carnegie Hall", except that
it has dared to give the public over an hour of
almost uninterrupted classical music.
Much of the risk has been taken out of
the enterprise by the introduction of a plot,
however small. In this case the plot, a wisp of
a thing that threads its way through Beethoven and Wagner, is nevertheless quite a
large concession to the box-office. For without it, how could Hollywood encourage the
laymen to come into the theatres to get an
education in good music?
This patronizing attitude by businessmen
whose musical knowledge and appreciation
ends with Clair de Lune and the Nutcracker
Suite is the factor that keeps Hollywood
and England decorating their period pieces
with classical music.
"FULL MOON AND EMPTY ARMS"
As an example, Rachmaninoff's second
piano concerto has been used as background
music for at least a half-dozen films, both in
Holy wood and in England.. This piece of
music is a successor, of course, to the highly
honored positions held recently by concertos
of Greig and Tschaikowsky.
Anyhow, you get the idea. Hollywood
producers, ever on the alert for raising the
cultural standards of society, are doing us
quite a favour.
The plot, incedentally, in "Carnege Hall",
concerns the story of a young lad with a
talent for playing the piano and a mother who
is very anxous to see her son turn into another Iturbi. The son, after years of diligently
studying Bach and Chopin, decides that "this
modern stuff has got something—it's POPULAR" and runs away from home to join
Vaughn Monroe's band as a pianist.
THE PRODIGY SON
Years later, of course, he returns, the
composer of a very successful jazz rhapsody
which he himself plays in Carnegie Hall.
The moral of the story is (a) Mother is
a bitch, but a forgiving one, and (b) The
only serious composing being done today is
in the jazz idiom.
And so we have Carnegie Hall. The highbrows will hate the music for being trite and
banal, the lowbrows will hate the story because it is weak and the music because there
is too much of it, and the Women's Culture
Society of Upper"Fairville will just love it
because there's all that good MUSIC in it,
my dear.
Meanwhile, only Variety can tell us if
"Carnegie Hall" is grossing millions. And in
the meantime, there is always Danny Kayw.
Always.
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS!
We Have a Good Stock on Hand of
PADLOCKS
Priced 25c to $2.95
Dudley Combination Padlocks
$1.25
Hewer Hardware Ltd.
4459 West 10th Ave.
WE DELIVER
ALma 1552
Freedom Of Court
Stressed By Farris
The degree of freedom of the courts
as a true reflection of the degree of
democracy of a nation was stressed
by Chief Justice Wendell B. Farris
when he addressed the opening class
of the first year Law students Monday.
This fifth freedom and its protection
by the Habeas Corpus Act are indicative of the predominant position in society of the law, the courts to enforce
it and the officials to present it, he said.
Mr. Justice Farris commended the 170
men and nine women on their choice
of the legal profession, adding that
study at law is the most excellent
foundation for business and political
life. He expressed the hope that financial gain is not paramount in the
minds of the students, saying that it
would probably come as a monument
to attention to the fundamental principles of the law.
Letter To  The Editor
Dear Sir:
It has been obvious from the
comments overheard in the registration lines that students attending the University of British
Columbia are more interested in
ensuring late morning lectures
than in taking courses which
will be of value to them.
The oft-heard remark, "I really
want to take Psychology 707 but it
was at 8.30" or "I guess I will have
to take Math 866 because it fits
in with my time table" show a
tragic disregard for the purposes
of higher education.
It would seem to me that some
person who has the qualifications
should make an effort to put
these misguided individuals on
the right track. Whether they
pay their own way or the government is supplying the cash lt
is certainly a waste of money and
time, if "students" persist in this
attitude.
Maybe this situation is a result of the mass production education that is being doled out at
most universities these days.
If such is the case, I, for one,
would mych rather see a longer
period of registration in order
that there be a greater opportunity for personal consultation
with the Deans of the various
faculties. No matter how odious
this suggestion may appear, after
the "battle of the Armories"
something on this order must be
done.
Otherwise, one can only suggest that the university enlarge
its staff of stenographers and go
into the business of mail-order
diplomas.
Yours for an education instead
of a mild anesthetic.
HAL  ROBERTSON.
Great Success to the Class of 7957
BRQWITBROS.
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MEETINGS
All past members and any new
men interested in apparatus work
on high bar, parallel bars, trampoline, mats, rings. Please turn out to
organization meeting HG 3. Thurs.
12:30
These Learning Years.
Fatigue caused by eyes that strain is not conducive to
easy reading or studying. Into your prescription for
glasses, every safeguard known to science is written to
assure better vision. For glasses that are comfortably
current and becomingly mart—Remember for your convenience, our two offices ....
PRESCRIPTION
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424 VANCOUVER BLOCK
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591 Howe treet
24 Hour Service
MONSTER RALLY
Wednesday at 12.30 in Brock Hall Stage Room
The
Daily
Ubyssey ... & The Totem
NEED YOUR HELP
There is a place on the staff
of the DAILY UBYSSEY, the
TOTEM, or the THUNDERBIRD for
all students interested
in gaining valuable experience
in newswriting, photography,
magazine writing and make-up
as well as for those more anxious
to have a lot of fun in
the most fun-loving of all
campus organizations ....
So come to the Wednesday meeting
The Student Publication Board
ENLARGED OFFICES IN THE NORTH BASEMENT OF BROCK HALL
i
A
\ Tuesday, September 23, 1947
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGE 3
GREETINGS FROM
ARMCO DRAINAGE AND METAL
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UBC SERVICE STATION
Complete Automobile Servicing
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lust Off University Boulevard
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TRAER & DICKIE LTD.
Now Showing
A Lovely Fall Collection
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COATS — SUITS — DRESSES
627 Howe St.
MA. 0631
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t
MITCHELL-FOLEY
ARE
ALL   READY!
WITH YOUR
VARSITY NEEDS
A Good Fountain Pen
will make your work easier. Select yours from
our large stock of Waterman, Parker or Sheaf-
fers at prices to suit your needs.
English and Canadian
LEATHER BRIEF CASES
$8.75 up
Zipper Paper Cases
$4.75 up
Solid English Leather
Attache Cases, $12.75 up
Loose-Leaf Zipper Ring
BINDERS
are a must for every university student.    Our stock
comprises values from
$2.69 up
all complete with 100
sheets and set of guides.
3-RING  BLACK  AND   CANVAS   COVERED  LOOSELEAF BINDERS—Size llx8i with 100 sheets
95c and up
DRAFTING SETS — 11.50 to 31.00
Also a god stock of Drawing Boards — T Squares —
Scale Rules — Slide Scales — Set Squares — Drafting
Pads — Drawing Pencils — Erasers — Ink  and  all
other necessities.
MITCnELL-FOLEY Ltd.
CPDCSET SPENCERS
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The School Supply House
522 W. Hastings
VAN PERRY BRINGS MUCH
EXPERIENCE TO NEW JOB
Pubster, news broadcaster, reporter, army personnel selection officer and husband, those are the qualifications of tall,
balding Van Perry, the University's newly appointed Public
Relations Officer.
Perry was appointed in July of
this year to replace Art Sager who
left to join the staff of the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation.
Born in Vancouver nearly 30 years
ago, Perry is the son of a Dominion
Forest Products engineer now in the
Dominion Forest Products laboratory
on the UBC campus.
He ignored his father's modest ambition to have him become an engineer and at an early age took to
journalism, via the chalk-and-back-
fence school. Upon graduation he
joined the staff of the "Pub" being
relegated to the position of general
reporter. His Pub career, according
to Perry, was distinguished by his
frequent brawls with his editor-in-
t In summer vacation work for
Canadian Press in 1938, he scored a
sensational beet when the CPU pier
"D" Are broke out. Perry modestly
claims it was nothing that Richard
Harding Davis couldn't have done.
This scoop has furnished Perry with
plenty of material for his anecdotage
and he advises his friends walk rapidly
awy from him when fire-sirens are
heard.
In his third year at UBC he became
campus news broadcaster on the
Radio Society's foreruiner, "Varsity
Time," and hung around CJOR until
he took a job with British United
Press, which he held until the war
broke out.
Before going overseas as a Lieutenant in The Seaforth Highlanders
in June, 1940 Perry married his Pub-
romance Joan Haslam.
He was transferred into Personnel
Selection work overseas, served as
a staff officer at Canadian Military
Headquarters, returned to Canada in
1944, served a year on Pacific Command investigation staff, and retired
from active service duty to return to
UBC.
He had joined the staff of the Van-
couvre Daily Province as a reporter
early in the spring of 1946, and left
the staff of that newspaper in July
of this year to take up his appointment as Assistant in the President's
office and in the Extension Depart-
A P-M Picture
VAN PERRY
Seniors
May (Set
Tillicums
Freshmen won't be the only students to share in the advantges of
the Tillicum, the pocket-sized AMS
handbook, this year if a plan now
underway to make the book available to the general student body is
successful.
An additional 500 copies were printed this year at the suggestion of the
many students active in campus organizations who were unable to secure copies after they were distributed
to the freshmen last year.
The corrected and revised constitution and code of the Alma Mater
Society is published in full, as well
as a complete schedule of the responsibilities of the eleven council
members.
The neatly bound volume is designed to serve the two-fold purpose
part in campus activities and providing a useful handbook for club
executives who require copies of
the constitution according to editor
Loni Francis.
GREEK GIRLS NAUGHTY
FOR A NIGHT OCTOBER 3
Gamma Phi Beta and Kappa Kappa Gamma sororities are
joining forces to present the "Naughty Nineties Ball" at the
Commodore on October 3.
The cabaret, under the co-
convenership of Nancy Belton
and Phyllis Stevenson, will aid
the Gamma Phi International
Camp Fund for underprivileged
children and the Rehabilitation
Fund for tubercular patients.
The decorations, will be handled by Loise White, chief artist
for the UBC Extension Department, and SJally Ffanton. tt"he
Motif will be faintly reminlscient
of the Gay Nineties beer gardens.
Casey King land IBafc-b Mac-
Askill are in charge of the entertainment which will carry out
the Naughty Nineties motif. The
can-can dancing girls, under the
direction of Tish MacLeod, are
Joanne O'Fljaherty, Helen Carman, Maxine McClung, Evelyn
Dunfee Joan Hamilton, Shirley
McConvillie, Nancy and Joanne
Bowell.
Barbershop quartettes, under
the direction of Pat McClementh,
will accompany the dancing.
Shirley Woodward, Marg Parkinson, Doreen White, Daphne
Black, Barbara Chew, Polly Lane,
Rosemary Byrn, Diana DesBri-
say and Mavis Coleman will band
together to sing the old favorites.
NOTICE
Meeting of all students interested in bus transportation from
New Westminster will be held in
Arts 101, on Wed. at 12:30. Very
important, all interested please
turn out.
•        «        •
For Sale — Diamond engagement
ring, Vi carat. 25 points, 100
dollars; also lady's cocktail
bracelet, 90 dollars. Phone
KE. 2903-Y,
NOTICE
The first meeting of the Pre-
Med Undergraduate Society will
be held on Friday of this week
in App. Sc. 100 at 12:30. Your
prompt attendance is requested.
The Society has temporary quarters in the office formerly occupied by the Alumni Secretary in
the south end of the Brock
Building. Any Pre-Med students
who do not register during the
registration period are asked to
call at the office as soon as pos-
SIGNBOARD
WANTED
Wanted:   Ride   for   two  second   year
students.     8:30s     Monday—F r i d a y
from 16th or 17th and crown.
'Phone   "Kay"-Al.   2258-M
• • *
WANTED
Ride from  Arbutus and — Between
37th  and  34th.  8:30  a.m.  lectures.
'Phone "Orma"—Ke 4792-R.
» • •
FOR SALE
One Jade ring. Price $25
'Phone Ed. at Ke—2903-Y
VOC
The Varsity Outdoor Club will hold
a meeting of old members at noon,
Thursday Sept, 25, in AP Sci. 202.
Important.
♦        *       •
A business meeting of the Letters Club will be held on Thursday, Sept. 25, at 12:30 in Arts
103.   All members please attend.
There are vacancies for two
members in 3rd year and for one
in 4th year. Address letters of
application, stating qualifications,
to Miss Jean Thomson, secretary,
and deposit in Arts letter rack.
PAGING THE COLLEGE CROWD!
• Lansea & Glenaye Sweaters, Pullovers and Cardigans
of finest imported wools.
• Casual Wood Dresses—So gay, so versatile for class
and off-the-campus wear.
• Blazers—-tailored to perfection in finest wool flannel.
• Crepes and Forma Is—featuring that "new long look"
—distinctively styled with you in mind.
COEDS — DROP IN ANY TIME
MARTY LLOYD
"Styles with a Touch of Tomorrow'
4409 West 10th Avenue
University  District
ALma 2300
Hours:   9:30-8 pjn.
WITH THE COMPLIMENTS
AND BEST WISHES OF
GEORGIA PHARMACY LIMITED
777 West Georia
Leslie G. Henderson, Oc.P., '00
Glbb G. Henderson, B.A., B.A.Sc, '33
Best Wishes from
LOV-E BRASSIERE CO.
Limited
"The Original Corrective Brassiere'
— Scientifically Designed —
849 Howe Street
MArine 6025
GREETINGS TO UBC
To the Men and Women who
Enrlol This Year In Preparation For
Their Various Fields of Endeavour
We Extend Our Best Wishes
For Success And
"Good Luck"
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST
PRODUCTS  LIMITED
Vancouver, B. C,
ARMSTRONG b MONTEITH
Construcion Company
—————— limited ————
Extend Greetings
and Best Wishes to the Class of '51
•
ENGINEERS AND GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
1449 HORNBY ST.      —      VANCOUVER, B. C.
Vn> THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1947
CAMPBELL & GRILL
LTD.
ROOFING and SHEET METAL
CONTRACTORS
Extend Greetings to the Class of '51
122-124 - 6th Ave. W.
FAir. 2920
uv.
You Can Do Better With
KEYSTONE
BRAND
AT ALL STATIONERY STORES
LOOSELEAF SHEETS
and BINDERS
Scribblers - Exercise Books - Writing Tablets
Envelopes
And Other Needed Supplies
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Vancouver   -   Victoria   -    Edmonton
Calgary
COMPLIMENTS
of
COMMODORE
CABARET
DANCING PARTIES
. , , Mean Corsages. Let
your corsage be a work of
art. Styled to suit you by
experts. We also have a
special discount for students.
DELLRAE  FLORIST
BA. 3451
Just Drop In Or Give Us a Ring: at
Broadway at Macdonald BA. 3451
AN INVITATION
JACK KIRK
Fine Clothes
Is - - The - - Place
•
Smart Clothing For Smart Men
2561 Granville St.                                 BAyview 2189
'Phone Books
Ready Early
The Student Telephone Directory
will be ready for distribution this
year considerably earlier than in
past  years.
A plan to use the ultra modern
tabulating machines installed last
year in the regisrf.r's office has been
negotiated and is expected to allow
delivery of the handy-sized little volume well before the last day of October,
In past years names had to be hand
typed from registration cards by
members of the Publications Board.
This year the tabulator will supply
mechanically prepared lists within
two hours of the close of registration.
CORRECTIONS NEEDED
In order to include the majority of
the late registrants, the lists will not
be   compiled  until   the  end  of   the
week.
TOTEM SALES
"Students who did not All in
their Vancouver addresses and telephone numbers in their registration
booklets must make the correction
at the AMS office before Saturday,
September 27, if they wish to be included in the Directory," editor,
Frank Walden warns.
LOST
Ronson    Pocket    Lighter    Saturday
September 20, between bus stop and
administration.
Reward   A.M.S.
W. J. Sissons
3136 W. 10th
BA 6712 M
Frosh Lose Hair, Dignity
As Wave Of Green Hits
New York's dogmatic fal fashions shouldnt faze the flustered freshmen or freshettes. At least not until Frosh week is
over.
In the typical, high-handed manner
of college upperclassmen, the Freshmen's orientation committee has issued its annual list of do's and taboos
to be carefully observed and abided
by while the newly arrived are being
amused, confused and abused during
their six days of initiation.
And most of the regulations, many
of them traditional carry-overs from
last year's festivities, are in regards
to dress.
'FROSH CUTS'
Styled to look like so many leftovers from a Sinatra fan club, both
the guys and the gals are wearing
green bow ties. But right there the
Frankie-fan resemblence ends, for the
latest edition of Joe College is sporting—not a silly, rumpled thatched of
hair^-but a "Frosh-cut", which is
apparently a brush-cut just long enough for the frustrated freshman to
grasp and tear out during the more
depressing parts of Frosh week.
Joe's feminine counterpart is also
accentuating the tonsorial. Her coiffure consists of three pin-curls dangling nonchalantly, gaily over her
forehead.
SIGNS OF THE TIMES
Boon to the campus prowler is
the placard being worn on the back
of each and every initiate, proclaiming to all grazers the wearer's
name, address and telephone number.
But any groups of freshmen who proceed around the campus in single
file  while  wearing  the placards can
take   sweet   consolation   in   the   fact
that   they   are   probably   the   only
walking Burma Shave signs in captivity.
GLAMOUR OUT
Upper-class dictators have tabooed
all the store-bought glamour to which
the average freshette was accustomed
during her high school days. In order
to "give us slow seniors a chance"
with the freshmen, the rule-maker
have denied the girls the use of
any kind of makeup.
Feminine fingernails too, are included in the grooming regulations.
All freshettes are required to paint
their nails with the bright green
polish provided by the committee.
Grim humor was apparently the
motive of one upperclassman who
last week informed two freshmen
that the men, as well as the women,
had to wear the green stuff on the
ends of their fingers. Then with little
amusement, the practical joker
watches as the two unknowing greenhorns seat themselves near the regalia table and apply the gooey green
to all ten fingers.
OFFENDERS PUNISHED
UBC's number one female spy
system and gestapo (combined) has
been meting out punishment to freshette offenders by smearing such delinquents with green lipstick. Guys
and gals are slated to do penance at
their respective smoker and banquet
at the end of the week.
SUCCESS TO THE CLASS OF '51
TERMINAL CITY IRON WORKS
1909 Franklin St.
Vancouver, B.C.
GREETINGS FROM
ALASKA PINE
CO. LTD.
Expert Vetoes Manager,
Council Acquiesces
Proposed plans for a full time manager for the Alma
Mater Society offices in Brock Hall have been dropped following the advice of a report completed during the summer
by George Masters, office manager of the Vancouver General
Proposed plans for a full time
manager for the Alma Mater Society offices in Brock Hall have
been dropped following the advice of a report completed during the summer by George Masters, office manager of the Vancouver General Hospital.
The move to acquire a permanent, paid, office manager began last spring and through the
agitation of several campus
bodies, including the Ubyssey,
came to head at the final general
meeting of the AMS in March.
MOTION
A motion calling for a thorough
investigation of the matter was
passed at that time, and a committee was set up comprised of
senior members of the student
council.
Rearrangement of  the  general
office plan been undertaken following suggestions in other
clauses of the Masters report.
OFFICE CHANGES
Changes include the installation of an information desk placed immediately inside the main
door. All inquiries and incoming calls will be received here
by one of the office staff.
The former War Memorial Office has been turned over to AMS
secretary Taddy Knapp and the
Student Council will not meet
in the office used by the Alumni
Association last year.
Stamps are now being sold at
the cashier's wicket, for the convenience of students and three
new members have been added
to the office staff to speed up the
routine.
To The University of B.C.
Student Body
We sincerely extend Greetings
and Good Wishes
May Your Endeavors Yield
Excellent Results
Malibu   Club-in-Canada
Molibu Yacht Charters
1927 West Georgia,   Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 23, 1947
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
UBC Overcrowding
Now On Way Out
In the not too dim and distant future students at the Uni-
wersity will not he plagued by crowded lecture huts, insufficient
library space and overtaxed labs.
At least, not if the Provincial Gov
ernment, the Board of Governors,
and the army of construction workers, plumbers, electricians, and carpenters now on the campus have
their way. The only obstacles are
rising costs of lumber, materials and
increased wages.
Construction now under way and
that about to start will cost around
$4  million.
The new 1800,000 Physics build i
will be completed this year. Labour
shortages and construction costs have
delayed completion but the building
is in partial use and the unfinished
rooms will be completed this session.
The new building is expected to
be one of Canada's leading nuclear
physics research centres. Construction has not yet begun on the Van
der Graaf generator, funds for which
came from the National Research
Council. The generator will take a
little over a year to build and when
it is completed plans call for construction to begin on a linear accelerator.
There are no windows in the main
lecture rooms which are soundproof
and air-conditioned.
Present indications show that the
National Research Council has ai
interest in the University which will
continue for some time.
The power house is undergoing a
$332,000 expansion and will be finished
in January.
Out by the barns a $50,000 Agriculture Pavilion was completed in
April . The Pavilion combines the
features of a motion picture theatre,
class room, stock ring, cold storage
warehouse, and butcher shop. It will
be used both for classes and judg
ing exhibits.
An important fur-bearing animal
lab was officially opened less than two
weeks ago. Although it may look like
it, Tlie Ubyssey has been assure)
that the building is not a converted
army hut but was built separately
of new materials. The final cost of the
equipment will be about twice the
ixjst ot the building.
Research into the diseases and
nutrition of fur-bearing animals will
be carried on here. Thirty mink havj
leeen donated as starting stock for
experimentation.
Still in the Agriculture Department, the government has called
tenders for construction of an Agri •
cultural Engineering and Mechanics
Building to cost about $50,000.
Construction of the Applied Science
Building was started this year. Th .•
building, to be four stories high will
lip partly finished in time for the-
will not be rcidy as the original al-
allocation of $750,000 was found inadequate due to increased building
costs. The foundations, west of the
power house, are well under way.
The noise in the usually peaceful
library is caused by construction
workers busily engaged in adding a
north wing to the building. The ad
dition, costing $775,000, will be entirely completed in one year. The new
space will be used for gneral study,
stacks, and carrels as well as other
facilities. The outside will be finished off with stonework in harmony
with surrounding buildings.
The Board of Governors is considering starting work on a building to
house Biological Sciences and Pharmacy. The plans are complete but
tenders have not yet been called as
high construction costs have raised
the price of building over the original $600,000 allotted.
Emergency accommodation includes
132 standard huts and one air force
hangar in use as a Physical Education
field house. The huts are being utilised as offices, storerooms, and lunch
counters as well as lecture rooms and
23 labs.
UBC Students
Play'At War
For Summer
Eighty UBC students in peacetime
khaki got a taste of Canada's "new
deal" army during four summer
months at Carihdian Officers Training
Corps camps from B.C. to Quebec.
They're back at classes today,
bronzed, hardy and with new muscles
brought by bridge building, overland
treks and the basic training of the
Dominion's active army.
SCIENCEMEN
Sciencemen predominated in the
UBC contingent that stormed Chilli-
wack with the Royal Canadian Engineers. Bridges across the Vedder
River and lengthy trails in the dust
marked their four months of arduous
training.
Montreal was operations centre far
several students who are in training
for the Army Ordnance Corps. Weekend leaves carried these candidates
to Toronto, New York State, and
other points.
MANY  IN  INFANTRY
The Infantry boasted many UBC
students at Currie Barracks in Calgary. Side trips to Banff were made
under the protective wing of the
Princess Patricia Light Infantry.
Largest contingent of candidates
from B.C. made the trip to Camp
Borden, biggest camp in Canada.
Individual schools were set up for the
various corps. Gunnery, driving,
and tank manoeuvers were offered
to students in the Armoured Corps.
The Army Service Corps, after a two
month basic training in small arms and
infantry tactics, specialized in driving
all types of vehicles, supplying and
catering to the army.
Other camps were run in Ontario
for Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and Signals. All these cadets
while not cramming for army exams
were visiting all the well known
resorts of the east. Most popular
weekend spot was the famous Was-
aga Beach on Georgian Bay.
ORIENTATION STARS
JABEZ, CLUBS, CAIRN
UBC's 1300 green-clad freshmen will be wined and dined
with a program that began at 9 a.m. in the auditorium Friday,
when the Frosh heard an address by Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie,
president of the university.
Following Dr. MacKenzie's speech,
representatives of UNTD, COTC,
Alumni Association and Legion addressed the assembled Frosh.
A unique "at home" evening with
dancing, card playing and refreshments was held in Brock Hall Saturday evening.
CAIRN TODAY
The Frosh face a crowded week for
besides lectures the freshman orientation committee has a heavy schedule
planned. It will begin with the Cairn
Ceremony held at noon today.
On Wednesday at noon in the
auditorium that Jabez classic "Her
Scienceman Lover" will be presented
All   day  Thursday  ha.i  been  set
aside as club day, when freshman
can register in any club that interests them. Registration for the various clubs will be held on the arts
lawn or in the auditorium in case
of rain.
SMOKER  THURSDAY
Also scheduled for Thursday is the
traditional Frosh smoker.
A big and little sister lunch has
been arranged for Saturday noon
followed by a SCM mixer in the evening.
Finally at 8:30 Tuesday, September
30, Frosh will be officially received
into the university at the Frosh reception to be held in Brock Hall,
to a Frosh—only pepmeet.
MADAME
HILARY
UNDER THE OWNERSHIP
OF AN EASTERN AUTHORITY
ON CO-ED APPAREL
Be "SMART" This Year
Wear   - Suits, Coats
AFTERNOON and EVENING GOWNS
from
MADAME    H ILLARY
4353 West 10th Ave. AL. 2161
VERN'S TOGS
We/comes U.B.C. Students Back to tbe Campus
Call in and see us - - - Always glad to see YOU
Vtf^m'MTi'w^mtwitm-1 muu     **
• BURBERRY RAIN COATS
Fully Satin Lined.    Guaranteed Rainproof.
34.50
• CROYDEN RAIN COATS
Double Breast or Military Cut.
19.95 to 27.50
• SPORTS COATS
Especially styled for young men.    A very large
selection.    Various prices.
12.95 to 38.50
• SWEATERS
All sizes.    Large stock Cardigans, Pullovers,
Sleeveless, etc.
3.95 to 17.50
• SLACKS — 500 PAIRS
Best brands in Canada.    A host of colors
and materials.    For your choice . . .
8.00 to 22.50
• COVERT TOP COATS
Shartly tailored.
49.50
• WIND AND RAINPROOF
Windproof and rainproof Jacks.    All sizes.
6.75 to 18.50
• 400 DOZEN MEN'S SOCKS
Anything you may desire in size or color
combinations.
69c to 4.50
• SHIRTS—Arrow, Tooke, B.V.D.
We can secure size or color *lf you do not find
what you want. Just leave your name. We will
notify you on arrival.    Various prices.
• BELT, SUSPENDERS & NECKWEAR
Neckwear in a big variety to suit your particular
needs.    Priced right.
PRICES—In the face of rising costs of g oods, this is important.   —  Our prices
are comparable to any in town.   Investigate.   You will find our prices are right.
NOTE There will be a definite shortage of shirts, etc., this fall. Buy now while
stocks are complete.
Agents tor Johnson's Made-to-Measure Clothing — the old reliable firm
VERNS  TOGS
4571 West 10th Ave.
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
— CLOTHING —
JUST  WEST  OF  SAFEWAY'S"
ALma 1863 PAGE 6
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1947
Frederick Goertz
LTD.
CERTIFIED INSTRUMENT MAKERS
Specialists in the Repair of
Instruments for Engineers, Aviators
Surveyors, Navigators
DRAWING SUPPLIES
•
All Work Guaranteed
564 Howe St., Vancouver     -     -     -     MArine 3822
Complete Mining Plants
International Tractors and Power Units
Elmco Loaders
Hu-iyood Mining Equipment
Fetter Diesel Engines
Wheat Electric Miners Lamps
Bertram Machine Tools
Pratt and Whitney Tools
Herbert Morris Cranes and Chain Hoists
B. C. Equipment Co.
Ltd.
HEAD OFFICE
551 Howe St.
Vancouver, B.C.
WAREHOUSES
306 Industrial St.
Granville Island
GREETINGS
TO THE
FRESHMAN CLASS
F. DREXEL CO. LTD.
831 Powell Street
Vancouver, B. C.
What you save
is the
most important
what you earn
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
The Cana dia n Bank
of Commerce
Is Pleased to Announce the Reopining
of the
UNIVERSITY  DISTRICT
BRANCH
Located at
4473 West 10th Ave. (near Sasamot)
ALma 3089
University Faculty and Students Cordially
Welcomed
H. M. CORNWALL, Manager
21 Branches in Vancouver and District
3500 Prepay Totem, Directory;
Few Still Available At AMS
Sales of the 1948 Totem, UBC's lavish student yearbook,
registration Saturday.
Approximately the same number of Student Telephone
Contrary to expectations, information has been received from the publishers that an additional supply of
paper stock has become available,
permitting limited sales of both publications during the first two weeks
of lectures.
Publications Board officials report
that  the   late  sales  will   be   carried
out through the AMS office and urge
that all students wishing to secure
either book should make early application there.
Members of the Publications
Board, under the personal direction
of Editor-in-Chief, Don Ferguson,
handled the early sales in the armouries. The plan was designed to in-
New Appointments Add
To Faculty Membership
In order to handle the ever-increasing enrolment at UBC,
a number of new appointments have been made in the teaching
staff at the University. The following permanent appointments
have been approved by the Board of Governors of UBC.
Dr. Harry B. Hawthorn, M.Sc., B.A.
(New Zealand), Ph.D. (Yale)-appointed Professor of Anthropology in
the Department of Economics, Political Science and Sociology as from
July 1st. Dr. Hawthorn is at present
a member of the Faculty of Sarah
Lawrence College. He has held a fellowship at the University of Hawaii
for research in Polynesian Anthropology and a Carnegie fellowship at
Yale and a fellowship from the Institute of Human Relations.
Walton J. Anderson, M.S.A. (Saskatchewan), Ph.D. elect (Chicago),
appointed Associate Professor in the
Department of Agricultural Economics. A former scholarship student at
the University of Saskatchewan, Mr.
Anderson has had nine years' experience with the Agricultural Economics Branch of the Dominion Depart-
Geoff. Andrew
Joins Staff
Geoffrey C. Andrew of the Department of External Affairs has
been appointed to the University
staff with the rank of professor,
according to a recent announcement from the President's office.
Professor Andrew will act as
Courtesy ot Vancouver Sun
Prof. G. C. ANDREW
assistant to the President, and
lecturer in the department of
English.
A former student of King's
College School, a graduate of
Dalhousie University and an
honors graduate of Balliol College, Oxford University, Prof.
Andrew has been employed in
business, education and administration.
After a period of teaching at
Upper Canada College, he joined
the staff of the Wartime Information Board, where he was
later appointed Secretary and
placed in charge of information
inside Canada.
When WIB was placed on a
peacetime footing as the Canadian Information Service, he became director of the Service, responsible for distribution of
Canadian information abroad. He
also served as Advisor to the
Canadian delegations to the
United Nations Assembly meetings in London and New York.
After the CIS was united with
the department of external affairs, Prof. Andrew became Chief
of the Information Division, a
position which he still holds,
ment of Agriculture, Ottawa. He is
now at the University of Chicago.
Dr. H. L. Holmes, M.Sc. (Queen's),
A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), appointed As.
sociate Professor in the Department
of Chemistry. He is at present an Associate Professor at the University of
Saskatchewan. In 1938 and 1939 he
was awarded a Diploma in •Chemistry from the Medizinish-Chemisches
Institut der Universitat, Graz, Austria; a Parker Travelling Fellowship
from Oxford, and a Research Asso-
ciateship from the Massachusette's Institute of Technology. In 1940-41 he
was private assistant to Professor R.
P. Linstead.
L. M. Shemilt, B.A.Sc. (Toronto),
M.Sc. (Manitoba), Ph.D. Elect (Toronto), appointed Assistant Professor
in the Department of Chemistry. Mr.
Shemilt is at present on the staff of
the University of Toronto.
John C. H. Porter, B.Arch. (McGill), appointed Assistant Professor
in the Department of Architecture.
Mr. Porter has had considerable
practical experience with architect's
firms in the east, and was for some
time a member of the St. John Town
Planning Commission. During the
war he served for five years as an
officer with the Royal Canadian Engineers.
GEOGRAPHY
F. K. North, M.A. (Brasenose College, Oxford)—appointed Assistant
Professor in the Department of Geology and Geography.
Jasper Stembridge, Senior Geographer of the Oxford University Press.
Appointed Special Lecturer in the
Department of Geology and Geography.
Dr. H. Ashton, M.A., Litt.D. (Con-
tab.), D.Lett. (Birmingham); D.Lett.
University of Paris), F.R.S.C—appointed special lecturer in the Department of French.
Benjamin N. Moyls, M.A. (U.B.O—
appointed Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics.
ECONOMICS
W. H. Merritt, M.A. elect (Toronto)
—appointed Lecturer in the Department of Economics, Political Science
and Sociology.
R. D. Dodwell, B.A. (U.B.C.), M.A.
elect (Toronto)—appointed Lecturer
in the Department of Economics political Science and Sociology.
Finlay A. Morrison, B.S.P. elect
(Sask.), appointed Lecturer iri the
Department of Pharmacy.
Miss Doris Hurren, B.Sc. (McGill),
appointed Lecturer in the Depsfrtment
of Home Economics.
Miss Nancy-Ruth Rutherford, M.Sc.
(Manitoba), appointed Lecturer in
the Department of Home nocEomics.
Parties Mark
Rushing Start
Sorority rushing was swung
into the second week of its programme with the start of the
open teas today. Rushing began
Saturday September 20 when the
nine sororities entertained each
of the rushees at open coke
parites.
Pan-Hellenic Society, under
direction of President Kay Lou-
tit, has been working with Miss
Dorothy Mawdsley, Dean of
Women, on the supervision of the
rushing programme.
reached a near record total of 3500 copies by the end of
Directories were sold during the ten-day registration period.
sure a fair distribution of currently
scarce  paper stocks.
ADVICE
Don Stainsby, Editor of this year's
Totem, cautions h i s customers
against losing their receipts. "The
little blue card you received when
you bought your Totem is our only
proof   that   you   have   paid   for   the
book, and must be presented in April when you receive your copy," he
stated.
The Totem has been acknowledged
as one of the best student yearbooks
on the continent over the past years,
and has been awarded the "All American Excellence" rating every year
of publication since 1940.
4
DRAUGHTING  INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-Squaret — Protractors — Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RULES
AMES LETTERING INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and Index
From $2.69
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS AND  PRINTERS
550 Seymour Street Vancouver, B.C.
PHONE PAc. 7311
SINCERE GOOD WISHES
FOR A SUCCESSFUL YEAR
TO THE STUDENT BODY
Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd.
CO. LTD.
BEST WISHES TO
U.B.C.
Crossman Machinery
co. LTD.
806 Beach Avenue
Vancouver, B. C.
FORST'S Ltd.
extends greetings and
Best Wishes
5 Stores
Vancouver    -    North Vancouver
New Westminster Tuesday, September 23, 1947
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
PAGE 7
1
r
Moyls Offers Bargain In Season Ticket Feature
Booster Pass Revealed
»
AMERICAN FOOTBALL
1947 SCHEDULE
Sept. 27—College of Idaho at Caldwell, Idaho.
Oct. 4—College o Puget Sound at Vancouver, B. C.
Oct. 11—Western Washington College at Bellingham, Wash.
Oct. 18—Willamette University at Salem, Oregon
Oct. 25—Whitman College at Vancouver, B. C.
Nov. 1—Lewis and Clark College at Vancouver, B.C.
Nov. 8—Pacific University at Vancouver, B.C.
Nov. 15—Linfield College at McMinnville, Oregon.
GOOD LUCK TO
THE CLASS OF '51
—and if the meat strike hangs on for
very long — Good luck to me!
KAY'S MEAT MARKET
4460 West 10th Ave.
ALma 1794
1/
BEST WISHES
TO THE STUDENT BODY
JOHN   McKINNON
B.C. DISTRIBUTOR
BRUNSWICKE BALKE, COLLENDER CO.
of Canada Ltd.
Billiard Tables and Bowling Alley Supplies
BLUE RIBBON LIMITED
Extend Greetings to you in another year of
Student Drive
Blue Ribbon Tea
"Perfectly Blended to Your Taste"   -
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE CLASS OF '51
Bloedel, Stewart and Welch Ltd.
Vancouver, B. C.
The authoritative source of news for the hundred thousand progressive citizens of New Westminster and the
Fraser Valley—people who keep up to date on local and
International happenings and who look to "The Columbian" as their shopping guide for all their purchases.
Whether one is a homekeeper, a merchant or a national
advertiser, "The Columbian" meets the need of a thoroughly established medium.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
A Continuous Chronicle of the
Lower Mainland for 87 Years
THE
BRITISH
COLUMBIAN
Established  1860
DAILY AND WEEKLY EDITIONS
As Sport Fan's Dream
Latest word from the office of the Graduate Manager of
Athletics, Luke Moyls, indicates that the Booster Pass System
inaugurated last year will be bigger and better than ever.
A new feature to the Booster Pass,
whereby the average fan with the
average coin can see every top athletic attraction on the campus for the
bargin price of Ave dollars, has been
incorporated this year,
Moyls announced Saturday to your
student press that 50 passes were
being reserved for the express use of
wives of student veterans. On sale
now at the Legion Hut, the Booster
Pass for the service wife will sell
at the same price.
IT'S GUARANTEED
Remaining for the general student
body are only 450 of these scarce se.
sames. Moyls has thwarted the
cynics by slapping an overall guarantee on the pass. For his ntbney,
the holder of a Booster Pass will get:
1) four American Football Conference games;
2) seven basketball Conference
games including a tilt with each of
the remaining seven teams in the
league;
3) at least seven additional exhib-
basketball games;
4) two McKenzie Cup games in
English Ruggar.
Moyls became ecstatic when he
exclaimed: "Figure it out! That's 20
games for five big bullets, or only
a quarter a game. What a bargain!"
An added feature of the Booster
Pass will enable the holder to obtain a reserved ticket free upon the
presentation of the Pass at the Reserve Wicket at the Gym any time
during the two days preceeding the
game.
The effect of this move will ensure the holder of a definite seat
as well as saving him the inconvenience  of qucueins up  for  ducats.
LUKE MOYLS .
it's guaranteed
ROUNDING
THE GRID CIRCUIT
WHITMAN COLLEGE, WALLA
WALLA, Wash. — Fullback
Johnny Richardson of Omak
shoved his 205 pounds back into
uniform and gave the Whitman
College backfield a lift out of
proportion to the half dozen additional men in suit since the
Missionaries began pre-season
drill.
In his first season last year
Richardson was one of the most
dependable regulars, who also
flanked Halfback Jack Cline of
Baker, back in uniform but with
eligibility undetermined.
And there were also such regulars suited as Capt. Center Stan
Lochrie of Ilwaco, only three-
striper in the crowd which may
yet top 50 men, and Guard Butch
Boewer, who came out again
after a Softball injury of last
spring had kept his playing in
doubt.
Vajda Leads Plankstars
In Forthcoming Ski Year  .
By JACK LEGGATT
It takes several feet of the skiers delight—snow—to enable
the campus skiers to take to their "planks", but even now at the
first of the new term, the active skiers have laid their plans for
the forthcoming gala season.
Off hand,  it looks as  though  the
coming season will see several
hundred U.B.C. skiers out trying
for positions on the widely known
competitive ski team. Under UBC
Ski Coach Peter Vajda, a vast program is getting under way to enable all prospective racers to have
a chance at securing a postition on
the   team.
Of course, one of the major
events of the coming season will
be the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Championships held at
Banff with the UBC team defending
champions.
For the first time in several
years, Banff will hold the spotlight
for the 1948 Dominion ski championships. Again in these individual
events, UBC stars will shine.
Backed by last years Western Canadian champion, Garvin Robinson,
it is expected that similar titles will
again fall to our Point Grey Halls
of Learning.
Actually, last years team members are in far better shape than the
average competitor. When skiing
finished for the season last April,
26 members of the team journeyed
up to Garibaldi Park for a one
month skiing holiday.
Even if this wasn't enough skiing
for one year, several members took
off late in June to compete in the
Mt. Hood downhill event which was
a killer from the word "go".
A drop of 4000 feet in two miles
taxed all the skill and daring of the
planksters. Even against American
Olympic stars, Gar Robinson, Arnie
Teasdale and several others came
within the  winning ten.
Yes sir, its going to be a big skiing year on the Campus and lets
hope the stuff—snow that is— falls
freely.
SOCCER
The first soccer meeting of the
season will be held in the stadium
(south end) today at noon.
All former players are asked to attend and a special invitation is offered to all new players. The first
proctise will be staged on Wednesday
at 2.30 p.m. on the upper field.
First soccer games get away this
Saturday.
RUGGER
Contrary to the rumors emanating
from downtown sources UBC English
Rugger teams will operate in much
the same manner as last year. Campus
officials say that Miller, Tisdal and
McKechnie Cup games will be played
as well as the popular California return games. Rugby practises are
slated to begin next week.
MULTIGRAPH SALES AGENCY
Agents for MULTIGRAPH DUPLICATIONS
extend greetings
to the entire Student Body—
525 West Georgia MArine 0261
BEST WISHES
AT THE START OF ANOTHER YEAR
BRITISH ROPES
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BEST WISHES FOR 1947
FROM
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS  LTD.
592 SEYMOUR STREET
— PAcific 7942 —
Royal Typewriters — Standard and Portable
Campus Representative:
Marguerite Byrnes, B.A., 2962 Crown St. — ALma 0538Y
Congratulations and Best Wishes
to those who enter University
this year.
May success attend you.
FAMOUS
CLOAK & SUIT CO.
"DOWN TO BUSINESS
BEST WISHES
•
BELL & MITCHELL
LTD.
We Extend Best Wishes For A
Successful and Happy Student Year
Dickson Tea and Coffee
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The
British Columbia
Advisory Board
•
Toronto General
Trusts  Corporation
Brig. Sherwood Lett, C.B.E., D.S.O.,
ESTABLISHED
1882
M.C., LLD.
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Col. the Hon. Eric Hamber
W. H. Malkin
George T. Cunningham
Vancouver Office:
Pender and Seymour Streets
Prentice Bloedel
ASSETS UNDER ADMINISTRATION
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over $275,000.00 r
chalk talk . . .
by Chick Turner
A WELCOME TO THE FROSH
Klahowya, freshies! With a pleased rumble the mighty
Thunderbird spreads wide its ruffled wings and nods its beak in
approval. By no wmost of your student officialdom has tossed
you the welcome mat, but with well-worn whisk your humble
scribe dusts the carpet anew and beckons you all to the shadows
under the eye of the Totem, the symbol of the spirit of UBC
With Totie your sports editor says "Welcome, frosh!"
Well, you've reached the campus,—you're on the mall.
Operators all, you're now big-time "collitch" joes and gals. Oh,—
not quite! There's yet the test, the time-honored ritual of the
university: the week of initiation. It's a week of fun, a week
of mock servility before your intelectual masters (Yak, Yak).
It's your week: you're in the spotlight. The sophs envy your
innocence (from the sublime to the ridiculous). The upper-class
(women) envy your fresh youth B(crac!) Butthis week you
must envy our suavity and poise, our mundane experience. So,
show deference and respect, freshies, or its the brush and the
lily pond for you.
That's Not For Me
With those famous last words your scribe casts down the
whip. Ah, yes, like the cagey matador he will stand gracefully
aside and watch the brawl from afar. Time is precious, and the
Chief (how that man Dyer loves lattery) has "urged" me to
use the fleeting seconds to give you a brief picture of the athletic
setup on the campus.
Space must confine us to a preliminary outline of the intercollegiate sports arena. UBC, the Dominion's youngest university, has of late adopted the most aggressive sports program* of
any college in Canada, with the possible exception of the
University of Western Ontario at London.
We'll confine our comments on that southern Ontario
institution to a brief remark about its inauguration of the
athletic scholarship. Western is the first (and still the only)
university above the border to take the big step, and your
reporter has viewed conclusive evidence the past year, testifying its its success. The Western Mustangs have dominated the
Eatern Collegiate Union (McGill, Queens, Toronto, Western)
for the past two years, especially in football, basketball and
track.
A NORTH—SOUTH AXIS
For reasons with which your scribe will deal in some later
effort, the athletic scholarship is not a feasible policy at Point
Grey at the present time. However, Varsity took an equally
pioneering move two years ago when she became the first of
Canada's "centres of higher learning" to join an American
Conference.
In 1945 UBC pulled out of the faltering Western Intercollegiate circuit after taking a financial hosing in the Hardy
Cup series, and accepted a bid to become a member of the
Pacific Northwest Coast Conference.
The PNCC was a league consisting of. privately endowed
colleges stretching through Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.
Admission was sought by both parties. The Americans appreciated the prestige the conference would reap by incuding
among its membership the second largest Canadian university,
while, on the other hand, the senate and faculty of UBC looked
with favor upon one of the most stringent clauses in the conference code: no athletic scholarships.
Grin And Bear It
Although the athletic moguls on the campus could not but
feel embarassed at the enrolment figures which gave UBC a
greater overall student body than those of the other colleges
combined ,they saw the PNCC as a step in the right direction
towards their ultimate goal: participation in the Pacific Coast
Conference.
Complications will appear, however, if this further move is
ever broached seriously, for it will seem impracticable to enter;
such terrific competition without the fortification of the athletic
scholarship and its BBT (books, board, tuition) sanction with
which to secure or keep our stellar athletes.
History In The Making
Well, frosh, that's the drill. Since we started our conference
escapade two years ago we've won two titles. In 1946 the
Thunderbird, basketball boys swept through their conference
schedule absorbing only one loss to cop the pennant bauble.
And this spring the Blue and Gold thinclads romped to their
first conference track title at Portand Oregon, where they
dethroned the perenial title-holders, the Whitman College Missionaries, who had dominated the PNCC cinder paths for the
past 20-odd years.
And Now The Commercial
Before your reporter signs off and rubs the slate clean, he
wishes to submit the annual plug for the sports page.
As the official recorder of every athletic event on the
campus worth print, the "sheet" acts as an indispensible organ
in your student life. Most of our experienced staff has left us for
foreign pastures, and your scribe is left with but one or two
regulars. There are three Associate editorships still open, and
plenty of advancement awaits the keen sports reporter.
If you want to meet people, if you want lots of laughs, and
a useful student career, come down to the pub offices on the
north side of the Brock and see the boys at the "desk". Sure,
there's a little work to it, but it's an extra-curricular activity
you'll enjoy.
Ubyssey Photo by Pat Worthington
Action on the Gridiron—Big All-Conference Guard Herb Capozzi (on the right aids in taking
ot a man in blocking practice uring on of the daily afternoon American football sessions. Greg
Kabat an his Blue and Gold cleaters are prepping for their Conference opener against the
College of Iaho at Caldwell, Idaho this Saturay.
Fast-Flying Gridmen Off To Idaho
Saturday For 47 PNC Grid Opener
By HAL MURPHY
Major campus sport gets underway in big style Saturday with a full scale invasion of Caldwell, Idaho, by Greg Kabat's irrepressible Thu nderbirds. College of Idaho will be the first team
to run into the renewed vigour of the UBC American Football squad.
Rapidly  being  worked  into  shape
by Kabat, all American Wisconsin
132, the 'Birds are expecting a bigger
season than the last which saw the
valiant Blue and Gold stalwarts end
up in the cellar position in the Pacific Northwest Intercollegiate Conference. If determination .is any criterion
the 1947 Bird line up is headed for a
better berth in the standings.
CAPOZZI BACK
Popular members of last year*3
squad who are in training include
Herb Capozzi, Dmitri Goloubef, Al
Lamb, Phil Nixon, and the well
known pair Don Nesbit and Doug
Reid . Most of these boys will be
in Saturday's game south of thet
border,
Chief mentor Kabat says that at
least of half of this years crew will
be new to the campus. Big hope lies
in such players as Bob Murphy, Fred
French, and Joe Fairleigh who arte
expected to give the boys the spark
that was missing last fall.
PAGE 8
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1947
CHICK TURNER, Sports Editor
Assistants—Hal Murphy, Al Hunter
Reporters This Issue—Dave Barker, Jack Legatt Bob Kerr
ADDITIONS TO P.E. STAFF
Bob Osborne's Physical Education
Department received some welcome
additions  to  its roster:
Mr. Albert Laithewaite, a graduate
of Chester College, and Carnegie
Physiceil   Training  College   at  eeLds,
Dr. Fiddes, former professor from
the University of Saskatchewan Honorary  Lecturer in  Anatomy.
Miss Marjorie Leeming, former
teacher at King Edward High
School and one time Junior Singles
Tennis Champion of Canada: Instructor  in  Phys Ed.
Miss May Adams, graduate of McGill, who served in the school system of BC: Instructor in Physical
Education.
HENRI'S CHARCOAL GRILL
713 West Georgia Street MArine 8923
Famous For Smorgasbord
New Hangars
Graces Campus
Newest addition to the sports
equipment of the University of British Columbia, is a recently purchased
aiarplane hangar. Located behind
the Brock Hall, this hangar will help
to alleviate the strain now being
placed  on  the present gymnasium.
The Hangar was brought in from
Tophino on the west side of Vancouver Island, and assembled at its present site.
The inside of the hangar is lined
for a total of 10 courts for different
sports. Included are two regulation
Basketball courts, three volleyball
courts, 2 tennis courts, and three badminton courts.
The floor is all asphalt except for
a small part at one end which is left
just as it was found, dirt. This will
be  useful  for  indoor  track  events.
At the other end of the hangar there
will be a golf practice range set up.
There will be room for nine golfers to
try out their cuts slices, and hooks.
WYNNE PREDICTS
'MURAL SETUP
BEST   YET
Intramurals prexy Ivor Wynne, in
an exclusive Ubyssey Interview Monday morning, stated that he expects
great things In the Intramural field
this session.
Asked for a statement by a Ubyssey reporter Wynne said, "The intramural setup this year will be bigger
and better than anything that has
been seen at the UBC. With added
facilities ,ln the form of an airplane
should call into the Gym office to
hangar, and with the full cooperation
of the Ubyssey staff, we are going to
go places."
Wynne further stated that in order
to get things rolling as quickly as
possible, all groups interested in
Intramural competition will meet in
Hut G3, on Thursday, September 2y
at 12:30 p.m.
Prior to this meeting all groups
pick up their entry forms.
Freshman especially are urged to
form competing groups, such as ex-
high clubs, faculty groups, and class
groups.
To be eligible, entries must have at
least 25 names in their respective
groups.
NOTICE
Men interested in playing American
football are notified that there are
positions open on two teams this
year, the Varsity and the Junior Var-
sitl. Practices are held in conjunction
with each other. Turn out at the
stadium, 4:30.
GOOD LUCK TO THE
CLASS OF '51
PACIFIC fltEflT CO. LTD.
Jack
George
Joe
•    Ernie
GORDON BROS
The Big Imperial Garage at 10th and Alma
BAyview 8449
EXTEND BEST WISHES
FOR A SUCCESSFUL AND
HAPPY STUDENT YEAR
"CARE WILL SAVE YOUR CAR'
GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES TO
ALL FACULTIES
•
4
Electric Power and Equipment Ltd.
1285 Homer Street Vancouver, B.C.
FELIX
GINGER
ALE
Goes
With
Everything

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