UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Dec 2, 1954

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0123864.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123864.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0123864-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0123864-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123864-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0123864-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0123864-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0123864-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0123864-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0123864.ris

Full Text

 A MM Mi  VMM JTiSf AJSm
Vol.27
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1954
5 CENTS
No. 27
LOOKING OVER the brief on Government Scholarships
they presented to the Prime Minister of Canada are members of the NFCUS delegation, left to right W. A. Burns,
full-time President of NFCUS, Bill Angus, President of
Students' Council at University of Toronto, Peter Martin,
Vice-President for Ontario, and Tony Enriquez, past-
president of of NFCUS.   (See story on page 5).
Housers Refuse
Council Request
' The university administration
has refused a student council
recommendation limiting accommodation in Fort and Acadia
residence camps for students.
Minister,
UBC Differ
Over T.T.
UBC might be willing to
start training all of BC's teachers, but the Provincial Government has no such plans.
President Norman MacKenzie
Tuesday night told the UBC
Alumni Association's annual
meeting that he'd "like to see
the University assume the responsibility for all teacher
training in the province."
Wednesday, Education Minister Ray Williston said in Victoria, present studies toward establishing a Faculty of Education at UBC wouldn't include
"amalgamation" of the faculty
and  Provincial  Normal  School.
He said the plan would mean
only that Normal School training would be reorganized so
that studies could provide credit
toward a Bachelor of Education
degree in the UBC faculty.
Normal Schools at Vancouver
and Victoria would remain in
operation, he   said.
The education minister's remarks quashed for thc moment
possibility   that  all  teachers  in
(Continued   on   Page  7)
See    EDUCATION
Council recommended to the
Housing Committee faculty
members who are not engaged
in camp supervision be asked
to leave within three years.
At the end of this period rent
rate would be raised to a figure
comparable with rates off the
campus.
MISAPPREHENSION
President Underhill stated
councillors had submitted the
recommendation under the misapprehension that councillors
were committee members in all
respects except on issues dealing with the internal or financial administration of the Housing Committee.
Bray told Student Council the
exclusion of the students from
the committee while the report
was being discussed gave the
students no chance to answer
questions about the recommendations.
While admitting students
"Hhjited" participation on the
housing committee, Dick Underhill Tuesday outlined the effects of student representation.
Underhill felt the students'
opposition to faculty residing in
.the campus was "averaging out
the ratio of student and faculty
residents."
He revealed 18 out of.26 new
residents were students.
He also pointed out the students' action had effected the
removal of six persons not connected with the university since
Sept. t.
The committee gave no reasons for its decision to reject
the   students' recommendation.
Council Takes No
Action On Pools;
Students To Decide
By STANLEY BECK
Student Council tottered on
the edge of two pools at Tuesday's meeting but at the end of
four hours' debate refused to
dive into either one.
After two hours of discussion
Treasurer Bon Bray withdrew a
motion that Stuednt Council,
recoraend construction ot a second pool to the student body
which will make the final decision at an AMS general meeting probably in March.
APPROVAL
Earlier Bob Brady moved that
the report of the sub-committee
on swimming pools, which favored the construction of a second pool, all costs being equal,
be approved.
However, Council was not
ready to accept the committees
recommendations and the report
was merely received.
Friday Council will meet with
Faculty members to discuss and
clarify the situation.
It is not expected that Council will take any further action
until the first meeting of the
second term.
The sub- committee recommended that a second pool be
built even if it is Just as cheap
to roof the present pool because
it felt it would be superior from
an instructional, recreational
and competitive point of view.
However, serious doubt was
raised as to the committee's
contention that little or no recreational swimming would take
place in the large pool once the
novelty had worn off.
It was pointed out that the
first group to be considered was
the student body as a whole and
that the great majority of any
swimming they did would be of
a recreational nature.
JUSTIFIED
Bray commented that at one
time he felt the same about the
issue but that a study of universities with the same type of
swimming pool facilities Justified   the   committee's   findings.
Doubt was also raised as to
the committee's contention that
a shorter pool would be of
greater value from a competitive
point of view. Statements of
some of Canada's foremost
swimming authorities were referred to in which they advocated the construction of more 55-
yard pools to train Canada's
swimmers.
Brady pointed out that Jack
Pomfret, Max Howell and Dick
Mitchell, al of the Physical Education department, all had a
great deal of experience in competitive swimming and that they
were unanimous in their agreement that a 25-yard pool would
be of more value.
In regard to the discrepancy
in cost and maintenance of a
large roofed pool and two pools,
many present at the meeting expressed the opinion that it would
be desirable to receive estimates from more than one arch.*
tect.
ESTIMATES
It was also contended that
present plans for the roofing of
the large pool contain many
frills that if removed would reduce the cost considerably. The
question of whether the 10-metre
diving tower could be removed
before roofing the pool was
particularly raised. Present plans
call for the tower to be retained.
At Friday's meeting with the
Faculty, AMS President Dick
Underhill will raise the question
of obtaining a second set of estimates on both plans.
'tween clones
Biology Club   ,
Airs Brandy
CUA Asks Candidates'
Discrimination Views
The Civic Unity Association, a group of most of Vancouver's ethnic groups, has resolved to take an anti-discrimination bylaw to the city council this spring.
I Decision was made after the
group Tuesday night "heartily
(endorsed" the report on beer
j parlour discrimination against
i coloured customers made by
' campus Civil Liberties Union.
President N.A.M. MacKenzie! The move folloW9 u similar
declined comment Wednesday j one made this Fall by the Coun-
on a charge of Administration cil of Jewish women. The CUA
employment   discrimination.        I*18© Plans to send letters to all
MacKenzie
Silent On
Red Profs
candidates for December civic
elections, asking their views on
the situation.
CUA is associated with such
campus notables as president
N. A. M. MacKenzie, Dr. H. B.
The charge 'was laid last
month by campus Labor Progressive Party leader Archie
McGugan. The President at the
time was attending a conference
in Ottawa.
Dr.   MacKenzie   offered   rea-1 HawtHbrne,   and   Prot    Hunter
sons  for  his declination but   is- lgwis
sued no  statement   for  publics- |i_i-M__w-M-H_M-->-«-a.
tion.
Dean  G.C.   Andrew  had  pre-,
viously   offered    'no comment"
to the charges at the time they i
were laid.
McGugan, at a Student Chris-!
tian Movement meeting, had &t- j
tacked the administration tor i
refusing to hire communisa pro- j
fessors. j
He said two such "qualified j
men" were personally known |
by  himself. j^«.
BIOLOGY CLUB sponsors
John Brandy speaking on "Deer
Nutrition" the talk will include
a field trip to the deer pens.
These Interested will meet at
the main entrance of the Biology building noon today.
H*      ft-      ft*
HIGH SCHOOL CONPER-
ence Committee will hold a final
meeting in the Board Room noon
Friday, Dec. 3.
•Ip *V *r
NEWMAN CLUB will hold
a general meeting noon today in
HL 5.
V TT T
PHRATERES will hold a
Phrateres meeting Friday noon
in   Physics   201.
^P *r *P
CHRISTIAN    SCIENCE   OR-
ganization will hold their weekly Testimony Meeting at noon
today   in  Physics 300.
•P *f* vf*
THE CAMPUS COOLSTERS.
specialists in every type of music from bop to Swedish Schot-
tisches, wish to announce that
they are available for dances,
parties and Phrateres firesides
during the coming festive season. Anything from a trio to a
fourteen piece big band is ready
to go. We even have a banjo
player. Contact Brian Guns at
West 1&84 R.
GRADS-RETURN THOSE PHOTOS
BY TOMORROW OR HEADS ROLL
Grads who have had their pix taken at D'Arcy Gal-"
leries and have picked up their proofs are requested to
return them today or tomorrow at the latest.
There are only 30 or 40 students who have yet to
turn them in. D'Arcy Galleries are the last studios to have
their pix finished. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1954
/mWsWW
M MBmWs
eee
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Mail subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published in Vancouver throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
the University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 1230
or Alma 1231. Advertising Manager is Geoff Conway.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editors-Ray Logie News Editor*—Pal Carney
CUP Editor—Pete Petersen Sports Editor—Ken Latttb
Associate Editor—Stan Beck ' Executive Editor—Oeoff Conway
Senior Editor This Issue—Jean Whiteside
Reporters: Dolores Banerd, Dave Morgan, Marie Stephens,
Pat Russel, Sylvia Shorthouse, Bob Johanne.
Sports: Nell McDonald, Peter Worthington, Maurice Gibbons.
Ring Out The Old
We have added up this term's accomplishments and
mistakes and found a plus value for nearly everyone--
particularly the general student body.
Suffering from their usual apathy, the students still
have managed to muddle through and make some proper
decisions. A ftw groups have even shown particular brilliance,
and others have ddne some plain good work.
Probably the most laudable effort is one of the most recent—the petition to have a Bachelor of Science degree established at UBC, a move which the administration itself knows
is long overdue. Probably just as commendable was the
Civil Liberties Union's racial prejudice survey, whioh will
go toward pricking the conscience of Vancouver.
Thq students made a good-decision in the budget fight
between the Men's Athletic Directorate and the Undergraduate Societies; the disputed money went where it was
most needed. Amazingly, students made the blood drive a
.success in spite of the absence of browbeating and promotion.  Perhaps it was because of it.
Student Council's biggest achievement was its handling
of the only really disastrous event this term—the Brock fire.
Councillors wasted no time organizing the fund drive. Makeshift arrangements for student activities were organized with
hardly a flaw. Council should also be praised for its plan
to excavate the Brock, and the job done on Homecoming.
We were pleased to see destruction-bent Ron Longstaffe
separated from the Fraternity Investigating Committee, and
the Council decision to pull out of NFCUS but not ignore
it completely, was probably the shrewdest move possible.
Even the provincial government deserves praise, both for
its $700,000 grant toward a medical building and its
plans for the University Endowment Lands. However, the
final judgment wil be made next spring when we see the
size of the capital grant for UBC's expansion program.
Then there were the mistakes. And some of them were
bad. Which was the worst is debatable: honors would go
either to the bungled job of fighting the Brock fire, or the
shocking lack of support given the East-West game—for
which students sold less than one-quarter of the tickets they
promised, and left the B.C. Athletic Round Table Society-
holding the bag.
Students also erred in supporting the Student Council
motion of censure against The Ubyssey which, given all the
facts, was completely honest, and was willing to grant space
to any argument, in its exposure of the three discriminatory
fraternities. Students set a dangerous precedent apparently
because of maliciousness or revenge or in obliviousness to
the issue involved.
Student  Council's  frosh   initiation  program  was  ludicrous in that it bred the very conditions  it set  out to ob-
Iviato.   The recent Toronto game was shoddily managed.
Most inexcusable, however, were some of the administration mistakes. We could tolerate the indifference to
'racial discrimination by Panhellenic, or the slow transfer
[of the pool seas to the stadium; but there can be little
(forgiveness for the refusal to make public to the students
[the proceedings of the Men's Athletic Committee; the recusal to do something about the professors, glassblowers and
[hangers-on squatting in Acadia Camp; and the failure to announce that no McCarthyite policy exists at the university.
Next term, however, will tell the tale—particularly in
^respect to the students.
Their energy will be measured by what is done to support the NFCUS scholarship campaign and the Brock fund;
they will  be facing some very  large  issues:   student  elections,   fraternity   discrimination,   the   Undergraduates   Societies Committee constitution dispute, and the swimming pool
proposals.
There will be other challenges.
Cross Purposes?
Editor's Notei — The following it a reply to President MacKensie's answer to
Dean Angus' original article
en the Quebec tax dispute
(spearing in The Ubyssey).
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am glad that President
MacKenzie, in commenting on
the article which I contributed
to The Ubyssey of October 26,
has stated the cage for modifying Canadian federalism because of "the importance of
Canadian unity and of 'Canada' as a nation." I am replying briefly to avoid the danger of our being at cross purposes.
What I was asked to do was
to explain the Quebec tax dispute. I tried to do this by
stating as sympathetically as
possible the reasons given in
that province for refusing a
federal grant in support of
Universities and imposing a
provincial Income tax. President MacKenzie has completed
the picture by stating as sympathetically as possible the
case for the provinces which
have accepted the federal
grant and have Imposed a provincial Income tax.
In so doing President MacKenzie has expressed his own
views very strongly. I shall
confine myself to indicating
my own views and showing to
what extent they differ from
those of President MacKenzie.
As a member of the Royal
Commission on Dominion-Provincial Relations I joined in
the recommendation that the
Parliament of Canada alone
should impose the three great
direct taxes; that payments
should be made to provincial
governments on the basis of
fiscal need; and that the provincial legislatures should be
left free, within the limits of
their constitutional competence
to determine how to spend
their revenues. I am afraid
that it is part of what President MacKenzie calls "important human facts about our
national life an,d the kind of
world we live in" that these
recommendations have never
been accepted by those provincial governments which
would not have benefitted
financially, and that the tax
agreements on modified lines
have not been accepted by
Quebec.
My views, fourteen years
later, are set out in an article,
"An Echo of the Past," in the
Canadian Tax Journal, Vol.
1:5, Sept.-Oct. 1953.
Although there is some similarity between the views
which President MacKenzie
has advocated in his letter
published on Nov. 23rd and
those which I have indicated
in this letter, U does seem to
me that there is a significant
difference.
President MacKenzie has
emphasized "the importance of
Canadian unity and of 'Canada' as a nation." I hnve adhered to the position that federalism is both thc basis of
Canadian unity and a neccsary
condition for its maintenance
unless it is changed by free
consent. The consent has not.
as yet, been forthcoming, and
I cannot trat even "several of
the most important human
facts about our national life
and the kind of world we live
in" as a substitute for consent.
H.  F,  ANGUS .
itfhii by  Hound
WHAT OALLI
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I have been amazed for the
last two months at the incredible gall displayed by Freda
Messerschmidt and her small
band of cohorts when they set
themselves up as the infallible
arbiters of what constitutes an
act of discrimination.
I have also been fascinated
by the cheek that our valient
Freda has displayed when she
called upon the sororities, the
fraternities, the Administration
the City Council, the Beverage
Dispensers' Union, the B.C.
Hotel Association and "the individual hotel owners to
amend their ways and to conform to her idea of purity.
She must be very wise indeed. I admire her self-confidence.
I also secretly admire anyone that is so devoted to a
eause that she will manufacture discrimination from the
Very flhtwy and inconclusive
evidence that the "pub-crswl-
This is the test lt»4
Vbyisey. Contrary Ho papular belle! pubsters DO study.
They    may    sacrifice their
health and time, but they
have been known to pass
exams. Publication resumes
January 4.
HON.  P. A. GAGLARDI
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S industrial development was the
main subject discussed by the
Hon. P. A. Gaglardi on campus Tuesday. Public Works
Minister in the Socred cabinet he' discussed Kitimat and
the recent Columbia River
proposals.
ERNEST   WINCH
NARCOTICS was the topic of
CCF's venerable spokesman
and parliamentarian Ernest
Winch, when he spoke at UBC
Wednesday noon. Drug users
are victims not criminals, he
said. Mr. Winch is the eldest
of CCF's father add sod'duo.
ers" produced for her. The evidence that was gathered I'm
sure would not stand up in
court, and I would suggest that
she is bordering on slander
when she accuses these hotels
of discrimination.
This is especially true in the
case of the three hotels out of
five in which only delay in
service was experienced. Now
Freda knows as well as I do
that delay in being served does
not mean discrimination. Why
did she call this discrimination. Why didn't she say Vancouver has a relatively clean
record in this respect? Was she
just trying to manufacture discrimination?
As for the two hotels that
did discriminate, and the fraternities that have diselrmina-
tory clauses, why should Freda
and her cohorts try to make
them conform 1b her all-wise
opinions. After all, discrimination or the act <bf drStrimma-
1fon is* part of-the civil liberty
of the person who practices
them. Discrimination ls up to
the individual, and Freda
should allow each lndlVdual to
work it out for himself.
Ed. Mike.
FOR RENT
BED AND  BREAKFAST Accomodation for two girls. Available for Spring term. 3760 West
14. Alma 3076 R (evenings).
* *      *
LOST
PICKET "800" 10" SLIDE
rule and case on Monday, November 22nd. Finder please call
Trev James AL. 0051.
* *     *
A BROWN LEATHER BRIEF-'
case full of papers, with the
initials P.L.M. If anyone finds
it would they return it to Peter
Marchant, Dept. of English.
* *      *
IN OR AROUND WESBROOK
a maroon Schaeffer Snorkel
fountain pen. Finder please
phone AL.  0428  and ask  for
Nikki.
* *      *
WANTED
TYPING AND MIMEOGRAPH-
ing electric typewriter. Carbon
paper and ribbons generously
used. Accurate work. Mrs. F.
M. Gow, 4456 West 10th Ave.
AL. 3682.
* *      *
ONE RIDER WANTED LEAVE
from J 8th and'Cambie proceed
along 16th or 25th. 8:30's Mon.-
Sat. (also 3 for Sat. only) to
continue next term. Phone EM.
7200. Gordon.
* *      *
DRIVING EAST? SHARE Expenses. Contact W. S. Parker
AL. 3745 L.
* #      *
FOR  SALE
TUX SUIT IN GOOD CONDI-
tion size 38 very reasonable.
Phone FA.  5179  R.
* *      *
PAIR MEN'S TYROL SKI
boots, size 11, used only two
years, excellent condition. Ph.
Paul Watson AL. 1211 M.
* *      #
PAIR OF AUSTRIAN SKI
boots, brand new, size 9*2,
price $48.00. Must be seen to
be appreciated. Contact John
Banfield, KE.  1894. Thursday, December 2, 1954
THE UBYSSEY.
Page Three
Christians
By ANNE SKELTON
Temporary Chairman, Religious Council
What is a Christian? Obviously, this is not a very ex-
I elusive term considering the wide range of individuals that
class themselves, as such. There are definitely some groups
! that cannot lay claim to the title: the militant atheists, the ■
practising humanists and a variety of religious congregations who in reaching God do not acknowledge a medium in
Jesus Christ.
Still, taking all these people into account by ignoring
those of the in«Wferent and those agnostics who represent
only mass apathy—a disintegrating rather than a hostile
force—the North American continent is built on a predominantly Christian framework.
What is Christmas? Obviously, this is not a very exclusive word, either, judging from the numbers who celebrate
it. The commemoration originated as a pagan service of
worship in honour of the Scandinavian sun-god. It was then
Incorporated into the Christian calendar and through history
it accumulated those trimmings known as tradition: gift
giving, carol singing, "the trees, Santa Claus.
What is a Christian Christmas? Here, you have a more
rigid and closed phrase, not as widely used as the separate
words, Christian and Christmas. Christian used as a noun
Is controversial, guaranteed to provoke discussion, but, its
use as an adjective is questionable. Christmas described in
this way, has a new connotation. It apparently suggests
pietistic attempts to force a spirit into the December festivities—the cardboard manger scene, the midnight mass,
the carol service, the religious Christmas cards. Many years
ago the Christian Christmas merely meant the birthday of
Christ.
A FULL Christmas
' For a FULL Christmas, buy your wife the automatic
Put-Put range, the very latest in electric ranges. Enjoy a
FULL Christmas at home with Put-Put!"
Christmas messages like this are broadcast to mankind
almost every minute by the greatest choir ever to fill the
skies in this year of 1954 A.D. (Anno Dollare). Man has
again come to the time of the year when Buck Almighty
reigns, as it seems, supreme. The Great Turkey Festival
is coming up, and Man is getting ready for the eating and
the drinking and a record car demolishing and death toll.
Children await God Santa Claus to arrive with his red-
nosed angel, await Mr. Christmas in person.
It was different 1954 years ago when a different message filled the skies of the Holy Land.
-Behold I bring you good tidings of great joy... this
<lay is born to you a Saviour, who is Christ the Lord ... Glory
to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men of good
will!
Perhaps it is the good will that is no longer in men.
Peace, at any rate, is not on earth, and men are doing
little to change that fact.
Perhaps, if men return to the spirit of the first Christmas, peace can still be had on earth, the peace that come
to men of good will, the peace that Christ came to give us
and for which He was born on Christmas eve 1954 years ago.
Perhaps we should halt for a while ,shut off the radio,
and iive a thought to the real meaning of Christmas.
Hans Peter Krosby,
Vice-President, Newman
Churchgoers
Many persons rarely seen in church at any other time
somehow appear about December 25th. Christmas shares
with Easter the dubious honour of being a time when many
leel that it is "a good thing" to go to publicly worship God.
In the midst of the holiday spree of spending and gift-
giving and re-unions replete with "Christmas Cheer" few give
any thought to what is behind a North American Christmas. Those few are people who in this day still take the birth
of Jesus Christ seriously. Strange people they must be for
any good college student can tell you that religion is fine
for children and old ladies.
Well, I must be a poor student because I think that everyone has a religion or a philosophy of life. I also think it
makes all the difference on whose side we bet our life, because tiie Man whose birth a few will celebrate said 'he who
is not for us is against us.' This seems to me to imply that
no one can be neutral.
Roy Officer, Arts 4
Religious Spirit Advanced
As Possible Apathy Solution
Two dailies, Vancouver Herald and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer have recently published articles regarding university students and youth in general. We feel these are deserving of our attention.
On November 24 this appeared in the Herald: "Christians in Minority at Colleges,"
by Stewart Anderson, a Canadian Press staff writer, Kingston, Ont." The Canadian
Council of Churches said
Tuesday only 30 per cent ol
unversity students have any
church connection . .. a study
made by the secretary of the
Student Christian Movement
showed only a minority of the
30 per cent could be called
mature Christians.
"Canon Hunt, general secretary of the executive council of the Church ot England
ln Canada, said the lives of the
majority ot students lack coherence.
"Prof. M. R. Powicke of Toronto, chairman of the executive committee of the Student
Christian Movement, termed
the attitude ot college students
toward Christianity as one of
'caution verging on apathy.'
"Co-operation among the
churches was the underlying
note of the departmental report given by Rev. K. S. Wills,
a Church of Christ (Disciples)
clergyman, now with the council in Toronto.
"Are our Canadian Churches
really convinced that ihey
should move together except
where deep convictions prevent them from doing so? or
are they In reality still quite
satisfied with ihe outdated ap*.
proach of competitive denom
.nationalism?' said the report."
In Royal Brougham's column in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Billy Graham was
guest columnist November 23.
". . . Every coach knows that
clean living is one of the bases
of physical power. You simply
cannot abuse your body, be
addicted to filthy habits, and
be a star on the athletic field.
"Years ago men thought that
if a fellow didn't drink and
run with the fast set he wasn't
a real he-man. Now we are discovering that drinking and
other forms of body-wrecking
pleasures are signs of weak-
(Signed articles appearing
on this page nave been submitted by the Religious Council and its member clubs.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
FROM 110.00
T-SQUARES. PROTRACTORS
SET SQUARES
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POIYPHA8E SLIDE RULES
ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and
Index
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke £ Stuart
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS Ik PRINTERS
5S0 Seymour St. Vancouver
ness rather than manliness. It
takes a better man to live a
clean life.
"You say, 'That's pretty
rough,' but believe me, it pays
oft every time. It pays off in
more strength, more drive,
more skill, more friends and
more victories . . . Life is a
challenge. In every field of
endeavor theer is plenty of
room at the top . . . If an athlete let's money, pride, bad
habits take precedence over
the development of his skill
and ability in his sport, he will
never reach the top.."
Do we call ourselves Christians and yet fail to practise
tolerance, kindness, and love
to all mankind whether ft be
io a Roman Catholic. Jew or
Protectants?
To be a good business man,
a good athlete, a good Christian one has to really apply oneself to the task. The real
values in life — happiness,
peace, love and well-earned
success are not achieved by
sitting back and watching the
world pass by.
Before peace of mind and
peace between the nations can
possibly be maintained, was as
individuals have to put our
own house in order with the
help of a power higher than
ourselves. Today we are recog*
nizin g more and more the •
place of this higher power.
Why can't we as University
students work in closer unity,
to find the truths of Christianity io guide us to true tolerance and peace.
Marilyn McLallen. 4th Arts
Fred E. Haak, 3rd Arts
D'Arcy Photography
Called 'Incompetent'
A petition protesting the "incompetent handling and "poor
quality" of the graduation
photos taken ■ by Darcy Studios
was presented to Student Council Tuesday by Engineering
Undergraduate Society representative Bob Johnson.
A member of the EUS executive, Johnson stated this was
not the first year that there
had been disagreement with
D'Arcy Studios over the Grad
pictures.
The disagreements with the
studio came to a head this year
when the AMS informed the
EUS that all pictures would
have to be taken at the studio.
Formerly D'Arcy photographed
the grads on campus. This
year's arrangement was "inconvenient," said Johnson.
Many more complaints arose
when the finished photos were
blurry and some of the grads
had received only three out of
a promised four pictures.
An inexperienced photographer had taken the pictures,
and   EUS   felt  that   the Studio
QuxitQij* (Ui tfiW^ifoX huL
Stvwctes
a) />mk tx oWmj,
1
should be responsible for turn,
ing out good work, Johnson
said.
The petition recommended
that D'Arcy Studios be excluded from any similar contracts
in the future.
Committee
Says No
To B.Sc.
A new Bachelor of Science
degree will not be awarded at
the next convocation.
This was announced Wednesday after a university adminis»
tration sub-committee reported
that they deemed it "not advis*
able* at this time" at a meeting
of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
A petition requesting the in»
stitution of a B.Sc. degree signed
by 197 students had been presented by Dr. C. C. B. Duff,
chairman of the Arts and Science
Joint Interfaculty committee on
Thursday, November 19.
,
rnth fcage Four
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1954|
USC Powers May Be
Decided By Students
UBC students will probably
be asked at the spring general
meeting whether the Undergraduate Societies Committee
should have the power to overrule Student Council.
This became apparent Tuesday when Councillors refused
to budge from their stand in
their constitution battle with
USC, despite an engineering
resolution "condemning" Student Council for its refusal to
approve USC's constitution. ,
The controversy Is over a
clause in the USC const! tutian
which states that a USC ruling
shall stand despite Student
Council objections, providing it
is reaffirmed by USC in a proportional vote following meetings of the undergraduate societies.    |
- Such a USC ruling, however,
would stand only until the next
AMS general meeting, when it
would have to be approved.
Only concession Student
Council would make Tuesday
was to submit the thorny legal
problem to the ^Student Court
for advice which would be forwarded   to the   fall   meeting.'
Both Council and USC spokesmen agreed thc issue will eventually have to go to students
for a decision.
"It's a question of whether
Student Council is to always
be the supreme body on the
campus," said AMS President,
Dick Underhill. "We think it
should."
Countered former USC chairman Monte McKay: "USC is a
jnore representative group, and
should be able to overrule
Council in extreme cases. This
isn't a power which would be
abused"
McKay appeared at the noon
meeting to support the stand of
USC chairman Jim KiHeen.
Further support came from engineer Bill Tracy, who was at
the meeting to get Council reaction to the "condemnation"
resolution passed  by  the Engi
neering Undergraduate Society.
Councillor Ron Longstaffe
suggested a "special committee"
be established to study the issue
instead of the Student Court,
but his amendment to Treasurer
Ron Bray's motion was defeated.
What will happen if one of
the special USC rulings appears
between now and the spring
general meeting remains up in
the air.
"If we disagreed with you
between now and the meeting,
we'd have to collect 100 signatures for a special general meeting—is  that it?  asked Killeen.
"That's right," replied Underbill.
DRECmr 0M SALE
IN AMS OFFKE STILL
These indispensable little
books are on sale in the
AMS office and approximately 1800 have been sold. They
contain a valuable calendar
of events, so you know whats
coming up and well before
your 'competition.'
These blue-covered pieces
of literature also contain her
telephone number and address, as well as all the other
pretty girls on campus. (All
the handsome guys too!)
So, go, post haste, to the
AMS office, and get your student directory. They're a campus MUST!
/^**
FRANCES MURPHY
DANCE SCHOOL
lAyview S41I
Private Instruction
Rhumba • Tango - Samba
Fox Trot-Waltz. Jive
Old Time
Beginners • Brush Up
Advanced Courses
If no answer CEdar ••?•
Alma Hall, 9171W. Broadway
PMe
h*Hee
EVERY SATURDAY
Wallie Peters' Orchestra
ALMA HALL
Broadway at Alma Read
^Admission 50c       Open 9-121
SASAMAT CASS
Alma  2400
ALMA'S COMMUNITY TAXI
24-Hour Service 10th and Trimble
Practical economics
at "MY BANK",
where students' accounts are
welcome. You can open «n
account for as little as a
dollar.
Bank oi Mon i ri ai
WUU K INI.   W I F |l    (.IN.'.OIANS    IN    tViHr    W.M K    o<
Your Bank on the Campus...
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY
Manager
(ZuJktfHt
M
Christmas Cards and Sifts
# Abundant Magazine Selection
All at Your ONLY Campus Drug Store
from 9:00 a.m. till 10:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LTD.
l'/a Blocks East of the Empire Pool
ALma 0339
JACK RU8HANT
ALma 2404
Photographer and Camera Sales
4S38 West 10th Ave.
(Opposite Safeway)
CAMERAS - ACCESSORIES
FILM & BULBS
FOR GIFTS — FOR CHRISTMAS USE
Far All Your Clothing Needs
ft Cashmere   Lambswool   Sweaters—for   men   and
women.
ft Daks Slacks
ft Imported Sports Jackets
ft Viyella Shirts
ft Ladies' Gloves from France and Italy.
FRED   HOLMES   LTD.
Vancouver's Uptown British Importers
2845 Granville (between 12th and 13th) CH. 9240
Featuring a Popular-Priced
MENU FOR STUDENTS
*.ioo°
(Formerly Ben's Cafe)
4565 W. 10th Avenue
Next to Safeway
Enquire about our Meal Ticket Plan
College  Printers  Ltd
//
PRINTERS OF THE UBYSSEY"
4430 West 10th Ave.
ALma 3253
Thrilling
new colours
to add to your
XMto
f ^           r^i\
Collection
A full-fashioned sweater with a pert new
scalloped turtle neck, very new % bracelet
sleeve... in cashmcre-soft Lambswool.
Daintily hand-finished, shrink-proof and
moth-proof ...hy Glenayr.
Al good shops
here
every
w
$8.95
ImZMtitsWiiM Thursday, December 2, 1954
TOE UBYSSEY
Pag & Five
,..' ♦•»»•*.
Proposed By NFCUS
A $5,500,000 proposal for national university scholarships
has been presented to Prime
Minister St. Laurent by the National Federation of University
Students.
In a brief opening the NFCUS
drive for Federal Government
scholarships, the federation asked that 10,000 Canadian students
be assisted in the form of 2500
scholarships and bursaries, each
tenable for four years.
"Relatively s u b s t a n t ia 1"
awards averaging $500 would go
to about one-fifth of the student
population.
The NFCUS campaign is based
on   the   report  of  the   Massey
Royal Commission report which
vurged a national program of university scholarships.
The NFCUS brief was presented to the Prime Minister by
NFCUS President Doug Burns,
vice-presidents Paul Piche and
Peter Martin, general secretary
J. Y. Pilion. Norman Chalmers,
chairman of the NFCUS scholarship campaign committee, and
W. H. Angus, president of the
student council at University of
Toronto.
The brief notes 'the importance of provincial rights in the
fild of education," but contniues
to declare:
4
INITIATIVE
"We feel that in view of the
relatively great financial power of the Federal Government,
the initiative required for the
inauguration of bursary pro-,
gram of the scope we are sug-;
gesting must come from that I
government." j
The brief describes the schol-j
arship   program's   objective   as
"broad enough to assist the val-1
uable    good'   students  as   well j
as   the   tnerely    brilliant,   but
not so  broad  as  to  be  revolutionary.'
It claims the existence "in
surmountable barriers" to higher education, pointing out that
in 1952, according to McGill
President Cyril James, only 3
percent of those between 15
and 24 were attending university in Canada, compared wHh
15 percent in the United States.
SURVEY
It also refers to a survey i
which showed 54 percent of l
those abandoning university do,
so because of financial reasons j
Only four percent of those who
begin schooling in grade one
graduate from university.
"University education is now
necessary for almost any fonn
of personal advancement; there
it must bo freely available it' thc
best qualified are to hold the
key positions in Canadian So I
ciety,"    states   the    brief. |
"The equality  of  opportunih
essential    to   free    society    can |
only  exist  if there  are  no   in '
surmountable barriers to higher
education. Such  barriers do e\ |
■ist." I
The brief contends there are
also barriers other than financial: 'We submit, admittedly
only on the basis of personal
experience, that there is a very
real feeling among those otherwise eligible for university education in some sections of
society that higher education is
something to which they have
not the right to aspire.
PROGRAM
"A well publicized program
of government assistance would
help sucrr intelligent young
people to overcome this psychological difficulty and perhaps
encourage them to more fully
develop their talents.
"They would be encouraged
to attend university by a clear
cut statemen; of the community's hope and expectation that
they would do so; and the program would also help meet
their subsequent purely materia]
problems."
The brief here suites: "The
assistance given to tens of
thousands of veteran students
through the Department of Veteran's Affairs in the years immediately after the war showed
clearly the potential ability to
absorb higher education of many
men and women who could
never otherwise have hoped to
and never otherwise thought of
coming to college."
Canada's lou>priced
quality watch
When you choose a Rideau
Watch, you arc assured
of accuracy and long
service at moderate cost.
Models illustrated have
17-jewel movements, made
in Switzerland
exclusively for Birks,
B1 II KS
JEWELLERS
SHOES to set your feet a dancing
—To any colour, to suit your formal or street wear
—Dyeing a specialty; also reglazirg and resuedlng
—The Finest workmanship in shoe repair and ruberwear
Standard   Shoe   Renu
4437 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0608
The brief also claims that
many students drop out of
school for reasons which are
"basically financial," such as
those who fail academically
while attempting to simultaneously attend school and hold
down a full-time job.
FINANCIAL
"While a case history records
thus far compiled indicate that
i high proportion of these students return late to complete
their studies, extra years of
their lives are taken and unnecessary obstacles placed in
their path by the present lack
of financial assistance," states
the brief.
The brief particularly points
out that 15 percent of Canadian
students receive aid—often in
small amounts—while 70 percent receive assistance in the
United Kingdom, and often with
substantial living allowances.
"French university  education
(Continued on Page  12)
See NFCUS
*h* rill IfM
ChriMmaJ
Clrtttihf (jifa
MARION   LEES
THE NEW UNIVERSITY SHOP
5772 University Blvd. ALma 3820
1  BLOCK  EAST OF THE EMPIRE POOL
flw the Ge4A
HOSIERY
SKIRTS
EXQUISITE BRAS
SPORTWEAR
SWEATERS
LANSEA
PRIDE OF G.
ST. MICHAEL
TISSUE KNIT
On ijDuh fiMi fuuvchaM
THIS COUPON
*)w the JHen
DAYS' COLLEGE CORDS
SLACKS
JACKETS
SWEATERS
SHIRTS
TIES
SHORTS
SOCKS
entitles you to 10%'discount
Marion Lees
5772 University Blvd. ALma 3820
1 Block East of the Empire Pool
*******
U      '1   'I"
■W»"t« Page Six
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1954
PROFESSOR PROFILE
Music. Dogs And Ships
By 8HELA0H LINDSEY
"I give you music, dogs and
ships."
Miss Barbara Pentland,
composer and instructor in
music at the University of
British Columbia has a particular propensity for composing music while sitting up in
bed.
Miss Pentland began doing
this at the age of nine. Her
first work was entitled "the
Blue Grotto." Barbara laughingly explained in an interview that it was named for
no reason al all but most probably because it sounded good.
Since the age of nine she has
composed over forty works including two symphonies, a
concerto for baroque organ
and strings (Barbara calls this
•'her baroquean concerto"), a
concerto for violin and small
orchestra, a chamber opera,
"the Lake", a song oycle, two
string quartets, music for the
ballet, films, radio documentaries and drama, sonatas and
sonatinas for piano, choral
works and rounds for unaccompanied voices,
CAS8ENTI PLAYERS
On Saturday Dec. 4, the Cassenti Players, a versatile chamber ensemble formed very recently, will perform, for the
first time, Miss Pentland's octet for wind instruments composed in 1948. The octet has
four movements marked allegretto, lento espressivo, vivace
and grave sostenuto.
Miss Pentland's work has
received international recognition, having been performed in
Budapest, Prague, Vienna,
London, major cities in South
America, Australia, The United States and Canada. In June
of this year her 2nd Symphony
was played over the British
Broadcasting Corporation.
Her works have also been
performed by the Vancouver
Junior Symphony Orchestra,
the Vancouver Symphony, the
CBC Symphony, the ABC symphony of Australia, London
Symphony, thc Rimanoczy
Quartet of Vancouver and the
Juillard Quartet of New York.
"LIVING COUNTERPOINT"
Miss Pentland was born in
Winnipeg in 1912, and received hi-, early schooling there
and ii Montreal. In 1929-30
Barbara studied composition
in Paris with Cecile Gauthier.
In I he fall of 1936 Barbara
entered the graduate school
of the Juillard School of Music in New York on a fellowship. She remained there until 1939.
While at the Juillard she
studied with Frederick Jacobi
and Bernard Wagenaar. Soon
after her return to Canada she
Kiinecl the staff of the Toronto
Conservatory of Music to
teach theory and composition.
She remained in Toronto until
1949 when she joined the staff
al UBC.
DOGS AND SHIPS
Miss Pentland lives quietly
in a small tastefully decorated hut in Acadia Camp
very near the tennis courts.
Her L-shaped living-room is
very exciting to enter. One is
immediately struck by a most
."successful mobile and Mr. Bin-
ning's "Signal Stations." A
major feature of the room is,
ot course, her piano.
Miss Pentland's colour pre-
ierence is for red, black, and
and white. She even chose her
dog "Dart" who is of uncertain breed because being black
and white, he matches her piano. Indeed, Miss Pentland's
hobbies are dogs and ships.
She reluctantly but excitedly admits many trips to Vancouver's harbours to study
and even board freighters and
liners in port.
In addition to Mr. Binning's
painting an "enormous" page
from a fifteenth century Spanish antiphonal obtained in San
Francisco is hanging on the
* wall. Barbara also has an ex-
miss  Barbara  Pentland
cellent record player and an
almost complete record collection of her own compositions.
"NO VOICE"
To return to Miss Pentland's
studies: during the summers of
1941 and 1942 she studied at
New Hampshire with Aron
the Berkshire Music centre in
Copland. During these summers she also had an opportunity to work with Paul
Hindemith. During one of the
summers she was a member of
Hindemlth's male voice chorus
if only because she was the
only woman composer at
Berkshire that summer. Miss
Pentland does not hesitate to
point out that she -has not got
a singing voice. But, she adds,
'"a good musician can sing in
a chorus, he doesn't need a
voice at all, really."
Miss Pentland prefers not
to consider her work or that of
a contemporary composer
from the point of view of influence. Her first introduction
to professional music came in
France, and although there
may be evidence of a French
period in her music she feels
that a composer "creates
through imitating the past."
"I think we should write in
the idiom of the present," added Barbara, "if you really are
part of the present you will
express yourself in contemporary language."
INFLUENCED
When asked how she would
describe her music, Barbara
made a few jottings for us:
"My music is melodic in impulse, moving horizontally to
create a linear, contrapuntal
texture. The harmony, therefore, results from the combination of melodies.
This is more the technique
of Medieval music than of the
Nineteenth century. Without
being atavistic," I think. the
20th century seems closer in
spirit to those grand old
French and Burgundian composers than to our immediate
past.
"It is therefore quite natural that contemporary composers should turn away in
disillusionment from the grand
gesture and the overstuffed
orchestral furnishing to a
simpler, more direct and terser expression, sans fanfare,
sans come-on, sans bang-up
finale.
"I think a few of the listeners are beginning to come with
us."
Many of us who have studied with Barbara or heard her
music are inclined to agree
with her. .Yet we do not share
the experience described by
Barbara in her own epitaph
written as a round for unaccompanied vocies:
Here lies a composer
Whose work indisposed her.
Students...
U-FIX IT YOURSELF
and SAVE 50% on the loan of Tools and Supply Parts
at Special Prices
We have 35 different valve lifters, also ridge reamers, de-
glazing tools, drills, torque wrenches. Best valve-grind equipment, pin-fitting, boring and sleeving equipment 10 cylinder
hones, brake-bonding, drum-turning. Katke lining, Hastings
pistoq^ i'inMs, When you buy our parts, special deal on tool
loans. "You fix it yourself" under our supervision.
1823 West 4th Ave. (at Burrard)
CH. 4818
Also enlarged facilities now at back of 1080 Trimble
ttmmSm
nflWU'fotJl)
1822 W. Broadway      CE. llll
2213 W. 41st ai Yew It
1 DAY
SERVICE
IhlrtfCtoiiiiifSlnei
iSPOTLESS/
DEAN'S
Fine Foods
Mellow Whip
Ice Cream
10th & Sasamat
ALma 2396
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 aju. - 5 p.m.  Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pant and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned and Operated ky
The University of B.t
DE HAAS STUDIO
4439 West 10th Avenue
ALma 2174
# MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY: Your portrait is the per-
fectChristmas gift, only you can give. Sorority, fraternity,
photographs: real portraits for passport prices!
f). BETTER PHOTO FINISHING: Specialized in 35 mm.
arid reflexes for eLica, Contax, Rollei. Camera-owners, unequalled enlargements from your negatives at regular
charge. ' <*, eW*%
# ROLL FILMS: Have plenty of rolls handy for the holiday season! Try the Gwapan 33, it gives you more speed
(125 ASA and costs no more.
# FLASHBULBS! Don't forget flash bulbs! The Philips
PF 25 flashbulbs with blue safety-spot gives 18,000 Im/sec
for 17 cents, that is 20% more light than other makes of the
same price.
When you pause...make it count...have a Coke
DRINK
&a&k
■M'Kdirfsiiifti
lethSet t*4erel tames
"*Ze*e" l» ■ seefstmsee
tmt^^MtmmSsm^^^^mm*mtS^mtwm
*■**■■■■■*
C-2S
COCA-COiA LTD. Thursday, December 2, 1954
THE UBYSSEY
Page Seven
EDUCATION
(Continued from Page I)
B.C. would be trained on the
UBC campus, and the Normal
•Schools abandoned.
The B.C. Teachers' Federation has already suggested a
"new deal" In education training, and possibilities of change
are now being considered by a
special committee consisting of
representatives from the Department of Education, Normal
School and UBC'S School of
Education.
At present, teacher training
students at UBC receive a
Master's degree in education.
No faculty exists to provide a
Bachelor of Education degree.
The President said the public
should "give some practical
covenance of its belief in the
improvement of education In
other ways than by talking
about it and criticizing the
teachers, schools and Department of Education."
He said this could be done
through public recognition of
the importance of teaching and
by attaching the same kind of
prestige to the profession as is
accredited law and medicine.
He urged that more men and
women be encouraged to take
up teaching as a career. "We
must raise the salaries and
living conditions of teachers,"
he said.
Old Ladies' Give
Dramatic Impact
1 h»hihhhi_hhi imiawmiimi .min inmiiim awinnmin.
BEST WISHES TO THE UNIVERSITY
100 Per Scent
Bonking Success
By SYLVIA SHOBTHOUSE
Campus Frederic Wood*Fhe-
atre has once again come up
with an unusual and stunning
performance.
Three Vancouver actresses
thrilled a very appreciative
audience Tuesday night in the
opening performance of Rodney Ackland's psychological
thriller, "The Old Ladies."
Verlie Cooter, Myra Benson and Gay Scrivener, under
the direction of Peter Manner*
ing created much more dramatic impact than the play itself deserved.
The plight of three lonely
psychopath old ladles was indicated by the performance of
Verlie Cooter as the timid
old maid living in dreams of
the past. Her perfection of
movement and voice, and
portrayal of mental hysteria
intensified much of the volume of the tragedy.
An impact of suspense and
touch of humour were exce-
lently created by Myra Benson who ' stole many scenes
in the two dimensional role of
the strange an scheming gypsy. Her facial expression and
consistency of character made
up for frequent over-dramatization of speech.
The performance of Gay
Scrivener as an elderly widow
The latest in ideas comes from
Pittsburgh   where   two   skunks
have been hired to promote bank!
••rvjee-.    At   last   report,   the
skunks are not claiming all the
credit, but nearly 30.000 people i
had streamed through the bank's j
exhibit during a three-day run.;
Fearful of exposure, the bank is
playing possum about its fumigation methods. Now the ambitious skunks are reported to be
in  training for  permanent em- [
ployment with the bank. A rival
claims the whole thing smells to'
high heaven, but the bank says1
It's been   the   most   successful j
piece ot sales promotion they've |
ever done. I
The Royal Bank is not yet on
the market  for skunks, hoping!
our customers will love us for,
ourselves    alone.    However,    if
there's a change in policy, we'll
let you know. Meantime, if you'd j
care to throw your business our
way, you'll find our services and
facilities most satisfactory. There
are   33   rranches   of  the   Royal!
Bank  of Canada in  Vancouver j
and   the    surrounding   district, j
The Royal Bank of Canada. i
38 YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD
PAcim c   OI 7 I
1035 Seymour St..
Vancouver. B.C.
Send your
Voice   for
Xmas:   Talk
for 3 min.
(75c.)   Phone
Ta. 3944 for
appointment.
For a
Light Smoke
and a
Pleasing Taste
Call for
PHILIP
MORRIS
whose life is built upon
dreams of a distant son, was
outstanding m some scenes
but she did not quite achieve
emotional impact and sensitivity.
The experimental sets of
Charles Stegman captured the
atmosphere of suspense and remorse through the depiction
of the three humble rooms of
the old ladies within a decaying old house.
Unobtrusive and fluid lighting and sound effects, together with perfection of detail completed the effect.
The performance maintain*
ed its air of pity and suspense
throughout. However, considerable dragging of pace in the
final act subtracted a great
deal from the impact of the
climax.
Trimble Service Garage
4494 W. 10th Avenue
ALma 1551
Dressmaking and Tailoring to your own
individual suggestions.
Parisian Ladies' Dress Shop
Opposite Safeway on Tenth Avenue
"COME IN AND SEE OUR SEPARATES"
GIFTS    fa*   C**U*   $&JLViJkAA
Watches by Elgin, Bulova
Gruen
Blue Ribbon Diamonds
Expert Repairs—Guaranteed
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
4560 W. 10th Ave. ALma 2009
FM-14
EATON'S
HAS  SMART
SKI   TOGS
You girls, who plan
a Christmas holiday  in the
great Outdoors, be smart,
—visit Eaton's first!
You'll be ready for skiing
and spills?* Warm in a ski
jacket made expressly for
Eaton's   (in   Switzerland).
Black with colour overtones,
29.80
And   wearing   Downhill   Ski
Slacks of nylon blend
gabardine. ••
Quilt-lined Jackets are 13.99
Wool Socks 2.95 Wool Cap 4.59
Wool Mitts 2.9S
EATON'S   Sportswear — Second
Fiobr
Telephone Orders MArine 7112.
West  1600
Also at EATON'S New Westminster NW 4811 Page Eight
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1954
Panel Discusses Teevee
At Special Events Meet
A bright future for Canadian
television was predicted by
three members of the campus
Special Events Committee's
four-man panel on Canadian
television Wednesday  noon.
The discussion became an interplay between city columnist
Jack Wasserman and the other
panel members, Lister Sinclair
of McLean's Magazine and CB
C, Marce Munro of tne CBC
and columnist Eric Nicol.
Speaking on behalf of TV
viewers, Wasserman' described
himself as "the prophet of doom
as far as Canadian television is
concerned."
"KILL  CRIATIVE ABILITY"
He predicted that TV in Canada would die at the hands of
"hucksters" because of its scope,
and would eventually kill creative ability and talent.
Wasserman's comments were,
strongly opposed by Marce!
Munro, speaking on behalf of |
producers. Munro prophesized J
a promising future for Canadian
television once technical cliffi-)
cultics are overcome.
He  also emphasized   the importance of protecting Canadian
itelevision   from  American   TV, j
to preserve Canadian culture.
The panel discussion was do-:
minated by Lister Sinclair who
spoke from the viewpoint of TV
writers and actors.
Sinclair challenged Wasserman's severe criticism of Canadian TV by illustrating that
only those who have experienced both viewing and production are in a position to understand difficulties to be overcome.
SEVERE   CRITICISM
Comparing Canadian television and radio in its early
stages, Sinclair commented that
radio "had also gone through
the tomato-throwing stage."
He expressed his belief that
TV would eventually ^ reach the
same high standard as Canadian
radio.
"We have to learn it by doing
it," he said.
Eric Nicol, speaking from the
stand of TV writers, stressed
the importance of broad appeal
In television.
TWO  CATEGORIES
Elaborating on Sinclair's division of TV into the two catego
ries of "actual and premeditated" television, Nicol commented that actual, or live television
holds more emotional power
than any other single medium.
He pin-pointed the two main
difficulties of Canadian TV
writers today as their inability
to understand "TV Jargon" and
recognize what Is needed and
wanted, owing to lack of experience.
The discussion, largely a battle of wits, was kept on a broad
level and at times the speakers
digressed from the topic.
When Wasserman became involved in his comments, Sinclair charged, "You are attributing to me the opposites of
my opinions and then refuting
them."
The panel generally agreed
only on-the-spot TV would keep
television alive.
Moderator for the discussion
was Dr. Daniells.
B-.C. Matriculation and Science School
—Since 1914—
High Grade Tuition and Reasonable Fees
Senior and Junior Matriculation
Tuition.in University Subjects
Languages - Mathematics - Chemistry - Physics
4349 W. 10th Ave. ALma .1248
They're Nora at Varsity Jewelers
* The Most Exquisite
Stlf-Winding Watches
In the World !
NEW 1955
"Xadtf Suhtia"
HIGH FASHION TIMEPIECES
Beauty in Motion Winds by Motion
From $59.50 to $85.00
YOUR CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT
V ;
Peoples Co-op Bookstore
PHONE OR MAIL FOR OUR CHRISTMAS
CATALOGUE
397 West Pender
MA. 5838
NO TIGHT, fUSSY CURLS HERE!
This hairdo was made with^t
ton* permanent
hair styles
...the special
for casual
Bobbi Pin Curl Permanent is
made to give lyou lovelier,
softer curls... the kind you
need for today's casual hairdos like the "Capri" pictured above. A Bobbi wave is
never tight, never frizzy.
Right after using Bobbi your
hait will have the beauty, the
body, the soft, lovely look ol
naturally wavy hair. And it
will slay that way lor weeks
and weeks!
(iiving yourself a Bobbi is
easier, quicker than you ever
dreamed possible. Vou just
put your hair in pin curls
and apply Bobbi Crenie Oil
Lotion. A little later, rinse
with water, let dry, brush out
— and that's all! No clumsy
curlers to use. No help
needed.
Ask for Bobbi Pin Curl
Permanent. If you like to be
iu fashion — if you can make
a simple pin curl — you'll
love Bobbi!       $1.75
Just pin-curl as usual. Apply Hohbi, rinse 15 minutes later.
When hair is dry, simply brush out. No neutral'.er needed.
No (driers, no resetting. So easy, you do it yourself. Ttartdty, December 2, 1934
^HETJBYSSEY
P«fe 'Nine
What's news at Ind?
of Subway!
Here and there ift the vicinity of Sudbury, tall headframes'
rise from the rugged landscape. Deep down, as much
us a mile beneath the surface, more than 120 miles of
underground railway have been built. On its tracks 146
electric locomotives haul ore from the working areas
to the great hoists which lift the ore to the surface.
Most of these locomotives are powered by Edison'
nickel-iron batteries—which are themselves partly, made '.
of nickel—but some 20-ton giants, like the one in the ,
picture, .operate by trolley from overhead wires and ,'
can haul as much as 130 tons of ore in one train.
120 miles of subway would be a major undertaking
anywhere. In the Inco mines, each mile is an example
of the planning and engineering necessary when 13
million tons of ore have to be raised to the surface
each year.  ,
TRADE     MARK
"Thr ItiirnaittrvfA'idr!", a 72-
/nijif lwc/i, jullx illiislinliil, trill
br sent Jrtr ou ret/iir.st U> anyone
interested.
THE
I
INTERNATIONAL
N
ICKEL
CO
MPANY
OF   CANADA,   LIMITED   •   25   KING   STREET   WEST,   TORONTO
A   MERRY   CHRISTMAS Page Ten
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1954
COLUMNS UNLIMITED
We're Early, But;
Merry Christmas!
By KEN LAMB
Jingle bottles, jingle bottles,
Ringing out good cheer,
Christmas comes but once every 365 days,
.  So pass another beer.
; —Pine olde English poem
Or,
Wassail, wassail,
Wassail, wassail,
Wassail, wassail,
Let's have some more ale.
—Even finer olde English poem.
Anyway, opening the holiday season on that fine Christian
note with which it is opened every year, we of the Youbyssey sport
staff wish one and ale a Merry Christmas. This being the final
edition of the year, we wish to wish It now. MERRY CHRISTMAS.
Even merryer christmasses and happy new years go to following chaps, largely part of a list of people having things to do
with athletics about the campus.
To Don Coryell, and his entire football team, the men who
fooled UBC, Canada, Toronto, themselves, and eVen Don by nearly
becoming the unofficial Canadian champs.
To Dick Mitchell, the jack-of-all-trades, who is line coach of
that great team. May hii hockey players find the Christmas
exams a cinch and be back next year.
To Donny Spence, the fellow Jelly Anderson told he was too
small to play football. Hah, if Jelly could see him now.
While still on football, fill up the stockings of Kevin O'Connell, Jim Boulding, Hon Stewart, Pete Gregory, Bob Brady
and Johnny Newton, the men who made the honours list of the
Evergreen Conference.
Greetings to Jack Pomfret, who might surprise a lot of people
with thc hidden talent he found both in his old basketball men
and his newcomers. May the beneficies of Christmas extend into
the Evergreen sked.
THE WAY THOSE GUYS CAN STEAL A BALL I
And before leaving basketball, remember to look here sometime in January and find out why the Birds will be doing quite
well in the conference. You'll probaly find out it's because fhey
are one hell of a scrappy crowd.
Pull stockings and a loaded tree to Max Howell, the once-
feared enemy of UBC's rugger Birds, who in his first year on
the teaching and coaching staff has come up with a great rugger
team in the Braves.
Also to Albert Laithwaite, who is really smiling these days
at the way his Chiefs are going. For the grin that really charms
though, see Albert after Christmas, when his squad will be featuring. Bob Morford, John Newton, and some other players who"
will come back to the English code.
The Tomahawks get a special nod from old Santa, though.
•The one-win wonders, who gave the mighty Braves their toughest
game of the year, have hit their stride (oh trite phrase, how useful thou) and will be winning quite a few more after the recession.
And we say recession, because after this weekend, the sport
scene at UBC has a very thick curtain rung down on it.
To Ernie Kuyt, Bud Frederickson, Jack Butterfield and the
restj of the defence of the Bird's soccer team. If that team could
find a way to score more often, it would be leading the league.
To the Varsity Grasshockey team, one of the less heralded but
more successful campus squads, and also the leaders of the city
league.
AND THE ROWERS—OLYMPIC CHAMPS. 1956
To the Rowing Club and Frank Read, who will soon be back
in full swing with a healed ankle. May the Vancouver Rowing
club stop making obnoxious overtures and may the kind winds
blow the harbour free of fog and logs. On to victory and the
spring, and California, here they come.
The athlete list closes with wishes for a great pair of injured
fullbacks, rugger man Bill Whyte and football star Jim Boulding.
Bill is suffering from a dislocated shoulder. Boulding, who really
wrecked his knee in the Toronto game, is up on crutches.
Be kind to the UBC athletes, Santa, old pot, and also to those
who aid the running of the organization.
A box of holly to John Springer and Stan Glasgow of the athletic news bureau, the institution that publicizes UBC sports
throughout the province and also makes life that much easier for
sports writers.
To Don Jabour, Isy Wolfe, and Mike Jeffry, who carried on
the great work of playing hosts to the Toronto team (which wants
lo tome back) and who established some of the best downtown
relations this campus has had in some time.
To Eric Whitehead and his round table, who helped us almost
beat thtj east," goes a salute and a hope they find a way out of
their monetary difficulties.
To Bus Phillips, of course, who has our vote for one of the
best executives anywhere. He's the man that runs one of the most
varied and largest sport schedules of any university with one of
the smallest budgets.
And to that great institution, Johnny Owen, serving his 24th
(it could be more) year in the trainer's ranks, goes the last of the
Christmas cards.
But we must not forget the fan. So to all of them, the dolts,
trom all of us, may their wassail bowl be emptied many times, may
ihey riot graduate at yuletide, and may they be back to read and
weep January 6.      Tally Ho!
Chiefs, Rowers To Play
Season's Feature Game
By NEIL MACDONALD
Television viewers and rugger fans will get a front row seat, this Saturday, when.
Chiefs take on league-leading Rowing Club with high hopes of scuttling them in mid-stream.
The Braves meet the Rowing Club 3's  at 1:15 at UBC, and Tomahawks meet ex-
Prince of Wales at Trafalgar Park, at 21 p.m., with the PW boys being Tomahawks' toughest
opposition since they started playing this season,
WHYTE INJURED
Cool, fast-thinking fullback
Bill Whyte will miss this week's
game as a result of the injury he
sustained last weuk against Meralomas. It's the same Bill Whtye
who used to chuck the occasional game for the Vancouver Caps
baseball team. •
The southpaw fullback loss
will leave a great gap in Chief's
backfield.
Chiefs have improved steadily
this year after a slow start and
are a sure challenge the supremacy of high and mighty Rowing
Club. They hope to continue
their win streak of four in a row
by pounding out an upset in the
stadium come Saturday.
MORE WINS YET
Braves, behind a won-1 draw
record, will be shooting to continue their undefeated streak.
Their 70 points scored and only
17 against, speaks well for the
defense which has been great all
year.
Tom Anthony leads the
Braves' scoring with 4 ties for
12 points, with John Mulberry
a close second with 5 conversions and 10 points. Bob McLeod'3 3 tries for 9 points places
him third, with Harry Walters,
Bruno Gandossl and John Legg
next with 2 tries apiece for 6
points. Coach Howell's offense
has the scoring evenly distributed; making everyone dangerous.
Dr. Parr's Tomahawks, with
a win in their pockets, will be
out to take Ex-Prince of Wales,
and get a win streak really un*
der way.
Is   Your   Future   Properly   and
Adequately   Planned ?
You can very easily determine and plan your future
through the scientific procedures now widely accepted
by leaders in business and industry.
DON'T BE MISGUIDED—CONSULT
JOHN W. A. FLEURY
Personnel Consultant Industrial Psychologist
606 Stock Exchange Bldg. TAtlow 7748
a    Gift Suggestions
^ for a Student Budget!
1
ffijk
*S"~S3am,
• FOR FATHER
Forsyth's "Sugar 'n Spice"
15 colors 1
B.B.B. fine English briar
• FOR MOTHER
Elizabeth Arden Bluegrass
dusting powder, cologne   A
Imported taffeta 16-rib umbrellas: border design, gemstone
handle 6.95
* FOR GIRLFRIEND
Coro rhinestone necklace, earrings —
boxed set 5.00
Longene silver floral lighter        2.95
• FOR BROTHER
Swedish Scandia slalom ski: steel edge
24.95
Waterman's C-F fountain pen — cartridge filled, Cadillac design       15.00
• FOR BOYFRIEND
Braemar, Cox Moore, Glenlynn, Alan
Paine, Lyle & Scott cashmeres, 36-46
18.95 to 29.50
* FOR SISTER
Hughes zipper plastic travel kit: brush,
comb, toothbrush holder 4.95
Bermuda   short   pyjamas,   flannelette,
gay checks or plains. S, M, L     4-95
Ski  mitt  — reinforced  leather p*alm,
weathercloth back 2.95
Shop Early and Have A Merry Christmas
'**W'«eMwe**M**me**we^
INCORPORATED  2*°   MAY   1670. Thursday, December 2, 1954
THE UBYSSEY
Sports Edltor-KEN LAMB
TEOHVNT
Skier
ly Chance
Ted
By HEN LAMB
•A   chance   invitation   to   a
mg lad who had nolhing to
one Sunday afternoon led to
skiing career of one of Can-
i's finest young Jump pros-
%*ed Hunt,  runner-up in  the
12   Canadian   Championships
aping event, end winner of
my lesser events, was the boy
11 who was asked to go lor
hike on the North Shore and
a result planned to take up
ling.
►NE OR THE TWO
In the 10 years since the hike
b's done rather well.
He was one of the two mem-
srs of the Canadian  team en-
jred  in   the  World Champion-
llps at  Sweden  last  year.  He
iffered a bad fall just previous
the   match,   and   patched   as
was,    showed    remarkably
Ml
In the open class, held for the
Ssiting jumpers after the
jhampionships, though still
taken up he placed eighth,
imping with some of the
lobe's *top men.
But this year, Ted ambled
Ito the Varsity rugger scene,
lid wound up as scrum half for
lax Howell's galloping Braves,
|inners of every game but one.
id that one .they tied.
LARGE COG
(And Max   attributes   a   large
|rt of the Wahoos' success  to
clever    master-minding   of
icidentally,  Ted plays  centre
the     Pilsener's    Vancouver
|tcrosse  Club and fires a high
in golf.
le learned to play rugger at
Ird Byng, "good old Lord
png" he called the school, and
obvious ho must have" learn-
well.
lAINING
)vcr   Christmas   holidays   ho
11   be   out   training   skiers   of
campus  ski  club and  team,
being   primarily   interested
ipassing his second year Phys-
course, will probably not be
lompetirig member of the club
|s  year.
Jut at   21.   he  still  has  a  lot
I runway   time ahead  of   him,
po that will probably be well
pit bringing skiing honors to
lada.
larpole Cuts Off
raves Win Streak
iraves   win   streak   was   cut
|rt last night when the junior
;ue   leaders,   Marpole,   over-
/ered  the  UBC team  78-42.
["he hot shooting Fraser river
b's fast break was too much
the exam and injury weak-
Braves, whose defence left
:h 'to   be   desired.
Birds Meet Alberni
In Hoopla Hotbed
Into the craziest and most violently prejudiced basketball
town in the world journey the Thunderbirds this weekend
for a two-night stand against the Alberni Athletics, semi-
finalists of the Canadian basketball championships.
And Pomfret's men, only ten
in number, will probaly make
the Alberni fans just slightly
angry when they swipe both ends
of the double header from the
Islanders.
Furthermore, as the Birds
seem to be specializing this year
in a type of basketball guaranteed to upset the hometowners,
tt should be a real ball.
FOOL 'EM. JACK
Pomfret's kids, touted in many
Quartets to fare poorly in the
Evergreen CoaLmremee beeawse
of a lack of experience, are
making up for the lack of their
fight.
Pomfret's kids, touted in many
quarters to fare poorly In the
Evergreen Conference because
of a lack of experience, are
making up for the lack by their
fight.
One of their specialties Is to
steal the ball right out of the
opposition's hands, a most disconcerting moved and one nei
ther the Athletics nor their supporters Will like.
Jack says he will have no
trouble with cutting, because
exams will be doing his pruning for him. Three of tiie birds
will not be able to make the
trip because ei lab and similar
tests.
LABT GAME
It will be the last game for the
Birds for a while, though if
possible there might be an end
of the year series with some city
teams.
Birds will be lining up
a|ain!t a team that was beaten
by 10 points last week by Seattle.
Page Eleven
LOOKING FOR A FAIR DEAL!
Bring Your Automotive Problem To
608 Mccracken shell service
10th and Discovery ALma 1707
A Friendly and Complete Service
"ASK THE MAN WHO DEALS HERE"
■h
SHIRTS
15c
I4MHMM
With   rleanliiK   *r   lln«»
•lilrla   only   lfli
II NIVERSITY STUDENTS
Buying gars at DUECK
C AN SAVE WITH SAFETY
JUST LOOK AT THESE LOW PRICES!
'48 ftym. Twdor
Rich dark blue special deluxe model
with heater.
$695
'47 Fraser Manh.
Lovely green, fully equipped with
radio,  heater.
$495
'49 Monarch Sed.
Smart light grey
with radio and air
conditioner.
$895
'51 Meteor Tudor . '54 Nash Metrop.
Popular Forest
Green. Radio, air
conditioner.
$1095
Nearly new two-
tone hardtop. 5000
miles, all extras.
$1295
'50 Stud. Champ.
Economical sedan
with gas-miserly
overdrive. All extras.
$995
'51 Vanguard Sed
Beautiful m a roon
finish, with air
conditioner.
$595
'50 Austin Sedan
Finished in soft
beige, matching
leather  interior.
$495
Finest- Financing Facilities
DUEOK Financing is keyed to the customer, tailored to the
budget no matter what the problems. Peaks of income, seasonal slumps, are all taken care of. You'll find DUECK will
go out of the way to help arrange a plan to suit YOU!
ON  BROADWAY
Open till 10 p.m. Every Night
DUECK
College  £kep
Open 11:30 to 1:30 Monday to Friday
Main Floor, North Wing of Brock Hall
Solve your Christmas Shopping Problems
by giving.
Pauline Johnson Chocolates
Boxes are especially packed for mailing.
(jefttf tc the Iflardi (JM?
Get your costumes ot...
Watts & Co.
WE ALSO EXTEND SPECIAL SERVICES FOR
TUXEDOES, WHITE DINNER JACKETS AND
TAILS ... AT USUAL STUDENT PRICES.
831 Howe Street
PA.7*to
■wmmmmmmm^mmiatm\t
*<•<!
m tips m
Wr'-ft
000,
Let's face It . . . you really need a Royal portable
this Christmas.
So do your Christmas hinting early. For example,
you might complain a bit about eyestrain (from studying hastily scribbled notes). Or, if you're away from
home, a letter they can fust about read should do nicely.
If you're extra adroit, you might even tell about one of
those eager characters who make some extra money for
themselves by typing notes for their long-suffering
fellow-learners.
Remember... the fastest you can go in longhand is 30
words a minute—it doesn't take much practice to go
twice that on a Royal portable!
WHAT TO HINT FOR: A sturdy, sweet-looking, fast-typing Royal
portable! Has all the big machine features: Magic Margin*, Tabulator, Touch Control, Speed Selector, Line Meter, etc. In Tan or
Grey, with smart Fiberglas carrying case, priced from $79.95.
the new rugged
RSBt
portable
•R.T.MR..TC.
THE WORLD OVER, MORE PEOPLE USE ROYAL
TYPEWRITERS THAN ANY OTHER KIND! Page Twelve
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1954
NFCUS
(Continued from Page ft)
is virtually a state responsibility
throughout,"    the   brief    adds.
"Australia aids some 3000 stu-
dents."
SAVINGS
The Prime Minister was told
that Canadian students can save
un average of $600 ($300 for
women) during the summer,
while at least $1200 is required
to attend university for a year.
"Few families can afford to
supply the difference," the brief
states, adding that what bur-
s.iry aid does exist is doJed out
in amounts of $100 to $250.
The request to the Prime
Minister expressed the belief
that his "well known personal
interest" required that the brief
be presented to him in advance
of the NFCUS campaign.
IMPORTANT
It cone .'ides: "We feel sure
•that under your leadership Canada will not long continue to
lag behind o'her nations in providing full opportunities for the
development of talents and abilities of her  youth.
'The prospective establishment of a Canada Council we
wholeheartedly welcome as an
important *"•? in this direction.
Job Forms
Available
J. F. McLean, UBC Placement Office director has announced employment registration forms for prospective graduates are now available at the
Personnel and Placement Office
west  of the  Armouries.
The registration forms are
available from the offices of the
respective faculties and departments.
Although    prospective   grads
may   be sure of getting a  job
after graduation or are not plan-
j ning on working, they are re-
■ quested to fill out the form and
j indicate their plans.  It is   not
only   important   now   but   will
serve as a permanent record in
years to come.
A picture is required for the
, form, but it may be taken at
'• the Personnel Office for a nom-
i inal fee.
"Permit us   to  express  with
confidence the   hope   that   you
will find it possible in this connection to' give early and fav-
I ourable   consideration   to ways
i and  means of making  possible
j a  v.stly  expanded  program of
i scholarship and  bursary* assistance to university students."
CANADIAN BILLIARD
CHAMPIONSHIPS
TOTHILL versus MARTIN
Canadian  Billiard  Champion
Since 1927
Boy Champion of World
In 1905
Beat Clarke McConachy—
Present World Champion
Contender For
Canadian Championship
Former Provincial
Amateur Champion
High Run of 384 For This Year
Monday and Tuesday - Dae. 6th & 7 th
Stan Martin's .Billiard Parlor
West Vancouver
Wednesday and Thursday - Dae. 8th & 9th
- Tom Tothill's Alma Billiard Parlor
3617 West Broadway (at Alma)
FINALS
Friday and Saturday - Doc. 10th & 11th
Dunsmuir Auditorium — 111 Dunsrouir St.
Opposite Bus Depot
TIME: 8 p.m. each night. TICKETS: $1 per person.
Canadian Billiard.Championships Sponsored By
THE BRUNSWICK BALKE COLLENDER
OF CANADA LTD.
_, World's Largest Manufacturers of Bowling and
Billiard Equipment
M7 Granville St.. Vancouver
NOW!
YOUR MONEY BACK
A BRAND NEW SUN UFE HAN WHKHs
11 Provide* Insurance protection to ago 65.
21 Returns oil beak annual prtmluim paid
if assured lives to 65.
b available) for mat* and female
| Uvea ages 15 to 50.
At 65, the funds eon be (a) taken In cash) (b) used to purchase
a paid-up policy for the original sum assured and the balance
taken In cash or as guaranteed Income) (e) seed to provide an
annuity; (d) left on deposit at a guaranteed rate ef liefest
Inquire now about this remarkable
mem Sum life plan, htm) call ar vries
JIM BRANDON
JACK PEARSON
LARRY WRIGHT
6th Floor, Royal Bank Building PA. 5321
SUN LIP I Of CANADA
CAMPBELL
CLIANEAS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. S4I0
Dbeoual for Students
.1
Martin's Bokory
ft Dalicattsson
5784 University Blvd.
DIRECT FROM GERMANY
Novelty Gifts, Fancy Work, Pure Lambs Wool Sweatersets,
Jersey Knit Suits and Dresses by Bleyle; Knitting Wools
HOMECRAFT IMPORTERS
2348 West 4th Ave. Ph. CHerry 2614
Complete Stylings in Christmas
Season Flowers
Crtn/tuJ JUrUU
FASHION FLOWERS
WE'RE READY TO SERVE YOU WITH
SMARTLY STYLED CORSAGES
4
Flowers for All Occasions
4528 West 10th Ave. AL. 3351
(Opposite Safeway)
■,*F"U
1.-.; *j*_V    .' ?.- *• 1
:*\,*S
fc r„A£; '1
 #•>:■.!
■cr» ■•*". "N&i-i •■■■•
&-;
'•■ilp'**''*' ':i
. V. . ..i •■'**   .»
m v-'-^v;
\
V-""
///BEST WISHES

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0123864/manifest

Comment

Related Items