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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1938

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 HOMECOMING
VARSITY VS.  HUSKIES
SATURDAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
HOMECOMING
FOOTBALL RALLY
FRIDAY NIGHT
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OOTOBER 18, 1938
No. 8
Prof, G.M. Shrum
Honors Memory
Of Dr. Wesbrook
The annual Wesbrook Memorial
service, honoring the memory ot Dr.
F. F. Wesbrook, first president of
the University of B.C., will be held
at the graveside ln Mountain View
Cemetery at noon Thursday, October
ao.
Dr. O. M. Shrum, Honorary President of the class of Arts '89, this
year's senior class at the University,
will speak at the open-air service.
A wreath will be laid on the grave.
All senior class members with cars
are asked to make them available
for the occasion. Cars will leave the
campus at 12.80 noon sharp.
''Please communicate with Art
Clarke, president of Arts '30, If you
can supply a car.
REV. GEMMEL
AS A.C. DEAN
MEMORIAL.   SERVICE
DEAN  HEDLIY
FORI
The College opened this fall with
the largest freshman class of theological students  ln  many years.
There are thirty students in residence and several others who live In
town. This summer, for the first
time, the building was opened as living quarters to the students and staff
of the University Summer Sohool.
NEW BEAN
The Rev. W. C. Oemmell, for years
a missionary in Japan*, is expected
to take up residence soon as the
new Dean of Residence In place of
the Rev. C. W. Hedley who died last
summer. A memorial service for
Dean Hedley will be held ln the
College Chapel on Friday, October
21 at 6.30.
Until the arrival of the new dean
the   Rev.   Tom  Bailey,  Arts  40,  la
acting Head of Hall.
ELECTIONS
The student organization of the
A.T.C. is carried on by The Literary
and Athletic Association. Elected
president for the year was Tom
Bailey, 'with two vice-presidents,
Ward De Beck in charge of athletics
and T. David Somervllle in charge
of literary activities.
On November 3, the College plans
to hold Its annual Oratorical Contest for the O. O. McOeer trophy.
Try-outs are scheduled for next Monday.
DEBATE ON BUSES
Informal debates are held from
time to time. The last of these took
place last Tuesday on the subject
'That the evening bus service should
be abolished.' The affirmative won.
Two social events have been marked off on the calendar of the College.
Today an entertainment for the
clergy of the city will be presented
at St. Mary's and the Annual Donation Tea will be held on the afternoon  of November7.
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL TO HAVE
SAME GROCERIES
On the Initiative of Dave Morrow,
member of the Inter - Fraternity
Council, proposals for a new system
of buying food supplies are under
discussion.
Under this new system all the fraternity houses would deal with the
same store and would be granted a
considerable discount on such foods
as vegetables, fruits,  eggs, etc.
The practice in the past hae been
for each fraternity to buy ita foods
from Individual dealers at ordinary
retail prices, and In the words of
Dave  Morrow.   "Some   of  the  bills
from   the   retail   stores   have   been
criminal."
It  Is  ln  order  to  try and   Improve
this situation, that the new co-operation has been proposed.
CALLING YOU!
Varsity Time is still understaffed,
and the executive is continuing the
search  for radio talent.
Owen Sheffield, Musical Director of
the program, will be on hand in the
Studio, Room O. Aggie Bldg., this
afternoon from 3.30 until dark or
thereabouts,   to   interview   candidates.
Musical stars—vocal and instrumental—are at a prelmum Just now,
and many more announcers and
script-writers are needed.
| THE BATTLEGROUND
THE PRIZE |
The big feature of Homecoming celebrations this year
is the football game between
the Huskies of Saskatehewan
and the Thunderbirds of B.C.
The Hardy Cup shown at the
right will be the spoils In the
game Saturday at the Varsity
Stadium shown above.
44Love Parade" Brings Back
Era of Short Skirts, Negligees
Crudeness of Early Musicals Apparent in   1929 Film;
First Mickey Mouse Delights Audience
By J. D. MACFARLANE
Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette
Macdonald "came back" at the Film
Society showing of the 1020 classic
'"The Love Parade" ln the Audito-
rum Friday night.
Playing the parts of the philandering Count Renard and the sophisticated Queen of Sylvanla whose main
problem was the choice of a husband, the two veterans of the screen
somewhat jangled the tender susceptibilities of 1038 students with
their representation of the rather
sexy innuendoes of the early musical comedy screen productions
OAUDY IMITATION.
Production by the European director Lubltsch "The Love Parade"
brings back pleasant memories of
the tuneful melodies of the era, but
at the same time ruins, to a large
extent, the effect which might be
gained, by the gaudy Imitation of
the stage tricks of the Broadway
musicals.
Especially remarkable were the
glaring crudities revealed In the acting of Miss Macdonald whose queen
ly qualities were neither royal nor
anything like the charming personality evidenced by her most recent
films.
Her     acting    was ' ludicrous     and
stilted  and  at  the  best  she  made   a
poor chorus girl
RESULT OF STOCK MARKETS.
Filmy negligees and the short
skirts of the period combined with
an accentuated version of the sensuous walk of the Broadway stage,
served ohly to make one wonder If
the mentalities of the critics who
picked "The Love Parade" as a hit
ln 1020 were not somewhat jarred out
of the tune by the crash of the stock
market. '
Maurice Chevalier was good entertainment, but still lacked the mobility of personality which makes a
lasting star of the film firmament, a
tact which ls evidenced even more
forcefully by his absence from headline features of late.
HEART STRINO HARPIST.
The famous smile, and the sugary,
(Continued on Page S)
"Huskies" Will Be
Here On Saturday
3,500 See Hardy
Cup Game at
Saskatchewan
Shouts, yells, and songs of nearly
a thousand University of Saskatchewan students greeted U.B.C. Thunderbirds on their arrival at Saskatoon,
The throng resolved into a parade
which was led by a band and floats
representing the various faculties of
the university.
A gala evening followed when the
team was entertained at a Reunion
Dance at the Besaborough Hotel.
Carson McOuire spoke on behalf of
the Thunderbirds.
There was a tremendous turnout
for the game, which drew 3500 spectators. Including a large percentage
of the 1700 University of Saskatchewan   students.
ARTS-AGGIE
NEXT MONTH
AM US ELECTIONS ON
THURSDAY NOON
The elections for officers of the
Artsmen's Undergraduate Executive
will be held ln Arts 100 on Thursday  Oct.   20  at   12.45.
This Is of paramount Importance
because the president automatically
becomes a member of the Discipline
Committee, and the executive takes
charge of Open House for the Arts
faculty.
The biggest social event of the
season the Arts-Aggie Ball will be
held ln the Crystal Ballroom of the
Hotel Vancouver on Thursday Nov.
17. All arrangements for this formal
ball will be the work of A.M.U.S.
executive.
Open House has In the past been
a great advertisement tor the U.B.C.
and will be conducted next spring
under the executive elected. The
programme Includes exhibits by all
faculties.
If you want a good Arts-Aggie
Ball it ls up to you to turn out and
elect a supreme executive. Remember that this ls your opportunity to
show your faculty loyalty . . . Turn
est.
—Photo by Ted Underhiil.
CHEMISTRY 2, THURSDAY, OOTOBER 13th, 2:30 P.M. . . . One desk is shown above. There
are four desks, eaoh with 16 students, in the laboratory, and two suoh rooms are required for
Chemistry 2. At the time this photo was taken, there were two assistants in charge of Chemistry
1, 2, 3, and 5, handling a total of approximately four hundred students. This is the flrst of a series
of photographs to be published in the Ubyssey this fall, with the purpose of emphasizing the
ridiculous working oondltlons in certain parts of the University.
... OR ELSE
"Homecoming will have to be
a financial success or all the
club budgets will have to be
cut." This Is the announcement
made by Bob Smith, A. M. S.
treasurer, who has been perusing club budgets for the past
three weeks. He believes that
the financial welfare of the
U.B.C. students depends on the
success of the Hardy Cup
Games.
Second Hardy Cup Game Will Be Feature of
Homecoming-; Dance Friday Night
The University of British Columbia gets a big opportunity to repay the royal treatment accorded their own Thunderbirds at Saskatoon curlier this fall, when the University ot
Saskatchewan Huskies, star attraction on the coming Homecoming programme, visit the Coast this week-end for a crucial,
two-game, Hardy Cup football series.
According to information received from the prairies, the
Huskies are duo to arrive in Vancouver Saturday morning at
8.45 a.m. by C.P.R. Although nothing definite has yet been
arranged, Home-coming officials are said to be ready to schedule a grand reception and parade in honour of the jaunting
gridders.
 aSTIR UP INTEREST
The welcome which the Thunderbird footballers received when they
invaded Saskatoon, made a great impression on the Coast boys and no
effort will be spared during the time
the Huskies are here to make their
stay one they won't forget.
Local interest in the coming series
between the two Universities will be
stirred up Friday evening by the staging of the Grand Football Rally in
the Crystal Ballroom, with the result
that, by the time the Huskies arrive
the whole University should be fanatically football-conscious.
Saturday afternoon, Coach Oolb
McEwen will send his Qreen and
White-clad hirelings out onto the
Stadium, where they have a most Important date with the soaring Thunderbirds of Maury Van Vllet.
BATTLE  ROYAL
The  battle la  expected to be of
the titanic variety as tbe snarling
Huskies   have   already   met   defeat
once this year at the hands of the
B.   C.   lads,   and   consequently   will
have their fangs sharpened in the
hope of  turning  the tables on the
powerful Blue and Oold machine.
At   the   W.U.S.   Tea-Dance   to   be
staged in the Oym immediately after
the  stadium warfare   has   been   declared closed for the day, the Huskies
are  expected   to  be   honored  guests,
and  to have  the pleasure of undergoing, or rather experiencing, a system   of   unrestricted   cut-ins   on   the
part of UB.O. co-eds.
Further celebrations to take place
between Saturday and Wednesday ot
the following week are now reoeivlng
the attention of Homecoming officials.
SECOND  TUSSLE
The second and final game of the
series, and one whieh is expected to
be an Important factor in deciding
the destination of the Hardy Cup
for the coming year, will be played
Wednesday evening at Athletic
Park.
Dr. SEDGEWICK
AT INSTITUTE
SCORES "TYRANNY OF
WORDS"
" 'The Word' is the sign of creative
Intelligence which has brought the
world out of chaos, and its use can
be either good or bad," was the
theme of Dr. O. Q. Sedgewlck's address before the Vancouver Institute
Saturday evening.
An audience of nearly 000 heard
Dr. Sedgewick score the tyranny of
word usage, especially of catch
phrases and "jingoism" to Influence
public opinion.
"Canadian Unity" as applied to the
next general election was the point
upon which the speaker based his
argument, Indicating that "the word
is a two-edged sword and can also
expose  sham."
He pointed out the potency of the
spoken word since the beginning of
creation, and deplored the tyranny
of the use of words ln such phrases
as "Racial Purity," "Peace with
Honor" and "A War to End War."
Dr. Sedgewick, ln summing up his
address showed the use of the word
to make for either good or bad, order
or chaos, and said, "It is up to us
college people to pierce the sham
and  find a reality,  If any."
APPLIED SCIENCE
ELECTION RESULTS
The following Is a partial list of
those elected ln the Ap. Sc. class,
and S. M. U. 8., and U. E. S. elections :
The class of Sc. '41 elected the following to office: Bus Ryan, president;
Ron Renshaw, ath. rep.
Those elected ln Sc. '40 were: Chas.
Lighthall, president; Jack McLean,
vice-president; D. Patrick, Jim Ussher, ath. rep.
The secretary of the S. M. U. S. for
the coming year Is Rex Parker, and
the secretary of the U. E. S. is Chas.
Parker.
ELECTRIC COMPANY
WANTS INFORMATION
Clubs which are planning campus
functions attracting an unusual number of guests are requested to Inform the B. C. Electric at either
Elliott 1807 or Seymour 5161, stating
the approximate number of people
requiring service, and the times at
which  service will  be  needed.
Although special busses will be
provided whenever necessary, the
company has found it impossible to
provide adequate service if notice
of such  events is  not  given.
'MOCK TRIALS" FOR
NEW LAW SOCIETY
Dr. Jennings will be the guest
speaker of the University Law
Society at its next meeting to be
held Wednesday, Oct 10, in Arts 206.
Inn   in   London.
Bernard Reed resident of the
Society, states "It Is the Intention
of the Law Society to stage several 'mock trials' In the near future,
with the assistance of Prof. Jennings.' "
Pub Office To Be
Private
The publications offlce
and telephone will be
closed to the public for the
rest of the year. Business
may be conducted over the
counter. Permission to use
the telephone for university business may be obtained by explaining the
nature of the business to
a membor of the board in
charge of the offlce. The
publications offioe is the
centre for at least four
campus clubs and lack of
space makes it necessary
that the student body be
excluded. There will be no
exceptions to this rule. T«ro
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ...
Campus Subscriptions, $1.80
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy CumminKs
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Phone Point Orey 206
Mall Subscriptions, $3.00
Friday
Robert King
Irene Eedy
Joyce Cooper
Rosemary Collins
Jack Mair
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ozzy Durkin Jack Mercer
Van Perry Lester Pronger
'    SPORTS EDITOR
Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE  SPORTS EDITORS
Basil Robinson Myrne Nevlson
C.  U. P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Van Perry Ann Jeremy Joyce Cooper
"     PUB. SECRETARY CIRCULATION MOR.
Virginia Galloway Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL  STAFF
Jack Margeson, Helen Hann, Pat Keatley, Joan Thompson, BUI Backman,
Joan Haslam, Ted Underbill, Jack Metford, Ruth Millar, Janet Walker,
Brlta Vesterback, Bob Manson, Florence Hurndall, BUI Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Doreen Henderson.
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
BUS SERVICE
On Friday evening following the Film Society Production
eighty-five people stood at the bus stand wniting to he transported to Sasamat street. Very shortly a bus arrived but could
only accommodate sixty of the crowd inside its doors. This left
twenty-five students and members of the general public in the
cold bus-stand with no alternative but to walk the two miles or
wait half an hour until the bus could get back again to the
University.
Naturally the chilly students blamed the situation on the
company and bitterly derided poor bus service. Actually the bus
company had no knowledge, until they arrived on the .campus,
that there would be more than the usual three or four late workers
wishing to ride to the street car. The fault was not with the
company but with the members of the Film Society for failing
to inform the B.C. Electric of their ahow. If this unpleasant situation is to bo avoided in the future every university club should
have delegates to arrange for adequate transportation.
The complaint has often been heard that the University is
too far away from the city. Surely it is in the interests of the
University to facilitate tho carrying of Vancouver citizens to and
from the University whon they wish to come and go.
looking Back to arts!
Looking back through our flies we
find some items whioh strike a familiar note, "plus oa change, plus e'eat
la meme chose." In 1019 too the problem of overcrowding was a sore subject.
CHAOTIC DISORDER
In fact, If we are to believe the
description of chaotic disorder given
us by one embittered student we
may be thankful that things now are
no worse than they are. It is true
that the state of our Caf at lunch-
time Is not exactly conducive to
peaceful digestion and that seats In
the library are at a premium, still
we don't often And classes wandering
about the corridors, vainly searching for a room large enough to hold
them or students unable to make
their way up and down stairs because of the congestion.
THE  PROMISED LAND
At that time all eyes turned hopefully  toward   the  Promised  Land  of
Pt.  Orey.   According  to  this  crusading   spirit   the   many  inconveniences
endured by the  students  resulted  ln
a   lack  of  work,  study,   and   played
their part  In  preventing the  growth
of   oollege   spirit   and   pride   ln   the
university.    Real    life,    he    Insisted,
would begin with the opening of the
much  needed  buildings at Pt.  Orey.
Alas   for  the   futility   of   wishes
granted.     Still     another     familiar
topic struck our eye.
A warm controversy had arisen regarding the Frosh Initiation. Aa the
years went by it was becoming more
and more severe and the powers that
be feared that it might equal the
historical and ofttlmes tragic occurences which had marked its passing
at older universities.
NIPPED IN THE BUD
Therefore, they have decided to
nip it In the bud before the animal
spirits of the ever Increasing number of students became unoontrol-
able.
An Initiation was necessary they
agreed but not If It were to place
the   name   of   the   U.B.C.   In   disrepute.
Another reporter gave his impression of the Frosh reception. In those
days one did not find seniors searching frantically for unattached youths
to escort their little sisters. For then
It was a highly organised affair.
NEEDLE IN HAYSTACK
The girls were all grouped In numbers, for example, one lot would
stand under 'from S to 30.' Then ln
a large, compact mass the Frosh
bore down upon them. They soanned
thetr programmes, then the ladles
nearby. The question of the evening
was "Have you found your partner
yet?"
The nervous strain finally became too much for some uncour-
ageoua souls, who retired to the
calm of the library for a quiet
game of cards.
ANIMATED CONVERSATION
Our friend the reporter, after conversing solemnly but stralnedly with
unknown Freshettes on the beauty
of the orchestra, the size of the
crowd and the state of the floor, betook himself thankfully home to
burn the midnight oil, oonoocting a
report suitably enthusiastic for the
public  eye.
Rather reminiscent of the Frosh
class party, one might say.
Truly there ts nothing new under
the sun.
,..*,,,,..
.   .   0   9   .   O   V~*~*
HERE'IM* THERE
w
Ith th<
Exchange Editor
1 * *  f   I   1  T   I  I ff
By J. D. MACFARLANE
Evidently Saskatchewan has not
got over the U.B.C. Thunderbirds
yea.
In "Co-Ed Confabs," by "Sally," regular columnist of the Sheaf, there
ls a bit of whimsy about a football
player. Why this item appears in a
'co-ed column' we don't know. . . .
But anyway, here is the excerpt:
"A deserted football field—a lone
player wandering around, eyes on the
ground, peering Intently at every
patch of grass. He went down the
Held for a touch—but there were no
accompanying hurrahs from a frenzied crowd—that didn't worry him—
Oh my, no! He circled each post
and slowly crept toward the stands—
a hopeless look on that portion of
his face dlscernable after the B.C.
boys had done their bit. Up and
down he went, peeking under seats
—was the man crazy? Shall we ask
him? Alright, here goes, "And what
may you be doing my rough tough
and luffly rugby player?" His face
lit up—someone to confide In! "I
am hunting for the pound that I lost
In the game this afternoon. Some
call lt madness others call lt rugby."
Now what were you doing In the
stadium,  Sally?
•       •       •
The Sheaf answers another question for us. * What do people think
in times of vacuous stress? The answer is ln the form of a bit of Introspective rambling called "Classroom
Thoughts."
"Let's see . . . seat ISO, about six
rows up . . . excuse me lady, I didn't
mean to kick you . . . the lug, where
did she get those barges . . . 103, 104,
100 . . . that must be lt, it's vacant
anyway ... ho hum I Bell should go
soon . . . cheerful looking guy on my
left . . . make a good funeral director
. . . and this dame on the right
wow I Icebergs! Why don't I get next
to some of the good lookers . . . O
well, they're Just as cool . . . there's
the bell . . . Judas! I missed the last
class . . . have to borrow somebody's
notes again . . . the French Revolu
tion and the guillotine, massacres and
flowing blood . . . nice people, these
Siberians . . . Wish the prof would
take the frog out of his throat ... or
ls lt a lizard . . . some not bad-looking glntches ln this class . . . Oh ohl
the prof's evil eye ls on me again . . .
better pay attention . . . more French
names . . . the guy that Invented
them must have been hare lipped . . .
or toothless . . . wish there was somewhere to put my feet . . . they're still
sore from last night . . . what a
party! . . . well, that's the last time
. . . tonight I'm home . . . better stick
something down . . . more names on
the board! Wonder what he said
about them . . . guess lt wasn't Important ... I hope . . . say, what
time id it, buddy? . . . no, I said what
time? . . . got a watch? . . . oh,
neither have I, bust the darn thing
In the showers . . . wonder should I
pinch the doormouse on my right . . .
hey, got the time? ten to? . . . thanks
. . . boyoboy, what an ouch-face . . .
I should talk . . . sigh, sigh . . .
causes and results of the Fr. Rev. . . .
been taking this since Orade 0 and
stlU know nothing about it . . .
Whew! ... he Just asked the Iceberg
a question . . . what a close shave . . .
wonder if he picked the name at random or does he know her? . . . what if
he picks me . . . I'll maintain a dignified silence ... no use putting my
foot in it . . . Why doesn't this dame
let me have half the arm rest . . .
where does she think she is, in a
boarding house? . . . Look at her
stick down . . . she doesn't miss muoh
. . . Well, notes are supposed to be
brief, and that's one thing about mine
. . . Crlpes! is that prof, covering
ground! . . . trying to out-Winchell
Wlnchell I guess . . . hotter'n biases
ln here today ... Ye Oods! that
dame's elbow again . . . O well, lt
keeps me awake anyway . . . only
one page of notes . . . what time is
it please? Twenty after? . . . thanks
. . . how does she know, she never
even bothered to look . . . that's cooperation for you . . . three minutes
to go ... I should be thinking of
what I'm writing so it won't look like
brand new stuff when I come to review it ... if and when . . . wonder
if I can make the door at the same
time as  that cute  little  frill  in  the
FASCISM AND
COMMUNISM
IN DEBATE
An interesting and timely topic
wilt be debated by members of the
Parliamentary Forum on Wednesday evening October 10 at 7.30 p.m.
in Arts 100.
The topic "Resolved that Communism Is a greater menace to civilization than Fascism" Is a timely subject and of great Interest.
Sid Kilbank, who ls a prominent
forum debater and former winner of
an Inter High School Debating
League will take the affirmative. The
negative will be supported by Jim
Ferris also widely known as one of
the foremost debatera of the University.
Jim, who has been absent from
the University for a few years, ably
represented in the former McOoun
and Imperial debating series.
The meeting Is open to all and
thoae Interested are Invited to attend. The subject will be thrown
open to the entire assembly for dlsousslon.
TECHNOCRAT TO
SPEAK TODAY
Mr. W. E. Walter, Director of the
Vancouver Technocracy Section, will
address the students under the auspices of the University Technocracy
Society at an open meeting in Arts
100 today at 12.00.
His topic will be "Opportunity in
Chaos," ln which he will present
Technocracy's social analysis and
the highlights of the engineering
specifications or design of the Tech-
nate. The speaker has lectured
throughout the western part of Mexico, the Unltde States and Canada.
He will present an Introductory
lecture for the famous Howard Scott,
founder and Director-In-Chief of the
Continent-wide organization, who
will speak In Vancouver on Nov. 14.
SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS
WANTED FOR
TOTEM
The Juniors and Sophomores have
proved themselves to be more apathetic than the Freshmen ln respect of
having their photographs taken for
the 1030 Totem. Few Juniors and less
Sophomores have bothered to make
appointments.
As a last resort circulars have
been sent to every Junior and every
Senior, asking them, In fact pleading wtth them, to do the proverbial
something about the photographs.
The Sophomores are to be left to
their own devices; and the two hundred of them taken 'while in their
Freshman year 'will reappear In the
annual.
Seniors will be taken now too.
They are expected to have a new
photo this year, as any previous picture lacks the gown. The gown and
hood will be supplied at the studio,
so that lack of one cannot be offered
as an excuse. ,
Appointments can be made by a
student of any year at the Auditorium Box Office on any day at
noon.
seoond row . . . what the hell '.t, the
matter with that bell . . . maybe if
they would dust the cobwebs out of
it . . . Time slouches on . . . what did
he say about an essay? . . . that's
what I get for having a grasshopper
mind . . . Why must he start a new
chapter when the period is almost
over . . . aftermaths of the French
Rev. ... at last, saved by the bell . . .
Crlpes I'm hungry . . . missed that
good looker too . . . 'xcuse me . . .
gotta catch a car . . . watta Jam . . .
free for the afternoon, thank heaven."
—J-M.
*        *        •
FLASH! In Edmonton Hugh Robson, Australian Imperial Debater, is
still asking "what Is a co-ed?"
That '80' for today, friends. See
you on Varsity Time Friday at 8.18,
over CJOR.
A good Idea's to save your money.
At  least,  so  I've  been  told,
For money saved buys  lollypops
To suck on when you're old.
'Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Prank" Ploke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service.
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD
Complete Repair Facilities.
PT. OREY 63
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Hrs.: 0 a.m. to 8 p.m.) Saturdays 0 a.m. to noon
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HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals of the Oolf
Swing. The winter season Is the time to Iron
out your difficulties and
learn how to enjoy
Oolf.
i^
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THESPIANS ADMIT
NEW MALE MEMBERS
Fifty hopefuls tried out on Monday afternoon for parts in the four
plays which have been decided on
by the Player's Club for their Christmas program.
Rehearsals will atart as aoon aa
tbe parts have been alloted.
For the first time in the annals of
the Player's Club there have been
secondary tryouts. The new members
are: Douglas Archibald, Arthur Ballard, William Colledge, Richard
Crichton, Jack Dorchester, James
Fraaee, Kenneth Keefe, BUI McLellan, Douglas Wilson, and Douglas
Worth.
SENIOR OLASS
Officers for the coming year in the
class of Arts 'SB are as follows: Arthur Clarke, president; Marlon Reed,
vice-president; Audrey Ohown, secretary, and Jack McLaren, treasurer.
The annual class party will be held
on October 27.
NEWMAN  CLUB
A meeting of the Newman club
will be held at 8 p.m., October 19, at
the home of Mrs. I. Rader, 4614
Bellevue.
Mr. Leo Sweeney will address the
club on his recent trip to New Zealand.
TOTEM  MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
Totem Staff, and any othera interested In working on the Totem in
Arts 104 today at 12.40 p.m. Everyone is asked to turn out as there -will
be important matters discussed.
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
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OET VALUE
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for the activities
of your—
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OO. LIMITED
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*
Full Course
Luncheon 25c
U.B.C.    ROOST    CAFETERIA
SALISBURY LODOE ANNEX
"Let's All Meet At The Roost!" Engage The Roost For Private Parties
Four o'clock
Tea Tuesday, Ootober 18, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
My**
ALONG/ ^jLf
By PROXY
Once upon a time there 'was a columnist. He did his best, in many
ways, for the good of the paper and
the good of himself. And he tried
his best to please his Immediate superiors. He even tried to please
those who were not so immediately
superior.
He wrote columns that were criticised, and he wrote columns that
caused him to be criticized. He wrote
columns about things that people
told him to write columns about.
He wrote columns without being
told what to write about. He was
accused of writing rot, he was accused of writing something a bit
better. He was told to be funny, and
he was told not to be funny. He was
generally kicked around by people.
He was slowly going nuts.
Then, one day, he wrote a column
about something he thought to be
worth while. It was a good column,
and to the point. It was not In the
nature of criticism, but was really
a bouquet, tossed In the direction of
what he felt to be a deserving individual. Thereby, unfortunately,
hangs no printable tale.
But it did something to the columnist when the said column, written
about the said deserving Individual,
was objected to by a very remote superior. Objected to—no, that's too
kind a term for what happened. The
column was flatly refused. It was
crumpled, mangled, jumped upon,
and torn into very tiny fragments. It
was thrown into the refuse box. It
was, in short, dlslntegregrated by
the wrathful outburst of the very remote superior.
The name of the columnist whose
effort was subjected to such treatment ls better, for many reasons, left
untold. But -what happened as a result of the cataclysm might be mentioned.
I happen to know this columnist
personally. I know that he's the kind
of guy who lacks any too much self-
confidence, even at hts best. I know
that on the particular day of the
episode in question, the columnist
had missed two lectures. Very Important lectures they were, too. And
he was the kind of person who oan't
miss lectures without a certain feeling of guilt. He was conscientious.
So when he came into the offloe just
before the third lecture of the day,
and found his superior jumping up
and down on what remained of his
oolumn, and was told to get busy
and write another column—whioh
he knew meant that he'd miss another lecture,  things  happened.
The guy went absolutely nuts. I've
never seen anything like It before,
and I never hope to again. Something must have gone ping in his
brain. Fifteen miutes, twenty minutes went by before the rest of us
oould hang on to him for more than
a second at a time. And when we
did Anally calm him down, and pinned him, quivering, to the south
wall, we looked around to aee what
had happened.
Well, you've probably seen the
Pub Office on press day. You may
even have seen lt on oocaslons when
people are just throwing plates and
things around for the fun of it. But
you've never seen it after a raving
lunatic had laid his hands on every
movable and breakable thing in the
plaoe. We were knee-deep ln smashed coke bottles. Ham sandwiches
and chocolate oake were smeared ln
a slimy mess all over the floor, and
the celling was full of holes from
the attack of madly thrown furn.
ture.
So we stood there, looking over
the mess, and holding the poor fellow, still shivering and panting,
tightly against the wall It was a
very delicate situation, and very difficult to solve with any degree of
tact    We forgot about tact
We carried him—the columnist, of
course—out to the parking lot and
loaded him Into a car. We took him
home, practically in pieces, and delivered him safely Into the hands of
his alarmed parents. We left them
grlef-strlcken, screaming about what
J, tHH*l«,mMIM*MIHIII, Illll •HHMMIttmtHHmilHHM HMIM*
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION   .
"AT  THE  GATES"
"OUR   SERVICE   MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
niMtHMHMIIIHHIHMMIMIHIHHMIMIIMllHMMIMMHtMIIIHtM
SCHOLARSHIP
SUPPORTED BY
SOCIAL CLUB
INCLUDES   STUDENT
WELFARE   AND
PROBLEMS
As one of the results of the C.S.A..
conference at Winnipeg last Christmas, the Social Problems Club was
born on this campus with the purpose of studying student welfare and
general sooial problems.
At present the Club is Intent on
supporting the C.S.A.'s drive for
national scholarships, and expects
real success ln this direction.
It was through the efforts of the
Sooial Problem's Club that last year
R. L. Calder, K.C, came to the oampus to speak on the Padlock Law,
and the Spanish delegates this year.
During the next three months, the
Society hopes to obtain equally prominent speakers for the student
body.
Affiliated with the Vancouver
Youth Council and co-operating with
other campus clubs, the Social Problems Club ls rapidly beginning a significant and influential organisation
among university activities.
PHRATERES INITIATION
THURSDAYEVENING
Thn most important event tn the
Phrateres' Calendar Is the Club's
Initiation and Banquet, to be held
this year tn the Oeorgian room of
Hudson's Bay on Thuraday, October
20.
The affair will begin at 6.30, and
dress will be formal.
Two delegates from the Beta Chapter of Phrateres at the University of
Washington have been especially Invited to the U.B.C. campus for the
Phrateres' Initiation programme, and
will stay over for the home-coming
weekend.
Remember, before you can be Initiated, you must have written your
exam. This will only take a few
minutes, and will be held on Wednesday of thia weak from 3.80 to 4.80
in Arts _b3.
THUNDERING
HOOFS
OB
CHANG SUEY
AT THB PALOMAR
LOVE PARADE
{Continued from Page 1)
play on the heartstrings of the feminine part of the audience, but to
such an extent that the more delicate characterisation 'was submerg-
ged.
But  then  the  motif  of the  picture waa musical comedy, and the
musioal background waa excellent.
Choruses throughout the presentation were full and colorful, while
the  humor  of the  leaser  players,
although   Inclined   to   the   farolal,
waa well Mended Into the  piece.
Although  both  the acting  of   the
players,   and   the   continuity   of  the
sequences, were somewhat unshaded
and rough, the pioture as a whole is
Illustrative   In   a   marked   degree   of
the advances made by producers in
both the teohnloal and dramatic aspects of mualcal  productions  in the
last few yeara.
ENTER MICKEY MOUSE.
We were glad to see In this picture that our beloved Mickey, at
least, waa not a mutilated version
of his present self. Walt Disney's
flrst piece, hitherto held in the deep,
dark recesses of a filing system, came
to U.B.C. Friday night in triumph.
It came in triumph because of the
whole-hearted laughter whioh the
airy and perfeotly foolish antics of
the characters produced In the audience. The flint was particularly
amusing since the majority of people
of today are as at home with Mickey
Mouse aa they are with Aesops Fables . . a fact which made the comparison of Disney's modified technique and well developed dramatic
and musioal sequences in the 'Mickey' cartoons of the present day with
the arrant foolishness and somewhat
wayward sequences of the flrst picture an uproarious pastime for movie-goers whose recent diet of cartoons has become accustomed to
subtle   sophistication.
the University, the stress and strain
of overwork and overcrowding, had
done to their boy. We left with
bowed heads, thinking that we would
rather not have our names connected
with an organization that would do
such a thing to a high-strung youth
such  as  the  columnist   had   been.
And so I had to write this column.
I didn't write it for the good of the
paper, and I didn't write it because
I am one of those guys who ls soared
to refuse an order from a very remote superior. I was asked to -write
it, sure. But I only wrote it for
two   reasons.     First:   The   columnist
The Bug Driver's Lament
CHAPTER FOUR
Horace Q. Fizzle, minion of the
Discipline Oommittee, could have
snapped his bubble gum, he was that
disgusted. The bus was stuffed like
an olive, and saucily shaking every
other wheel at pedestrians. Besides,
Horace had a cold, and his lone nasal
diaper waa nestled in a rear pocket,
where it was as safe as a bet on the
Yankees. Sniffing noisily, he drew a
bead on an umpteenth-year science-
man sitting literally on his right
hand.
"My nose runs like Seymour
Creek I" he blurbed Incautiously.
The U. Y. 8. very carefully finished
tolling up its yo-yo, then slowly
turned, raised its singed eye-brows,
and spat out a mouthful of log
tables. It regarded Horace for some
time with bleary, bromine-shot eyes
and Anally mumbled:
"Yeah? Then it probably smells
like False Creek, huh?"
Horace's grey cells prowled around
this snappy come-back suspiciously,
then went into a tight huddle. In
three minutes flat they tottered out
with a wobbly-kneed decision. Horace
wooted weakly. But the backwash of
these cerebral calisthenics made him
blink. And a co-ed who was hanging
by her snow-shoes from the straps
thought he was peddling a wink. Now
this co-ed had a face like a mile of
bad road, and therefore always wore
a heavy, corduroy veil when at large.
Her name was Elvira May Ooggle-
fisher. Seizing on Fizzle as a weak-
minded prospect, she swung over
him.
"Do you know what time the ferry
leaves for Hoboken?" she cawed suggestively.
Horace beamed, and whipped back:
"No, but I can show you a fine line
of Navajo blankets I"
The atart of a beautiful friendship.
But at this touching moment, a
Freshman failed miserably to simultaneously maintain his equUibrium,
consolidate the position of his Dick
Tracey badge, and read a blighted
masterpiece called "Incredible True
Detective and Romance Stories, with
Astrological Supplement, and Eight
by Ten Photo of Donald Duck." So
that one of his great, big, blakey-
armoured flounders found its way
onto Horace's time-honoured visage.
His hot, Siwash blood roused by this
uncalled-for demoUtlon of his features, Fizzle drew himself up, and
glared at the offender.
"Sir?" he bleated, tentatively.
The Frosh blinked owllshly over
the top of its turtle-neck sweater,
and did some diplomatic lisping
which was lost to the world. Horaoe
was momentarily stunned as he realized that he was master of the situation, and just stood there, opening
and shutting his mouth like a goldfish on a rubber-neck tour. But Elvira
May Ooggleflsher felt that she was
getting the dirty end of the sucker,
so she grabbed Fizzle and jumped out
the window with him in her arms,
Just as a horrible laugh ripped up
and down the bus. It seemed to come
from an advertisement, which went
something like this: "MenI Do you
covet a pair of dimpled knees? Are
you puny? Does some big bully slap
you down every time you go any
nearer the sand than spinach? Well,
remember our slogan—'Eat Flush-
man's Yeast .and become a Raging
Beast I' " Leering out of the ad. was
the sinister map of Chang Suey. A
wing-Jing flashed, the driver screamed, and, with a preliminary wiggle
of herhips, the bus crashed Into the
Cairn, the foundation of which had
been weakened by negleot. It slowly
toppled over to reveal a figure sitting
on a chair, with its legs crossed, and
calmly cleaning Its glasses. The figure
replaced the glasses on Its nose, surveyed the wreckage quietly, and
sighed:
"That, as Euripides once said, ls
what I call a drink."
The horrible laugh of Chang Suey
rang out once more.
Is Little Nell behind the eight ball
again?
was a pal of mine, and I wanted to
see one more column go ln under the
baby-buggy head. Second: I felt that
there could be no better way to pay
tribute to a pal and a gentleman, a
fellow who had been completely
smashed by the peculiar methods of
executive distinction, than to mention him in his own column.
And   Incidentally,   I   missed   a   lecture myself to do lt.
THE END OF THE LINE
Or Why is a Yo Yo?
By  BILL BACKMAN
FLASH!
Yo yo haa hit the oampus. Everybody from Frosh to Juniors seem to
have gone back to the screwiest
sport ever invented by man. Even
the sports editors of the Ubyssey
have taken an interest in this ?? 1 ?
sport. Rumor hath it that a Big
Blocker was seen yo-yolng.
WHY ANO WHAT
Why ts a yo yo? What is a yo yo?
The history of this top ts one that
has many curious references and allusions. One tale is that a Filipino
had nothing to do while he was incarcerated in the jail house in Santa
Barbara, Cal. While pondering over
his mistakes and the mysteries of
life this enterprising lad whittled a
toy from a piece of wood. This top
was supposed to walk up a string,
spin at amazing speeds, do the screwiest stunts from walking along the
ground to spinning in the air—all
at the command of the genius who
held the ropes.
Men, women, boys, girls—all took
to this toy like Frosh used to take
to the Lily Pond. From east to west,
from north to south, everyone with
a yen for something new became
seduoed by the Infatuation that the
manipulation of this top conveyed.
Unlike all other crazy and dizzy
oddities this toy has withstood the
ravages of Psychological studies.
OLOBE  TROTTERS
The yo yo has girdled the world
many times, but unlike our airplanes
it takes years to do this. Planes go
round and round and crash; but
every day ln some part of the world
some keen wide-eyed child is being
taught the mysteries of working the
yo yo.
Contests,   civic,   provincial   and
International     have    been    held
throughout the world to determine
who   oan   make  the  top  say  the
most ln the shortest tlmt. Today ln
Western Canada contests are being
held at schools, theatres and street
corners to And tbe best player of
tbls—the daffiest oddity slnoe the
Versailles Treaty.
No  roads  of  life  are  there  uninfluenced   by   this   toy.   Herein   lies
pathos,    tragedy,    Joy,    anticipation
from the most humble to the most
exalted, ranging from kids to adults,
semi-morons to morons.
NAZI INFLUENCE
In tragedy and pathos lies there
a tale. When Vienna was Vienna,
before you and I saw 'Viennese
Nights' and waltzed to the romantio
strains of the 'Blue Danube,' in short,
before the Nazis said "begone you
joy" In that part of the world, one
of the greatest capitalists went goofy
and shot himself In a moment ot
jealousy and pique. It seems that
his wife one of the social elite oame
under the Influence of this top and,
horrors! after clandestine practise
emerged as the ohamplon player of
all Austria. Jealously got the upper
hand. They don't it seems yo yo in
Austria any more.
KID PSYCHOLOGY
In a more serious and influential
phase of this toy 'kid' psychology is
the driving force. I Interviewed the
promoter of the top the other night
who gave me his reasons for devot
ing his life to the yo yo. Lovo of
children ls this driving force. Self-
styled a 'kid' psychologist, he informed me the purpose Is to give the
kids "something they cannot get at
home!"
BOOSTS INFERIORITY
COMPLEX
The child tn the average family
does not get all the attention and
notice that he craves. This is how
the yo yo fits in. He buys one of
these toys and being interested he
devotes most of his spare time to
mastering this miniature flywheel, to
put lt through its 50 odd stunts. The
one with the most Intensity behind
his practise Is In most cases the child
who gets the least attention at home.
He learns the difficult tricks and becomes the champ ln his neighborhood theatre and then wins one of
the sweaters which is a sign of his
superiority. The kid wouldn't part
with that sweater. It means more
to him than what money oan ever
mean.
He eventually goea baok to tbe
gang and teaches them how to
make the top talk. He becomes a
leader In his gang, and—a teacher.
He teaches the trioks and stunts
to those who know not.
SATISFACTION 7
In the hearts of those who are
not champions it Alls the vague
emptiness, the hunger that the child
has for attention—"lt gives them
something they cannot get at home.
No fooling, they're the real McCoy
—thoae two-tone sweaters on speolal
at the Esquire on South Oranvllle.
-Money that Stays at
Home... and Builds!
Last year the Oil Companies of British Columbia paid these taxes:
Sales Tax f 1,083,880
Provincial, Corporate, Municipal and
School Taxes         179,120
$1,263,000*
♦This figure does not inolude 7-oent
Provincial Road Tax on gasoline or
Vfe-oent per gallon tax on Fuel-Oil.
And last year the Oil Companies spent in British Columbia:
Direct Payrolls $2,487,762
Supplies Purchased    2,244*000
Freight Within the Province     2,128,834
$6,860,686
Or a combined total of $8,123,696.
Figures ordinarily make dull reading. But we nsk you to consider
for a moment what this Eight Million Dollars means.
It is half the annual output of our fisheries industrv in B.C. It
exeeeds in value our annual production of copper; it is tkree millions
more than our yield of silver. It is nearly double the value of our
Okanagan apple crop.
A large share of this Eight Million Dollars goes to support the-
machinery of government, but more than $6,800,000, you will observe,
flows into the commercial lifestrea'n of the province, creating employment, paying good wages, buying supplies of all kinds, providing work
for railway and transport men — in fact, stimulating business everywhere and making better times.
The petroleum industry is vital—oreative—in tune with the times.
It must have a fair reward for its accomplishments if it is not to be
hampered or restricted in its service.
PETROLEUM INDUSTRIES
OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
BRITISH  AMERICAN   OIL  CO.   LTD.
B.C. FUEL COMPANY LTD.
HOME  OIL DISTRIBUTORS  LTD.
IMPERIAL OIL LTD.
UNION OIL CO.
SHELL OIL CO.  OF B.C.  LTD.
SIGNAL OIL CO. LTD.
STANDARD OIL CO.  OF B.C.  LTD.
TEXAS CO. OF CANADA LTD.
OF CANADA LTD.
This is one of a series of advertisements telling you about the services and
operations of the Petroleum Industries of British Columbia.
-__ ROWINO  OLUB BANQUET
THURSDAY
6.00 P.M. IN OAF.
WATCH  !
'BIRDS   VS.   HUSKIES
SATURDAY—STADIUM
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1938
Rugger Squads Bat .750
In Four Games Saturday
Varsity   Squad   Beats
Rowing  Club 35-6
Well, they did it again.
Varsity's soaring Thunderbirds
swooped down on Brockton
Point Saturday afternoon long
enough to trounce New Westminster's gang of ruggers 35-6.
Fielding an aggressive fifteen whloh
featured a spoiling and individual
style of play, the boys from across
Kingsway held Varsity's highly touted
entry somewhat ln check for the first
half but failed to keep up the pace
after  the  change-over.
The Royals had scarcely worn the
itch out of their new purple and gold
sweaters when they were awarded a
penalty kick by referee Lange. The
Westminster booter split the uprights
to give his team a short-lived 3-point
lead.
TEAOLE TIES IT.
With Varsity on the attack an offside was called against Westminster
and Earnie Teagle converted from 35
yards out to tie up the game.
Swarming into enemy territory
again, U.B.C. forged into the lead
when Howie McPhee outdistanced the
Royal backfleld to score after a nice
passing attack by the three-quarter
line. The kick for the two extra
points fell short.
Not to be outdone the forwards
opened an attack which resulted ln
Sandy Lang scoring. Teagle converted to give Varsity an 11-3 lead. Westminster converted another penalty
and Wilson College crossed the line
to bring half-time score 14-6.
In the second half Varsity's famed
three line really went to town with
Howie McPhee registering two tries,
captain Strat Leggat and Tod Tremblay adding one each.
Vic Moore upheld the honor of the
scrum by plunging over after Lang
engineered a smart play. Ernie Teagle converted to finish the rout.
Tommy Robson and Noel Harrison
were powerhouses for the Varsity side
ln the forward department while Ted
McPhee instigated many scoring
movements by his unselfish play and
faultless ball  handling.
Ernie Teagle boomed over four converts and a penalty goal to bring his
total for the day to 11 points. To date
the sandy-haired fullback has registered no less than 34 points in two
games—every one the product of his
trusty boot.
Statistics reveal that the 'Birds appear set to establish another record
for high scoring. In three games this
season, they have clicked for no less
than 106 points, and have yet to have
their line crossed—a great record
which points to the strong possibility
of Coach Carey emulating Captain
Dobble's feat of producing a "Wonder
Team."
SCRUM STAR
VARSITY SECONDS WIN
OVER NOrVWESTERS
. .A     flashing     three-quarter     line
spelled viotory fer the Varsity Seconds on Saturday when they downed a fighting North-West team at
Confederation   Park   14-6.   The   aggression of tbe home-team's scrum
balanced the plunging of the Varsity    threes,    and    the    half-time
whistle found the soore tied 6-all.
Tables  were   turned  ln  the  second
half, however, and the Varsity scrum
started  'working  the  ball  out  to  the
backfleld,    with    a    scrum-half    Art
Physick   sparking   the   attack.   King
Nell was top scorer for the students
carrying the ball over the line three
times, each try climaxing the efforts
of the threes. An unidentified scrum-
man   got   the    other   try   which   was
converted  by fullback  David  Maw.
The victory gave the Varsity team
a -win and a loss to their credit. Their
display was a vast improvement over
the game two weeks ago when they
were downed by the frosh team.
This hardy Individual Is one of the
shining lights of the Varsity Ruggers'
forward wall. He answers to the call
of Tommy Robson, and when he hits
'em, they stay hit.
IIMIIMIHMIimilMIIHIIHHMMHMIIHIIMHHIHIMIfllHIIMMIMM
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
(IHIIHIIIHIIHIMMIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIHIIHtllllHIHItllll
Our   blue   and   gold   hockeyists
chalked up on the board one win
and loss for their efforts Saturday
when   the   U.B.C.   squad   emerged
with a close 2-1 win over Ex-Klt-
sUano and Varsity  succumbed  4-0
to General America, league champs
for the last Ave years.
Highlight    of   the   Varsity    match
was     the     stellar     performance     of
Freshette Peggy Crowe, goalie. Time
and again she withstood  the powerful  drive  of the  America's  forwards
while   her  own   team-mates,   lacking
combination,    made    little    headway
against   the   -winners'   defence.   Congrats Peggy.
CARTER STARS
Rifling home a shot exactly one
minute before full time, centre-forward Anne Carter, broke the one-all
tie which had lasted since early In
the game and saved the day for the
superior U.B.C. team. Now they can
boast of two wins in as many starts.
A veritable bulwark ln the collegian's defense was fullback Hortense
Warne who Is -well known for her
ability to always get her ball, leaving surprised forwards running on
sans that scoring necessity. Sheila
Wilson and Oerry Armstrong turned
ln outstanding work on the wings.
NEW  COACH
■With a new coach scheduled to
start work at the regular practice
tomorrow, optimism runs high on the
Hockey front. It is two weeks before
they go forth to battle again and by
that time the squads should be definitely picked and In top condition.
SPORTS GALLERY
Today we give you—Sheila Wilson.
Always eager to practice and early
for games, Sheila ls starting her
fourth year as left wing for the
senior eleven. One of the best runners ln the city she has proved Invaluable and a deciding factor ln
many of the collegians' victories.
BASKETBALL
With the basketball season due to
open In a couple of weeks Coach Bob
Osborne wants all the players out
to practices, especially tomorrow at
5.30.
It actually looks as if the senior
hoopettes, long rather hopeless contenders for basketball laurels (of the
better kind) are going to have a good
team this year. Cross your Angers,
girls.
U. B. C.   Team   Downs
Barbarians  17-8
Coming from behind in n second holf roily thot netted three
consecutive tries in the Inst fifteen minutes, the U.B.C. rugger-
men proved their worth against
first division competition by
downing the strong West Vancouver Barbarian aggregation
17-8   at   the   Stadium   Saturday.
Led by the ghost-stepping of fleet
Ormle Hall and the point-garnering
toe of booting Bas Robinson, the Blue
and Oold ran the heavier West Van
squad ragged, and then opened up to
swamp the Black and White boys in
one of the strongest finishes on record.
FROM BEHIND.
Varsity forced the play in the flrst
half, with Robinson opening the
scoring by splitting the posts with a
penalty goal trom 35 yards out after
the Varsity pack had forced the play
far up the field. Fred Billings climaxed a great forward attack by
falling on the ball over the pay-line
to give Varsity a 6-0 lead.
The Barbarians came back strong
to force over an unconverted try
near the end ot the second half,
and then soon after the breather,
the visitors took an 8-6 advantage
by breaking loose for a converted
try.
HALL STARS.
With fifteen minutes to go Inside
three-quarter Ormle Hall slipped Into
the clear for a 25-yard sprint to the
touch line, and the Blue and Oold
took the lead. A few minutes later
the same player crossed the goal line
on a nice play engineered by Waddy
Robertson, and scrum-half Baz Robinson converted to make the score
14-8.
Don Pyle sewed up the game ln the
last few minutes of play by taking a
pass after a three-quarter run with
Robertson ln the lead. Robinson Just
missed the convert and the final
whistle saw the score stand at 17-8
for the students.
This ls the flrst victory for the
U.B.C. team and gives promise of
great things in the future, especially
since the scrum has Anally rounded
into shape.
IOE  HOOKEY
Meeting  on  Thursday  at  12.30  in
Arte  104.   All  out.
BIO BLOOKERS
Big Block Club members are preparing for the biggest Homecoming
festival ln years by completing plans
for a big luncheon in the Caf. to which
Immortals such as Bob Osborne,
Oordon Root and Milt Owen of former  Thunderbird   teams  will  attend.
At a meeting in the gym today
noon, final set-up for the Big Block
cheering section ln the stadium for
the Saturday game wiM be completed.
FROSH TEAM BEATEN
BY EX-BRITANNIA
The    freshmen    contribution    to
campus     rugby     waa     thoroughly
routed by the Ex-Britannia entrant
last  Saturday   when  they   blew   a
11-0 lead to  go down to an 18-11
score.   The   students   emmaaaed   a
large  lead  In  the  flrst half  when
Junior Lamb ran and kicked  bis
way to eleven points.
Twice the versitile star crossed the
line for tries, and once he converted.
Not content with a mere eight points
he  went ahead  to boom over a penalty  kick  from  way out  to  give  the
frosh their 11-0 lead.
SLIPS
Then it happened. The actum decided that running after the ball
was superfluous and that a good
brisk 'walk ln the general direction
would suffice. The whole backfleld
espied a beautiful freshette on the
side-lines and the game ceased to
exist. In brief, the somnolent Ex-
Brltannlas woke up with a Jerk to
drive over eighteen points with finesse.
One try followed another as the
befuddled frosh tried to stem the
flow, and converts boosted the total
even higher. Points weren't all they
got as Ross Wilson was carried off
the field with a dislocated forearm,
and Johnny Clement nursed a black
eye.
Coach Ranjl Mattu watched the
game blow away his reputation as
a coach and promises to Inject some
spirit into the team or else
The Varsity team has showed itself to be potential championship
material as the wise boys picked
Vancouver as the team to beat this
year.
HITCHENSMEN
SUBDUE POWER
OF KERR1E XI
CROLL    SCORES    FOR
U.B.C.   IN   1-1   TIE
Displaying     almost     mld-seaaon
form and absolutely no respect for
their    heavily-favored    opponents,
Charlie Hltohens' U.B.C. soccermen
created a major upaet Saturday at
McBride Park by holding the powerful Kerrisdale outfit to a wind-
Infested 1-1 tie.
Opening   against   a   strong  breeze
that frustrated their frequent movements in the general direction of the
Kerries'   goal,   the  collegians   nevertheless held their lines until well on
In   the   flrst   half   when   Ed.   Rush,
brother   of  the  Varaity   centre-half,
counted  to  put  the  Kerries In  the
lead. With the wind  still  bothering
them, the Hltchensmen -were finding
It   difficult  to   repulse   the   foraging
expeditions   of   the   Kerrisdale   forward line, but the half-time whistle
arrived without further score.
CROLL SCORES
As the second period opened, it
was a case of Varsity with the gale
behind them and Kerrisdale often
finding lt necessary to make despar-
ate, risky clearances. The students
pressed constantly for the equaliser,
and were Anally rewarded when
Paton was forced to handle on the
Kerrle goal-line. From the resultant
penalty, skipper Alan Croll tied the
game up with a well-placed effort
that gave the enemy 'keeper no
chance.
Desperate Red and White forays
which more or less dominated the
play until the final whistle were
with some difficulty repulsed by a
plucky Blue and Oold defense, with
Leong in goal,- Croll and Affleck
backs going about their task ln
grand  style.
m
'BIRDS RECEIVE GREAT
WELCOME ON TRIP
The Thunderbirds of the gridiron
who have Just returned from the
prairies  tell  of  great  things that
were  done   In   the   cause    of   the
bruising fall pastime by the folks
over the mountains when the B.C.
boya  travelled    to   tbe   plains    to
tangle with the Bears and the Huskies.
Parades that slowed up traffic for
hours were the order of the day at
both Edmonton and Saskatoon where
the citizens of those cities turned out
-n   masse   to  welcome  the   warriors
from  the  coast.
The  tremendous  enthusiasm   with
which  the  coast squad  was  greeted
on their trip makes the followers of
the Blue and Oold team more determined  than  ever to give  the prairie
lads    a   real    royal    reception   when
they  roll   into  town  next  Saturday.
Turn  out  and   do   your   part   In
making  this  Homecoming  football
parade and  game the greatest on
record.
ROOM AND BOARD
at   8068   Acadia  Road,   University  Hill. Phone Mrs.  Mundall,
Pt.   Orey  787-L.
VAN VLIET BOILING AS
'MURALS FLOP
Maury Van Vllet is boiling over.
Reason? He's positively disgusted
with the lack of support afforded his
pride   and   Joy—the   Intra-murals.
According to Maury, a committee
of athletic class representatives
meets ln his office every Monday at
noon and works hard to make up
league schedules, etc., only to have
the majority of the athletic aspiring
undergraduates  Ignore  them
So come on and pull up your socks,
you Science, Aggie and Arts Men
and get Into the Intra-mural sports
swim. Oet out and win the Governor's Cup for your faculty.
Here ls the draw for this week's
intra-mural  Volleyball:
WEDNESDAY, 19th, 18.30:
1. Arts   '40  vs.   Arts   '41.
2. Arts   '30   vs.   Arts   '42.
FRIDAY,   21»t,   18.30:
1. Science '40 vs. Science '41.
2. Science '30 vs.  Agriculture.
SOCIAL   PROBLEMS
The Social Problems Club Is holding a meeting today in Arts 208 at
12.3S to which all persons Interested
are  invited.
iiiwmnniimfifmmffmiininmmiifnfiifiiimfiiiiiiintiniiffmmimfffffnT
Smooth, buttery toffee
in delicious milk
chocolate /
m
a treat
to eat—
try it today /
c.iTia
THE    BEST    CHOCOLATE    MADE
DOMINEERING
DOMINOES IN
BIG VICTORY
Varsity's    perennial    rivals,    the
Victoria Dominoes, moved up one
place   In   the  fight  for  basketball
honors  when   they   took   the   1088
edition of the Thunderbirds Saturday to the tune of 46-10
Despit    the    lop-sided    score,    the
game   proved    one   of   potentialities
for   the   Varsity   squad   was   playing
without  the  able guidance  of  Coach
Van Vllet, and Rann Matthison, last
year's  .captain   who   hasn't   yet    returned   from   an   eastern   Jaunt.
Freshman Don Livingstone, gangling centre man, stole the show netting eight points in his flrst appearance, 'while Brud Matheson 'was next
'with seven.
FROSH TEAM
Of special interest to freshman
basketball enthusiasts ls the news
emanating trom the gym that the
Varsity Intermediate "A" team -will
be formed by frosh exclusively this
year.
It waa decided to form a frosh
team because of the vast quantity of
ready material to draw from. Coaching the team will be senior star, By
Straight, who will lend his seasoned
talents to the freshmen ln order to
have a supply of players to draw
from when senior stars leave the
Institution. This year'a squad has
been critically weakened owing to
the lack of ready material to stem
the loss of last year's regulars, and
It ls hoped that this new plan will
considerably strengthen the forces
of basketball at Varsity. The frosh
team will be managed by Bob Scott.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Rev. J. D. Hobden of the John
Howard Society will address an open
meeting of the Psychology Club on
the topic "After the Penitentiary,
What?" In Arts 100 on Thursday,
October 20 at 12.40.
GRASS HOCKEY TEAM
BEATS VANCOUVER
Varsity's grass-hockey team Anally
hit a winning combination on Saturday, whert they downed a Aghtlng
Vancouver team 3-2. The team showed vastly better than ln their other
starts Aashlng brilliant combination
plays to dazzle the Vancouver defence.
Twice Fargey bulged the net with
shots climaxing rushes by the entire
forward wall, and . once Lennox
scored. At all times the Student forwards held the line of play, lacking
only ln experience to punch through
for additional scores
>IIIIIHIItlllHIIIIHIIIHIIItlllMI,llllllllllll,MIIIIII,llll,l,«««l_
Have a real
HOME-COOKED   MEAL
with Mr. and Mrs. Thomson at
THE   OABLES   INN
IHIimtHIIHHHIMHIMHHIHHIIHHIIIIH. llllllMH.IIHMHl.il
ESQUIRFS
FIRST
ANNIVERSARY
ALL-WOOL
SWEATERS
Reg'. $4.00
$2
.95
Just sort of a special on
account of our birthday. These
sweaters are really smart. Just
the thing for Varsity. They
come In two tones and in solid
colors. They're the Ideal thing
for Varsity men and they've
been priced to make them easy
to buy.
i
ORDER YOUR
TIP TOP SUIT AT
THE ESQUIRE
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at  the  Spanish  Orlll
ESQUIRE
Men's Apparel
Exclusive Tip Top
Agents
on South Granville
"Clothea   Styled   for   To-day"
3664 Granville St. Bay.  0680

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