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The Ubyssey Dec 4, 1919

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 ®fj? HhgBSM}
Issued Weekly by  the  Publications Board of the Univ<
2rsity of British Columbia
Volume II.                                                     VANCOUVER, B. C, DECEMBER 4, 1919                                                           Number 9
Auditorium Crowded on Presentation
of Christmas Plays by 'Varsity Talent
NEW MEMBERS OF PLAYERS'
CLUB SHOW ABILITY TO
CARRY ON WORK OF FORMER
YEARS
Thursday, Nov. 27th, saw the opening
performance of the best presentation of
Christmas playlets yst staged by the
U. B. C. Players' Club. "First-nighters"
—ready, perhaps, to extend a sympathetic interest to those making their
"first appearance on any stage," or to
overlook any contretemps in the matter
of scene-shifting—breathed a sigh of relief before the first play had proceeded
far, and settled down to enjoyment un-
marred by any amateurish mistakes on
the part of the actors.
In the selection of plays, or rather
playlets, this season, the Players' Club
has adopted an ambitious policy. A
spice of novelty was introduced by the
presentation of a fourteenth century
miracle play, "The Sacrifice of Isaac,"
and a mediaeval French farce, "Master
Pierre Patelin," as well as the more
usual selection of two modern plays by
Masefield and Pinero.
A noticeably tense feeling held the audience during the entire performance of
the miracle play, which reproduced a
section of mediaeval life—the acting of
Scriptural scenes by the choir boys of
the fifteenth century. Mr. C. T. Robson,
as Abraham, and Miss Evelyn Eveleigh,
as his son Isaac, played the principal
parts in this, while Mr. Manuel sustained
the role of the Angel admirably. The
effect of the chanting of the choir boys
with their swinging censers, and the well
delivered exposition of Mr. Coates, was
impressive and bore out the solemnity
of the scene.
"Master Pierre Patelin" proved a
spirited farce, which enraptured +':e audience from start to finish. Mr. M. J.
1 Saunders, in the title role, played the
part of the sousless man of the learned
profession to perfection, while Mr.
Kirby's artistic imitation of a sheep took
the audience by storm. Miss Helen
Clark, of Arts '23, took the part of the
much-tried wife of the needy lawyer,
and Mr. J. C. Berto and Mr. A. Webster
filled the roles of Mons. Joceaulime and
the Judge respectively.
Of an entirely different nature was the
next play. "The Locked Chest" proved
of most compelling interest, and, with
its swift movement to a highly dramatic
(Continued on Page 6)
'VARSITY WILL
PLAY FIREMEN
The U. B. C. Rugby team will
play their first game in the second
half of the league schedule at
Brockton Point on Saturday, when
they meet the Firemen. The game
will start at 2 o'clock, sharp.
Enough  said.
Judges Decide in
Favor of "Aggies"
SCIENCE GOES DOWN TO DEFEAT
IN INTER-FACULTY DEBATE
—SPEAKERS PRAISED
On Wednesday evening last the inter-
Faculty debate between Agriculture and
Science was held. The subject was,
"Resolved that Canada's railroads be
nationalized." Messrs. R. Hodson and
D. A. Wallace, Science, supported the
affirmative, while the negative was upheld by Messrs. C. Traves and C. P.
Leckie, of Agriculture. President Klinck,
Dr. Davidson and Prof. Boving acted as
judges.
"Because of her geographical position," declared Mr. Hodson, leader of
the affirmative, "the railway is practically Canada's only means of transport. Therefore, it should be run for
the convenience of the nations —- in
other words, for the people by the people." Furthermore, if the various lines
were consolidated, much needed expense
would be eliminated for stations, offices,
etc.
Mr. Traves, leader of the negative,
traced the development of some of
Canada's railways. He quoted figures
to prove conclusively that the Government methods of construction were
most extravagant. In a vigorous, convincing speech, he fully showed the inefficiency of the present government-
owned railways throughout the world.
The supporter of the affirmative, Mr.
Wallace, continuing his colleague's arguments, pointed out that fully two per
cent, of the profits of private companies
were spent in rectifying mistakes and in
legal controversies. He quoted the
postoffice as an example of Government
(Continued on Page 3)
Prof. Kickers Are
Beaten By Students
UNDERGRADUATES WIN  SOCCER
CLASSIC BY SCORING ONLY
GOAL OF GAME
The Time—Wednesday, November 26th,
1919; 3.15 p.m.
The Place—K.E.H.S. Campus.
Professors—Davidson, Hutchinson, Kil-
lam, Clark, Elliot, Hare, Boving,
Larson,  Foley, Jones, Angus.
Undergrads.—Keenleyside, Baker, Wol-
verton. Mitchell, Swencisky, Day,
Fleming, Stewart, Denham, Jackson,
Jones.
The Game—'&XqCE!!!  ????  ^"I'l, etc.
The Result—Professors,   0;   Students,   1.
The Description
Briefly, the game was between the
Students' forwards and the Professors'
backs. Urged on by the rapturous applause of the side-lines, the Profs, made
several dramatic attempts to pierce the
Undergrad. defense, but Wolverton and
Baker were always in the way. The
Overgrads. were undoubtedly the favorite team, and the defense work of Dr.
Hutchinson and Dr. Davidson was immensely popular. "John," however, was
the most popular figure on the ice, and
the applause reached a climax when he
succeeded in bringing his foot into violent contact with Swencisky's facade.
The scoring, which was the least "interesting feature of the game, was accomplished near the end of the first half,
when Joe Denham slipped the ball past
Dr. Davidson from a scrimmage in
front. The contortions of the players,
as they attempted to retain their balance
on the slippery field, added greatly to
the enjoyment of the spectators. When
Foley failed to get the right angle of
elevation on the ball from the penalty
line in the second half, the Profs.' one
and only chance to score went soaring
over the goal-posts. For the rest of the
game Keenleyside was left in shivering
isolation.
The best feature of the game was the
fact that the Profs, proved themselves
such good sports as to turn out at all.
Such games increase the respect as well
as the liking of the students for their instructors, and after the game on Wednesday the Professors were hailed as
the best of sports by everyone who attended the game. Which leads to the
remark that it would be no bad idea to
make this game an annual affair. The
interest taken  in the  first  affair  of  the
(Continued on Page 7) THE   UBYSSEY
December 4, 1919
BOYS!
WE'VE SOME DANDY Overcoats
and Raincoats, specially designed
for young men; snappy models, with
belt and waist seams. Give them the
once-over:
$30, $35 to $50
CLASSY  NECKWEAR.     All   that   is
new will be  found  here:  $1.00 to $4.50
Fancy   Silk   Hose.     Almost   any   color
you  could  wish for:   $1.75 to $2.00.
Your trade  is appreciated.
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820   GRANVILLE  STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
iflaaljtnn - (Craft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY    should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHI0NCRAFT
ffitmitrti
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
ARTS '22 WOMEN
UPHOLD REPUTATION
The postponed meeting of the
Women's Lit. was held on Friday, Nov.
28th, when the Freshettes and Sophomores met in their annual debate to
decide the question: "Resolved that
debating as a forma.1 exercise is beneficial to the mental interests of debaters
and audience."
The subject was upheld on the affirmative by Misses L. Cowdell and Reid for
Arts '22, and on the negative by Misses
M. Portsmouth and K. Allardyce for
Arts '23.
Miss Cowdell dealt with the value of
debating to the individual, maintaining
that it strengthens power of independent thinking, trains the debater in
sifting important from trivial, and demands an accurate knowledge of sound
facts.
Miss Portsmouth argued that formal
debating fosters love of argument for
argument's sake, rather than an intelligent knowledge based on fact; that
there is a tendency to look at the question from one viewpoint, whereas truth
of matter must be looked at fairly and
squarely from all angles.
Miss Reid pointed out that, by previous preparation, a debater is enabled
to present to his audience a broader
view of subjects, and that he presents
for debaters in embryo a model in manner and  style of delivery.
Miss Allardyce, with illustrations, held
that the emotional element conquers
cold logic and most often decides our
opin;ons.
The rebuttal was brisk, clear, and decisive. Professor Angus acted as judge,
and, after an instructive criticism on the
mer'ts and demerits of the individual
sneakers, gave his decision in favor of
the affirmative.
E^PLOY^ENT BUREAU
FOR U. B. C. STUDENTS
A  iob for you !
Tf any student w:sbes to work (for
real nav) drring the Christmas vacation,
watch the bulletin boards for announcements. A tiertmnent Student F.mnlov-
ment Bnreau has been established by
the Alumni Association, witli the view
of bringing students into touch w:th employers who have positions to offer. It
is the purpose of the societv to remain
active not only during holiday periods,
but also to be of service to anyone who
wishes nart time work during the session. The first announcement has al-
rearlv been posted in the Arts build:ng.
giving a li=t of positions to be filled during- the Christmas season.
Further information may be received
from I,. H. Jackson ('phone. Seymour
?>505), 602 "Paci^c Building, or Miss Jean
Robinson,  Seymour 6164.
NUMBER, PLEASE!
Will those students who have neglected to hand in their addresses and telephone numbers to the office kindly attend to this matter at once. A great
deal of inconvenience and annoyance,
both to the office and to student organizations, is often caused from incomplete
records.    Don't put it off—do it now.
.. the ..
Clarke & Stuart Co.
LimiUd
Commercial  Stationers  and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about tomorrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
 of	
" Th e  Ubyssey
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. December 4, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
GIFTS!   GIFTS!!
31 Box of
McDonald's Chocolates
Is Always Acceptable
THEY ARE   MADE EVERY   DAY
MCDONALD'S CHOCOLATES
793 GRANVILLE STREET, near Robson
%. X>ft d. @o.
©^elusive furriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods'
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
10% off to Returned Men
DO  YOU  MENTION  YOU  SAW  IT
IN THE "UBYSSEY"?
Give a fountain Pen!
A BOY OR GIRL always appre-
preciate a good Fountain Pen.
We have Waterman's, Conklin's,
and "Birks" — a wide selection at
various  prices.    Call  early.
Genry Birks <t Sons Ltd.
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
them published.
DR. HEBB LECTURES
ON SOLAR SYSTEM
On Tuesday evening last Dr. Hebb
gave a very interesting lecture on "The
Solar System and Some of its Theories"
to a well-filled hall.
After a brief outline of several
theories advanced from time to time as
to the cause of the sun's heat, he explained that that which is most generally believed at present is a combination
of the radio-activity, heat of contraction
of the sun's crust and heat of meteoric
impacts  theories.
Bode's hypothesis of the possibility of
a new planet being found between Mars
and Jupiter was then shown to be sub-
stant'ated in part by the discovery at a
later date of numerous planetoids in the
position suspected.
The action of tides on the earth's
crust and in the oceans was spoken of.
The description of the influence of the
planets on one another brought the lecture to a close.
Mr. J. H. Mennie will speak on Tuesday,  December  9th,  about  "Explosives."
CHRISTMAS RECITAL
ON FRIDAY EVENING
To-morrow evening the University
Musical Society will hold a Student
Christmas Recital in the Auditorium.
All students and Faculty members have
been invited. Owing to the limited capacity of the hall, the distribution of
tickets has been curtailed, and these
must  be presented at the door.
The chief feature of the programme
will be the choruses by the men's and
women's glee clubs. Vocal and instrumental solos will be rendered by members of the society, and, as an added
attraction, the double male quartette
will sing a few rollicking college songs.
A number of selections will be rendered by the members of the University
orchestra, who have been practising
faithfully during the Fall term. Many
new members have joined this year and
will make their first public appearance
to-morrow   night.
JUDGES DECIDE
(Continued from Page 1)
efficiency. "The same prosperous conditions will prevail when the Government takes over the railroads," he
stated.
Mr. Leckie showed how unsuccessful
Government ownership had been in
other parts of the world. It has not
justified itself in European countries, he
declared. Then why should it be tried
out in Canada?
While the judges were arriving at
their decision, the chairman, Mr. Rive,
in a short speech, frankly admitted that
the high quality and vigor of the debate
had greatly astounded him, and that it
was in every way superior to that between Arts '20 and Arts '22.
President Klinck, acting as spokesman for the judges, gave the speakers
many useful hints for "the next time,"
and complimented them on the high
quality of the debate. The' decision was
rendered in favor of Agriculture, the
negative  side.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTT-SHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special   Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business    Department,    bears    that
well-known
Sprott Shaw Stamp==Quality
R. J. Sl-rtOTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
ANNUAL BOARD
The following have been appointed to
the Annual staff for 1919-1920: Editor,
Miss Hazel McConnel, '21; associate
editors, Paul Whitley '22, E. Johnston
'22; art editor,  H. Doyle, Science '21.
SHELLY'S
4X BREAD
®
HE FINEST FOOD in the
world. Serve it to your
family and watch them grow; eat
it yourself and notice the difference from any other bread.
AT YOUR GROCER'S
 OR	
PHONE FAIRMONT 44 THE   UBYSSEY
December 4, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our slock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE  OUR   WINDOWS   for
New Models
309    to    3 J 5
Hastings Street W.
Exclusive Designs in
CHRISTMAS   GREETING   CARDS
(Business and Personal)
CHRISTMAS PAPETERIES
GIFT   BOXES   OF   STATIONERY
LEATHER GOODS
IVORY MANICURE  SETS
VOLLAND'S   CHILDREN'S   GIFT
BOOKS
FRAMED MOTTOES
HALLOWE'EN   SPECIALTIES
BIRTHDAY
AND   FRIENDSHIP   CARDS
WEDDINGS
AND   CONGRATULATIONS
BIRTH   ANNOUNCEMENTS
MEMORIAL CARDS
Western Specialty Limited
Society Stationers
and Printers
572 Granville St.,   Vancouver
British Columbia
Issued every Thursday by the Publications  Board
of  the   University   of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
I Lillian Cowdell
Associate  Editors -! H.   L.   Keenleyside
\C. D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   II.   Imlah
Exchange  Editor T.   P.   Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager. J.   N.  Weld
Advertising   Manager L.   Fournier
,    . ( D. A. Wallace       D. Mclntyre
Assistants -' ,,,   ,, Tr T   ™    .
^ W.  McKee J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for the Week C.  D. Taylor
ERRING PROFESSORS
The following paragraph, from the
editorial column of "The Gateway," the
student publication of the University of
Alberta, will bear reprinting. We have
the same trouble in the University of
British Columbia:
"We have been requested to mention
the fact that certain professors are guilty of that unpardonable sin of trespassing on the interval allowed the students
between each lecture period. This question is one which is regularly discussed
in our columns at least once a year, and
much more frequently in other circles.
We trust the offenders will bear in mind
that even the most studious of us enjoy
a few minutes' breathing space between
lectures on a programme of three or
four successive hours, especially with
the temperature which now prevails in
most of our classrooms. There are only
a few who transgress, and vve trust that
they will consider the feelings of the
poor sufferers, and give no further cause
for complaint. We would also urge the
students to play their part by being on
time at all lectures, and thus giving the
professor   the   maximum   time   allotted."
*
*
COLLEGE SPIRIT
Much has been said in these columns
during the past two years of the college
spirit prevailing in the University of
British Columbia. In fact, the existence
of such a spirit, or of anything bearing
the slightest resemblance to it, has often
been questioned. There are many who
state that "there ain't no such animal."
Are these people justified in making this
assertion?    Apparently they are.
Out of a total of 893 students enrolled
in the University, only 404—'less than
half—are active members of any college
organization. This is no mere guess.
These figures have been secured after a
careful investigation. There are 404
men and women attending U. B. C. who
take an interest in the University and
who are doing their best to establish the
proper spirit in this institution. But
what about the other 489? What good
are they to U.B.C? Of course, it is nice
to say that there are almost nine hundred  students  attending the  University;
but, when this statement is made, the
usefulness of our excess baggage- has
come to an  end.
Probably the greater part of these
students are in their first year, and offer
the explanation that they do not know
which societies to join. This is a poor
excuse, when they have had three
months in which to investigate. Others
may attend the lectures, spend a few
hours in the reading-room, pack up their
books, and go home, having no interest
in their University outside of their
studies. We know a certain professor
who has a well-defined opinion of such
students.    We agree with him.
The table below takes in the majority
of the societies in the University. Some,
of course, have been left out, since they
have no list of active members. Others
have been eliminated, since their membership is composed of students who
belong to at least one other organization. In the first column is to be found
the present membership; in the second
column is the number of students in
that society who do not belong to any
other society standing above it in the
list.    Following is the table:
Athletic  Associations      211
Literary   Societies  109 71
Chemistry   Society  101 _  59
Ec.  Discussion  Club  50 ~   18
Players'   Club  50 10
Sigma Delta Kappa  38 3
Ag.  Discussion  Club  33 19
Orchestra     19 8
Letters   Club     18 5
Total    404
EX CATHEDRA
By the Editor for the Week
Somebody is always taking the joy
out of life. For nearly a month we have
been congratulating ourselves on that
historic victory over the Centrals out at
the Point. And now the Park Commissioners politely inform us that our "jazz *
wagon" cut up the track about the oval
to such an extent that, unless $75 is immediately forthcoming, someone will
have to be sacrificed and go to jail.
For a sure sign of approaching
exams., just glance into the library.
About two hundred have already
signed up for the Victoria trip. You
can't afford to miss this outing. Hand
in your name now, or you will be too
late. 	
Mr. Tansley is anxious to meet the
fellow who said he wished it would snow
every day. 	
Sherwood Lett and John Mennie, our
first Rhodes scholars, will leave in a
few days for England, to begin their
work at Oxford. The best wishes of all
'Varsity students go with them.
The editor for the week heaves a sigh
of relief. No more "Ubyssey" troubles
until after Christmas—and perhaps not
then. 	
The extreme pessimist: The Freshman who is already signing himself as
L. R. Found, Arts '24.
What's   the   use   of   studying   for   the
coming    examinations?      The    world    is
scheduled to come to an end on December 17th. •mirmmr
December 4, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
(HotttBOonbtntt
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and_class of the
writer.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—The answer given by the Arts
Men's executive to the charge that many
men of that Faculty have not been able to
secure tickets to their own dance is that
adequate notice was given them as to when
and where the tickets would be on sale, the
inference being that, had they been on hand
at the right time, all would have secured
tickets. Manifestly, this inference is incorrect. Exclusive of a number of graduates
and officers of other faculties that it seems
necessary to invite, about two hundred
tickets were available for Arts men. A simple arithmetic calculation would have told
the executive this. They surely knew that
there were approximately three hundred and
fifty Arts men in the University, and that
nearly half of them would necessarily be
disappointed, yet tickets were sold indiscriminately to any that chose to ask for
them. May we suggest that next year, if
the number allowed to attend the Arts
men's dance is again limited, that Arts men,
and especially those of the upper years, be
given first opportunity to secure tickets.
ARTS  '21ITE.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—At examination time we are
given numbers, ostensibly for purposes of
identification, instead of our more usual
appellations. Then why do the presiding
examiners so often ask us to sign our names
to our papers? Some of us, I believe, would
much prefer not to own the rubbish we
write other  than by number.
Now that I have eased my mind of a
grievance, might I suggest that we sing
college songs while waiting for our Professors to enter the lecture rooms? Such, I
am told, was the custom at Toronto University some years ago, and very probably is
still.
D.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I should like to take advantage
of your paper to express my thanks to the
members of Arts '22, and particularly to
those who labored in the preparation of the
eloquent presentation I received on Friday.
The artistic temperament of Miss Agony
(am I correct?) and Miss Rowan is quite
apparent. I am also indebted to Mr. G. G.
King; his cigarettes were appreciated by
Mr. de Pencier as well as myself. On the
whole, it was quite effective, and I should
like  to express our heartfelt appreciation.
Y°UrS' G. W.  B. F.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—In your issue of last week there
appeared a letter worthy of notice rather for
the kindly and unselfish spirit permeating
.it than for the amount of intelligence which
it displayed. It is hardly worth answering,
but criticism, even if it is foolish, should
not be  left  entirely unchallenged.
If there are "two hundred students" unable to secure tickets for the Arts dance, it
is entirely their own fault! Everyone knows
that sufficient notice was given regarding
the days on which tickets could be secured.
Announcements a week previous to the sale
of tickets appeared on the regular notice
boards, and also in the "Ubyssey." Wednesday morning, November 19th, notices
were posted in both Arts and Physics buildings to the effect that it was the day, and
yet, Torserfer and his weeping, wailing and
gnashing two hundred did not have enough
interest in the biggest dance of the college
year to "walk down to the Council room to
secure their tickets—and now they are seeking   to   find   excuses   for   their   own   laziness.
It is indeed a shame the sale of tickets
could not have continued until the evening
of November 4th, for by that time a few of
our brilliant students, bubbling over with
enthusiasm and college spirit, might possibly have waked up. We apologize for being
early—a grievous fault it is—but, oh! that
Torserfer and his tardy companions would
cultivate the habit.
Yours. _, . T„,
SAUM.
DELIVERS LECTURE TO
MEMBERS OF W. U. S.
The first of a series of lectures planned
by the executive of the Women's Undergraduate Society, on "Vocations for
Women." was given by Mrs. Boving on
Thursday afternoon. In a most fascinating manner, Mrs. Boving, who has a
thorough grasp of her subject, told the
girls assembled of the advantages of a
physical training, and the great opportunities which will shortly open up for
women with a real knowledge of the
profession. Citing the numerous public
playgrounds of Montreal, with their expert attendants, she held that before
long Vancouver will see established
similar places, where children can play
safely and receive competent instruction
in athletics and games.
It is. very unfortunate that there was
such a poor attendance at this meeting,
as this series of lectures is for the
benefit of the women of the University,
and will well repay the time and interest shown by those who attend.
THE   YAMATO
Direct Importers of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2288
In Philosophy I.
Professor   Henderson—What    is    the
"contradictory" of "man?"
The  Class—"Woman."
DANCING  CLASSES
Adult Beginner Class,  starting
Monday, Dec. 1st
High   School   Beginner   Class,   starting
Saturday,  Nov.  29th
Private  Lessons  by Appointment
Saturday    Evening    Social    Dance
(by invitation)
M.   Lester Academy Sey.  1689
The New Styles Are Smart
5
OR THE WINTER SEASON we can suppty the Footwear wants
of the young man and young woman with jus! the sort of Footwear
they will enjoy wearing.    An expert Fitting Service at your command
ihe INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST   SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
December 4, 1919
Art  and Style  Clothes Shop
Real Class
Every young man likes to have
nice Neckwear and Hose, so that
he may feel his best when
"Stepping Out."
Don't fail to give us the "once
over,"  as   our  lines   are   complete.
Sox, 75c and up to $3.00
Ties, $1.00 up to $5.00
Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre) ■
Jm\) Cut flown,    f mml (dork a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and  Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone,  Sey. 6410
BRANCH  STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey. 2313
932 Granville   St. Phone, Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government  St. Phone 4742
'VARSITY SECONDS
DEFEAT K.C7S, 5 3
Although all other football games
were called off on Saturday, the mere
fact of a snowy field did not deter the
'Varsity seconds in the least, and they
ploughed their way to victory over a
team comprised of K.C.'s, Firemen and
others, to the tune of 5 points to 3.
The first half was all 'Varsity and the
K.C.'s were hard put to defend their
line, the greasy ball and slow field helping them considerably. Toft and Scotl,
'Varsity halves, were working hard, and
the forwards, led by Gunning, were on
the ball at all times. The half ended
with  no score.
The ball was kept in 'Varsity territory
most of the second half, and, with the
time over half gone, Wally Baker, K.C.,
left outside three-quarter, broke through
and got over the corner for a touch. The
kick was not converted.
'Varsity, with a three-to-nothing defeat staring them in the face, bucked up
and forced the play up the field. With
a few minutes to go, the K.C.'s, in a five-
yard scrum, heeled the ball over their
line, and, when the bunch was untangled, Gunning was found on the bottom
with a death grip on the ball. Rout
Harvey, with a nice kick, converted, and
the whistle blew, with 'Varsity two
points up.
Scott, Tofte and Gunning played a
strong game for 'Varsity, while the Try-
hitts and Townley, at fullback, were the
best of the K.C.'s.
The following represented U. B. C:
Broadfoot, Harvey, Hearst, Russell,
Solloway, Arkley, Tofte, Scott, Meeki-
son, MacPherson, Wallace, Hatch, Johnston and Gunning.
AUDITORIUM  CROWDED
(Continued from Page 1)
conclusion, kept the attention of the
spectators focussed on the discovery by
the young wife of the utter baseness of
her husband's character. Miss Beatrice
Johnson gave an excellent rendering of
the part of Vidgis, and Mr. G. H. Scott
gave a striking interpretation of the
tired and greedy farmer, Thord. Goddi.
The other actors in this play were Mr.
E. W. Jackson, as Toroff; Mr. Joe de
Pericier, as Ingield, and Messrs. A.
Crawford and R. Hunter, his attendants.
The last part of the performance was
in the nature of comedy pure and simple
—"Playgoers," ' by Sir Arthur Pinero.
Mr. Bruce Fraser and Miss Kirsteen
Leveson gave a fine presentation of the
trials of the master and mistress of the
house in their desire to provide their
domestics with an evening's elevating
entertainment. The servants, Misses K.
Stuart, A. Berkeley, G. E. Mackinnon
and N. Willis, filled their roles admirably, while Mr. Lacey J. Fisher, as the
Odd Man, made a decided hit. On the
conclusion of the act, an artistic floral
offering was presented to Mr. Fraser.
The Players' Club deserves to be congratulated on the very successful presentation of these none too easy plays,
and the members of the student body
will look forward with anticipation to
the great dramatic event of the 'Varsity
year—the annual spring play.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A..
Principal
Success Business
College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B
. C.
Phone,  Fairmont
2075
The Art of Speaking
Debates,   Speeches,   Play-parts,
Recitations   Coached
Special   rate   on   single   lessons   to
U. B. C.   Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite  23,   709   Dunsmuir   Street
Phone,   Sey.  6535Y
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
MAKE    OUR    STORE    YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
Cbe Uancouver Stationers Ltd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
Insist on your Dealer supplying
you with
KEYSTONE
Loose Leaf
COVERS a„d SHEETS
No. 3736 Open End size 5% x 8%
No. 2768 Open Side size 9% x 7%
No. 2769  Open  Side  size  lO1^ x 8
Smith, Davidson % Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  & Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C. December 4, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
PROF.  KICKERS  ARE  BEATEN
(Continued from Page 1)
kind presages a continued and even
heightened enthusiasm if they are continued.
The Sidelights
A  lot   of  money  changed  hands  after
the game.
Mr. Ridington played hard, putting up
a very good game.
So did Alf. Swencisky; but he requests
that, in future, the librarian keep his feet
off his face, or his "pedal extremities off
the prosaic."
Talk about Worrall or Gwyther!  Have
you ever seen  Doc. Davidson kick?
Professors Jones, Larsen, Foley,
Elb'ot and Angus must have had a row.
They absolutely refused to work together.
Did you get that. Professor Foley?
He's a bally fine player, too, don'-cher-
know.
Mr. Elliot, of the Bolsheviki sweater,
was the hardest working man on the
forward line. He demonstrated admirably to the Freshies. the Freshmores
and the Freshettes "the co-efficient of
linear expansion" as applied to the
ground.
Our special correspondent tells us
that the Freshettes went to see Professor Larsen.
There were more of the fair sex at
the game than at any other this year.
The male students were quite jealous of
the Profs.
Where did the Chemistry Department
get that hat?
Doc. Clark smoked at intervals during
the game to get up steam. When he
onened 'er up sufficiently, the way he
went 'round the corners on two wheels
was a sight to behold.
Doc. Hutchinson's nseudonodia were
much in evidence, and the way he fed
the forwards was one of the features of
the game.
At one time we thought there was going to be some excitement, when husky
Joe Denhrm rolled up his sleeves beside
the microscope.
The;r    alibi    is    that    no
fbal!    would    so    anywhere
Hughie's" socks.
respectable
near     "Old
The way that Johnny Weld rooted for
his nnme=ake on the Profs.' team was
worthy of both the rooter and rootee.
SOPHS. VS. AGGIES
The next of the series of men's inter-
class debates, held by the Men's Literary
Society, will be between Second Year
Arts nnd Agriculture. This was decided
on Wednesday afternoon, by matching
coins. Arts '22 and Agriculture turned
"heads," and Arts '20 "tails." The
Seniors will meet the winners of the
coming debate in  the  final.
M.  PERRIN,  Manager — 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT   PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,   it  may   be  the   dance  floor—or  the   atmosphere   that   pervades—or   the
character of the people.
PERHAPS   it  is  all   three—for   the   BARRON   is   different,   and   that   is   why   this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee Luncheon, 11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER Every Day, including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
THE COLLEGE CAT
There is a better world, they say,
where shining hosts, in bright array,
are always playing at shooting stars, or
twanging on their gold guitars. You
breathe the pure scholastic air, for all
are educated there; St. Peter, as he
turns the key, presents you with a Ph.
D. And matters not what tongue you
speak, for all are talking fluent Greek.
Upon that bright and sunny shore
there'll be no lectures evermore; and,
banished grief and heavy care, there is
no sugar shortage there; but you may
live in peace for aye, and see a French
farce every day. On snowy pinions let
us fly to seek our happy home on high,
where Profs, can never make a din, nor
Freshies  ever enter in.
PUSSY.
WILL ATTEMPT TO
REVIVE PRACTICES
In reply to the complaint registered
in last week's issue of the "Ubyssey," it
is brought to the attention of the students (not for the first time) that University Song Books are on sale in the
Students' Council room. Every effort
will be made to arrange a noon-hour
practice. Up to the present, the auditorium has almost invariably been used for
the Musical Society, the Players' Club,
special speakers to the University, or
meetings of the Alma Mater-Society, the
Literary Department, etc. In some instances the hall has been vacant because
a meeting of some society has been
postponed at the last minute — leaving
no time to arrange for a song practice,
e.g., last Thursday.
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Ideal Overcoat
for Winter
We're showing snappy belted
models for young men; all materials —■ coverts, tweeds, worsteds,
gabardines, mixtures, greens,
browns, greys. Every coat is real
class.    Remarkable values,  too,  at
$35, $45, $50, $55
J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
123, 125, 127 Hastings Street, West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the big Red Arrow Sign
The University Intermediate basketball team ran away from St. Mark's on
Monday evening, winning a City League
game by a 71-6 score.
R.€.Purdy,D<l.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
December 4, 1919
U.B.C. Students, Attention
Why   not   send   home   to   Mother,
as a Christmas Remembrance,
one of our
Guaranteed Security
Policies ?
Special inducements will be given
those  answering  this  ad.
during December.
.. The
Western Life
A
ssurance
Co.
701 LONDON BLDG.
626  Pender  Street,  West
VANCOUVER, B. C.
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
DEER MERTEL—JOE
Deer Mertel:—
Well, Mertel, I wish you was here last
Thurs. nite. They is a bunch of actors
in this University who formed a club
and which do plays, and on Thurs. did
4 of them, also on Fri. and Sat. but I
only went one nite. The show was fine.
In the 1st play a fello was going to kill
his sun, which they said was his sun but
who reely wasnt because it was a girl.
They fooled lots of peeple, but they
couldnt fool me. You know what I am,
Mertel. Well anyway they didnt kill the
kid because a guy dressed in white,
which was bigger and stronger than the
killeing guy, said not to. I laffed all
through the 2nd one. Tn this they was
a crazy Frenchman who rode around on
a broom and put a fryetng pan on his
head. The 3rd was all about a farmer
who had a hedake and wanted his supper, and his wife who had a cusin who
killed a man and wouldnt get his "supper. Lots of people laffed at this play,
but I didnt. I no what it is to be hungry, Mertel. In the last play they was
a lot of servants and one was always
cryeing. They was a guy who needed a
shave and was looking for a list of
coot:es most of the time. The boss
wanted to take the bunch to the show
but only the fello wanted to go. Maybe
he thot he wood find his cooties there.
I wish someone wood ask me to go to
a  show, Mertel.
Well. Mertel, you remember I told
you they was to be a football game between the profs, and the students. They
played the game and the students one.
The game was lots of fun and the profs,
all wore funny close. They was one big
prof, named Tohn, who had a beard, who
kicked the biggest guy on the other side
in the face. FTe had lots of nerve,
Mertel.
T have lots of fun at this University,
Mertel, but exams, come a week from
Sat. and if I dont pass I get kicked out.
I hope  I pass, Mertel.
JOE.
KNITTERS NEEDED
Sleeveless sweaters are urgently needed by the Red Cross, and the women of
the University are asked to secure wool
and directions for knitting from Miss
Mclnnes. These garments may be made
during the  Christmas holidays.
MRS.  SAGE  BEREAVED
Mrs. Walter Sage received on Saturday news of the death of her father, Mr.
Donald P. MacKinnon, at his home in
Calgary, Alberta.
WILL ADDRESS "Y"
Next Monday, at noon. Miss Conklin,
who is on her way to India, will address
the members of the University Y. W.
C. A.
U. B. C. can never be accused of not
fostering a democratic spirit among its
students. At the actors' ball, which followed the evening performance at the
Players' Club last Saturday, among
those present were priests, angels, merchants, sheep, judges, servants, maidens,
murderers, and society leaders.
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The "Combination"
•J A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over instep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
<I This insures that perfect glove fit
around the instep and ankle. The'
maximum of comfort and sttyle.
Guff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank  of  Commerce
Wolsey, Rameses
Tumbril's and
Stanfield's
^ The Good English and
Domestic Underwears are
avilable at Spencers
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED

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