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The Ubyssey Nov 19, 1954

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Vol 2?
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1954
5 CENTS
No. 23
Blues Wined, Dined,
Readied  For Game
COMMANDEERING several thousand Ubysseys, UBC
Engineers did a brisk business selling the news sheets.
Proceeds went to the Engineer-Nurse March of Dimes
drive Thursday. Female footballers, musicians-and strongmen contributed their efforts to the campaign.
—Photo by Denis Maze
FEMME   FATALES
Rain, Thefts, All
Part of Campaign
By JIM CARNEY
ft almost rained, the Nurses almost won the ball game,
the Coolsters almost stole the Engineers' tractor, and the Red-
sweater boys collected almost $380, as over 1000 students
witnessed the annual March of Dimes drive Thursday noon.
During a blitz in which noth-
Frat Head
Silent On
Inter Fraternity Council President Jack Hamilton has refused
ing was sacred, the Engineers
invaded classrooms and even
stooped to selling Ubysseys em-
bossed with the definitely in
poor taste slogans "Stamp Out
The Pub."
Twas truly a day of thrills,
chills,   grunts   and   groans,   attenuated theivings and all such
forms of dastardly goings on.
HOMEMAKERS   WIN
Mayhap the highpoint of the
Starting   Lineup
For  Saturday  Tilt
TORONTO
UBC
John Prendergast
C
Ron Stewart
Bob Waugh
LG
Bob Brady
Ray Mackie  •
RG
Gerry O'Flanagan
Bill Beamish
LT
Gordy Elliott
Alex Macklin
RT
Ernie Nyhaug
Don Smith
LE
Buz Hudson
Fred Smale
RE
Gary Taylor
Ted Lansky
FW
Stu Mathews
Harry Wilson
QB
Ted Duncan
Bob Pinkney
LH
John Newton
Steve Oneschuck ^
RH
Donn Spence
Phil Muhtz
FB
Jim Boulding
Andrew Mum On
McGugan Charge
Dean Oeoffrey C. Andrew Thursday labelled as "unsubstantiated" the charge laid by campus Labor-Progressive Party
leader Archie McGugan  that  the  University will  not hire
^Communist professors.
Dean    Andrew,    refusing   to
to comment on the recently form-! festivities was the Nurses-Home
ed committee to investigate "gen-|Ec   football   game,   which   saw
A ,,   .     .    .      i the brutal belles of the  Home-
tlemens agreements    in frater-, ^^  facuUy gtamp U)e
"'ties. , pan \>unch  into   the soggy  turf i
The   committee   was   formed  by a 2-0 count. j
by IFC, November 4 alter the' One cannot really appreciate
resignation of Lambda Chi Al- the finer points of the game
pha fraternity from the council, j until one espies these hefty
Lambda Chi subsequently re- j wenches gamboling on the green-
turned to IFC. sward.
, "Engineer   for   a   day"   was
Hamilton refused to name the  clarence Barker   who offidally
committee chairman, its number
launched the gridiron match with
of members, or its activities.    , a swirlg of his mignty toe Clar.
He said it was a subordinate \ ence also collected $12.28.
committee of IFC and is merely
expected to release its findings
at  the  investigation's end.
Hamilton would give no indication of when the report will
be made.
In a statement on the committee's formation Hamilton had revealed it was composed of members from Delta Upsilon, Lambda Chi Alpha and Sigma Chi.
The committee's purpose is to
RED HOT  MAMAS
Adding immeasurably to the
success of the drive was the
Lady Godiva Band who rented
and asundered the air with such
old standards as "The I Can't
Get Over You, So Get Up And
Answer The Phone Blues," and
"Give Me Back My Boots And
Saddle" the favorite ditty oi
their namesake.
A souped up cardboard box
with bicycle wheels and a John
"investigate and explore all teas- MacDonald - Murray McKenzie
ible methods of carrying the dis- j drive took the honors in the
crimination fight beyond the con-1 chariot race. It was piloted by
stitutional level." I Bill Emigh.
Armour's   Integrity
Upheld By Acadians
Play
Aid   Brock
Acadia Camp Council Monday reaffirmed the "honesty
and integrity" of Mr. P. Armour, Acadia camp porter recently   retired  from his  duties   by   the   University   personnel
— - —      ■  - • office.
■k | f-^l ^»       |     "Mr, Armour was retired for
I^OOn   >   ISy    I O    disregarding, on more than one
I occasion,   written   orders   issued
by   thc   Mousing   Administraton
i concerning   the  employment   of
part   time   janitorial   staff.
Players Club will present "The.     ..Wt,  wou,d   ,ike tf)  wisn   Mr
Critic" as a benefit show Friday   Annum- tho best of luck  in his
noon   in   the   Auditorium   with   new   job,"   Council   said. !
all proceeds going to the Brock       Acac1iil    president   Bob   Pugh:
         _ , said   Armour   had   been  retired j
Rooting   Fund. ...,-, i  ^n-      ,-        i !
by the  Personnel Oil ice- tor al-'
The   play   is   expected   to   be   u,d^,d   im.ffil.u,lu.y   and   incom. j
jusl   as  successful   as   il   was   in prtcnec  November .'{.                       i
the    original    presentation    and Acadia  council set   up  '•> com-
every   student   has   a   chance   to iniltee   to   investigate   the   "dis-
laugh ii couple of shingles right missal,"   and   circulated   a   poli-
outo   the   Brock   roof. tion charging t lie action had done
Admission price is 2D cents. an "injustice" lo Armour.
Quintet
Goofs At
Concert
By EZRA WHEATCROPT
One could almost say the Ray
Lowden Quntet goofed, With the
exception of Chuck Knott's
swinging bass, Al McMillan's
brilliant piano, and occasional
flashes of Ray's vibes, It wasn't
much of a show.
Chuck and Al were about all
that, made sitting in the auditorium better than standing out
in the rain  Wednesday noon.
Jazz Society seems to be the
victim of a gradually worsening attitude on the behalf of the
"downtown" musicians. Time
was when a person could go to
a Jazz Soc sponsored concert
and expect to hear at least a
rehearsed group.
UNION SHOP
Jazz Soc is forced to hire
union musicians, at union wages,
which amount to over seven
dolars per man for one hour's
playing.
It is, perhaps, impossible to
expect a rehearsed group when
two or three days before a
concert no one knows who is
playing. When the line-up Ls finally released it varies extremely
with   what   actually   appears.
Chuck Knott, who has played
with the finest symphony orchestras in Canada, including Sir
Ernest McMillan's, swung the
group terrifically when it was
at all possible.
1  MAN BAND
Al McMillan, one of the newer faces to appear in Vancouver's
upper circle of jazz musicians,
was a concert by himself as
playing some of the finest piano
heajd in this city.
It is too bad when these
musicians, several of whom rate
with the greatest jazz men in
Canada have nothing better to
do at noon hour than come out
to UBC and take the student's
money for what hardly rates
as a  good  jam  session.
Sommers To Talk
On Forestry Kere
The Hon. R. E. Sommers, B.C.
Land Minister, will speak on
campus Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
Ho will be sponsored by thc
Vancouver Institute. The meeting, open to the public, will be
held in Physics 200. "Forestry
in B.C." will bo hLs subject.
reply to McGugan's allegations,
said he had 'no desire to comment on unsubstantiated
charges."
While McGugan, in a counter
reply, asked for an official statement of the University's employment policy in regard to
Communlsits.
McGugan said "If the University does not discriminate
against Communists it could easily be cleared up by a statement
from Dean Andrew."
Dean Andrew* said the Association of University Professors,
an organization cited by McGugan as officially discriminating against Communists, to his
knowledge did not exist.
In reply to this McGugan said
"I might have the name wrong,
or it may not be a formal organization."
"But," he continued, "such a
policy was announced at a gathering of Canadian University
presidents two or three years
ago.
Dean Andrew gave as his reason for declining comment that
he had "no desire to give the
LPP publicity on unsubstantiated charges."
Toronto Squad On
Social Merrygoround
By Stanley Beck
University of Toronto Blues, 25 strong, disembarked from
a TCA North Star at 9:15 Thursday night ready to defend
the theory that football is played only in the East.
The Blues, heralded as the finest team to venture out of
Hogtown in 20 years, were greeted by Mayor Fred Hume,
the UBC band, UBC Pep Chlb, and a student delegation. After
a car-chain parade through downtown Vancouver they were
whisked out to the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house where
they will be billeted during their three-day stay.
Tonight they will be the guests* of the University and the
Toronto Alumni Association at a banquet on the campus.
From the banquet they will go to the combined UBC-St. Martins basketball game and Pep Rally al War Memorial Gym
Where they will be introduced to the crowd.
The piues will be one of the toughest teams a Thunderbird squad has ever had to face.
By playing UBC, Toronto hasf
everything to lose and nothing to
Songwriters Needed
Miss Mary MacKenzie of the
CBC is looking for a calypso
song describing UBC life
for a broadcast Sunday when
West Indian students will send
Christmas greetings to friends
and relatives at home.
*ain. On November 27 they must
play the winner of this Saturdays Queens - Western Ontario
semi-final for 'the Yates Cup,
symbolic of Canadian university
football supremacy. If they
should lose to UBC and then win
the Yat<»s Cup UBC could justifiably lay claim to the Canadian
college crown.
WE DISAGREE
And although 5500 UBC students and 25 football players may
not agree there is every reason
to believe the Blues can more
than handle Birds.
Toronto coach Bob Masterson
and halfback Steven Oneschuck
are enough to support that belief alone.
Masterson, who has played
football with the University of
Miami, Washington Redskins,
New York Yankees and New
York Giants, is one of the finest
coaches, college or professional,
in Canada.
Oneschuck is without dispute
the finest college football player
in Canada. Last year he was the
number one draft choice of the
Big Four professional clubs.
EVERYTHING  TO  GAIN
On the other hand Thunderbirds have everything to gain
and nothing to lose and they'
don't mind a bit being considered the underdogs. Coach Coryell
feels that the team will prove
itself when and where it counts
— Saturday afternoon in UBC
Stadium.
With fullback Jim Boulding
and guard Gerry O'Flanagan
back in harness the Birds are in
better shape then they have
been all season. The team is up
for the game and if drive and
determination count then UBC
will emerge a winner.
'tween dosses
Frosh Dance
Moved To Gym
SATURDAY'S      FROSH
Dance will be held in the Women's Gym. Because of a COTC
function the location was moved
from the Armory. Tickets are
$2 a couple. They may be bought
for $1 at the East-West football
game. It will not be cabaret
style. Staring time is 9 p.m.
*F *r *r
UNITED    NATIONS    CLUB
presents Dr. Frederic H, Soward,
head of the Department of International Studies, speaking on
the question "What Comes Alter
E.D.C." today at noon in Arts
100. This is the last meeting of
this term.
eje ef» eft
VARSITY  CHRISTIAN  FEL-
lowship will hold an International Student's Supper followed by
a speaker and a discusion Friday, 6 p.m. at 4745 W. 6th Ave.
All International Students are
welcome.
*r *P *r
INTERNATIONAL      HOUSE
Association presents Alfonso
Renteria who will show slides
from Mexico on Friday at 8
p.m. in the Club Hut.
*r *r Tr
EL  CIRCULO LATINO  AM-
ericano is holding another Fiesta
at the Italian Hall, 140 E. Hast-
ins, Friday at 8:30 p.m. Dress
is in "Picasso Designs."
*r T *r
CAMERA CLUB will hold a
General Meeting on Friday, noon
in Arts 204 to discuss enlarging
paper.
(Continued on Page 3)
See CLASSES
Students   Petition    Administration
To   Initiate   New   B.Sc.   Degree
A   university    administration!
sub-committee met Thursday at-1
ternoon   to  consider   a   student j
petition asking that the Univer- j
sity award Bachelor of Science
degrees   to  students  graduating
from   the   Faculty  of   Arts  and
Science in pure science, courses.
The petition, signed by 197
students, was pft-sented to Dr.
D. C. B. Duff, professor of bacteriology and chairman of the
Arts and Science Joint Inter-
faculty committee on Bachelor
of Science degrees early Thursday.
REPORT   COMING
The committee is expected to
make a report to the December
meeting of the Faculty  of Arts
and Science. Final decision rests
; with   the   University   Senate.
The studeni petition read in
full:
i "We the undersigned feel that
a Bachelor of Science degree
s'hould be offered at the University ot B.C. for those students
majoring and honoring in
science. Some of  the arguments
in favor of offering a Bachelor \
of Science degree are: j
ARGUMENTS STATED I
"1. It is incongrous that the'
Faculty of Arts and Science!
offers only Bachelor of Arts:
degrees.
2. Most Canadian universities
grant the degree of Bachelor of
Science.
3. The purpose of a degree
is to indicate the graduate's field
of   specialization.
4. Just    as    those    employers
hiring persons who have specialized in the humanities expect a
Bachelor of Arts degree, so employers hiring technically trained persons expect a Bachelor
of Science degree.
Therefore we submit that the
following degrees be awarded
by the Faculty of Arts and
Science at the next congregation: Bachelor of Arts (honors),
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Science (honors), Bachelor of
Science."
HAINES REPLIES TO CRITICS;
DIRECTORY A SURE THING'
Vehemently denying accusations that his Handbook
will "boob" editor Rae Haines is confident ot a large sale.
"The book may be late," he said Thursday—'"but it
will still be a campus best-seller.
The Student Directory will be on sale by Tuesday, he
said.
Names, numbers and other necessary campus information are promised by the book
Cost is lif> cents. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, November 19, 1954
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Matl subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published in Vancouver throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
tile University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 12S0
or Alma 1231.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Ray Logie News Editor——Pal Camay
CUP Editor—Pete Paterson Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Associate Editor—Stan Book       Executive Editor—Geoff Conway
SENIOR EDITOR—ROD SMITH
Desk and Reporters: Monte McKay, Jim Carney. Marie Ste-
£hens, Jackie Seale, Pat Russell, Nancy Seed, Dick Leiterman,
•olores Banerd.
Sports: Neil McDonald, Peter Worthington, Maurice Gibbons.
Redundant Pools
The idea of two pools sitting side by side on this campus is completely ridiculous and actually stupid.
The swimming pool committee has taken elaborate pains
to show that it will be cheaper to build a small roofed pool
and maintain an unroofed BEG pool than to put a roof
on the BEG pool.
We would like to ask the committee a few questions.
Why doesn't the committee admit that their plans for
roofing the present pool include an elaborate and unnecessarily-expensive sliding glass roof which could be moved
back and forth to allow access to the 10-metre diving tower?
Doesn't the committee remember that a California firm
was allowed to build the pool (because their bid was lowest
and in spite of the fact their their type of construction was
more liable to damage by frost) on condition that a roof would
be put on the pool, thus removing the 'danger of the pool
cracking when cold', weather set in?
Why doesn't the committee admit that there is already
a crack in the pool, a crack which allowed hundreds of gallons to seep away daily even during the BEG?
Why doesn't the committee admit that a roof on the
present pool does not have to go over the attractive but' unnecessary diving tower—built to conform to BEG specifications but useless to ordinary swimmers? Only two men
in Canada had the ability to dive competitively off this
tower in the Canadian BEG trials.
We would also like to ask the commitee if they think
championship swimmers can be trained in their planned 25-
yard pool. A look at Crystal Pool should supply the answer.
And does the commitee forget the row which was raised
downtown when the pool was given to UBC? What does
ihe committee think the reaction of Percy Norman and
friends will be when we express our intention to build yet
another pool and go back on our moral obligation to roof
Ihe BEG pool?
We would like' an answer to some of these questions.
Soon, Please
Premier Bennett has defended the big stock deal between Alaska Pine and Cellulose and Rayonier Inc. of New
York, with the flat assertion: "Under the management license
plan it is impossible that foreign factories will be fed by B.C.
raw materials. No one informed on the legislation and the
management license plan can infer otherwise.
"Our products will go through our own improved plants
and ottr government will keep a watchful eye on our interest."
He also said: "The present government's management
licertse policy is resulting in the establishment in B.C. of more
manufacturing plants than ever before in the history of B.C."
Premier Bennett contends that no unprocessed logs may
be exported under a forest mangement license, hence protecting the 750,000 acres of timberland to be licensed to
Alaska Pine.
In other words, the Premier would have us believe that
Rayonier has bought controlling interest in Alaska Pine only
to share in whatever profits may be made within B.C. The
New York firm was not after B.C. raw materials for its
U.S. plants.
B.C. would have the benefit of Rayonier's enormous research facilities and international trading experience, but
at the same time would retain its raw timber to provide a
base for a manufacturing industry of its own.
If this is in fact the situation, Premier Bennett and his
associates are almost unassailable—apart from those to whom
American capital will always be a psychological anathema.
Nevertheless, the premier's assertion that legislation and
the management license plan prevent "unprocessed" timber
from going to the U.S. has been challenged; it is claimed that
present regulations are impotent in the case of joint stock
companies. Of course, the premier's reference to a "watchful eye" could be taken to mean that the Provincial Government will arbitrarily confiscate a license if the ruling is
ignored by joint stock companies.
Beyond these questions, however, is another consideration: monopolies. The Rayonier firm has been linked to
Crown Zellerbach Corporation, an industrial mammoth which
already has considerable holdings in B.C. If the Crown Zellerbach firm controls Rayonier as alleged, B.C.'s forest industry would be in an all-powerful American grip.
The press and opposition political leaders have unanimously called for another Royal Commission into B.C.'s
forest industry, something recommended "within 10 years"—
nine years ago—by Chief Justice Gordon Sloan in a Royal
Commission report. This is a proposal which is absolutely
necessary in the light of the recent conflict and confusion.
Meanwhile, the government's present plans should probably be allowed to proceed, considering that Premier Bennett's arguments—viewed in their best light—have effectively quashed most argument.
But the Royal Commission soon, please.
President Gives
Report To Public
Over CBC Radio
Editor's note: Th* following1 i« *H* ttxt of President
MacKtnsU's annual report to
th* provinc*. broadcast ov*r
CBC Tu*sday *T*ning.
We   regret  limitation,  of
space present us from print-,
ing th* complete report.
.. . The Chancellor, Brigadier
Sherwood Lett, has gone off as
Head of the Canadian mission
to Indo-China ... I mention this
not only because of our affection and admiration for our
Chancellor, but because 11
marks in another new and significant way how much we are
a part of the world we live in
and how important the Pacific
and Asia have become to us.
. . . For many years, v/e at
the University of British Columbia have talked about the
organization of formal courses
in Far Eastern Studies, and
have frequently stated that we
are the logical place in Canada
at which work of this kind
should be organized. To date,
because of limited finances, we
have done very little about this,
but I hope and expect that within the next year or two this
most important dream can become a reality.
BROCK REBUILDING
Two weeks ago, the student
centre, the Brock Memorial
Building, burned down . . . the
student body with their usual
energy and initiative have organized a campaign and already
the Brock is being rebuilt.
The loss of this building by
fire naturally gives us special
concern and emphasized anew
the urgent necessity of getting
on with our building program.
We are still using 304 old army
huts—151 of these for academic
purposes, that is as classrooms,
laboratories, offices   and   the
like; the balance, 193, as living
accommodation for young men
and women.   These   buildings
are highly inflammable. Many
of them house expensive equipment   and* collections   which
could not be replaced. In addition to this, our student enrollment is increasing rapidly, and
by 1964, will be well over the
10,000  mark.  Our enrollment
this year  is 5,873—about 440
higher than a year ago, and we
know   from   the    numbers    of
children and young people in
our schools that each year the
number of University students
will increase  by  from  400  to
700.
BUILDINGS NEEDED
In addition to new buildings,
we need revenue for operating
purposes ... If we are to persuade the best and ablest of our
young men and women to come
back to the universities, rather
than go off to attractive positions in industry, business and
government, we will have to
give them the recognition that
is due them and pay them proportionately.
. . . Last May, at our Spring
Congregation, the first class to
enroll in our new Medical Faculty received their degrees . , .
The organization of a new Medical Faculty is a difficult and
expensive undertaking, and
mucli remains to be done tb
complete the program, particularly in respect of the buildings and other facilities needed.
We were delighted, therefore,
to learn a few days ago that
the Government is making
available some of the money,
which was authorized by the
Legislature some two or three
years^ago, for the construction
of a building for the Medical
Faculty on the grounds of the
Vancouver General Hospital,
and we are very grateful to
them for this action . . .
BEG GAMES
The British Empire and
Commonwealth Games, which
were held last summer, were a
great event in the history of
this city and this University.
. . . Incidentally, one of < the
most thrilling events for those
of us who belong to the University of British Columbia was
the performance of the UBC
oarsmen. The fact that they
were able to win, and win,in
the way that they did, is a
great achievement and a great
credit to their coach, Frank
Read, and to every member of
tho crew.
FOR  SALE
1 OFFICERS SERGE UNI-
form, average size, 2 pr pants
$55; Sam Brown belt $13; 1
pr. 0V4 brown boots $15; Retina IIA camera 2.9 lens $110.
Phone Pete Worthington, Acadia, AL. 0079.
DOUBLE BREASTED TUX-
edo for sale, about size 38-40.
YO. 2558.
riLMSOC
,~L-A fori Stuocnts Ano Staff Onlv/
NEXT TUES.
3:45, 8:00, 8:15
MICKEY ROONEY
in
"HUCKMIERRY
FINN"
.,. Especially   for
English Students
AUDITORIUM 35c
WANTED
RIDE WANTED, VICINITY OF
18th and Cambie for 8:10 lectures and return. Phone Jack,
EM. 8922.
* w      >:<
A BLACK WALLET IN THE
Arts building or library finder
please phone Theresa James.
KE. 8157 Y.
# #      >!•
COACHING
MATHS 101, reasonable. Phone
AL. 0208 Y;
LOST
A    LIGHT    BROWN    BRIEF
case. Reward. Phone John Mc-
Goran, AL. 1561.
A    DARK    BROWN    LOOSE-
leaf,   contact   Diana   Lam   or
phone  KE.  5031.
I
SERVICE
I      Shirts • Cleaning - Shot.
1 DAY
P OIL ESS.
Practical economics
at "MY BANK",
where students' accounts are
welcome. You can open an
account for as little as a
dollar.
MM-
mttma,
Your Bank on the Campus...
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY
Manager
Campus capers coll for Coke
Hew long can Jack be nimble?
Square dancing's rugged ...
better tune up now and then
with refreshing Coca-Cola.
PKIKK
7*
federal toMrn
1
■'; GwfoGi
"Ceke"H e reehteree1 Ireee-merk
CH
COCA-COLA LTD.
Lets go...with
P4IA.M
lEAD in storage batteries gives
your engine rugged reliable starting power—lead in
ethyl gasoline provides smoother, more powerful engine operation.
Each year 160,000 tons of lead are mined,
smelted and refined by Cominco from
Canadian ores—lead,—the metal that
makes motoring better.
IHf  CONSOUDATFD MINING  AND ^\_
JMUlINi (QMHWt 01 (ANABA UMIttO   \. S' Friday, November If), 1954
THE UBYSSEY
Pige Tii
ree
Politicos
Emulate
Pubsters
Two 'campus political clubs
are issuing mimeographed "newspapers."
The Liberal and Conservative
clubs both have circulars which
are being distributed by mail
and at public meetings.
Student Council has ratified
the production oi the "rags."
"The Campus Liberal" is a
four-page, stapled bulletin dealing in the main with the Liberals'   campus   activities.
Notification of campus meetings and statement of policy
forms the main content.
"The Phoenix," published by
UBC tories, is a single page
flier. Its first issue publicized
a campus public meeting and
offers a history of the Canadian
Progressive Conservative Party.
The bulletins are to be published monthly.
The "Campus Liberal" is edited by Alvin Gilcrest. Peter Henslowe  handles  "The  Phoenix."
Recruiting at
'Normal Level
Recruiting for the Officer's
Training Corps has run about
the same as last year.
The RCAF has reached their
quota in all branches except the
ground technical, medical, and
chaplain divisions: Recruiting in
these branhces will close on
January   31.
The navy has almost filled its
quota and will close recruiting
this Friday, November 18.
The Army is open for recruiting in almost all branches of
their services. Closing date for
Army recruiting will be mid
January.
Sale   In
College Shop
Like Phoenix from the ashes,
wonderful things have risen
from the Brock's debris.
UBC students with bargain
hunting gleams in their eyes
can be seen coming from all
points of the compass, and they
are heading for just one place—
the  College  Shop.
Twenty years hence, you may
point with pride to some of
these valuable articles, such as
V-neck and cardigan sweaters,
T-shirts, and sweat-pants and tell
your great-grandchildren of the
night the Brock went up in
flames.
The College Shop will welcome everyone with open arms
from 11:30 to 1:30 so don't delay
—today is the last big day.
Send   your
voice lor
Xmas.   Talk
for  3   min.
(75c).   Phone
TA. 3944  for
appointment
FRANCES MURPHY
DANCE SCHOOL
BAyview 3425
Private Instruction
Rhumba - Tango - Samba
Fox Trot - Waltz. Jive
Old Time
Beginners - Brush Up
Advanced Courses
If no answer CEdar 6878
Alma Hall, 3879 W. Broadway
I
ft*
DICK UNDERHILL
Vast Sums
Staked on
Football
As a grand gesture of confidence in thc University of Toronto'football team" Dick A<ngus,
President of the Students Administration Council at the U.
of T., has wagered one whole
dollar on the outcome of the
East-West  game  this  Saturday.
Angus has challenged AMS
President' Dick Underhill' to
match the wager with an equally
vast sum.
Angus stipulated "regardless
of the final tally of the 'gladiators,' the total sum of the two
Canadian dollars be turned over
to your 'Rebuild the Brock' fund
accompanied by the goodwill
and good wishes of the student
body of the University of Toronto.'' .
"I'll bet my buck on UBC,"
said Underhill when he received
the challenge.
Editor of the Ubyssey, Peter
Sypnowi .-. has been named
stakeholder until the outcome
of Saturday's East-West football
game is known.
CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
HIGH     SCHOOL     CONFER-
once   Committee   will   hold   an
important  meeting Friday noon
in   the   Board   Room.
ff*       *v       *v
CHINESE    VARSITY    CLUB
will   hold   a   General   Meeting
noon Friday in Hut L2.
*      *      >f>
LIBERAL CLUB will sponsor Colonel Fairney, Mi1, speaking on "Canada's Growth as an
Industrial Nation" noon Tuesday   in  Arts   100.
ff* fft ff*
GIRL'S* SKI TEAM meets today at 4:30 in the Women's
Gym. Ski movies will be shown.
fft ff. ff,
STUDENT     CHRISTIAN
Movement will sponsor a Fireside on "World Studwit Christ-
ion Federation" on Sunday, Nov.
19 at 3:20 p.m. at 2741 Fraser
St. (just below 12th). Speaker
will be W. J. Rose.
*r *r *P
USC meeting at noon on Monday, Nov. 22 in the Board Room.
All undergraduate societies are
urged to attend.
ff*        *V        *r*
INDIA STUDENTS ASSOCIA-
tion meets today noon in Arts
206 to discuss public relations
for the coming visit of Dr. Pan-
dia.
ff,      if.      ff,
WOMEN'S RESIDENCE fall
informal dance, "Corral Capers,"
will be held in the Women's
Gym, Saturday, Nov. 27, 8:30
to 12:00. Former residents can
obtain tickets, $1.00 per couple,
from Muriel Sharp, Isabel Mac-
Innes Hall.
CAMPBELL
CLEANERS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2480
Discount for Studenia
AUSTIN SALES AND SERVICE CENTRE
TENTH and ALMA ST.      CEdar «!0S
Full-fashioned Kitten sweaters in
cashmere-soft Lambswool.., 100% Super
#
ii
m
Orion. Hand-finished, shrink-proof and
moth-proof... byGLENAyR
s.s. pullover *6-95
l.s. pullover $7'5
cardigan       ^q°j
At good shops everywhere Csr
COMING . . . Friday, November 26
the
MY DOG HAS FLEAS REVUE
*   i     i
E ATO NS
THE
EXCITING GIFT
of a
Christmas Blouse
r
. . . a sparkling . .>. enchanting
blouse designed with deliberate
flattery in California. Imported
by Eaton's NOW (and selling like
mad), a dazzling collection of
woven boucle and lace. Festive
toppings for holiday whirls.
Sizes 32 to 38.
A. Bolero blouse strictly a shrug. Rhinestones
on white. 19.95
B. Pink paler than strawberry ice cream, with
shiny, tiny beads.   Pullover. 16.95
C. Pltin«i"K pullover iu periwinkle blue. Iced
with glitter and simulated pearls.    16.95
Eaton's Sportswear—Second Floor
Telephone  Orders—MArine  7112,  West   1600
v/' Also al Eaton's
New Westminster — N\V 4811 Page Four
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, November 19, 1954
TOUGHER OPPOSITION than
these members of the Home
Sc football team, 1054 winners of the Petticoat Conference,   will   be   facing   Roger
Kronquist, Thunderbird quarterback tomorrow. Jolly Roger
will be pitching against the
Varsity Blues, one of the East's
top three. Game time 2 p.m
Students are asked to eliminate congestion by entering by
the East gate.
—MAZE PHOTO
Birds
Face
N-Hour
At 2 p.m.
By KEN LAMB
H-hour for the UBC Thunderbirds will be 21 p.m. tomorrow afternoon.
In case you haven't heard,
that's when the Birds take on
the vaunted Toronto Varsity
Blues, coached by Bob Master-
son and led by Steve Oneschuck, the finest all-round
player' in Eastern ball, be it
college or professional.
BY THE RECORD
By season record, by the loss
Of McGill, by the lack of depth
that has plagued them all season,
the Birds will go into the game
as underdogs.
Despite the pessimism which
has been expressed by many, including most of the football conscious on the campus, coach Don
Coryell has promised surprises
for the ticket purchasers.
He is predicting a win for his
club.
And he is. not talking just to
hear himself heard. It could be
the Birds are capable of dumping the powerful Blue boys.
OLD RELIABLES
Don has promised no new
plays for the game and will rely
on his season's patterns. To a
certain extent, just how well
the Evergreen Conference compares to the Eastern Intercollegiate depends on the success of
those patterns.
For general strategy Don has
called for a running game and
will be placing the accent on
passing only if the ground attack is bogged down.
CONDITIONS GOOD
The field conditions, despite
the heavy rain, are expected to
be fairly good, as UBC has one
of the best drained gridirons in
the Northwest.
To bolster his team Don has
acquired Gerry O'Flanagan.
courtesy of the eligibility committee, and will be .using the
hard driving player at offensive
guard.
Tan Brown, Al Hammer, John
Boone, and Derek Vallis have
been brought up from the Jayvees and will be performing for
the defensive squad.
One of the elements that could
hurt the Birds' chances was the
short notice on which the game
date was changed. Don had given
his boys a week off, expecting
to have two weeks left for practising.
Sports Editor—KEN LAMB
A STALWART of Home Ec, 1-0 conquerors of a hard fighting Nurses team, rips off a gain for the Roger Kronquist
and Jim Boulding coached team. The gain was one which
helped the home wreckers in their down field march that
was stopped short on the bedpan brigade's one-yard line.
—Maze Photo
Varsity   Meets   Legion
In   Relegation   Match
Varsity takes on third division
Grandview Legion in the fourth
round of the Richardson Cup at
Templeton Park, at 2 p.m., this
Sunday, November 21, while
Chiefs meet South Main Athletics al King Edward Park.
Coach Ed Luckett hopes to
bring out a few now players
over the weekend in a hope to
get more scoring punch into the
lineup. Varsity sporting six
goals scored for six games are
the scoreless wonders of the
league.
The Varsity defense has been
the only thing that has appeared
like   "B"   division   soccer.   With
the best goal-keeper in the league between the posts in Ernie
Kuyt. Varsity is sprouting an
eight goals against record. That
beats big Jim Kinna's record
of nine against and Kinna has
league leading Pilscners out in
front of him.
j Bud Frederickson who played
I in the benefit game on Novem-
; ber 11 will be back in the lineup
! for Varsity.
The big game against Sapperton, that was to have been play-
i ed in the Stadium, has been
postponed indefinitely, because
of the big East-West duel which
goes on November 20.
Featuring a Popular-Priced
MENU FOR STUDENTS
(jot4on\i /ZeJtautaht
(Formerly Ben's Cafe)
4565 W. 10th Avenue
Next to Safeway
Enquire about our Meal Ticket Plan
BirdsMeet
St.Martins
HereTwice
"While the big boys are away,
the younger one get a chance to
play'' will be the theme for
sen ial Jack Pomfret's Thunderbirds this weekend when they
meet St. Martin's Rangers, a
club from Olympia, Washington,
in a two game exhibition series.
These "younger boys," namely
the half dozen roo'ies currently holding down positions, will
be trying to show, in the absence of three of their football
olaylng teammates that they can
stick fcwith the Birds.
PRO TEM
The footballers pro tern are
Gary Taylor, Buz Hudson and
Ernie Nyhaug, who will be
mighty men for the Birds against
Toronto Blues Saturday afternoon.
When these
come back to
body   has  got
gridiron greats
the fold, some-
to  go.   Part  of
Jack's decision as to who those
somebodies will be will be made
by the showing of these "young-
ers.
A prelim game will be played both Friday and Saturday
night at 6>4S. Feature game
8i30. There will be a special
student price of 25 cents.
SHIRTS
■ wC  UmntHtea
<HMi el«anln« w  Hom
•hlrti only IM
'«I»Ji!JIJIMji
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
FROM S10.00
T-SQUARES. PROTRACTORS
SET SQUARES
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POIYPHASE SLIDE RULES
ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and
Index
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS fc PRINTERS
550 Seymour St., Vancouver
PROTECT
WHILE YOU
SAVE
9et ample protection, ot lew met
your local Mutual Ufa et Caaaaa
r4
UTUALI1FE
Ol CANADA
< it tr  / /A/*
Vancouver Branch Office: 402 West Pender Street.
Eric V. Chown. LL.B., C.L.U., Branch Manager.
Vancouver - Interior B.C. • Yukon Branch Office:
Stock Exchange Building, 457 Howe Street,
H. C. Webber, C.L.U.. Branch Manager.
New Westminster - Fraser Valley Branch Office: Zeller Building,
604 Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Fred B. G'froerer, Branch Manager.
Victoria Branch Office: 201 Scollard Building,
Robt. M. Moore, C.L.U.. Branch Manager.
Nelson Branch Office • 450 Baker Street,
W. L. Hall. C.L.U.. Branch Manager.
For a
Light Smoke
and a
Pleasing Taste

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