UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Dec 11, 1919

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0123795.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123795.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0123795-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0123795-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123795-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0123795-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0123795-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0123795-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0123795-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0123795.ris

Full Text

 Issued Weekly  by  the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, DECEMBER 11, 1919
Number 10
Musical Society
Gives Recital
CHRISTMAS   CONCERT   ENJOYED
BY  SMALL, BUT ENTHUSIASTIC AUDIENCE
The only disappointing feature of the
Musical Society's Christmas recital on
Friday evening was this, that the end
came too soon after the beginning.
Apart from this defect, the uncaptious
critic found nothing but enjoyment, and
the hearty applause of the audience implied that this feeling was general. The
programme was an evenly-balance combination of orchestral selections and instrumental solos, with the old-fashioned
songs, "forever new," in which every audience delights. All the solos won well-
merited encores, as did the appealing
melody of "Kentucky Babe," rendered
by the Glee Club chorus. Other delightful vocal selections included those of
Miss A. Healy, "Vale" and "The Blackbird"; Mr. W. H. Coates, "Songs of
Araby" and "Annie Laurie"; and Miss
K. Grant, "She Is Far from the Land"
and "Do You Wonder Where the Fairies
Are." The chorus also sang "They All
Love Jack" and "The Song of the Vikings" in a spirited manner.
A novel feature, which brought down
the house, was the male double-quartette, which delighted its audience with
the tragedy of "The Teacher and the
Tack," followed by "The Bullfrog."
Considering the small number of times
that these men have been able to practise their combination, they evinced a
remarkable command of the intricacies
of part-singing.
The instrumental solos were also
worthy of high praise. Mr. V. Fink
rendered "Cavatina" as a delightful violin solo; Miss L. Coates played "Andante" and "Murmure du Vent"; and
Mr. Mahrer gave a beautiful 'cello solo
of "The Swan." The work of the orchestra was of exceptional merit, the
preponderance of violins giving the
music an elusive charm. The selections
presented were "Alita" (Losey), "Bluebird" (Kummer), "Salut d'Amour"
(Elgar), and "La Rose."
In short, Mr. Russell was altogether
over-modest when he explained that this
concert was merely in the nature of a
test of the material for the Spring concert. As a matter of fact, the performers comported themselves like veterans.
Mr. Russell's conducting is a model of
that art, being efficient, but in no way
ostentatious. The highly commendable
manner in which Mr. Keith Shaw filled
the role of "corner man" is also deserving of special mention.
'Varsity Ties
With Mounties
ON   SNOW-COVERED   FIELD  THE
SOCCER TEAMS  BATTLE
TO DRAW
One of the finest exhibitions of soccer
that has recently been staged was witnessed on Wednesday afternoon, when
the University met the R.N.W.M.P. on
Bridge Street grounds. Moreover, the
'Varsity had much the better of the argument, although the score was two all.
The ball was in the Mounties' territory
for the larger portion of the game, and
but for the wonderful work in goal of
the police goalie the score would have
been decisively in favor of. the Blue and
Gold. As their opponents were among
the best teams in the city, the 'Varsity
soccerites are correspondingly elated.
The game itself was a really excellent
exhibition, despite the snow and ice
which coated the field to a depth of
three or four inches. In the first half
there was no score whatever, but the
'Varsity was having most of the play.
With the start of the second period the
Blue and Gold immediately got to work
and repeatedly bombarded the Red goal.
Time after time the ball went in, only
to be stopped by the goalie or to hit the
posts or crossbar. At length, however,
after a fierce scramble, Denham slipped
the ball over the line. Ten minutes from
the end of the game the Police forwards
ran the ball down the field and scored
on an open goal. There was a good deal
of discussion concerning this score, as
the 'Varsity defense claimed that the
ball had rolled over the dead line before
it was crossed to the centre for the
score. The goal was allowed. About
three minutes later the Mounties took
the lead, and the ice-sheathed ball slid
through the goalkeeper's hands for a
second score. With a very few minutes
to go, the 'Varsity faced a hard task, but
by a nice piece of foot-work by Baker
and a splendid shot from Denham, the
score was tied, with only half a minute
to go. The whistle found the ball in
mid-field.
For the 'Varsity, Cameron on the
right wing and Wolverton at right fullback were the stars of the game. Hall
and Williams of the Police were as conspicuous as anyone on the field.
The team to represent the 'Varsity in
Victoria has now been selected, and the
following men will represent the Blue
and Gold at that time:
Keenleyside
Wolverton        Swencisky
Rushbury Mitchell Mark
Cameron   Denham   Foley   Jackson    Stewart
Arts Men Stage
A Gay Evening
ARRIVAL  OF   XYLOPHONE  ADDS
"PEP" TO THE HISTORIC
FUNCTION
For the first time in three years, in
the history of the Arts dance, precedent
was broken and tradition defied in the
transference of the place of festivity
from our own Auditorium to Lester
Court. But this fact did not in any way
hamper the enjoyment of the evening.
With all due reverence to our stately,
ancestral halls, we must confess we are
unable any longer to create an artistic
illusion therein, either by concealing the
somewhat faded green woodwork with
innumerable quantities of blue and gold
bunting, or by eliminating the ink-stains
upon the floor with a plentiful application of borax, with the vain hope of
forcing said floor to coincide more perfectly with the feet of the dancers. For
these reasons, therefore, the change was
welcomed.
Although complaints were voiced as
to the ungenerosity of the orchestra,
there were none as to the quality of the
music. Shortly after 11 o'clock, the
addition of a saxophone and a xylophone produced the required volume of
sound and jazz calculated to give impetus to the present foolish generation
in their efforts to trip the light fantastic.
Under the excellent organization of
Mr. Anders, the refreshments were
served with a degree of efficiency much
appreciated by students accustomed to
the limitations of the'U.B.C. kitchen.
NOTA BENE
All students going to Victoria will fill
in the following form, tear it off and
send it in to the Students' Council room
on Thursday:
I intend to take the	
boat to Victoria.
I  intend to return on	
Name	 THE   UBYSSEY
December 11, 1919
BOYS!
WE'VE      SOME      DANDY      Overcoats-1
and Raincoats,  specially designed
for  young  men;   snappy   models,   with
belt and waist seams.    Give them the
once-over:
$30, $35 to $50
CLASSY  NECKWEAR.    All  that  is
new will be  found here:  $1.00 to $4.50
Fancy   Silk   Hose.     Almost   any   color
you could  wish tor:   $1.75 to $2.00.
Your trade  is appreciated.
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820  GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
JteaJjintt - (Eraft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHI0N0RAFT
®Jj00. Joater $c (Ho.
2amttrl>
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
BOOK OF LAMENTATIONS
Chapter 51
1. And in those days it came to pass
that the teachers and preachers who
dwelt in the land were gathered together;
2. And he that ruled over them
arose, and spoke in a loud voice:
3. Hear ye, all ye professors that excel in learning, instructing the children
of the land,
4. For f say unto thee, that he who
hath in his heart that which causeth him
to suffer anguish, even let that man
speak.
5. Then arose a man weeping, and
with great lamentation answered him,
saying:
6. Behold, O King, a time approach-
eth when the youth whom we teach,
even the youth whom we love, shall depart  from  among us;
7. Verily, \ say unto you. he shall depart and contain himself in ways of
sloth, and for two changes of the moon
shall he  do  no  work.
8. Thereat doth thy servant sorrow,
with much lamentation, for the fear of
the evil ways the youth  shall learn.
9. Thereat the whole of the people
were sore afraid and wept without ceasing, even to the going down of the sun.
10. Then arose the man of cunning,
even lie of wise councils, and, addressing the people with soft words, spake
thus, uttering with his voice winged
words:
11. Behold now. if ye shall hearken
unto my sayings, I, even I, shall show
unto ye that way in which we shall cause
the youth to labor diligently, yea, even
though he be not always with us.
12. For we shall each say unto him.
Son of Abraham, while thou dost sojourn in the far country, thus shalt thou
do: Write for me on line waxen tablets,
yea, and inscribe it with exceeding
great care, all that thou thinkest concerning This or That—even as it shall
move ye to ask, thus let the youth do.
13. And cause the youth to inscribe
for thee 20 tablets for each man, and let
this number be in no wise reduced. Thus
shall the youth labor with great diligence, and at no time shall he fall prey
to the vain thoughts of this world.
Chapter 52
1. And lo! it came to pass as the
wise man had said. And the youth of
the land did much labor and toil, and
the candle did burn at both ends, even
while all others did rejoice and dance
with  great joy.
2. And behold, as the days waxed
old the youth did still write: but soon
came the time when his writing did
cause his head to be loosened, and he
did  jump  like   a   young  goat.
3. But still did he write: and when
the day of reckoning did come his writing, even the work of his hands, did he
give  to  the  teachers.
4. Then did the teachers who lived
in the land read that which tne youth
had written. But soon came the day of
reckoning, and the wrath of the Lord
descended on the teachers for that they
had caused the youth to jump like a
young  goat.
5. For as the teachers read quickly
that which the youth had written, behold their wits  did leave them and they
("Continued on Page 6)
.. the ..
Clarke <& Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing  Instruments  and   Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about to-morrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
of
11
The Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C. December 11, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
GIFTS!   GIFTS!!
Jl Box of
McDonald's Chocolates
Is Always Acceptable
THEY ARE   MADE  EVERY   DAY
MCDONALD'S CHOCOLATES
793 CRANVILLE STREET, near Robson
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods"
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE   STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
10% off to Returned Men
%. 3Ut <L ©o.
©^elusive furriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
DO YOU MENTION YOU SAW IT
IN THE "UBYSSEY"?
Give a Tountain Pen!
A BOY OR GIRL always appre-
preciate a good Fountain Pen.
We have Waterman's, Conklin's,
and "Birks" — a wide selection at
various  prices.     Call  early.
lyenrv Birks & Sons Ltd.
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
them published.
THE WINNING POINT SCORED IN
LAST MINUTE —FINAL
SCORE 30-29
On Saturday evening the U.B.C. senior
basketball team won another close contest, when they defeated the Y.M.C.A.
"B" team by a 30-29 score in the Normal
gymnasium. For closeness, this game
would be hard to beat. University finished the first half with the score 15-14
in their favor, and, though the "Y" tied
the count several times during the last
half, they could not forge ahead of the
blue and gold. With only one minute
to play, the score was even.' The "Y"
committed a foul, and the honor of winning the game fell to Art Lord, when he
dropped the ball in the basket from the
free-shot line. Art is finding it hard to
miss  these  shots  this  year.
Capt. "Sid" Anderson and George
Dixon were the leading point-getters for
'Varsity. Sid scored the majority of his
baskets in the first half, while George
scored all his points after the intermission.
Following is the U. B. C. lineup, with
the points scored: Guards, Lord (4) and
Gross (4); centre, Buchanan (2): forwards, Dixon  (8) and Anderson  (12).
U.B.C. VS. EX-BRITANNIAS
On Wednesday evening the 'Varsity
Intermediates defeated the ex-Britannia
basketball quintette in an exciting league
game in the B. II. S. gymnasium. The
'Varsity five worked well throughout.
Although the size of the gym. did not
permit much combination play, the forwards especially proved too fast for
their opponents. The score at half time
was 26-14. In the second half the play
was very fast and even, each team gaining 13 points. The final score was 39-
27. 'Varsity lined up as follows: Guards,
R. Hunter (4) and Peterson; centre, C.
Mathers (10); forwards, C. Ternan (13)
and  R. Anderson  (12).
DEAN  TUCKER  ADDRESSES
STUDENT BODY
On Friday noon, December 5th, the
student body was favored by an address
from Dean Tucker, a pioneer of Vancouver, who is at present visiting our
city as a leader in the Inter-Church Conference and the Forward Movement.
Unfortunately, the notice of his coming
was posted at a very late hour, which
undoubtedly accounted for the poor attendance.
Dean Tucker's story was exceedingly
interesting. He told of how, years ago,
he had first crossed the wild prairie*
and sought the Pacific slope; of how he
had been forced to return to Ontario for
six months and await the completion of
our first continental railroad: and of how
he finally reached Vancouver, then a
small town of barely two thousand
population, where he was appointed rector of the yet unbuilt Christ Church.
The struggle for existence was a bitter
one, and Dean Tucker thrilled his audience as he told how valiant hearts had
accomplished the impossible, and how,
finally, the church was constructed, and
a home for himself provided on the corner of Burrard and Georgia Streets.
Dean Tucker ended with a strong appeal for the students to engage in some
brand of social service.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special   Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
SprottShaw Stamp==Quality
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and   Second-Hand
Book  Shop
Specialists in University Books
THE   BATHER
Sun-kissed  and   hearing   the   calm   voice   of
the sea
I pause expectant, then with onward leap
I feel the strong arm of the pulsing deep
Close round me.    O I could  ever be
By the sea's harsh lips kissed everlastingly!
But dawn has come, and deeper than joy
of sleep
Is  the calm  of the  woods,  and  ambrosial
winds that leap
To kiss the brow and seaward flit away.
From  the  clear  mid-heaven  a  lonely   cloud
looks down
After a bath of sunlight, viewing the sea;
And   turning   kind   eyes   to   me,    speaks
calm and slow.
In answer:   "Men seek wealth and great renown,
Feeling no  thrill of boundless life  to be."
And he replies,   "From the dark deep to the
spacious heavens I go."
R.  F.   ADAM.
She Wanted Progress
"No, sah, Ah doan't neber ride on dem
tilings," said an old colored lady looking
in on the merry-go-round. "Why, de
other day I seen dat Rastus Johnson git
on an' ride as much as a dollah's worth
an' git off at the very same place he got
on at, an' I sez to him, 'Rastus,' I sez,
'y°' spent yo' money, but whar yo'
been?'"—Boston  Transcript. THE   UBYSSEY
December 11, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our slock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE  OUR   WINDOWS   for
New Models
309    to    3 J 5
Hastings Street W*
Exclusive Designs in
CHRISTMAS   GREETING   CARDS
(Business  and Personal)
CHRISTMAS PAPETERIES
GIFT   BOXES   OF   STATIONERY
LEATHER GOODS
IVORY  MANICURE  SETS
VOLLAND'S   CHILDREN'S   GIFT
BOOKS
FRAMED MOTTOES
HALLOWE'EN   SPECIALTIES
BIRTHDAY
AND   FRIENDSHIP   CARDS
WEDDINGS
AND   CONGRATULATIONS
BIRTH    ANNOUNCEMENTS
MEMORIAL  CARDS
Western Specialty Limited
Society Stationers
and Printers
572 Granville St.,   Vancouver
British Columbia
Issued every  Thursday by the  Publications   Board
of  the  University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
( Lillian Cowdell
Associate  Editors -j H.   L.   Keenleyside
[C. D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   H.   Imlah
Exchange  Editor . v T.   P.   Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager J.   N.   Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
.     . ( D.  A.  Wallace       D.  Mclntyre
Assistants '  ,,r    _,  __ _   _     A
^ W.   McKee J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor  for   the   Week H.   Keenleyside
AFTER THE EXAMS. ARE OVER
Have yon ever visited Victoria? This
is not introductory to a dissertation on
the beauties of the Island scenery, or
the superiority of Vancouver vim and
energy. Nay, gentle reader, it is but an
innocent-seeming query, leading to the
natural conclusion: If not, take the opportunity this Christinas and join the
army of invasion on the 19th, which
plans to make the Capital City realize
once and for all the existence of U.B.C.
It is difficult to give a summarized
statement of the advantages to be derived from the trip. Apart from the
genuine entertainment afforded by the
various games, there is the fostering of
a feeling of partnership and co-operation
in the nascent traditions of the University. Support for the teams wearing our
colors is needed more, if possible, on a
foreign strand than on the well-known
field of Brockton Point. And then it
must be remembered that such support
is the most definite announcement possible to outsiders that U.B.C. students
are ready to stand as a unit behind 'Varsity activities,—the final proof of the
presence of at least a modicum of that
elusive  blessing—college spirit.
The Victoria trip is one of the biggest events of the session. Are you going to miss it?
Hp        v        *&
"GREEN STOCKINGS"
The announcement by the University
Players' Club of their selection for the
Spring play has been causing a certain
amount of discussion among the students. The statement of any definite
opinion is largely hindered by the lack
of knowledge of the play. Through the
kindness of the director of the Players'
Club, the Editorial Board was given
access to a copy of "Green Stockings,"
and the resultant opinions were highly
favorable.
The play is an English comedy by
Mason—an author and playwright of
some renown. It is as different as possible from .the production of last year,
and should lend itself more easily to the
interpretation of undergraduate talent.
It is  not in any sense a farce, but it is
a clever and deliciously funny comedy.
There are no scenes or lines to which
exception could be taken, even by the
most fastidious of critics. Although
"Green Stockings" will not put the same
premium upon facial expression and
elocution as did the brilliant lines of
Oscar Wilde, it will not be any simple
play to stage, and the Players' Club will
have no easy task in selecting suitable
roles for their dramatic artists.
Through the efforts of the publicity
department of the Players' Club, the
University will be given more details of
the previous success of the plays than
we can do at present. It is possible to
note, however, that the Dramatic Society of McGill University has already
staged "Green Stockings," and that it
was considered a great success by our
Eastern compatriots. Its only appearance in Vancouver w;is made in 1911,
when Margaret Anglin played the role
of Celia in the Vancouver Opera House,
now knowri as the Orpheum.
Discussion has already started—as
last year—regarding the suitability of
such plays for a University Society; and,
while the Editorial Board does not offer
any opinion.on the subject, we will gladly publish the ideas of other students,
supporting either side of the question.
EX CATHEDRA
By the Publications Board
You will note that the editor for the
week no longer accepts entire responsibility for this  column.
If it were not for exams, and essays,
the "Ubyssey" could really wish you all
a Merry Christmas. As it is, we feel
much too "grouchy."
The Christmas card sale staged by the
Y.W.C.A. was too great a success. The
cards supplied only about one-half the
students who desired them.
Those who have given essays over the
Christmas holidays: Sage, Eastman,
Sedgewick, Wood,  Henry.
It is reported that Dr. Sedgewick recently burned another batch of uncorrected essays, after which the Doctor
castigated several young ladies for not
completing  their   compositions   on   time.
Why is it that the administration
office could not get out a timetable for
the exams, that did not make 60 per
cent, of the students report clashes?
There is no excuse for such absolute
carelessness. And why only one timetable for over nine hundred students?
Did you notice T. J. Kearney & Co.
sliding on the sidewalk outside their
place of business on Willow Street?
Nothing   like   boosting   your   own   busi-
Isn't  Professor  Russell "cute"?
Ireland is recalling her sons from the
Dominions, in the hope that their broad
training in democratic institutions may
at last result in the solving of their
Home Rule problem. The latest to depart is R. F. Adams, of Arts '20, and
otherwise of more than international
fame. Irishmen may now slumber in
peace. December 11, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
(QotYvspotibmn
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—The following facts are of interest to anyone who enjoys the study of
character:
During the time when the snow was on
the ground and the Freshies and others
were indulging in snow fights, a certain
professor of this University was walking up
Willow Street. A well-meaning youth fired
a white missile at him, but, unfortunately,
his aim was not at all straight. Nevertheless, the professor became angry and proceeded to attack the students, using language that would have been unseemly in a
Science Freshman. The mildest word used
was  "cad."
Another professor passed a few minutes
later, and he also was snowballed. He was
a sport, and laughingly threw a few in return.       "Get wise to yourself," Doc.
FRESHETTE.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I am very glad to see that my
recent letter to your widely-assimilated
journal had such a profound effect. Already,
I believe, two Away-from-Home societies
have been formed, and, despite the discouragement hurled at them by Prof. Wood, I
understand that much propaganda work has
been done to advertise the peculiar excellencies of Chilliwack and Anyox. Victoria
is as yet silent—carrying out the reputation
of that metropolis for slow and sedate progress.
But I am still unsatisfied, for no society
has been formed to represent the locality to
which I belong. (I, myself, am too bashful
to take any initiatory steps.) But it is a
shame that Kitsilano has no place in this
great home-town movement. (And this
despite the location of Dr. Sedgewick's
dwelling.) Cannot something be done?
Yours   for  progress   in   horn-blowing,
HOMESICK.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—With the announcement of the
Spring play, we are again confronted with
the perennial question, "What should be the
aim of a University Dramatic Society?"
Seventy-five per cent, of those students who
are interested in things literary or artistic
(possibly in their ignorance) answer, "that
the aim of a University Dramatic Society
should be to promote, as far as it is able,
those things which tend to the elevation and
purification of the dramatic art." Or, in
other words, in making the selection, they
should choose plays which are not the usual
type of stock comedy, but should decide
upon those which are the finer and more
unusual examples of comedy and tragedy.
For if a University Society refuses to present the "better things," who is going to do
so? And this question is particularly apropos in our unlettered West. If the aim of
our University Players' Club is not the elevation of the drama, then what excuse has
it for its existence?
The University Society should present
Shakespeare, Sophocles, or some other master, whose works we cannot see by going to
the Empress. The stock answer is, of course,
that the; Players' Club cannot do justice to
Shakespeare. Quite true! Anyone who attended last year's play is painfully aware
that we have no Garrick, ana no Mrs. Sid-
dons among us. We admit that the presentation of a "Midsummer Night's Dream"
by the U.B.C. Players' Club would not be of
the same standard of excellence as if presented by a regular Shakespearean company; yet a creditable performance might be
staged even by our society. And if the executive is afraid of failing in the presentation, what do they think of last year's attempt? Ask anyone who sat through the
first act of "The Importance . . ." whether
or not it was a success. Nothing ever
presented could have been more dull and
insipid than Wilde's sparkling lines projected at the audience by nice, ordinary college
boys. They were completely out of their
element, and, knowing it, failed in producing any conviction in the minds of the audience.
Shakespeare would be difficult, but not in
the same way. In many of his plays the
interpretation would be easier, because it
would be more human and natural. At the
worst,    would   it   not   be   better   to   fail   in
attempting something worth while, rather
than fail in the presentation of something
only  superficially clever?
But we may as well save our words
Apparently the Players' Club has been carried away by the desire for something sensational, and, as far as they are concerned,
the drama, as an art, may take care of
itself.
Yours for the movies,
THEDA  BARA.
URGE NECESSITY
OF FURTHER AID
U.B.C. returned men will be interested in a report published in last
week's " 'Varsity," in which it states
that a short time ago representatives
from the various Canadian universities
met in Ottawa to urge upon the Government the necessity of giving further
aid to soldier students in the Dominion.
The committee, according to the report,
lobbied practically every member of the
House, and, as a result, many of the
honorable gentlemen definitely espoused
the cause of the student veteran. As the
matter stands, the question is in the
hands of a committee, the majority of
the members of which have expressed
themselves as being favorably inclined
toward the granting of additional assistance.
The veterans at the University of
Toronto, in order to place their requirements in a tangible light, have recommended that a system of loans be established, in which payments would commence five years after graduation.
It is evident that the men must keep
organized in order to advise those in
authority of their attitude toward vital
matters affecting them. Returned men
in the U. B. C. should join and boost
our own organization. If a man stands
in no financial need himself, he should
show his interest in supporting the need
of his less fortunate comrade-in-arms.
Join now. Either President Alex. Mun-
roe, Secretary Honeyman, or Treasurer
Traves will be glad to hear from any
soldier student in the University.
The New Styles Are Smart
$
OR THE WINTER SEASON we can suppty the Footwear wants
of the young man and young woman with ju£ the sort of Footwear
they will enjoy wearing.    An expert Fitting Service at your command
ike INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
December 11, 1919
Art and Style Clothes Shop
Real Class
Every young man likes to have
nice Neckwear and Hose, so that
he may feel his best when
"Stepping Out."
Don't fail to give US' the "once
over,"   as   our  lines   are  complete.
Sox, 75c and up to $3.00
Ties, $1.00 up to $5.00
Ben Fetch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
Trob Cat Tlowm.     Tmttrai Ulork a Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone, Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey.  2313
932  Granville   St. Phone,  Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St. Phone 4742
U.B.C.  AND  HAWAII
The first shipment of cattle from
Canada to the Hawaiian Islands left
Vancouver Saturday morning for San
Francisco, where it will board the
steamship Lurline for Kahalui, Island of
Maui. The shipment consisted of 18
pure-bred Holsteins and two pure-bred
Jerseys, and fs composed of selected
animals of the finest breeding and show-
yard type from the leading herds of the
Province of British  Columbia.
The entire order was selected by Professor J. A. McLean, of the University
of British Columbia, and every animal
lias been chosen with the utmost care.
The request for this Canadian stock is
a direct outgrowth of the visit which
Professor McLean made to the territory of Hawaii last summer for the purpose of judging the livestock at their
exhibition.
THE SCIENCE DANCE
A meeting of the Science Men's Un-
dergrad. was held recently to discuss
the forthcoming dance. After some discussion, the following plans were approved: The dance will be held in the
Hotel Vancouver on Friday, February
Kith, 1920, and. as in the case of the
Arts dance, the number of tickets will
be limited. No single tickets will be
sold, each ticket admitting a couple.
The best orchestra obtainable will be
procured, and a splendid supper will be
served in the grill-room. No pains will
be spared to make everything as complete as possible, and this, the first
dance held by the Science Men, will be
a real University event and a credit to
our institution. Evening dress will be
entirely optional.
STANFORD
Those University students who intend
remaining in the city over the Christmas holidays will do well to remember
the Rugby game between the University
team and the representatives of Stanford University of California. The game
with the University will be played at
Brockton Point on December 27th. This
will be the most important game of the
year, and a good representation of the
students should be on hand to cheer our
team to victory over the American invaders.
BOOK OF LAMENTATIONS
(Continued from Page 2)
did gnaw the grass of the field, and seaweed was to them as fine wheaten cake.
6. And on their knees and their
hands did they go; yea, they went sideways like unto the crab, even the great
crab that liveth in the city of the West.
7. And it came to pass that, after 77
years, the Lord took pity on these most
miserable ones, and their souls descended to the fiery regions. Here did they
continue to reside without toil or travail.
8. Yet it is ordained that each day as
it passeth shall be employed in reading
the tablets that were written, yea, written even by the youngest of the youths,
those whom their brethren despise.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A., Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
The Art of Speaking
Debates,   Speeches,   Play-parts,
Recitations   Coacherl
Special   rate   on   single   lessons   to
U. B. C.    Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite  23,   709   Dunsmuir   Street
Phone,   Sey.   6535Y
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
tfte Uancouver Stationers Ltd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
Insist on your Dealer supplying
you with
KEYSTONE
Loose Leaf
COVERS and SHEETS
No. 2736 Open End size 5% x 8%
No. 2768 Open Side size 9% x 7V2
No. 2769  Open  Side  size  lOVz x 8
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  & Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C. December 11, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
DEER MERTEL—JOE
Deer Mertel:—
Well, Mertel, they is only a few days
before exams and I dont no no more
about the subgects I am takeing in this
University than German Bill, as I call
the Kaiser, new about fiteing a war. I
ast a Sophomore, which is very wise
persons, why was exams and he said
they was "sands raisens" which they say
in France when they mean they is no
cause for it. He new what he was tauk-
ing about,  Mertel.
They is one fello in this University
what thinks he is smart but I wish I
could find him. On Thurs. he put up a
sine what said that there was 3 in. of
ice on Trout Lake and that all lectures
was cancelled until further notis so I
stayed away from school until yesterday
and everey day I would sleep until noon
and then get up and go skateing. It
was grate. But yesterday I found that
they was classes as per usual and that
the notis was a joke and that I was
marked absent everey day. They is some
people in this University what act like
they dont care what happens to others
so long as they are happy. T hope that
guy graduates at Xmas as they say hear
and I wish I cood find him. You no
what I am, Mertel, when 1m mad.
I gess you have herd about this sleeping sikness, Mertel, which the doctors
say they is no cases of it in Van but that
is not true. Last wk. this paper printed
a editorial which showed that the}' was
489 people rite hear in this University
what had that disese. T went to another
basketball game on Sat. nite, and we
won again." You and a hole lot of closer
than you mist a good game.
Everybody round me in this readeing
room is studdying and T think I will to
because none of the profs, think I will
pass. But T am going to fool them. You
no what I am, Mertel. Merry Xmas and
Happy  Xew Year.
TOE.
THE COLLEGE CAT
The dreams of future greatness, that
I had when but a kitten, were rudely
disillusioned, and myself unkindly smitten. Alas! my youthful memories have
suffered saddest fate; the fierce, unruly
cat is evidently out of date. Let dogs
delight in strife and noise, and chasing
vulgar rats; I only must associate with
aristocratic cats. For me the gentle
cream-jug smiles, and. as far as I am
able, I utilize the crumbs that fall from
Mr. Tansley's table. And if, while in
the "Better 'Ole," my nose acquires a
smutch, then Mr. Tansley comes along
to banish it with "Dutch." He holds me
firmly in his hands, does this most kindly male, and trims my whiskers very
straight, and curls my graceful tail.
They praise my gentle nature, such
reputation is my doom;  I may not hurt
M.  PERRIN,  Manager — 20 years with the leading Hotels ot Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT  PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,   it  may   be  the   dance  floor—or  the   atmosphere   that   pervades—or   the
character of the people.
PERHAPS   it   is   all   three—for   the   BARRON   is   different,   and   that   is   why   this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee  Luncheon,  11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER  Every Day,  including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
PHONE, SEYMOUR   7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
~v.
r
•4.'•*%!«**"'
U.B.C.  Students  Should  Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS   BLOCK,  464   GRANVILLE   STREET
the little mice within the Council room.
But in the stack-room's mouseless aisles
I solitary lag, with gratitude my tail
acquires an almost canine wag. My
childhood's dreams come back to me,
with visions bright of fame, when janitors should tremble at the whisper of my
name. Let other cats in distant climes
condemn my humble mien; they've never
had their pictures in the college magazine.
PUSSY.
THE ALUMNI DANCE
The annual dance given by the Alumni Association is to be held on Friday,
January 9th, from 9 o'clock until 2, in
Lester Court. A ticket has been provided for every undergraduate, and these
will be on sale at the University at noon
on each of the last three days of the
term.
Outsiders will be provided for by
means of. special invitations from the
various members of the Alumni Association.
Why is Mr. Wood so proud of the
fact that he has never visited North
Vancouver.
COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,     Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, Glencoe lodge
Phone, Seymour' oo22
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R.€.Purdy,Cta.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
Professor  C   (rising to  heights  of
rhetoric)—Just as a hen takes its chickens under its wing, where it can keep
its eye on them. THE   UBYSSEY
December 11, 1919
U.B.C. Students, Attention
Why   not   send   home   to   Mother,
as a Christmas Remembrance,
one of our
Guaranteed Security
Policies ?
Special  inducements  will  be  given
those   answering   this   ad.
during December.
.. The ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
701 LONDON BLDG.
626  Pender  Street,  West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who  stay  young
EXCHANGE
During the last decade, the University
Dramatic Society has won an enviable
reputation in the production of the
drama. A glance over the plays produced—every one of which was a decided success^—will show the standard
maintained. For the four years, 1903-
1912, Shakespearean masterpieces were
produced: "A Midsummer Night's
Dream," "As You Like It," "Twelfth
Night," and "The Taming of the
Shrew." Previous to this the Ladies'
Society had staged the mythological
play, "Pigmaleon and Galatea," and even
even before that equally well-known
plays had been produced, including
Goldsmith's "She Stoops to Conquer,"
and "The Good-Natured Man."
—University  of  N.   1?.
SIGMA DELTA KAPPA
REORGANIZES
With the adoption of an entirely new
constitution at a business meeting last
week, throwing open the membership to
all students interested, who send in their
names to the secretary, the Sigma Delta
Kanpa has entered upon the second
stage of its endeavor to stimulate literary discussion and public speaking.
Formed with the aim of supplementing
rather than rivalling the work of the existing Lits., the society has adopted as
its policy the promotion of "literary discussion."
Owing to certain radical changes in
the constitution, a new election of
officers was considered necessary, and
the following were appointed: Honorary president, Mr. Sage; president, Mr.
A. Swencisky; vice-president, Miss Patricia H. Smith; secretary-treasurer, Mr.
T. P. Peardon. Two positions on the
executive yet remain to be filled.
MEN'S LIT.
A short business meeting of the Men's
Lit. was held on Wednesday, December
3rd, with  Mr.  Rive in  the chair.
The executive was instructed to purchase the medals for the oratorical contest. It was decided that ten cents admission should be charged for this. It
will  take  place  on   Friday, January  16th.
The proposed league for a triangular
debate with Idaho and Oregon was discussed. The meeting decided to take on
the agreement submitted by the two
American universities, the first debate to
take place in the term 1920-21. This
year we have a dual debate with Washington.
The president then outlined the first
part of next year's programme. There
will be a mock parliament on January
7th, a debate between Arts '22 and Agric.
on the afternoon of January 14th, and
the final inter-class debate on January
21st.
The UBYSSEY will nozc hibernate
until January 8th, 19.20.
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The  '' Combination
Q A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over inslep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
•I This insures that perfeel glove fit
around the inslep and ankle. The
maximum of comfort and sltyle.
ClufF Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank   of   Commerce
Men's Gloves
For many years we have had the
distinction of providing the best Glove
stock in town; this one is no exception, in spite of the scarcity. Choose
gloves  early:
Dent's and  I'errin's Tan Capeskin,
unlined    $2.00,   $2.25,   $3.00
Fownes'   Capeskin   .. ■ $2.50
Dent's washable  Cape $3.50
Fownes' Russian Tan, hand-sewn.$3.00
Tan  Cape,   wool  lined $2.00
Fownes'    $2.50
Tan Mocha,   Dent's and Fownes' make
 $2.00, $2.25, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50
Buckskin Gloves $4.00  and  $5.50
Tan Mocha,' unlined $2.25, $2.50
Tan Mocha,  silk lined,  Dent's	
 $2.75 and $3.00
Grey  Mocha,   wool   lined $2.50
Dent's  Grey Suede, silk lined $3.00
Fownes'  Grey  Regal  Buck,  unlined;
per pair    $4.50
Fownes' Tan Cape, silk lined ...$3.00
Dent's   French    Suede,    dark   grey.
silk  lined    $2.50
Dent's  Fawn  Suede,   unlined $3.00
Silk   lined    $3.50
English   Chevrette,   silk   lined- $3.25
Wool  Gloves,   50c,  75c,  $1.00,  $1.25 and
$1.50.
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0123795/manifest

Comment

Related Items