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The Ubyssey Mar 4, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by  the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 4, 1920
Number 19
Idaho Speakers
Return Victorious
UPHOLD  NEGATIVE  AGAINST
U.B.C. IN FIRST DEBATE
On Friday evening last an interested
audience filled the Auditorium on the
occasion of the debate with the University of Idaho, on the subject, "Resolved
that the application of the closed shop
will best serve the cause of industrial
peace." Possibly the fact that the affair
was the first in which representatives
from this American college participated
lent an additional interest. That the
evening was well spent was the feeling
of all present; and the general opinion
was voiced in the words of Sir Charles
Hibbert Tupper, who, with Judge Cayley
and Mr. Geo. Kidd, of the B. C. Electric,
acted as judge, when he stated that it
was a contest characterized by careful
preparation and an excellent grasp of
the subject under discussion.
Mr. Walter J. Couper, Arts '20, opened
the debate for the U.B.C. In a clear,
logical speech, marked by a fluency and
ease in the use of well-chosen phrases,
this speaker made an excellent impression, confirming the high reputation
which his past oratorical efforts have
won for him. He showed how the individual workman is powerless in his
struggle with his employer, but the collective voice of many toilers commands
the respectful attention of those for
whom they toil. Success, however, depends upon complete organization, and
this is obtained by the application of
the principle of the closed shop. That
industrial war was occasioned by the
inequitable distribution of products, and
by the denial of his proper status to the
workman, was next maintained. Mr.
Couper then proceeded to show how the
closed shop would remedy these grievances, finding support for his contention
in the report of recent industrial commissions.
The first speaker for Idaho, Mr. Earl
Hunt, also made an excellent impression
upon opening the case for the negative.
But, as he continued, his stately, sonorous style of delivery grew somewhat
monotonous, though his arguments were
clearly and most insistently emphasized.
He based his plea against the closed
shop upon the statement that it was undemocratic; that it brought about a
monopoly of labor; that it was militant;
and that it meant a reduction in production, as well as a minimum wage, which
soon  becomes  the  maximum.
(Continued on Page 3)
U.B.C. DEBATERS LOSE AT
EUGENE
Apparently, Gerald McClay and
Charlie Traves, U.B.C. debaters,
who went to Eugene, Oregon, to-
speak on Monday night, were dealt
with just as unmercifully in the
south as our other champions were
in Vancouver. A telegram announcing the success of the University of Oregon was received on
Tuesday morning. However, "we
ain't got weary yet." Another debate is on the calendar. Boost
for it.
Scholarship For
Returned Soldiers
LEROY    MEMORIAL    FUND    INAUGURATED AT UNIVERSITY
SERVICE CLUB BANQUET
A scholarship of $250.00 will be
awarded to a returned soldier student
of the University for the work of the
present term, and annually thereafter.
So much was assured by the successful
inauguration of the Leroy Memorial
Scholarship Fund at the get-together
dinner of the University Service Club in
the Hotel Vancouver on Wednesday
night.
The 175 veterans present included
representatives from many universities.
There were men who had spent their
Freshman and Sophomore years in a
two-storey wooden shack on Cambie
Street. Others recalled more readily
the days when the present Physics building was the sole foundation of learning
in the province. There may even have
been some who will (allowing for a
reasonable proportion of failures) eventually receive their degrees in those
palatial buildings so imaginatively pictured in our entrance hall. There were
graduates from Eastern universities,
from the Old Country, and from foreign
lands; lawyers, doctors, generals, professors, and others, in various stages of
progression  towards  these  goals.
United, in spite of these divergencies,
by the common bonds of trench and
campus, all, standing in respectful
silence, listened to the solemn beautj
of "Salut des Morts," and, with these
strains still echoing, to the eloquent
tribute paid by Alec Munro to the heroism and devotion to ideals of our comrades who ' have not returned. Dean
Brock then outlined the  scheme  of   the
(Continued on Page 7)
Theatre Night Was
Evening of Joy
THREE 'VARSITY ACTS GREETED
WITH ROUNDS OF APPLAUSE
BY AUDIENCE
"On Thursday, February 26th* for one
night only, the University of British
Columbia will present The Lesser
Organ Dancers." So read the bill; and
on that night the Orpheum pit was filled
with the males of the University, 'to the
number of three hundred or more, bedecked in every conceivable variety of
gorgeous dress and undress. The rest of
the theatre was filled with the University girls and with sympathizers, for
everyone loved us that night, and enthusiasm ran high.
How can feeble pen depict the success
of the bill, strengthened, as we like to
think, by no less than three University
acts! Or how describe the utter villainy of Lacey Fisher; the alluring
beauty of green-stockinged Dave Taylor, as the heroine; or the undying fame
earned by our yell leader, Gordon
Meekison, no less than by the ubiquitous
"Mr.  Pebbles"!
Seriously, "The Vallain Chuckles," the
first of the University acts to be seen,
was an unqualified success. The laughs
were there, and they were well brought
out by Messrs. Fisher and Taylor. Their
"bones" made a hit and are said to be
in great demand.
No less successful was Ellis Goodman, who put over a comic monologue
to twenty rows of familiar grins—-no
easy task. In spite of a little too much
speed, which made the jokes hard to
follow, the black-face artist retired
amidst a thunder of well-deserved applause.
As the crowning gem and concluding
item of the crowded bill, The Lesser
Organ Dancers1 were a scream, enjoyed
no less by the Orpheum artists than by
the audience. The bloated king, the
dainty chorus, the unrecognizable beer-
porter—above all, the rival queens,
made an undoubted hit, especially with
those who saw their now eclipsed rivals,
The Greater Morgan Dancers, a few
weeks ago. But we can do no less than
give the full cast, for they all covered
themselves with glory. The beer-swilling king was cleverly played by Johnny
Berto, and the rival queens by Lefty
Nelson and Johnny Weld, whose dances
were visions of grace, especially the
snake   dance  of  the  latter.    Bill   Hatch
(Continued on Page 2) THE   UBYSSEY
March 4, 1920
SUPER
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GORGEOUS  GOWNS WORN  IN
PLAY
The idea of having to wear green
stockings may not appeal to most girls;
but if one is privileged to array oneself
in as many attractive gowns as does
Miss Dorothy Adams in the course of
the annual Players' Club performance,
which opens at the Avenue this evening,
the prospect becomes a pleasant one.
As Celia Faraday, Miss Adams appears first as a rather dowdy young lady
whom her family persist in regarding as
an old maid. But in-the second act she
blossoms out in the fashions of the hour,
and wears no less than three beautiful
creations in one act. One of these is
supplied by Gordon Drysdale Ltd., and
is a direct importation from New York.
With this radiant gown is worn a rich
sealskin coat from the fur department of
the Hudson's Bay Store. A very stunning evening gown is of rose-petal satin,
with silver'tissue; and another is a most
effective contrast to this, as it is of black
jet with a gold corsage and a jet panelled train.
Miss Alfreda Berkeley, one of the
lucky Freshettes in the cast, appears
first in a shell-pink frock of frilled
tulle, with a bodice of iridescent sequine.
An afternoon frock of blue and grey
georgette, and an evening dress of white
net over pink, form the rest of her wardrobe. Without a doubt, the gowns of
the blase Lady Trenchard, as played by-
Miss Kirsteen Leveson, will win immediate approval from the feminine section
of the audience. In one of these, draped
rose georgette is used to effect and is
set off with black ostrich tips. A more
stunning robe is an evening gown of
peacock blue and gold, worked in a
Chinese design over black. With this
is worn an elaborate Mandarin coat of
brocade. One of the most effective
dresses of Miss D. Gill is in jade color,
with a soft overskirt of chiffon. Miss I.
Miller, who recovered from her severe
attack of "flu" in time to appear at the
dress rehearsal, wears two attractive
evening gowns, and a very smart street
costume from the spring stock of Gold-
bloom's. The smart hats worn in the
play are from the latest styles of McDonald & Harper. It seems needless to
add that so carefully have Miss Helen
Reid and her costume committee arranged these matters, that the atmosphere of fashionable refinement of
"Green Stockings" has been admirably
reproduced.
THEATRE NIGHT
(Continued from Page 1)
and Bob Walker made very efficient
slaves. The chorus consisted of Neil
McCallum, Kenny Carlisle, Bill Scott,
Al. Hunter, Sid Anderson and Mike McLennan. Their parody reminded one
irresistably of the other chorus on the
bill—they were so different.
Except for occasional yells, the crowd
restrained themselves very well in the
theatre, and the energetic ones worked
off their surplus "pep" with a parade,
and a little carnival and circus in Chinatown, before an admiring crowd of gaping "Chinks." Finally, the festivities
ended inevitably at Purdy's, with cooling
internal lotions.
Queen Quality
Shoes  for  Women
These shoes represent a solid
standard of value, identified by the
trademark and demanded by well-
dressed women the country over.
You will buy them with confidence
and wear them with pleasure.
Queen Quality Shoe, Soap Kid, 8-
inch Lace Boot—Made on Astor
last; a perfect-fitting model; medium short vamp; good heavy,
flexible, Goodyear-welted soles
and medium heels.
Special       $15.00
Queen Quality High Lace Kid
Boots, in grey and fieldmouse;
extra fine stock; made on the
newest lasts; medium long, slender vamp; good weight soles and
high or medium heels,
per pair     $18.00
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
EVANS    &
HASTINGS
PRINTERS
 of	
" The   Ubyssey "
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
Phone, Seymour 189 March 4, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,    Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, GLENCOE LODGE
Phone, Seymour go22
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouver Stationers Dd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and   Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
This Advt.
is GOOD FOR
50 CENTS
On any tie at $1.50 and
up, purchased here week
ending March   1 3th.
Cut  Out   This  Advt.
AND SAVE 50  CENTS
Orpbcum
fiaberdasbers
Orpheum Theatre Building
759   GRANVILLE   STREET
ELECTION   ON   MONDAY
Votes for president of the Alma
Mater Society may be cast in the
Students' Council room on Monday, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
candidates are A. E. Lord and A.
Rive.    Do not fail to vote.
'VARSITY PLAYERS DEFEAT
MONARCHS
'Varsity puckchasers defeated the
Monarchs on Friday evening by a 4-2
score. An overtime period was necessary  to  decide  the   winners. *
The Monarchs started out strong, and
L.owry scored the first goal after several
unsuccessful rushes. Norm. Grimmett
evened the count before the period
ended.
Grimmett put U.B.C. in the lead early
in the second period. Lowry scored
again soon after, making it two all. No
more goals were scored before the session ended. Before the game it was
decided to play only two periods; but,
following a consultation in centre ice,
the teams agreed to an extra session.
'Varsity played all around their opponents in this period, but only secured
two goals. Jack Wilson sent in the first,
and Grimmett soon followed with his
third  goal  of the  evening.
The U.B.C. lineup was as follows:
Lambert, Plummer. J. Grimmett, N.
Grimmett, Ternan, Wilson, McDiarmid.
Substitute,  McPherson.
IDAHO SPEAKERS
(Continued from Page 1)
Mr. Joseph Denham, Arts '21, our
second champion, made the mistake of
confusing eloquence with argumentation. He would do well to remember
that a speech may be witty, caustic and
entertaining without being the least bit
convincing. After brushing aside the
contentions of the previous speaker in
a summary manner, Mr. Denham made a
spirited appeal for the recognition of the
working classes. It is the soul of man
and not his stomach that is stirring in
this movement for better conditions.
The democracy for which men fought
abroad should greet them upon their
return to their means of livelihood at
home.
The last member of this interesting
quartette, Mr. Ralph Breshears, proved
the most aggressive of the speakers.
With a forceful and emphatic manner,
he won the attention pf his hearers at
once. Although much of his speech was
devoted to a further insistence upon the
four principal points of his colleague, he
advanced the argument by the introduction of two contentions. The very
nature of the closed shop is that of a
warlike institution, bringing about
strikes and not the desired industrial
peace. He contended that other alternatives—compulsory arbitration, profit-
sharing and government ownership—
were more practicable.
Before announcing the decision of the
judges, President Klinck, who presided,
very graciously extended a welcome to
the visitors from the university to the
south. Upon the announcement of a
victory for Idaho, hearty applause mingled with college yells, indicating that
the verdict was cordially received.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTT-SHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   out
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Sprott Shaiv Stamp==Quality
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods9
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
1 0% off to Returned Men
TO-DAf AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about to morrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for' a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
them published. THE   UBYSSEY
March 4, 1920
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
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20th Century Brand
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
for Young Men are the best
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See our Windows and investigate
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Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who stay  young
Issued every  Thursday  by  the  Publications   Board
of the  University  of British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
(Lillian  Cowdell
A.   H.   Imlah
C. D. Taylor
Chief  Reporter A.   Evan   Boss
Exchange   Editor G.   G.   Coope
BUSINESS  STAFF:
Business  Manager J.  N.  Weld
Advertising   Manager L.    Fournier
I D. A. Wallace      W. R. Smith
Assistants '  ,„    ,r  „
^ W.   McKec
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for the Week. . . .
.C. D. Taylor
A. M. S. PRESIDENT
Two nominations have been received
for the president of the Alma Mater Society. Next Monday every student is
expected to indicate by his or her vote
whether A. E. Lord or A. Rive is favored
for this important position.
The men are too well known to require an introduction; but it is interesting to note that both at one time attended the K.E.H.S., both were members of Arts '19, and, at the end of their
Freshman year, went overseas with the
196th Battalion. Being transferred to
the 46th Battalion, they went to France
together and were wounded within a
short time of one another. Since returning to the University, "Art" and
"Alf" have been two of the busiest men
in U.B.C.
Last year Lord coached the Rugby
team, and played a leading role in the
Spring play. This year, as president of
the Men's Athletic Association, he ha.s
sat on the Students' Council, where his
cool deliberation and sane judgment
have characterized the meetings of that
body. When he was a Freshman "Art"
represented the Athletic Department on
the first Council the U.B.C. ever had.
As senior editor last year, Rive was
the "live wire" who placed the "Ubyssey" on a sure footing at a time when
many considered the publication of a
weekly paper a bold and foolish venture. This session "Alf" is president of
the Men's Literary Society, and, because
of his inimitable energy and managerial
ability, this organization has been
granted a new lease of life, and is undoubtedly experiencing the banner year
of its existence.
Who shall be our next president?
•T* V *fr
AN EVENING'S FUN
More than once in the past have U.
B. C. students taken local theatres b}'
storm, acted in an unorganized and
thoughtless manner, and succeeded only
in creating a great deal of disturbance,
without ever giving anyone the satisfaction of feeling that he had truly enjoyed
an evening's wholesome fun. But the
most fossilized student in the U. B. C.
could never speak thus of the 'Varsity
night at the Orpheum last week.
All the plans had been carefully made
and were carried out with that spontaneity and briskness which characterizes united college action. During the
whole performance there was nothing
which savored of the usual "rough-
house," and every feature was conducted
with honor to the 'Varsity students.
Equal credit is due Mr. Pilling, who
so generously co-operated in all the arrangements; those who, in any way,
added directly to the enjoyment of the
evening; and all students who, by their
conduct, made our first organized theatre party a success. It is to be hoped
that succeeding sessions may never fall
below the standard which has now been
set for them  to  follow and  improve.
*
*
TIME  OF ELECTIONS
In order to avoid the usual confusion,
note carefully the time of the Students'
Council elections. The first date, following the name of the office, represents
the last day on which nominations will
be accepted; the second date is that on
which the election will be held: Honorary president and president of the A.
M. S., March 1st, March 8th; secretary
and treasurer, March 8th, March 15th;
Undergraduate Societies, March 16th,
March 18th; Literary and Scientific Department and Athletic Associations,
March  15th,  March  22nd.
The editor-in-chief of publications will
be appointed by the Students' Council
on Tuesday, March 9th.
*      *     *
ELECTION INFORMATION
How many offices may any one student hold during a university session?
For the information of those who are
unable to answer this question correctly, we publish below the Point System,
which applies to all Alma Mater elections. The offices are distributed in the
following  manner:
Class "A"—The president, secretary
and treasurer of the Students' Council,
and the editor-in-chief and business
manager of the Publications Department, shall hold only one office.
Class "B"—The presidents of the Undergraduate Societies, the Literary and
Scientific Department, the Athletic Associations, the Women's Literary and
Men's Literary Societies, the Players'
Club; chief reporter, associate editors,
and advertising manager of the Publications Department, shall hold only two
offices, and one of these must be Class
"C."
Class "C"—No other person may hold
more than three offices.
*
*
BUY A GROUP
Unless you are. an abnormal student,
you will want a picture of your class, or
probably of an executive, similar to the
samples which have been appearing
from time to time on the notice boards.
The pictures are unmounted, in black
and white finish, and are ready for framing or pasting in your album. They may
be secured by calling at Bridgman's
studio, or, if you place a dollar bill in
an envelope, with your name and address, and send it to the studio, one will
be  mailed  to  you. March 4, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
EX CATHEDRA
Let no student neglect to cast his vote
in  the  approaching  elections.
There were over 400 at the debate
last Friday evening. Make it 500 when
Washington comes here on March 12th.
The Idaho men were treated to the
best that Western hosnitality could produce, in spite of the wishes of some,
who would have our inter-collegiate relations assume more the nature of a
cold,  business-like  transaction.
After final alterations have been made,
the examination timetable will be printed in the "Ubyssey."
It is being suggested that the Alma
Mater fee should be increased from $5.00
to $7.00, leaving $4.00 for student expenditures after the publications' allotment
has been subtracted. We shall discuss
the question next week. What do you
think about it?
Only   three   more    issues!    You   had
better send in that letter now.
If anyone has an opinion to offer regarding the appointment of the editor-
in-chief for next session, the members
of the Council will be glad to hear of it.
Why was the Avenue Theatre, last
Monday morning, like the Government
liquor   store   the   day   before   Christmas?
Last year the University of Manitoba
published a monthly paper. In January
of this year it was changed to a weekly,
and now our prairie friends plan on
issuing a daily next session. The
"Ubyssey" has no such ambition.
If our information be correct, the
Players' Club are planning to "take the
road" during the month of March in
"Green Stockings." Their present itinerary leads them to such renowned centres
as  Nanaimo and  New Westminster.
(£avvvBptmbmt£
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer. Letters must not exceed 400 words
in length.
AN   EXPLANATION
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: — Had your correspondents,
"Puzzled" and "Rugger," taken the trouble
to make a few inquiries about the conditions
which led to the lineup of the 'Varsity team
against the Firemen, they would have
directed their criticism in  another  direction.
Thise who know anything of the conditions
under which the Players' Club have to work
as regards rehearsals, know that it is impossible to hold a full rehearsal during the
week; so their only recourse is Saturday
afternoon. The question as to whether
Hunter would play or not was left entirely
to my decision. He did not "prefer" a rehearsal, as "Rugger" states; in fact, he was
very anxious to play. I preferred that he
should attend this rehearsal and be free for
the big game on the following Saturday, as
I considered that the team I had lined up
was  strong  enough   to  defeat  the  Firemen.
In  view  of  the  above  explanation,  I  hope
that   "Puzzled"   and   "Rugger"   will   realize
that their criticism has been misdirected.
A.  E.  LORD,
Captain Rugby  Team.
HOW  ABOUT   [T?
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear. Sir:—The following letter was printed in "The Gateway" {University of Alberta),
in the issue of February 12th, 1920:
The  Editor,   "The  Gateway."
Dear Sir:—In last week's issue of "The
Gateway" I noticed an article which stated
that the University of British Columbia
was not invited to join the Inter-University Athletic Association, and it appears
as though that University were rather
annoyed about the matter. The officials of
the University of Alberta Hockey Club are
rather surprised at this attitude on the
part of  B.   C.;   for last  November I  wrote
to the secretary of the U. B. C. Athletic
Association, asking B. C. to co-operate
with the other Western universities in the
formation of an inter-university hockey
league. No answer to this letter was received from B. C, so naturally we concluded that they were not interested in
the matter.
I hope that this will satisfactorily explain the seeming neglect on the part of
the  prairie  universities.
Tours very truly,
G. F. LEHMANN,
Secretary U. of A. Hockey Club.
I would ask the secretary of the U. B. C.
Athletic Association whether the statements
made in this letter are true, or untrue. If
tney are true, who is responsible for this
unnecessary lack of courtesy?
Yours faithfully,
ATHLETICUSS.
MUSICAL  SOCIETY  CONCERT ON
MARCH 19
As there is only one performance of
the University Musical Society concert,
advance accounts already assure a good
attendance of music-lovers. This year's
annual concert will be given in the ballroom of the Hotel Vancouver on Friday
night, March 19th. Tickets are now on
sale among the students, by members of
the Men's and.Women's Glee Clubs, and
by the orchestra. Representatives have
been appointed in each year, and tickets
may also be obtained from the secretary,
Jimmy Mitchell. Tickets will be on sale
during noon hours next week in the Students' Council room. The plan for
reservation of seats will be opened on
Saturday morning, March 13, at Evans'
Music Store.
The society has been very fortunate
this year in securing the services of Mrs.
Gertrude Huntley Green, of Victoria, as
solo pianist for the occasion. The orchestra has now been increased to
eighteen instruments. The chorus in this
fourth anual concert will number over
150 voices, which is the greatest group
of performers ever gathered together for
a public appearance as a University undergraduate  organization.
The New Spring Models in Footwear
For Young Men and Young Women
are a gathering of the best Shoe Values and the choicest Shoe Styles to be
found anywhere.
We will take the greatest pleasure in showing you the handsome new
creations for the Spring season.
<ihe INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666  GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
March 4, 1920
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B
. c.
Phone, Fairmont
2075
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Insist on your Dealer supplying
you with
KEYSTONE
Loose Leaf
COVERS and SHEETS
No. 2736 Open End size 5^ x 8%
No. 2768 Open Side size 9Ms x 7%
No. 2769  Open  Side size  10V£ x 8
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  & Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C.
R.e.Purdy,£ta.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
My Favorite
Character in
Literature
675 GRANVILLE STREET
By Woodyard Ripling
Practically everyone, at one time or
another, having read the last page of a
story, or the concluding line of a poem,
on laying down the book, has expressed
the wish that the author had not run out
of ideas, but had continued the work to
at least twice its original length. Such
were my feelings on reading "Tom
Sawyer," the brain-child of America's
foremost humorist, Mark Twain, for the
first time. That which appealed to me
was neither the style of the author, nor
the general trend of the narrative; but
the depiction of the character of Thomas
Sawyer, that mischievous urchin who
was one of the chief trials of his Aunt
Polly's life. Years have passed since I
followed the adventures of this youth
for the first time, years in which I have
read books by many writers, but still
Tom continues to be my favorite character.
There is hardly any need to say why
I admired Tom Sawyer to such an extent. What boy would not? Those with
an ever unsatisfied appetite for jam, or
anything forbidden, will look upon Tom
as a fellow-sufferer, and will extend to
him their deepest sympathy. On the
other hand, those of a more timid disposition will admire and envy him for
his very daring.
Imagine what a change would have
been wrought in the story if Tom Sawyer were a boy of the present day!
Instead of wishing to be a pirate on a
desert island, he would now delight in
being a soldier, and would no doubt have
the back yard laid out in a network of
trenches. Aunt Polly would stand dumb
with dismay on seeing a box of apples
being used as bombs, and the washtub
perforated in many places, with Tom underneath, pretendinf to be a "tank." Joe
Harper, one of Tom's friends, would also
be in his element. In lieu of imitating
a steamboat on the Mississippi, he could
now hang suspended from a tree, wave
his arms about, and think he was an
aeroplane, hovering over Tom's itrug...
ary  trenches.
How well I remember, in my public
school days, sitting, apparently studying, with my Geography spread out before me on the table. I had, however,
forgotten to turn the book right side up,
a detail which my paternal parent duly
noticed. Upon investigation, he discovered "Tom Sawyer" beneath the larger
book, and, after performing his painful
duty, sent me to bed, in disgrace. Little
he knew, though, that I stole quietly
downstairs soon afterwards, and, having
gained my cherished possession unnoticed, returned to bed and perused its
contents until I could no longer remain
awake. Since reading "Tom Sawyer" I
have developed a liking for many other
characters, principally those of Charles
Dickens; but so far none have carried
me away so completely as the hero of
Mark Twain's book.
Art  and  Style  Clothes Shop
Holeproof
Hosiery
SAY,  BOYS!
We don't like to say too much
about the goods we sell, but feel
that we must say a few words
about
Holeproof
Silk and Lisle Socks
They are the best that your money
can buy. All colors, for 75c and
$1.50 pair.
Yours for real service,
Ben  Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Castle Hotel is next door)
Tresb Cut Tlowm.     Tuneral Work a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Go. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and  Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY  GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street
BRANCH STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.
932  Granville   St.
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St.
Phone, Sey. 6410
Phone, Sey. 2313
Phone, Sey. 8723
Phone 4742 March 4, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
DEER MERTEL—JOE
•Deer Mertel:
Well, Mertel, we ure had a lot of fun
on Thurs. nite when we had our theatre
partey at the Orfeum. They was about
300 of us there and I was rite in the 1st.
row. You no what I am, Mertel—-always to the four in everything. I was
drest as a girl and when Harry Rose,
what is a regular actor in the show,
winked at me I looked at him like you
did when the conductor ast you if I was
your husband. I think I embarased him,
Mertel. I look even better as a girl
than a boy so I cant blame him for like-
ing my appearants.
The 1st. University act was where two
fellos came out and 1st. they was supposed to be in love and then one was
supposed to be the others mother but
the other one wouldnt stand for it so at
the last they was a couple of old men.
We were all mixed up, Mertel, and I am
glad they quit when they did becus maybe they wood have turned out to be each
others  grandchildren.
The next act was put on by a fello
what graduated at Xmas what wore a
black face and told jokes witch made us
all laff. Like most of the other acters
he had a joke on Mr. Peebles witch is a
sort detektive in thij University and
witch is always haveing fellos up in
court for gambleing. He had a bad nite
on Thurs.
The big act witch closed the show
was where 12 fellos put on a big dancing
act where most of them wa.s supposed
to be girls but no girl cood be so homely and heavey footed as they were. I
liked the girls in the headliner better.
The storey was about a king witch had
two wives witch he didnt like and while
he was dancing with one the other shot
him when he was drunk which he should
of been becus he drank enuf beer. But
he didnt reely die, Mertel, becus I saw
the fello what played the king up here
yesterday.
Next Thurs., Fri., and Sat. they is another play on witch is put on by the
Players Club of this University and I
have made a lot of money out of it all-
reddy. On Monday I went down to the
theater at 7 in the mourning and got
1st. in line to get my seat and about
9:30 they was about 200 in line and I
told everybody I wood get there tickets
for them if they wood give me 10 cents
extra. I made $4.30. I gess I no how
to use my hed. You no what I am,
Mertel. JOE.
PAPER READ ON WALTER DE LA
MARE
The regular fortnightly meeting of the
Letters Club was held at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. A. F. B. Clark, Kerrisdale,
on Tuesday evening, February 24th, at
8 o'clock. The programme was to have
been a paper on Walter de la Mare, by
Miss D. Blakey, '21; but, owing to her
unfortunate illness, the paper was read
by the president, Miss R. Grant.
• Stress was laid on the adaptability of
the poet to writing children's verse, and
several examples of this were read from
the volume, "Peacock Pie." Many other
points were discussed, such as his idealism  and   delicacy   of  form  and  content.
After Mr. Larsen, the honorary president, had concluded the discussion with
M.  PERRIN,  Manager — 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT  PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,   it   may   be   the   dance  floor—or  the  atmosphere   that   pervades—or   the
character of the people.
PERHAPS   it   is   all   three—for   the   BARRON   is   different,   and   that   is   why   this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee Luncheon, 11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER  Every Day, including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
PHONE, SEYMOUR   7853
C. HERMANN, Propriefcr
*V[
i'tiffljPiWMlMI?
U.B.C.  Students  Should  Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS  BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
a few remarks, the hostess, Mrs. Clark,
provided refreshments, and the club dispersed at an early hour. At the next
meeting Mr. Pratt will read a paper on
Lord Dunsany.
SCHOLARSHIP  FOR  SOLDIERS
(Continued from Page 1)
scholarship in memory of these fallen
comrades. The sum aimed at for the
permanent fund will be $10,000.00, the
interest to be granted to a student or
students in need of assistance, preference to be given to returned soldiers and
their dependents. Brigadier-General J.
A. Clarke, seconding the resolution, emphasized the duty of university men to
remodel the educational system of the
country, and to secure for the members
of the teaching profession salaries commensurate with their national influence.
President Mack Eastman then requested
that the members start the ball rolling
by subscribing on the spot for this purpose. In addition to this, $1,000.00 was
promised for the permanent fund.
Col. Mulloy, speaking to the toast,
"Alma Mater," deplored the lack of interest displayed by the universities of
Canada in the public affairs of the country, and blamed, upon this apathy, the
comoaritive paucity of university men in
the highest public positions. This state
of affairs indicated either that the universities do not fit men to assume
national responsibilities, or else that
students will not accept the tasks which
thev. better than most, should be able to
fulRl.
Caot. Ian MacKenzie brought forward
a point which has been very incomplete-
MISS ANDERSON
Teaches the latest Ballroom
Dances at her home. Small classes
arranged for.
1299 Seventh Avenue, West
Phone, Bayview 3104R
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and  Second-Hand
Book  Shop
Specialists  in University Books
ly recognized in this University. "There
are no finer traditions for the University
of British Columbia," said the G.W.V.A.
president, "than those founded on the
deeds of university men overseas."
Capt. MacKenzie commended the manner in which the Service Club was planning to perpetuate these traditions.
Prof. W. L. MacDonald briefly seconded
the toast to "Our Future."
The LeRoy Memorial Scholarship
Committee has been appointed as follows: Dean R. W. Brock (secretary-
treasurer), Gen. J. A. Clarke, Harry Let-
son, Drew Pratt, and Mack Eastman
(ex-officio). This committee will draw
plans for the raising of the fund, and,
in consultation with the Senate, will
make arrangements for the conditions of
the award. Meanwhile, it is in the power of every U.B.C. student to assist the
movement by "boosting" it, both inside
the University and out. THE   UBYSSEY
March 4, 1920
Novel Features at
Senior Party
HIGHLY     SUCCESSFUL     CLASS
FUNCTION TAKES FORM OF
LEAP YEAR DANCE
Did we have a good time? Well, ask
Freddie! Question us no more why he
and we have all been so happy since the
evening of the 25th.
"We went knowing we were going to
have a good time. ' No, not just because
Arts '20 were giving the party, but because the girls had complete charge of
everything, i.e., until supper. For one
thing, we were going to experience how
this HT world would run with women at
the helm. Now we're all hoping those
"grand an' glorious" days will come
often.
Never until that night did we know-
that there were such good sprinters
among the women of Arts '20, until we
saw them making a dive for the ferry.
Some missed it; but that wasn't their
fault, since the deck hand refused to
allow them to demonstrate their jumping ability as the boat was quietly pulling out for the North Shore. However,
they  all  arrived  there  bright  and  early.
The dance started with .a zest. If there
had been the slightest sign of timidity,
it was dissipated with a bang and a
shout when everyone joined hands for
the medley dance. Never before did it
prove so popular as it did that evening.
The supper was the signal for the
close of the leap year part of the programme. The coffee, sandwiches, ice
cream and cake were much appreciated.
Supper served, dancing was resumed.
The accommodation was truly superb.
For once the dancers did not have to
trample on each other's toes.
The members of Arts '20 extend their
gratitude and sincere thanks to Mr. and
Mrs. E. C. Walsh for the use of their
home on this most eventful evening.
'VARSITY FOOTBALLERS NOW
LEADING LEAGUE
Last Wednesday the 'Varsity soccer
team stepped into first place in the
Wednesday Afternoon League by defeating Spencer's, 6-3, at the Cambie
Street grounds. The teams scored alternately until well on in the second
half, when 'Varsity sent in three goals
in a row.
In spite of the two inches of mud. the
300 spectators witnessed some brilliant
playing. The work of the 'Varsity forwards and the centre half featured the
game. The only fault of the forward
l:ne was the tendency to remain offside.
This rrined many rushes and prevented
'Varsity from winning by a much larger
score.
Cameron, the clever outside right,
"tarted the scoring early in the game.
Not satisfied with one goal, he quickly
followed with another. Then Jackson
and  Foley scored two each.
Wolverton, the 'Varsity captain, was
back in the game after a lay-off of three
weeks, due to a broken rib sustained in
the game against the Mounted Police.
VAUGHN MOORE
STUDIO  OF DANCING
Colonial Theatre Bldg., cor. Granville and
Dunsmuir Streets
Phone, Seymour 2081.      9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Start Dancing Lessons NOW!
Applications -will be received for one more
week at $10.00 for eight private individual
lessons. Pay as you learn. Instruction
personally by Mr. or Mrs.  V. Moore.
We issue a guarantee -with each course.
The following players represented
'Varsity: Crowe, Wolverton, Swencis-
ky, Kant, Crute, Mitchell, McLeod,
Foley, Jackson, Baker and  Cameron.
LARGER ATTENDANCE NECESSARY AT DEBATES
The student body as a whole is to be
congratulated on the turnout to the
debate last Friday night. It showed a
commendable interest in college activities. But, in order that the Men's Lit.
may come out on the right side of the
ledger with these inter-collegiate debates, it is necessary that a still larger
crowd come to the debate against Washington, which takes place on Friday,
March 12th. The U.B.C. debaters that
night will uphold the affirmative of the
question, "Resolved that the Paris Peace
Conference should have given to China
those rights awarded to Japan in clauses
156, 157 and 158 of the Treaty of Peace."
Mr. T. P. Peardon, Arts '21, and Mr. A.
Richards, Agriculture '23, will be our
home team, while Mr. F. H. Buck, Arts
'20, and Mr. J. P. G. McLeod, Arts '22,
will travel to Seattle on the negative.
GIVE  LUNCHEON   IN   HONOR  OF
DEBATERS
The Men's Literary Society held a
very enjoyable and successful luncheon
last Saturday noon at the Vancouver
Citizens Club, in honor of the debaters.
The guests of honor were President
Klinck; Mr. Henry, the honorary president of the society; Dr. Sedgewick; Mr.
Earl Hunt and Mr. Ralph Breshears, the
Idaho debaters; Mr. W. J. Couper and
Mr Joseph Denham, the B. C. debaters.
Owing to the noise of dishes in the main
dining-room, it was impossible to have
speeches. President Klinck spoke very
shortly, and Mr. Rive made a few announcements. After the luncheon the
debaters were taken for an auto ride out
to Point Grey to see our future home.
They also went around Stanley Park,
stopping a few minutes to watch the
Centrals-Firemen Rugby game.
If! the evening the combined executives of the Men's and Women's Lit.
held a reception for the debaters. This
took the form of a dance, under the able
management of Miss Janet Gilley and
Mr. D. A. Wallace. The music was excellent, the eats were plentiful, there was
plenty of room., and everybody seemed
to enjoy it. U.B.C. may well be proud
of the way our visitors were entertained.
INTEREST IS  KEEN
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The "Combination"
<I A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over inslep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
<I This insures that perfect glove fit
around the instep and ankle. The
maximum of comfort and Style.
Cluff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank  of  Commerce
Entries close to-day for the Track
Club meet to be held at Brockton Point
on Saturday afternoon, March 13th. Because of the large number who are
anxious to take part in each event on
the programme, an elimination contest
is scheduled for next Saturday. If one
may judge from the enthusiasm which
appears to be running wild about the
halls, this is certain to be one of the
biggest affairs of the season. So stick
the date in your hat and be at the Point
a  week  from  Saturday.
President Klinck has been elected
unanimously to the position of honorary
president of the Alma Mater Society for
the session 1920-21.

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