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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1946

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 w
Bert Niosi Plays
For Gym Drive
GIVING INITIAL impetus to the fall revival of tho UBC
War Memorial Gymnasium Drive will be the job of Bert
Niosi when he arrives in Vancouver October 2.
"Canada's top band-leader will be
met at Uie station by a reception
committee with all the trimmings.
After fhe reception Niosi and his
18-piece orchestra face a full schedule.
GYM DANCE
Thursday, October 3: At Shaughnessy Military Hospital he plays
before wounded veterans.
In the evening he will highlight his western tour so far as
the gym drive is concerned by
playing for • War Memorial
Gymnasium Dance ln the UBC
Annery. Admission to the first
big event of the Gym Drive
year is set at $1.00 a couple.
Saturday,   October   5:    In   the
morning Niosi takes over star spot
on Spencer's air show. In the
evening he plays in the Gardens
Building of the Exhibition Grounds.
Tickets may be obtained hi the
AMS office, the Quad, and Kelly's
on Seymour. Admission: Advancf,
|1.10; Sate, HJB,
Other stops on his whirlwind
tour will include Chllliweck, New
Westminster, Nanaimo and Victoria.
ARMY IHOW STUFF
The band that is coming te the
Gym Drive So Far
$150,000
Cash donations $ 45,000
UBC & B.C. Gov't
Pledges      75,000
Other pledjttf    30,000
To^l .1150,000
Armory to aid the Gym Drive will
consist of 15 men: six from the
Army Show, a boy from Vernon,
and one Vom Vancouver.
Nlosi'4 pert vocalist is Pat Berry.
His trip to Vancouver climaxes a
oross-C-nada tour. The famous
Moil orchestra is regularly heard
coast-to-coast on CBC, originating
in Toronto.
Securing fhe orchestra to aid the
gym drive ia considered a minor
triumph by War Memorial Oym
Committee. Niosl played a vary
successful engagement here last
year.
More Huts
To House
More Vets
SEVEN SURPLUS ARMY huU
at Little Mounain camp, including
three now occupied by squatter
families, are expected to provide
housing for 40 UBC veterans' families this winter.
The huts were released to the
university Saturday, as a result of
negotiations between the university
Legion executive and the rehabilitation council and the emergency
administration.
Negotiations for the turnover
were completed Friday, shortly
after squatters moved ln on the
camp but could not be made public then owing to the absence of
President N.A.M. MacKenzie.
The huts will be converted into
suites and rented at low cost by
the university to student veterans
with families.
The legion now has hutment accommodation for approximately 140
of the 600 student veterans with
families it plans to house thi*
winter.
How soon vets will be able to
take up residence in the newly
acquired quarters is not known.
Squatters now living in the huta
turned over to UBC aay tney "are
here to stay."
"The students can moye into the
camp but not Into the suites we
occupy."
THE CAIRN
MacKemie, Biniey, Harwood recall traditions
VOL.XXK
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1946.
No. 1
AMS CARDS
Alma Mater Society membership
cards, being issued this year on
the basis of an alphabetical student-name list which should be
completed by tomorrow, will not
be available until October 1 or 2.
Making this announcement, AMS
President Ted Klrkpatrlck said
compilation of the list started Friday. In previous years, cards were
part ot the registration booklet.
EXPERTS SURVEY B.C.
MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS
NO NEW DEVELOPMENTS are expected for several
weeks In connection with the proposed plans to establish a
faculty of medicine at UBC.
For the last several weeks, medical experts from Canada
»ts»w1*||^ in
British Columbia regarding doctors and hospitals in British
Columl>i»« aipelally in the Vancouver area.
According to Dr. N. A. M. Mac-
Students Crowd
I Space
us, City
an   out-of-town
for   room   and
s are that you are
Kenzie, (resident of the university,
the report from those experts is
expected to be in tiie hands of the
administration within the next few
weeks.
FAMOUS NAMES
The report will deal with: the
advisability of establishing a medi.
cal school in B.C.; the medical
needs of the province; the hospital
situation In Vancouver; the relation of thf University to any medical school which may be established in B.C.; and, if a medical
faculty is started at UBC, whether
or not it should be housed on the
campus or at the site of a Vancouver hospital.
The men who have made the
survey include some Of the. most
famous names in North American
medicine.
Dr. Alan Gregg, director of the
Dr. Alan Gregg, director of
the division of medical sciences
for the Rockefeller Foundation,
broke his trip from China to
New York to take part In the
survey.
Pubsters Call
For New Blood
THE DRAGNET is out for all
students with an interest in publications work.
Publication Board officials will
be on hand in the Pub offices In
the north basement of Brock HaU
, this afternoon at 1:30 to meet anyone interested in working on the
Ubyssey, Totem, or UBC Thunderbird.
The   welcome   sign   will   greet
would-be reporters, feature writers
cartoonists, and photographers. No
previous  experience  is necessary
Another   meeting   will   be  held
tomorrow  at the same time for
those can not attend today.
Training will be provided for
the aspirants not only by the
student  editors,  but also by
professional writers and photographers from downtown.   A
series of Instructional lectures
by experts is being arranged
by the Publications Board for
the   special   benefit   of   newcomers.
Apart from the reputation it
has for developing experienced
newsmen and photographers, the
Pub is also noted for its atmosphere and gay parties.
Next to participate were Dr.
Goodpasture, dean of medicine at
Vanderbilt University, Dr. R. F.
Farquharson, professor of theura-
peutics at the University of Toronto and president of the Royal
College of Physicians and Surgeons
of Canada, and Dr. J. J. Ower, detn
of medicine at the University »f
Alberta.
Dr. Farquharson has been
invited to deliver the main address at Congregation on October 30.
During the past week, the investigation has been conducted by
Dr. L. R. Chandler, dean of medicine at Stanford University, Dr.
Herman Weiskotten, dean of the
medical school at Syracuse University and Dr. Victor Johnson,
secretary of the American Medical
Association's council on medical
education and hospitals.
IF
student   lo
board, the
out of luck.
Many t>Metaiyr accomoeatieas
have been phoned in, but the
majority of these are for only a
housekeeping room, a bed, or
loom with breakfast
Because of the high cost of restaurant meals, students turn down
many of the latter offers.
The University Extension Department has no records how
many of the hordes of out-of-town
students have been placed. This
situation occurs because each applicant is given a Ust of prospective landladies and set free to fine,
his own accomodation.
POINT GREY FULL
A conservative estimate figures
that every second house in Point
Grey has a student boarder.
The Fort and Acadia, the two
university camps are, unless last-
minute cancellations are maat,
filled to capacity.
Top priorities en the accomodations for 400 men and
90 women at Acadia, those
for 330 single men at Fort
Camp, go to students who occupied the dormitories last
year. Room-hunting veterans
are niwri in line.
Jokers are Smouldering;
Prairie U's Affiliating
DAVE HAYWARD, king of the unique Jokers Club of
UBC, has secret plans that will startle even the most radical.
Details of their forthcoming activities are as yet unre-
vealed, but Hayward likens them to a smoldering volcano.
"You may quote me as saying
FROSH FUN CALENDAR
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
12:30  President . A. M. MacKenze's address to new students
in the Auditorium. •
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
LSE registration, held outside on awn near Quad.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
12:30 Cairn Ceremony.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
12:30 Jabes' "Her Scienceman lover or the Birth of a
Nation" in the Auditoriua.
3:30 p.m.   WUS and WAA tea dance Brock Memorial Hall.
5:00 p.m.  Freshette supper in the Grm.
9:00 pjn.  SCM Mixer in Jirock Hall
SUNDAY, StePTEMBEU 29
3:30 p.m.   Phrateres Fireside.
7:30 p.m.   Church  service   at  St.   Atdrew's   Wesley   United
Church cor'Burrard and N*son.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1
12:30 pjn.   Mamook/, pep meet in Auditorium.
9:00 p.m.   Frosh deception in Armourie,
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2
12:3ft pjn.   Film Society Show.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3
12:30 p.m.   AMS meeting.
9:00 p.m.   p/ert Niosi and his orchestra il the Armouries.
Friday, October 4
12:30 p.m. ] Pep Meet.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5
9:00 p.m. \ Football dance in the Brock Hll.
8:00 p.m. ^Frosfli smoker in the Armouriet
T
,—theJokcrj wJU.fae4P*&*rfi-M|P-a
dirty sock," Hayward stated today.
BETTER ORGANIZED
Following the precedent set by
the Club last year, Jokers will
again spark campus activities, only
"they will be even better organized."
One detail that he revealed was
that the Jokers Club would give
very practical, sensible support to
the War Memorial Gym drive.
Permission had been granted
to a group at the University of
Alberta to organize a club affiliated with the UBC Jokers.
Another similar branch may be
ir. the offing for the Saskatchewan
campus, where there are no fraternities.
JOKERS STRONG
Jokers Club will be strong in
numbers on campus, Hayward estimating that about a half of the
total male population at UBC will
be members.
When asked if a girls' auxiliary
to the Jokers would be formed the
Ace Joker answered with a positive "NO".
A unique campaign to recruit new members will begin
next week, Hayward stated.
"Shuffling", a system of Inla-
tkm like fraternity iwphln^
will be Introduced.
Constitution of the club, secret
Jokers' Antics
Pay Off For Gym
THOSE MADCAPS of the campus—the Jokers—hav* managed to
make their antics pay off for the
Gym fund to a tune of no lessVAaa
13496.10.
The ten cents comes from a piggy
bank belonging to a little brother
of one of the Jokers.
The club is emphasizing that the
total so far is only a beginning and
that it's going to start growing almost immediately.
The sum of $3498.10 Includes re.
ceipts from Joker activities last
year. It represents such features
as selling hot dogs, raffling nylons,
and staging a show at the Orpheum
theatre.
Perm McLeod, manager of the
Memorial Gym Committee, points,
out that other money can be indirectly credited to the Jokers. In
appreciation of the Club's entertaining stunts, members of the
public sent in several sizeable
cheques.
as yet, has been revamped into a
complicated system -et packs and
decks.
'SHUFFLERS'
"A 'shuffler" first belongs to a
pock," Hayward explained. "He
graduates to a deck where he's
entitled to a few more privileges."
Jokers this year will wear a distinctive garb, and although Hayward refused to make a statement,
unofficial sources report that Jokers may wear red ties that will
enable them to masquerade as
thermometers.
When asked how he was managing without prominent Jokers
Dave King, Ronnie Robertson, and
Jimmy Boyle, who have left the
campus, Hayward declared he was
"moaning requiems."
He added, "But I'm proud of
them because they are among the'
first Jokers to graduate at the end
of first year."
A number of X-Jokers who graduated with their degree are forming a Jokers Alumni Association,
he said.
Medical Checkups
Now In Progress
MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS of
first and second year students
registering for the winter session
began on Monday, September 16,
Examination af e made by Metropolitan Health Service doctors.
Temporary additions have been
made to the clerical staff of the
Health Servire to accommodate
the increased number of students
REGULATIONS
Dr, J. S. Kitching, director of
the University Health Service,
wishes to announce te following
regulations, to be observed by all
stndents on the campus:
1) Students absent from lectures
or physical education \periods due
to illness must phone the University Health Service office during
the morning of their absence and
must report on return ^o the University. /
2) All injuries suffered and illness developed on themimpus or
ebewhere should be reported to
the office. '
3) A medical certificate must be
presented after missing examination because of illness. >
MacKenzie Speech
Marks Frosh Week
HIGHLIGHTING Frosh week is President N. A. M.
MacKenzie's address to the freshmen in the Auditorium at
12:15 p.m. today.
Lectures commencing at 11:30 today will stop at 12:10
permitting the new students to congregate in the Auditorium
to hear the president's speech.
Cairn Rites
To Honour
Class Of '25
IN THE MIDST OF buildings:
Brock Hall,, the stadium, and the
gym, monuments to the efforts
of university students, and with
the drive for Memorial Gymnasium proceeding, students will commemorate, the first student erection on the campus—the Calm opposite the Science building.
The ceremoney will be divided
into three sections.
Bob Harwood, junior member
of-council in charge of the Cairn
ceremoney will review UBC history from the founding in 1892 to
tarle flimsy, well known Canadian poet and instructor at the
university will comment on the
trek itself. Dr. Barney waa editor-
in-chief of the Ubyssey in 1925 and
himself took part in the march.
President MacKenzie will deal
with the present and future of
the university.
The UBC band will play at the
ceremony.
Built as a climax to the mass
trek in 1925 of students exasperated by crowded conditions in the
Fairview campus and delay in
construction of university buildings on the Point Grey site, the
Cairn was erected from stone
brought on the march.
It contains a scroll with names
of students taking part In the
agitation.
The Science building, library,
and nine other buildings were
completed as a result of the march
to the Point Grey site.
According to present plans, thc
ceremony will be recorded and
broadcast at a arter da«»."" —
Traditional Cairn Ceremony at
12:30 on Thursday will be the next
big event of Frosh week. Speakers
will include Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, president of the University
of British Columbia.
JABEZ, JABEZ
The celebrated Jabez production,
"Her Scienceman Lover or the
Birth of a Nation" will be presented by the Players Club on
Friday at 12:30 in the Auditorium.
Following at 3:30 p.m. will be the
WUS and WAA tea dance In the
Brock Hall.
Frosh Smoker is scheduled
for 8:00 p.m. in the Armouries
on Friday. Bob Harwood, Junior Member of AMS, announced that lots to eat and smoka
will be provided. Be stated,
"Entertainment for the Fresh
is being kept secret. Ihe only
statement made Is that no
freshettes wlU he permitted in
the vicinity of the Armoury
that evening."
Big sisters will tow their Uttle
sifters to the freshette supper on
Saturday at 5:00 pjn. All little
sisters mutt appear droned lev
their roles, llie supper will be followed by the SCM mixer in tht
Brock Hall at 9:00 pan,
RECEPTION
Terminating freshman Initiation
is the Fresh Reception to be held
in the Armory on October 1, at
9 p.m. Joe Micelli and his 16-
piece orchestra will provide entertainment for an expected attend*
ance of 1500 students. During the
evening Frosh will deposit their
regalia on the model calm. Special buses will provide transportation before and after the recap*
tion.
In connection with the War
Memorial Drive, Bert Niosl and
his orchestra will play in the
Armoury on October 3 at • pjn.
Other Froth week events include the Phrateres fireside
on   September   29,   and   the
American Football dance in the
Brock Hall on October 5.
University  church  service will
be held on September 20 at St.
Andrews Wesley United Church at
the corner of Burrard and Nelson
Streets.
t
Council Welcomes Frosh;
Lamb/ Mawdsley Speak
STUDENTS' COUNCIL members
headed by Ted Kirkpatrick, president of the Alma Mater Society,
welcomed the frosh to the University of British Columbia Friday, in
the Auditorium.
Prior to these speeches, Dr. Dorothy Mawdsley, Dean of Women,
spoke to the freshettes while Dr.
W. Kaye Lamb, librarian, addressed the men. Later the Newcomer's
Committee and veterans' Counsellors spoke to the freshmen while
Dr. Lamb explained the uses of the
library to the women students.
"Library identification cards are
not new but present overcrowded
conditions have made it necessary
for them to be brought back to
ensure speed of service," explained
Dr. Lamb. Although there are
170,000 books in the university library there are not enough of certain volumes to go around. Other
books are not yet available because
* of the lack of space in the stack
rooms.
Art Loan collection in the library
makes It possible for students to
borrow original paintings which
otherwise would be unobtainable.
The Library also has an excellent
collection of phonograph records
which students may borrow. However, certain rare discs and recordings of whole operas can not
be taken out by any one student
but may be borrowed for concerts.
On congregating in the Auditorium at 10:30 a.m. the new students
were welcomed by AMS president,
Ted Kirkpatrick, who then introduced the other members of the
Students' Council.
Frank turner, head of the Alumni Association explained the "Open
Door" policy of his association and '
offered free advice to any student
who needed it.
In the absence of the AMS treasurer, Don McRae, Ted Kirkpatrick
showed how the $13 Alma Mater
fee is spent. Of that total sum
three dollars goes for the retirement of bond issues for the Brock
Hall.   Three dollars is used for the
pass feature system which brings
at very reduced rates great artists
to the campus. $1.75 is used for
athletics and $1.50 for tiie publications. The remainder goes to the
general fund for maintenance of
AMS properties.
Psychological tests for all ex-
service personel were given in the
Auditorium on Thursday, September 19, at 8:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Consult the Veterans' Counsellors
for arrangement of a test.
Students were requested to obtain '
texts and to learn the location of
the buildings on the campus. Lectures commenced Monday as scheduled.
Staff Pledge^
Gym Fancl AicN
MEMBERS OF THE Faculty Association have pledged their wholehearted support for the drive to
build a War Memorial Gymnasium
on the campus.
In a meeting recently at the home
of the association's president, Dr.
H, Gunning, the faculty members
decided to set themselves a quota
to be met during the gym fund
drive this fall.
The exact amount of the quota
will be decided in the near future.
At the meeting, the rofessors expressed the feeling that they had
a great responsibility in helping
both morally and financially.
Officials of the Memorial Gym
Committee say they know that
from past experience the faculty
can be counted on lor considerable
help. They point out that in the
past professors pitched in to help
ensure the success of other drives
at UBC.
\% THE UBYSSEY, Tuesday, September 24,1946.  Page 2
■'\,
TheWifiHeVf
President and Secretary, Canadian University Press.
Authorised as Second Class Mall, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.  Mall Subscription • $2.00 per year.
Published every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday during the university year by the Student Publication Board
of the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of the Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall.   Phone ALma 1624.
For Advertising • Phone KErr. 1811.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  JACK FERRY
GENERAL STAFF:  Senior Editors - Don Stainsby, Don Ferguson, and Harry Castillou;   News Editor • Nancy
Macdonald;   Features Editor . Bob Mungall;   Copy Editor - John Wardroper;   Sports Editor • Laurie Dyeft
and Photography Director - Tommy Hatcher.
CROSSROADS
This is it.
There now seems little doubt that, for a
time at least as long es anyone can predict,
there will be more students at UBC this year
than in any other year.
That means an equally impressive amount
of problems. In spite of the comprehensive
planning done by the administration and by
student officials to prepare for the situation,
it's more than probable that conditions on
the campus will be, to say the least, nerve-
wracking.
In tur», that involves an especial need
this fall for the presence of a willingness to
meet, and solve, the friction-full situations
which undoubtedly will arise.
No doubt, many things in the first few
weeks, or even months, will be far from
satisfactory. Yet, if everyone prepare mentally for the shocks, then all should eventually be satisfactory.
How the problems are met will determine
the future of the university.
Like the rest of the world, UBC is at the
crossroads.
Here, the problem is to take care of an
influx of students expediently, while at the
same time maintaining UBC's scholastic
standards and spirit.
The manner in which the problem is
tackled will mean the difierence in whether
the university becomes an undistinguished
mass of students, or whether UBC's reputation and distinguishing spirit emerge untarnished.
When the university's policy became one
of admitting all those qualified to attend, it
must have been decided that UBC students
and faculty would respond in the necessary
manner, with the required spirit.
That spirit is the one which originally
brought a un versity to B.C., and then
brought it out to a magnificent site at Point
Grey, and then proceeded to develop both
high scholastic standards plus the most autonomous student government in Canada.
In welcoming the Freshman Class of 1946
—the most important Frosh Class in the
university history—The Ubyssey urges all
its members to take the right path at the
crossroads, the path which has already been
well worn by thousands of predecessors.
EVERYONE MAY HELP
It's too early yet to tell exactly how bad
the housing situation is for university students, but one thing is certain—it is far from
good.
From all indications, it seems that many
hopeful men and women have been pouring
into Vancouver intent on attending UBC
but without any assurance of finding a suitable place to live.
Whether their hopes were justified can not
l^Jaarned for some time. For those who
have managed to find places, but at higher
rates than they figured on.it might be months
before they learn that they can not stand
the pace financially.
Even if current plans to find emergency
shelter for veteran students work out satisfactorily, there's little doubt but that addi
tional homes will have to be found.
It's bad enough for any would-be student
to postpone a university education for lack
of a place to stay, but for veterans who have
already been forced by the war to miss valuable time the situation is desperate.
Appeals to the general public have so far
met with considerable success.
One source of help may have been overlooked. It's just possible that if every student now suitably accomodated would ask
his parents or landlady—"Could you find
room for another UBC student this year?"—
living quarters for another hundred or so
students might be found.
The attempts could at least be male. Successful attempts should be reported to the
Extension Department or Canadian Legion.
The Mummery
By JABEZ
Carrying his registration booklet at the
high port, Homer Quincey of Moose Groin,
Saskatchewan, marched stiffly into the Armories and halted in a queue. Homer was
used to queues, now. He knew queues so
well he could stand in one in his sleep. Matter of fact, he had been dozing in a queue in
the Admin Building when they woke him
up and told him it was time to pay his five
dollars. By then Homer had forgotten when
he first started to line up, and why. For the
last few days he had just been following the
large wart on the neck in front of him, blindly and open-mouthed, hoping it might lead
to food or a place to sit down.
It had led to another queue. It led to a
table marked "REPRESENTATIVE OF
DEANpF ARTS", where most of the &tqck-
judging 'seemed to Xte going on. Homer
combed his yellow hair and rubbed his
stubble nervously. He found himself confronted.
"What is your course?" asked the Representative.
ONCE BITTEN, TWICE SHY
Homer squinted at her, his small, red-
rimmed eyes wary. Once before in a similar situation he had spoken too soon, with
the result he spent four years in the RCAF
piloting a mop. Noticing a Calendar on the
table, Homer pointed to the cover.
"What's that say?" he asked cautiously.
"Why, it says, 'The University of "British
Columbia'," replied the surprised Rep.
"Yeah," murmured Homer, looking crafty,
"I'll take summa that."
The Rep recoiled slightly.
"But you must have some course. What
are you interested in taking?"
"Sixty bucks a month," Homer replied
readily, feeling surer of his ground.
NOT GREEDY
"But you also have to take fifteen units."
omer, anxious
"Sixty bucks'll be
next   January,"   beamed
Have you a
"Shucks, keep
not to seem greedy,
plenty."
The Rep nodded slowly, tried another
tack.
"All right, Mr. Quincy. Now, what year
are you in?"
"Twenty-eight
Homer.
"I mean, what college year,
white booklet?"
Before he realized what she was up to, the
Rep took Homer's five-dollar booklet, which
he hadn't even read yet. He watched her
closely, ready to snatch it back if she tried
anything funny.
"You'll have to take English 100 and 101,
and Math 10*.   What's your language?"
"Canadian," Homer answered promptly
and proudly.
The Rep drummed on the table.
"Look. How about German 90? Would
you like German 90?" #
CAGEY
"Is it in English?" Homer wasn't to be
tricked.
Writing in "German 90", the Rep went
on. "Then there's your science. Bo you have
a science?"
"On the right side of my nos«, sometimes,
yeah.   I was goin' into air ere. v ..."
"That's a sinus," the Rep in terrupted softly. The knuckles showed' white on her
clasped hands. "I'll put you down for Biology 100 and Chemistry 100."
"What happened to them first ninety-
nine?" asked Homer, but found himself shoved along to a series of tables marked "Geography", "English", "Spartish", and so on.
THE RUN-AROUND     if
Moving from table to table he watched,
fascinated, as the departrhents deftly drop-
continued on page 6)
The Children's Hour
 By   LES BEWLEY        ^^
NOTHNG, THEY SAY, goes downhill as fast as a thoroughbred. Well, to be frank about it, it isn't easy to come
down from the alpine heights of a $150 a paragraph from
the New Yorker and the lush cent-a-word pastures of the
Spadina Avenue Times (News of Garment Workers For
Garment Workers By Garment Workers—Beginning Next
Week, in four installments: "The Robe") to a free, for love
side spot in the "Ubyssey". Practically a throw-away sheet.
A hand bill for the junior haute monde. Ah, well, it costs
nothing, either way.
It's nice to be home again, and
to find one's slippers waiting under
the Cola box which will seme
nicely as a desk, thank you. And
now we know where we stand. No
one loses, no one gains. A meeting
of true minds, you might say. And
it, after a fair trial (say, 30 issues)
you don't like it, why just write a
Letter to the Editor; and I'll hand
it to him, personal, with the smear:
"Another crackpot, boss". Or, better still, come around to the Publications Office in person, and if
I'm not going thorugh my daily
bar-bell routine, we'll talk the
matter over.
So, willy-nilly (stop slapping
your knee, you Junior Boardman
you, that NOT a Mackenzie King
joke) ready or not, here we come.
It's this or another Picobac ad or
more of Mary Ann.
MENU FOR MISERS
For the nickel you don't spend,
then, yoii may expect nothing
much more than fragments of
Love Life it Laughter; a little
hillbilly humour (disguised as ballads Si American Primitives); a
short swig of sweetness & light;
idle tears; a round noggin of rat
poison. Plus, betimes, a little poetry, some polysyllabic petulance
and the odd aspirin foaming in the
wine of youth. Ylp-eee! And
prcoious lifttle poUticg. A pox
upon pimditry.
Oh, by the way—as far os this
column is concerned, drums are
something along the Amazon, and
won't be beaten here. We subscribe
to the idea that all men are born,
equal, and of woman—but that it
would have been better if a good
many hadn't. 1
Especially the sponsors of Causes.
So, if you happen to be nominated
or, woifjp still, elected, Public
Relations Liaaon Officer of the
Pullicity tt Press Reatlonsl Committee of the Social Animals Club
or the local branch of the Society
for Prevention of Cruelty to
P.roblems, don't fix your matted
eyes on this space, my little monster. Not unless you're prepared
to call and leave a new portable
typewriter and no questions asked,
with which machine you and I,
little man, will together attack the
venality of the French press and
the sluggards and thugs who oppose Our Cause. But you won't
you cheapskate.
LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL
This column will always stand
foursquare against: cancer, the
double standard ( ask your mother
about that) the horsewhipping of
chance, cardsharps, gambling and
opium hells and the slashing of
(automobile tires by disappointed
examination candidates. Add one
more: courses In marriage and | or
morriage relations. And conversely,
this column will always lie stead-
fastlf and four square for: veterans,
the single standard, the role of tha
Home In Society (For Aged, Borstal, Loyal Protestant and garden
variety), the Parliamentary Forum,
Walter Oage, cloche hats, national
parks and naval prize money.
Thus having pledged ourselves
not to assault your accredited
Intelligence with plans for the
betterment of this best of all possible worlds, let us, dear reader,
draw our chairs closer to the fire
of human friendliness. Then, hand
in hand, we shall stroll down the
avenue of this academic year.
With Mafic.
By PETER REMNANT
IT IS PROBABLY a little late
to be mentioning Shaw's 'Caesar
and Cleopatra', but since It la so
seldom that a film of such significance appears I have no intention
of letting the opportunity slide by.
As a matter of fact I owe the film
amends, having gone to it In the
expectation of a satire.
But Shaw's characterization of
Caesar is very far from satire, unless idealization to the point of
fiction could be construed as a
particularly subtle form of satire.
At any rate, Shaw presents a
brand new Caesar paddling around
Alexandria with, and there's another point, a brand new Cleopatra.
Because in spite of the liberal
display across the front of the
theatre depicting Cleopatra in
every one of the eighty-seven seductive poses, known to any houri
east of Gibraltar, the film itself
substitutes for Caesar's rather mature twenty-three-year-old playmate a mere slip of a thing—say
sixteen.
Aforethought
And although, to my jaded taste,
there is relaxation ln any departure from the old variations on a
theme of two young things with
the libido of great apes, demonstrating the American Way, there is
still nothing like Sex for selling
a film. Don't think Shaw doesn't
know it.
To come to the point, beneath
all that Egyptian sand there lurks
an alterior motive, and Shaw Ls
at his old game of writing a play
for tho benefit of the people who
can't understand his prefaces.
PEARLS
This Caesar, with his ever-ready
pearl for the nearest swine, his
undampt sense of humour and his
calm control of every crisis, is none
other than a neat enfleshment of
Shaw's political ideals. And just
about the time that Shaw was writing the play from which this film
grew, he was helping several other
people to found the Fabian Society.
In  this light some of Caesar's
characteristics are worth considert-
(Continued on Page 6)
suzEirrs rec
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SKIRTS
plenty of color and variety in these
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lands.
SWEATERS
gay and colorful in the favorite campus
shades of white, powder, rose, sea-
green and cherry.
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\ THE UBYSSEY, September 24, 1946,   Page 3
Ex-Pubster Writes From    Hut, Hut, Oh Which Hut?   47 STUDENT PRESIDENT
Kpi^lAII        _T    _^_T%_^   K       SW     I    a1_9-r,iV%-9l,l%# n„ KPN IVEIVVP numh»     that     tha     hut.     nr« Thn   Statistics   Lah.   that   USfrl   tn I ▼■»■_»  I I  V_^        Wfci        I    lUUI/        I    lbf>b
Ed. Note—Here's part of a letter from u former Pubster—Betty Hem—
who is now working for the British occupation authorities in Germany.
We thought it might be of interest to the general student body here.
Incidentally, the Ubysseys—Including a Goon Issue—have been sent.
"Dear Sir:
"Being over here in Germany on a Control Commission
job, we have naturally in our spare time wandered around
trying to find out what the young people are like. As Bonn,
where we are stationed, is a university town, we have had a
certain amount of opportunity to become acquainted with the
professors and students here.
"I being an old Pubster naturally was very much interested in
the university paper which, owing
to the frightful paper shortage, is
only a bi-monthly.
"Speaking to the Rektor (a position approximately equivalent to
Dr, MacKenzie's) one evening, I
learned that the professors have
been doing quite a number of the
articles for the paper as, except fo*-
a very few enthusiasts, they cannot get the general student body
interested in using their paper as
an open forum for discussions on
all the vital problems confronting
German students In their difficult
situation. ,
THIS IS TRUE
"Therefore, I thought it might
in some way help if you could send
me a representative collection of
past Ubysseys—including perhaos
a Science and a Goon Issue (although the latter is liable to confirm t^eir impression that all
Anglo-Saxons are mad!) Nevertheless, it would certainly be stimulating.
"Perhaps later if you wish, I
could arrange for a regular exchange but would have to consult
the education officer to see if this
is possible.
rANATICS
"My impression is that the majority of students, glad to be released from the army, are settling
down almost fanatically to their
studies, to make up for lost time
and don't want to get into anything which will be likely to distract their attention.
"As to the completeness of their
de-Naxlflcation, that is a difficult
question to decide, but I have
talked with some who—all political
questions aside—are just beginning
to realise how limited the scope of
their education was under the
Nazis.
"Many great figures in their own
and other countries' history and
literature they hadn't even heard
of until recently. (My recollection
is that we ourselves had at least
heard the names, even if we had
not any idea as to who or what
they were.)
"However, as I am not really
qualified to judge them, I'll leave
this, but I only hope you will be
kind enough to send me some
Ubysseys and I shall report on
what   impression   they   produce."
"Betty Hern,
"No.  1  District Censorship
Station.
"B.A.O.R."
Library Starts1
Checking Books
IN ORDER to facilitate checking
all outgoing books, a library inden-
tiflcation card, obtained at registration, must be presented each
time a book Is borrowed.
Stack permits will be given only
to fourth year honour students
and those doing post-graduate
work. No temporary permits will
be issued.
The library staff has been increased to handle larger circulation.
Several additional student assistants have been hired, and the
cataloguing staff has been enlarged.
NOTICE
THE LETTERS CLUB: Business
meeting in Arts 108, at 12:30, Friday, Sept. 27. All members are
requested to attend.
CARRY ON STUDENTS
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By KEN WEAVER
.NO, NO, NO, don't go that way
it's not down there, its moved.
Many students returning to the
campus after a long hard summer
of toil, find thmselves getting
lost on what they thought was
familiar ground.
LITTLE MEN
During the summer little men
have been busy shifting things
around to accomodate the new
buildings being erected. Man>
time-honoured campus institutions have moved from their previous small offices to more spacious
and some times more sumptuous
places.
Students looking for offices
and lecture rooms should re-
UNTD, COTC
Start Recruiting
APPLICATIONS are now being
accepted from those Interested in
the peaoetime training program
of the University Naval Training
Division and the UBC Contingent
of the Canadian Officers' Training
Corps. No definite date has been
set for the commencement of the
year's training.
UNTD training booklet has been
issued by Lieut.-Cmdr. H. M. Mac-
Ilroy, officer commanding the division. The booklet ls now available in the Armory.
UNTD SYLLABUS
The syllabus consists of 20 three-
hour parade periods, to be spent at
HMCS Discovery, where facilities
aro available to give cadets instruction in all phases of modern naval
warfare. Pay for these periods is
25c an hour.
In addition to the evening par-
aeds, a two weeks' compulsory
training cruise will be held during
the summer vacation on one of the
ships of the Royal Canadian Navy.
Rate of pay for cadets taking part
in the cruise has not been determined.
COTC APPLICANTS
No definite statement of the enlistment policy of the U.B.C. Contingent of the C.O.T.C. has so far
been released by Lt.-Col. R. W.
Bonner, Officer Commanding the
contingent.
Forms to be filled in by applicants regarding age, education, and
previous military training are now
being issued at the orderly room
in the Armory.
Applicants will be notified when
the scheme of enlistment and training has been determined.
Alumni Open Door
To Decade Grads
"OPEN DOOR" POLICY will be
featured in 1946-47 by the UBC
Alumni office, according to Frank
Turner, secretary-manager, of the
Alumni Association.
Acting as a liason between the
students and administration, the
Alumni Association alms to help
the students. Turner "will welcome a steady procession of students seeking help for that Is
one of the main purposes of this
Association."
DECADE CLASSES
"Homecoming" featuring the decade classes of 1916, first graduating class of UBC, 1926, the first class
to graduate from the university at
its present site, and the subsequent
decade years 1936 and 1946, will be
the chief work of the Alumni Association this year.
Bob Harwood, junior member of
Students' Council, will collaborate
with Ted Kirkpatrick, AMS president, and the Alumni committee
under the chairmanship of Walter
J Land to forward the "prodigious
plans."
War Memorial Drive will open
"homecoming" in a big way with
the members of the Alumni Association "1000%" behind the students.
The members plan to back the
university in its "surge to success."
AMS TO MEET
IN 3 WEEKS
NO DATE has been set for the
fall Alma Mater Society meeting,
although it is expected to be held
sometime within the next three
weeks.
The AMS meeting will be held as
usual in the Auditorium. Council
will present the auditors' report,
and also outline its policy for the
present year. Special services that
the Council is mantaining and new
services planned will bo discussed.
member that the huts are
grouped alphabetically. The
letter of the alphabet stands
for the first letter of the name
of the locality where the huts
are located. Huts grouped
along the Mall are lettered M.
Huts ln the old Orchard are
lettered O.
The Veterans Bureau and the
Employment Office are now situated in M7, across the road from
the Armouries. The Extension Department has moved from the Arts
Building to huts behind the Library, L 7,8,9,10.
NO BOOK EXCHANGE
Students looking for the< Book
Exchange should stop immediately.
Contrary to all rumors the Book
Exchange Has not as yet been assigned an office.
The Statistics Lab, that used to
be situated somewhere near Point
Grey has been moved to the University and is now situated in hut*
M20 and 21.
The Law and Commerce
faculty are located ln the G
gronup of huts, Just north of
the Brock building. Nursing
has been moved from the top
of the Applied Science building over to 03.
Hungry students, might take a
look at hut M24, where is placed
a Lunch Counter and Bakery. Thc
Bakery will supply all the campus
eating places with cakes and pies
etc.
However, the Publications Board
is still situated underneath the
Brock Building along with the
furnace and a few stray rats.
UBC WILL PLAY HOST to student president delegates
from American Pacific Coast universities at the 25th annual
conference of the Pacific Student Presidents' Association to
be held here next spring.
Conference president will be
AMS prexy Ted Kirkpatrick, who
was elected at the 1946 conference
May 31 and June 1 at the University of California, Berkely, Cal.
PROMOTE GOODWILL
Purpose of the annual meets is
"to foster and promote friendly and
cordial institutional relations
among member colleges and universities of the association,"
All colleges and universities located in the states of Washington,
Oregon, California, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah,
evada, Arizona and New Mexico;
in the territories of Alaska and
Hawaii; and in the province of
British Columbia and in the republic of Mexico are eligible for membership in the organization.
TOPICS
Topics discussed at the 1946 eon.
ference included problems of married veterans attending university,
intercollegiate athletics, student
administration, cultural activities
and intercolegiate debating. Thirty-one colleges were represented.
Date for the 1947 conference haa
not yet been set but is expected to
be some time in May.
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College girls have come into their own
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woman student desires flattering, practical,
feminine suits with particularly good lines. .
such are the suits that we offer the college
woman at Spencer's . . suits for her — and
her budget!
A. Heather brown suits, collarless, dolman
sleeve, tie front, skirt pleat back and
front 422.B0
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LIMITED
\ THE UBYSSEY, September 24th, 1946, Page 4
,11-'
can- em
By LAURIE DYER
BACK TO THE OLD GRIND
ALAS, SUMMER has gone. (What a punch line to star
a paragraph with!   It's so obvious!!)   Every year about this
time comes fall, and with it comes another term of learnin'.
So once again, we put on an intelligent expression and toddle
out to dear old UBC.
At first everything seems about the same. There's still
a line-up at the bus just as there was when we left after the
last exam last spring. There was a line-up at the Administration too and there undoubtedly will be in the Caf. Yes,
everything is about the same.
It's A Big Girl Now
But a second look around tells a different story. UBC is
growing even more than it did last year. It doesn't take long
to find more new huts for instance. It doesn't matter where
you go, there are plenty of puzzled freshmen and freshettes
wandering around the campus; even more than last year it
seems. Yea verily, everything at the old alma mammy seems
to be going big time.
Keeping right in step with the general expansion idea is
the realm of Sport. The Blue and Gold took long steps in
the right direction last year as far as sports are concerned
and this term would seem to offer even greater things to the
guys and gals who keep our colours flying high in the sport-
light. Just as an example of the way we're growing up, take
a gander at the Stadium.
Slight Growing Paint
Plans for the expansion of the Stadium are still under
way but even now, many additions have been made. Shortages of this, that, and the other thing haven't helped matters
any of course. Nevertheless, all the seats have been painted,
tiie field has been renovated to a colour that would delight
any Irish blood, and the track has been put into first class
shape.
On the north end of the oval, an auxiliary playing field
has been whipped into shape. At present, it is seeded, and
so it might be a good idea to keep your big feet off for awhile.
Also at the north end has been built a few rows of cement
peats following the semi-circular shape of the oval.
Drill Hall For Practices
Still at the north end, a large drill hall is being placed
at the beginning of what was formerly the 220 straightaway.
It is large enough so that it can be used for football practices
on a slightly smaller scale.
On the far side of the oval, three tennis courts are being
There will be two at the North end next to the aux-
ry playing field and another at the south end. Next to the
ter will be an out-door court for the odd game of "chink"
1 something else like that there.
More seats are also being put up on the far side of the
track.   With the addition of these covered bleachers, the Stadium will have a capacity of more than 4000 screaming
spectators.
Radio and Press Booth Yet
Behind the new seats there will be a putting or bowling
green as well as a couple of jumping pits for the cinder men.
Just south of the drill hall there will be new dressing rooms
intsalled.
The crowning glory comes with the addition of a Radio
booth and Press box at the top of the grandstand. This comes
as a gift from the graduating class of '45 and it is certainly
. a welcome present to the world of sport. Now that the Radio
Society can broadcast the Varsity games, interest in our teams
should blossom forth in great style.
It all adds up to the fact that Sport is expanding along
with the University. It certainly looks like a great year for
sport and for the Blue and Gold.
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GRIDMEN PREP FOR CONFERENCE LOOP
Kabat Moulds Offensive Squad
SEASON PASSES
SOLVE FINANCE
FOR SPORT FAN
FOR   THE    AVID    sports
enthusiast, the perennial
follower ot Vanity athletic
competition, a new and better
method of quenching Ae thirst
for spectator glee has been
devised by the Physical Ed
department. At the bargain
price of >5.00, tickets to be
known as "Booster Pastes"
will be issued to those interested. These penes will entitle the bearer* to reserved
seats in the stadium or gym
at all home games for football,
rugby, basketball, or any otter
feature attraction.
However, the tale of these
terrific tickets is limited to a
bare 500. Be on your toes, and
get them from the Graduate
Manager's office in the gym,
as toon as the sale date is
announced!
Hangar Solves
Space Problem
ONE OF THE additions to the
Sports facilities o the campus this
year will be in the form of a
hangar all the way from Toflno.
As yet the size of the floor is uncertain but the latest figues made
it 128 feet by 112.
This will provide a apace approximately equal to that of thc
Armoury floor. Although parts of
■it are here at present, it is not
expected that the building will be
ready for use until after Christmas.
When the whole thing is built
however, its possibilities are unlimited. The floor will be of asphalt and will therefore allow for
three tennis courts as well as
lots of space for Badminton.
INDOOR PRACTICES
It can be used for archery, golf
practices with the help of back
drops and cricket practices. There
U a possibility that in years to
come, a lacrosse box can be put
up and it is hoped that this will
develop into a regular intramural
sport.
All the teams will be able to
practice there. It will be large
enough for the grid teams to go
over their plays or for the rugger
teams to practice their tactics.
This would be particularly handy
on a rainy day when the team*
are supposed to play the next day.
The only drawback is that it
will be impossible to practice
tackling but the mogals hope to
beat this problem too.
Swimlcids Expect
Sensational Year
FOR ALL the little fishes at UBC
this year, tiie Swimming Club is
ready again. A big year is for-
seen for its members by Doug
Whittle, assistant Physical Ed.
Director.
The club went to the trouble last
year of coming out on top in a
telegraphic meet against other
Canadian Universities and Western
Washington. They also enteved the
B.C. champlqnshlpe and did very
well.
Notable In the former was a
young lady by the name of Kay
Worsfold who took a couple of
firsts. However there are many
stars of last year returning to the
club again this year.
MANY RETURN
Among them ar Dick ELUs and
Lou Attwell both of whom favor
the back stroke. Two breast stroke
artists, Jack Turner and Jim Hawthorn will be back, lite divers are
such good men as Chuck Bakany
and Harvey Allen.
Besides all this, Irene Strong is
on the campus this year. Mention
of her name is word enough that
big things are in store for the
swim fiends.
A meet is scheduled for the first
week in December against Archie
McKinnon's team in Victoria and
it is hoped that challenge meets
will be held against Conference
teams.
First meeting is on Mon., Oct 7
at 3:30. Members should pick up
Swimming Club Membership cards
at the AMS office.
SUPPORT
UBC's
GYM DRIVE
GREG  KABAT
... UBC's Head Grid Mentor
Tuesday, September 24, 1946
Page 4
LAURIE DYER, Sports Editor
P. E. STAFF TO START
COURSE FOR DEGREE
By LAURIE DYER
KEEPING in step with the general expansion on the
campus this year, it was announced recently by Bob Osborne
that the University will this year begin a course which will
lead to a degree in Physical Education.
The course will be a four year       —----—-———-—---—--—--——-—
affair ln the Faculty of Arts and
Science. Although as yet the exact
title of the degree haa not been
announced, the course will start
this term. Already there is an enrollment of 41 men and eight women for the course.
It is hoped that the students who
take this course will have two majors when they are finished. One
will be their Physical Education
and the other would be something
of their own choice which would
prepare them for High School
teaching.
TEACHER TRAINING
This would qualify them to teach
one subject along with Physical Ed.
in the schools. This is very desirable in most of the B.C. schools
today.
The first year of the course will
be an ordinary first year Arts
course but there are certain prerequisites which will have to be
taken to enter the Physical Ed.
course. Students will register for
this course in their second year
or after completing Senior Metric
providing that they have the necessary prerequisites.
This includes courses such as
Public Health and Preventive Me.
dicine, First Aid and Athletic Injuries and also nine units of Psychology.
VARIED STUDIES
There are also arrangements
made for studjuig Exercise and
Massage, Athletic Coaching, and
History and Princiles of Physical
Ed. and Recreation.
The course will total 60 units as
does an Arts course. However,
hours will be longer than the average Artaman's in that there will
be extra hours which would be
the equivalent of a lab.
These lab periods will be taken
on the gym floor or outside. In
second year, there will be seven
hours each week spread out
amongst Gymnastics and Calisthenics, Team Games, Aquatics,
Individlual and Dual Activities,
and the Dance.
VOC Gets Grants
To Repair Cabin
GREAT NEWS has come to the
attention of those mountain enthusiasts on tne campus who are
members of the Varsity Outdoor
Club. Council recently okayed a
grant of five hundred dollars for
the group to be used for repairing
their cabin.
The club is one of the few sporv
organizations off the campus but
nevertheless, it has done its share
in bringing glory to UBC. They
operate a cabin on Grouse Mountain and although the accomodation
lsN limited, this affords them the
privilege of being fairly choosey.
With the fairly tough requirements that the club has in practice, they obtain the guys and gals
who will get the fullest benefit
from what facilities they have.
There is instruction in skiing
pnd climbing throughout the year
in preparation for the big tournaments that the VOC takes pan
ir. including intercollegiate affairs.
The Mountalnmen made great
strides last year in their intercollegiate efforts at Mount Baker
and In entries up here In the different tournaments held.
Club president Fred Roots expects another bigger and better
year in '48 and with last years'
experience, things look rather
bright. That 500 smackers will
probably help a lot too.
NEED GRIDMEN
All prospective candidates for
American football are requested
to report for practice sessions being held every evening from 6:00
to 8:00. Particulars may be had
from the publications office in the
Brock, or from Johnny Owen in the
Stadium.   Report at once.
BEST WISHES FOR 1946
FROM
BRYNES TYPEWRITERS LTD.
592 SEYMOUR STREET
—PAc. 7942—
Royal Typewriters — Standard and Portable
Campus Representative:
ALma 0538Y Marguerite Byrnes
About Starry Back Bob Murphy
By NAP TURNER
PREPPING for their initial appearance on the gridiron
against Northwest Pacific Conference competition, the Varsity Thunderbirds have been going through their strenuous
paces for the past two weeks under the watchful eye of Coach
Greg Kabat. Upwards of 50 candidates are currently enjoying gregarious Greg's muscle-building course designed to
mould the 1946 edition of UBC football razzle-dazzle into the
hard-driving club needed to take the field against Willamette
College before a home crowd on October 5.
AIDING the mighty mentor in        ——-——---———--—-—-.	
his coaching chores is Jack Pomfret, all-round athlete graduate
from the University of Washington, among whose achievements
was the cracking of the world record for the 50 yard breastioke.
Jack has been drilling the linemen, converting the bruisers into
the proverbial brick well. Also
donning the togs with a whistle
is Dr. James H. Hutchinson, former Winnipeg Blue Bomber who
played with that club when they
marched to the Dominion Championship in 1942.
MANY RETURN
Back from last season's Hardy
Cup squad and ready to garb
themselves anew in the Blue and
Gold are backfield stalwarts Hex
Wilson, Dmitri Goloubef, Freddie
Jopson, Phil Guman, and Junior
Tennant, to mention a few. The
front wall has experienced Herbie
Capozzi and Bill Mcintosh to add
to the seasoning of the line.
Varsity stock was boosted a
couple of notches when Bob Murphy, highly touted as the best
plunging fullback ever to lug tin.
pigskin for Vancouver College, reported for heavy duty last week.
Powerful Robert, after a brief sojourn south of the border where
he had been offered a myriad oi
scholarships, threatens to form the
nucleus of the Varsity aggregation,
where his offensive ability will be
put to effective use.
RUGGER MEN, TOO
Two gridsters, boasting much
prowess in their accustomed surroundings on an English rugger
team, have decided to cast in their
lot with the American code. Dot.
Nesbit, the led with the educated
toe, and Bob Starry, another boy
from Lord Byng have offered their
services.
Harry Marks a veteran of grid
wars back in 1939 has shouldered
the pads, as has Joe Capozzi, big
brother of last year's co-captai,..
Herb. Doug. Reld, a product of
Johnny Farina's smooth-working
Kits teams, has caught the eyes
of the men behind the strategy as
a ball-carrier of the swivel-hipped
variety.
Putting the emphasis on condition, Kabat has been consistently
exhorting his charges to get in the
best shape possible. Indicative of
its effect on the summer-torn candidates are the sweat-drawn visages as they drag themselves to
the showers after a session.
WhUe Greg end hit staff'experiment on their boys, experienced
for the moat part only in afe Canadian brand of rugby, the Northwest Conference players to the
South are awaiting with sharp interest the outcome of Rabat's research.
Sport
Needs
Desk
Help
DO YOU crave excitement? Do
you enjoy the hurly-burly of having people running around screaming as you try to type? Did you
happen to notice that the last time
that you cut yourself, the blood
was just a little darker than usual?
You must admit that there is
nothing like a little excitement to
break the monotony of going to
lecture after lecture all day. Also
you must admit that a little noise
puts you in a mood where you
don't give a darn about anything.
And If your blood is just a little
on the dark side, you have passed
the last mile-stone on the way to
success
The dark effect is of course just
the printer's ink in your blood.
All of which means you are fully
qualified to become one of the
elite members of the Publications
Board, (hereafter referred to as
the Pub) and this in indeed quite
an honour.
A TRUE EXPERIENCE
Actually, it is a well known fact
around the University that the
Pub is one of the foremost groups
of characters on the campus. Naturally, you will want to join tho
happy throng, particularly if you
know anything about writing newspaper stories.
And obviousyly, if you are going
to tag along, you'll want to come
down and take a look at the situation. So, when you reach the
Pub, which by the way, is in the
depths of the old Brock Building,
just go through the swinging gate
and follow your nose.
If you follow this procedure,
you should wind up at the Sports
desk where a large hand will reach
out to welcome you. It will be all
the easier if you are interested in
sports and know a little about writing. If you are at all interested,
how about dropping into the Pub
for a minute. There*s always room
for a good sports scribe.
CONFERENCE
FOOTBALL
Oct. 5   Willamette vs UBC atUBC
Oct.   12   Western   Washington   vs
UBC at UBC
Oct. 19   Whitman College vs UBC
at UBC
Oct. 26   College of Idaho vs UBC
at UBC (Homecoming)
Nov. 2 College of Puget Sound vs
UBC at Tacoma.
Nov.  9   Linfield College vs UBC
at UBC
Nov.    15   Pacific    University    vs
UBC at Forest Grove (night game)
SUCCESS TO THE CLASS OF '50
Dietrich • Collins  Equipment Ltd.
890 S.W. Marine Drive
GREETINGS FROM
ALASKA PINE
CO. LTD.
GOOD LUCK TO THE
CLASS OF '50
PACIFIC MEAT CO. LTD. FOUR NEW MEMBERSjIAID
ON PHYSICAL ED.JSTAFF
By DAVE BARKER
WIT! THE offering of the Physical Education degree at
UBC thii year, and the subsequent expansion of the staff,
the University has gained several new outstanding people in
the ofllcei of the Gymnasium. Ivor Wynne and Jack Pomfret
will be kelping in the men's Physical Ed. set up, and Miss
Marian Henderson will be replacing Mrs. Sleightholme in the
Women'f department. Assisting her will be Miss Isabel Clay
who waa at UBC last year, and another newcomer, Miss Jean
•~——————————      Carmichael.
Rugger Players
Readyjo Start
THI BTCKJSH RUGBY season
will get underway on Wednesday
at 8:80. Tiie tret practice will be
held at the stadium, but at yet the
coaches Jet the teams have not
been definitely named. Everyone
who has the slightest prowess at
English Rugby ia asked to turn out.
It la hoped that there will be up to
3 or 4 aeeend division teams this
year.
UBCf Eng--* Rugby teams had
an excellent seaaon last year, the
Thunderbirds copping the Millar
and McKeniie Cups. Great thing
are in store for Varsity in the English Rugby seaaon of '46. Don't
forget, first practice, Wed. at 3:30
Turn out if you can. It takes lots
of man to build a really top notch
team.
FOR:
Zipper Locee-Leaf
ling Books and
Paper Cases
Brief Cases
Slide R*lee
Drawing Instruments
Fountain Pens and Pencils
and) all Other Requirements
MAKE
The
Wilson Stationery
Co. Ltd.
YOUR HEADQUARTERS
130 West Pender St.
Jikit Wt Blocks West of
Granville
Ivor Wynne, who hails from the
East, makes his home in Hamilton,
Ontario. He attended the Central
Collegiate Institute in Hamilton,
and then pushed on to McMaster
Universltiy in Toronto. Ivor was
captain of the basketball team at
McMaster, and also played quarterback on the football team. As
well as this he also played hardball and aoftbsll. At UBC Ivor will
be taking Phys. Ed classes, and
also coaching some teams if he ls
needed. One of his regular duties
will be the intramural program,
which he will be handling alone
this year.
BYNG BOY
Jack Pomfret is strictly a native
of Vancouver. He attended Lord
Byng High School, and while in
Vancouver he captured many B.C.
swimming championships. He attended the University of Washington, and played on the basketball
team there. He also played for
Lauries the year of '44 when
Lauries won the Western Canada
Basketball crown. Aside from
these distinctions, Jack also played
ice hockey and hardball, and almost took professional contracts ln
both. At present Jack is assisting
Greg Kabat In getting the football team ready for the Northwest
conference. When classes start,
Jack will have his regular work
as well, and also coaching teams.
In the women's department of the
P.E. work, Miss Marian Henderson
will take over from Mrs. Sleightholme. Assisting her will be Miss
Jean Carmlcael.
Miss Henderson comes from Toronto, attended High School ln Sar-
nia, and later returned to the University of Toronto. Miss Henderson
has played most sports, but when
quizzed she mentioned Basketball
and Softball especially.
NEW ASSISTANT
Miss Jean Carmichael, a native of
our capital city, Ottawa, will be
assisting Miss Henderson in the
Physical Ed program. She attended
Glebe Collegiate Institute. After
graduation there she pushed on to
higher levels at Queens, University
of Toronto, Columbia University
in New York.
Miss Carmichael has participated
in moat sports, including golf,
swimming and skating, which she
seems   particularly   interested   in.
•  PHYSICAL ED MOGULS-The
newly - formed department of
Physical Education owes its efficiency to the four men pictured
above. Reading from left to right:
Bob Osborne (department head),
Doug Whittle (assistant director of
physical education), Ivor Wynne,
and Jack Pomfret. The ladles to
the left take over the feminine
section of the department. From
left to right: Misses Carmichael,
Henderson (director), and Clay.
Football Moguls Considering
Large Inter-faculty Program
SPECULATION has run rampant around the Physical
Education offices lately about the feasibility of broadening
the football setup on the campus. In addition to the American football club under the tutelage of Greg Kabat slated to
engage the Northwest Pacific Coast Conference in gridiron
fray, an inter-faculty loop is being mooted. Possible entries
include the Arts octupus, Science, Law, Pre-Med., and
■-~~-—————————      Commerce.
TICKET SALE
WEDNESDAY
GRADUATE Manager Luke
Moyls announced late Monday
that UBC's latest sports bargain,
the Booster Ticket, goes on sale
at the Gym ticket wicket Wednesday morning at 1:3*.
Price of the past, which entitles the holder to a reserved
•eat at all home games, bath In
the stadium and gym, (except
special and benefit events) Is
$5.M.
The sale will be limited to
SM and will be available to
students only. First came, first
served.
MULTIGRAPH SALES AGENCY
(W.B.Tate)
Agents for MULTIGRAPH DUPLICATORS
extend greetings
to the entire Student Body —
525 West Georgia
MArine 0261
BIG BLOCK CLUB MEETS
THE FIRST meeting of the Big
Block Club is scheduled for Thursday in the Double Committee room
of the Brock. Time is 12:30 sharp.
Agenda includes a report from the
Awards Committee. Sweaters and
Blazers and activities for the year.
All members are asked to wear
their sweaters and be there for a
very important meeting.
NOTICE
Would all Clubs, Societies, Fraternities and Sororities pick up their
mail in the letter rack in the AMS
Office.
^ake Better
BEST WISHES TO
U.B.C.
CROSSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 Beach Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
STUDENTS!
Your Headquarters for:
Victor, Bluebird, Decca and
Columbia Records
Radios, Record Players,
Radio-Phonographs
Toasters, Irons, Hotplates Etc.
Columbia Radio and
Electric Ltd.
4508 West 10th
ALma 2544
2028 West 41st.
KErr. 4810
WITH THESE
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ISCHOOL  SUPPLY  DIALS*
Bob Osborne, In unofficial conference with the press is reported
to have favored tht idea in the
opinion that the 5000 husky males
now cavorting about the campus
were capable of producing more
than one football squad.
The brand of football suggested
would approximate the Canadian
code, leaving open the possibility
of entering the Junior Board of
Trade league and even of staging
exhibition contests with the newly
formed "Big Four."
NOT EASILY DONE 7BC
The PJ5. Department chief saia
that there were possible impediments to the scheme, The present
dearth of equipment looms as the
outstanding obstacle in the path
of the widening scope of sport at
UBC, and the shortage of football
gear shows no intention of being
relieved In the near future.
Again, lack of faculty organization, specially prevalent amongst the vast horde of Artsmen,
threatens to tie up big-time inter-
mural sport, which until now has
been limited to fraternities and
other clubs led last season by the
high flying Jokers. However, If
there be strength enough to unite
fuculty spirit, approvpl should be
easily forthcoming from the moguls In the Gym.
Imagination could hardly conceive of tho terrific appeal an
Arts-Science football game would •
have for ihe campus. Picturing the
well-drilled redshirts parading to
the stadium alonside the countless
array of wandering Artsmen seems
to be a source of great Interest. It
remains for the campus to get organized and fast.—Turner
FOUND
I brown leather wallet containing a considerable sum of money
with pictures, Identification papers
etc. Please claim at the Gymnasium office.
/
Grads Donate
Clock, Booth
SOMETHING new has been added and in this case, two things
even yet have been 'contributed to
make the game all the more enjoyable for Varsity's sport fans,
Both are donations from graduating classes. The Class of '45 has
had plana drawn up for a Radio
booth and Press box to be Installed
at the top of the grandstand in
the Stadium while the Class of '46
has presented the University witn
a time-clock to be put up in the
gymuaslum.
The Radio booth is under construction at the present ime and it
is expected that the first Conference game between the boys from
Willamette and UBC will be
broadcasted.
The booth will be made soundproof and will toe equipped with
modem apparatus suitable to carry the games to the pupllc in big-
time style.
TIME CLOCK IN GYM
Beside the Radio booth, a modern press box & being installed.
It should, be large enough for
five reporters at least, The whole
thing will occupy the centre section of the grandstand at the very
back.
The gift from the Class of *46
is in the form of a time clock and
automatic scoreboard for use in
the hoopla contests. It can most
certainly be used to great advantage not only by the spectators
but also by the team and the
coaches.
It is expected that the clock will
be placed above the corner door
on the south end of the gym. This
is the place that was formerly
used for broadcasting but It is
possible that the space can be used
for both.
BAy. 7141 XA.XI BA^ 7141
GREETINGS and BEST WISHES STUDENTS
Ride Back With
Point Grey Transportation Co. Ltd.
THE UBYSSEY, Tuesday, September 24, 1946.  Page 5
NAME LUKE MOYLS
GRAD MANAGER
THERE'S A NEW deal in sports
on UBC's campus this year, and,
following the modern organization
system of universities south of the
49th parallel, UBC now boasts a
Graduate Manager of Athletics.
The new sports head Lt not unfamiliar to UBC's athletic circles,
having played a major role ln
Varsity sports circles for the past
three years. Luke Moyls, probably
best known for his column "Die
Gospel" end his energetic work, as
•ports editor of The Ubyssey, was
appointed to this new position last
month.
Luke began an outstanding
journalistic career under Sports
Editor Chuck Claridge on the
UBC publication in 1943 as a
basketball reporter and became
sports editor the following year.
GOSPEL WELL KNOWN
His regular sports column, The
Gospel according to Luke, rapidly
became one of the most popular
features of The Ubyssey and was
voted second only to Jabez'a
Mummery in a campus poll last
spring.
Luke is also well known in
downtown sports circles, being associated with The News-Herald
sports department for three years.
He received his B.A. at UBC
this spring and was named winner
of The News • Herald's Senior
Award in Journalism.
Luke will start his new job by
taking over publicity and general
business management of student
sports. At present, like many other
new officials on the campus, he is
vainly searching for an of&oe from
which to direct his duties.
LUKE MOYLS
... a permanent fixture
Probable location of tha naw
office will be in the gym, and
tickets for all sports activities will
be on sale at the graduate manager's office as soon as it opens.
FENCING CLUB
THERE WILL BE a general
meeting of the Fencing Club In
Art's 104 on Wednesday, Sept 25, at
12:30 pjn.
These Learning Years.
a
Fatigue caused by eyes that strain Is not conducive to easy
reading or studying. Into your prescription for glasses, every
safeguard known to sclenre is written to assure better vision.
For glasses that are comfortably current and becomingly smart-
Remember for your convenience, our two offices .   .. .
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
CO.LTB.
424
VANCOUVER- BLOCN.
College Line-up (or Fall J
• Blazers-a "classic" for evary co-ad,
accompanied by a distinctive Imported skirt in stripea, chacka or
tweeds.
• Tailored Wool Casuals — for class or
off-the-campus wear.
• Date Dresses — gay, young and smart,
for "after five."
• Suits — classics    and   dressmakers,
designed especially for you for
campus living.
MARTY LLOYD
4409 West 10th Avenue ALma 2360
■■ i-'Wg*»f^«WP1^'
Great Success to the Class of 1950
BROW
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^m^mm_m_^—_m%mmmmmm__,______m^mtmmm^_t,
665 Granville Street
104 West Hastings St.
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We Extend Best Wishes For A
Successful and Happy Student Year
Dickson
Importing Co. Limited
Vancouver, B.C.
BEST WISHES
AT THE START OF ANOTHER YEAR
BRITISH ROPES
(CANADIAN FACTORY) LTD. THE UBYSSEY, Tuesday, September 24, 1946.   Page 6
THE MUMMERY (Continued From Page2)
ped him into sections and bundled him into
rooms. All afternoon he bounced back and
forth across the hollow square of tables, like
a billiard ball gone berserk. When he went
to a table, the man would take his timetable sheet and make some squiggly marks
on it. He'd go to another table and there the
man would stare at the squiggly marks,
frown, scatch his nose, shake his head and
send him back to the end of the line-up for
the first table. There the man would curse
softly, glare at Homer, scratch out the first
squiggly marks and squiggle in a set of new
ones.
"That's all I can do," he'd bark.
As he shambled back to the second table,
Homer looked at the squiggles and wondered how the man came to have an important
job like that if that was all he could do.
Triumphantly bearing the squiggles of the
second table, Homer would pass to a third,
where the man seemed to find all the squiggles very amusing. He laughed, a funny
sort of laugh, and Homer laughed too just
to be neighborly, until the man sent him
back to the first two tables to have all the
squiggles changed again. He wondered
what the sign outside had meant about going around clockwise. He felt there mutt
be something wrong with his mainspring.
SUCCESS!
When all the spaces on his time-table were
finally filled, Homer was delighted to find
that he was left with Sunday afternoons
and Christmas day free.   His only disap
pointment was that he had 8:30 lectures six
days a week.
"I live in New Westminster," he had explained to the English Department.
"Beautiful city," said the Department,
squiggling him for 8:30, section 78, HL4.
Getting past the remaining tables was just
a matter of time, but when Homer limped
from the Armouries he found his brand, new
five-dollar booklet had been ripped all to
hell. Well, they did it. He refused to go
back to the Admin Building and start over
again. He never wanted to stand in line
again, for anything. He walked slowly
towards the bus-stand, passing a long lineup for something or other. His feet winced
at the sight. Not until he rounded the Aggie Building did he see what this was the
queae for:
The bus.
Sniveling quietly, Homer turned his steps
back to the line's end, sagged into place,
and looked up into a large wart on the neck
in front. At last he was beginning to understand why the Registrar had asked him
about his standing in high school. Had he
stood enough? he wondered. Were his feet
ready for college?
Then Homer realized the advantage he
and other ex-servicemen enjoyed: they had
hundreds of hour* more queuing time to
their credit. This was just an extra-long
pay parade, that was all And Homer Quin-
cey shuffled towards the but with the light
of hope shining in his eyes,
WITH MALICE AFORETHOUGHT
(Continued from Page 2)
tion. Ha shows, at all times, a
hatred for violence and extra legal
acts, which might seem unusual
in a conqueror. He meets all situations, however, with strong self
control, and the control of those
under him by means of rational
legal code. With such weapons
he can overcome any amount of
disjointed opposition, built of fanaticism and superstition.
SHAW AND FILMS
Shaw has realized for many
ears the tremendous power of the
film industry, and the almost hypnotic effect of the films, over a
vast and easily Impressed audience.
In 1933 he pointed out Hollywood
as the most immoral city in the
world, not with connotations of sex,
but with reference to the doctrines of Anarchy which it was
irresponsibly pumping out to its
audience. And lt is worth mentioning that that anarchist outlook
has become as prominent in the
comics with their superhuman,
above the law heroes, as it baa in
small time American polities.
The appearance of 'Caesar and
Cleopatra' was a wonderful piece
of timing, and lt carries lessons of
major importance. Whether those
lessons were consciously directed
toward any specific country, It ia
impossible to know—their application ln the face of a growing contempt for legality is universal.
Brltannlcui, Caesar's acribe from
the Western Isles, ia a delightful
character and a superb fait of
friendly satire on the English, but
he la also the author of the moat
significant line in the whole picture: Only as Caesar's slave have
I been truly tree.
VET. CHEQUES WOOF Stalks Campus;
Freshettes Are Warned
TEXT BOOKS
WE BUY
and
WE SELL
CARDS - GIFTS • CHINA
STATIONERY
THE
BOOK WINKLE
"Near the Bits Stop''
4521W. 10th   ALma 0164
HERE OCT. 15
FIRST veterans' subsistence
cheques will be issued October
IS and 18 In the Armouries, according to Major J. F. MacLean,
Veterans' Counsellor.
Cheques will be issued in October
and each month from then on in
alphabetical order.   A to M October IS and N to Z October 16.
The Bank of Montreal, 10th
and Sasamat branch, has arranged   to  have  officials  on
hand those two days to cash
the cheques.
The first cheque will not be
made out for a full month, but will
cover only the period between
September 23 to October 12.
FRESHETTES SHOULD be ware* the next week or so
of some sinister looking women on the campus, who will be
masquerading under the name of WOOF. In simpler language WOOF may be translated as WUS Orders Out
Frivolity.
These women, who are actually         ■
members of the executive of Women's Undergraduate Society, win
make the rounds of the campus
di'ily, searching for offenders.
They will move in groups, ot
never leas than two (for the information of sciencemen) keeping
an eagle eye on all Freshettes who
foil to obey the regulations set up
for them.
GOOD LUCK TO THE
CLASS OF '50
ARMSTRONG and MONTIETH
Construction Company
Limited
1383 Hornby Street
Vancouver, B.C.
MARSHALL - WELLS
B.C. LTD.
Extend Best Wishes To The Student
Body and Wishes It Every Success
In the Season's Studies
-•>■
Armed with green lipstick, washcloths, soap and similar paraphernalia, the WOOF will enforce
rules and dole out suitable punishments. All new women student,
who do not toe the line will flna
themselves wearing green lipstick,
pin curls all over their heads,
clothes inside out and other similar tortures.
To top it all off, final punishments for the worst offenders will
be meted out at the Big-Little
Sister supper to be held in the
Gym Saturday at 5 p.m. All Big
Sisters must attend, bringing their
Little Sisters, to sit before the
highest tribunal of WOOF
WANTED
CAR RIDE from 49th and Fraser
for 8:30s every day. Please phoo
FRaser 2469 and ask for Nora.
Cabaret Offers
Victoria Weekend
RETURN FUGttT to Victoria
with weekend accomodations at the
Empress Hotel will be the grand
raffle prize offered at the Oamma
Phi Beta Cabaret to be held September 27 at the Commodore.
Given in support of the War
Memorial Gymnasium, the dance
will provide the op^ortxmity of
a sky tour of Vancouver by U-Fly
planes to the winners of two spot
dances.
Mingled with calypso songs and
dances and a can-can chorus will
bo drawings for a negligee, a man's
wool dressing gown, and a cashmere sweater set.
Tickets, at $5 a couple, may be
obtained from the AMS office
and members of the Gamma Phi
Beta Sorority.
FIRST MEETING
THE CHESS CLUB will hold its
first meeting of the Season Tuesday October 1 in Arts 102. Prospective memebers are invited.
BLUE RIBBON LIMITED
extend Greetings to you in another year of
Student drive
Blue Ribbon Tea
"Perfectly Blended to your Taste"
BeaintUe
AUTUMN SEMESTER
• With a visit to our Art Department
• A complete line of Art and Drafting Supplies
• Fountain Pens and Pencils
• Loose Leaf Ring Books and Exercise Books
566 Seymour Street
PAciflc 0171
GEHRKE'S Ltd.
Phone PA-0171
GREETINGS
TO THE
FRESHMAN CLASS
-_» ,. JsSaES^r-jsaa
F. DREXEL CO. LTD.
831 Powell Street aMj
Vancouver, B.C.
2561 Granville St
AN INVITATION
J4CI   III I
•  Sim Clotki
It - - The - - Place
Smart Clothing For Smart Men
BAyview 2189
Salesman! "Is your buyer tough."
Switchboard Operaton -'Why no, at least he's
always susceptible to a Sweet Cap."
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"Ths pursstfem in which lehette ten he smsksJ"
I
PROFS EAT
With the faculty buUdlnTnear-
lng completion, members of the
staff should soon be able to move
from their rather crowded dining
room In the cafeteria.
The stucco-finished ediface is
being constructed from old army
huts.
The west wing is to be a private
dining room and the east wing, a
lounge. The main dining room
will be located in the centre section.
The building, overlooking the Inlet, has one of the most picturesque views on the campus.
Book Exchange
Opens To-day
THE LONG LOST Book Exchange has Anally been located in
tho Men's Club room, upstairs in
the South End of the Brock.
Officials announced Hut the Exchange will be open fer business
to-day at 12:30.
The Ubyssey would like to bring
to the attenion of all students that
tho Book Exchange moved from
i-s present location.
Styles for Young Men
and
Men Who Stay Young
301 West Hastings
British Columbia
Advisory Board
•
Brig. Sherwood Lett, C.B.E., DSO,
M.C. LLD.
Hon. W. A. MacDonald, K.C.
Col. the Hon. Eric Hamber
W. H. Malkin
George T. Cunningham
The
TOROMO GEDERflL
TRUSTS CORPORflTIOn
ESTABLISHED
1882
•
Vancouver Office:
Pender and Seymour Streets
•
ASSETS UNDER ADMINISTRATION
over $275,000,000.00
Greetings And Best Wishes
lo The Class of '50
♦
DAL GRAUER
I. J.  KLEIN
J. A. CAMPBELL K.C.
STAN. S. McKEEN
W. C. MURRIN
T. S. DIXON
SENATOR J. W. deB. FARRIS
CAFE'BRAND FOOD PRODUCTS
CHRIS SPENCER
J. E. THOMPSON
BUCKERFIELDS LTD.
ALFRED HYAMS
McDonnell metal manufacturing Co. Ltd.
GEORGE REIFLE
FARRIS, McALPINE, STULZ, BULL and FARRIS
TERMINAL CITY IRON WORKS
ELECTRIC  POWER EQUIPMENT  LTD.

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