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The Ubyssey Nov 18, 1954

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 HOGTOWN vs. FOGTOWN
EZRA  WHEATCROFT
Skaol,   Baru   In   Intellectual   Clash
"Skoal" cried the conservative-minded,
tradition-bound, sickenly-flanneled invaders
from the veddy, veddy proper East.
"Baru . . . Because!" screamed the tra-
ditionless, gridiron-innnocent upstarts from
the West.
And so did the epic football spectacle of
the century takest place on the hallowed turf
of Johnny Owen Stadium, pitting together
University of Toronto (Blues, scourge of
Hogtown, and our own, beloved, belabored
and belicked Boids, representatives of Fog-
town.
And now, as the sun sinks slowly behind
Erwin Swangard, if you kiddies will gather
around, being careful not to crush your crinolines nor soil your pink shirts, Uncle Ezra
will deliver his annual intellectual dissertation on the philosophical background a'nd
cultural connotation of the grand old game of
feetball.
*.     *       *
"Skaol" is the traditional chug-a-lug cry
and marching and chowder song of suds-
sloppers. everywhere. It is also the name of
the Engineering Undergraduate Society at
Toronto, the rather spirited group of young
lads'who were fined $4000 and suspended
one year after 200 of their freshmen went
berserk on a "get acquainted" tour of the
campus and ripped up furniture, tore down
signs, overturned cars, slugged a prof and
generally had a ball.
This all bodes well of a grand time this
Saturday if Toronto's footballers have one-
third the protoplasm of their thick-skulled
sciencemen.
The "Baru" business will do for the moment to serve as a rallying cry for followers
of the Thunderbirds and is Uncle Ezra's personal recommendation for a retaliatory slogan whilst drowning suds with Toronto supporters after yon gridiron battle.
Now Dr. Rdbert Hutchins has expressed
belief that his Excited States of America is
the only country in the world to get football
mixed up with higher education. Now I'll
bet my pass-key to the women's dorms that
this is one of the few institutes of every-
upwards-and-onwards learning that escapes
Dr. Hutchins complaint. We is, to use a My
Canine Has Vermin term, as pure as the
driven snow. Even compared to Toronto the
Good's gridiron gargantuas.
*r tt tT
Disregarding   the   illiterate   mumblings
from Blowhard Richard Bedclothes, the Metaphor Mangier of Beatty Street, your wise,
omnipotent and just plain potent Uncle
drains the last fetid drop from his plaster of
pans crystal ball and predicts Thunderbirds
will rise to the occasion and vanquish Varsity
Blues in the brew battle Saturday night at
the Shrine of Cece's Loaded Tray.
*r *r *r
Boids' showing Saturday just could determine the future of the perennial-dream--
a Canadian intercollegiate football league
linking UBC with the prairie universities.
And on this rousing note we will end our
treatise with the school yell of the Wheat-
cropt-founded Varsity Indoor Club:
Knit one; purl two
UBC Thunderbirds, Yoo-Hoo.
THE UBYSSEY
VoL 17
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1954
SCENTS
No. 22
LAYING DOWN the law to UBC Muduit kudus is Doug
Burns president of the National Federation of Canadian
University Students. Burns spoke at a panel discussion
on NFCUS Wednesday in Physical 200. On his left is Jim
Craig, local federation head.      —Photo by Brian Thomas
Burns   Urges   NFCUS
Representation Abroad
The panel almost outnumbered the audience at yesterday's
Student Council sponsored debate on the National Federation
of Canadian University Students in Physics 200.
mssstms.Mssmmmsmmmtsssssssm-_-■-----■-------■----- ^       Only 23 students turned Out to
take   in   the   panel   discussion
that featured NFCUS President
FRATS JOIN HANDS
FOR CAMPUS BLIT1
Over   250   'East-West'   football   tickets   were  sold   in  a
campus-wide blitz Wednesday
morning.
Each fraternity was alloted
a portion of the campus to try
their   salesmanship   on.
The frat men torrented
down on unsuspecting students trying to persuade them
to attend Saturday's big East-
West football game.
Doug Burns, and with AMS President Dick Underhill, Treasurer
Ron Bray, and John Spencer,
Law 2, rounding out the panel.
Burns, last year's Student
Council president at thc University of Alberta and elected full-
time President of the NFCUS
last month in Toronto, presented
a report from the Toronto Conference.
In his report, Burns stressed
the importance of having a nat-
(dontinued on Page 3)
See   NFCUS
Dean Ref uses Comment
On McGugan's Charge
V
RUN, READ, AND WEEP MAU
YOUR EXAM LIST IS POSTED
The tentative exam time-table for Christmas exams
has been posted in all campus buildings, and on the
notice board in the Quad.
Any clashes of exam times must be reported to the
Registrar's office by November 25 so that the final schedule can be drawn up.
The final time-table will be released within 10 days.
Big Welcome Planned
For Jncoming Toronto
UBC's first real football weekend will get under way at
International airport Thursday evening at 8:15 when the first
of two planes bearing the Toronto Varsity Blues arrives.
Mayor Hume, University offi
cials, a brass band, thc Pep Club
and a large student delegation
will be on hand to meet the
planes. The second plane arrives
at 9:15.
From the airport a student
motor cavalcade will drive
through downtown Vancouver to
the Devonshire Hotel where a
reception will be held for the
visitors..
BILLETED
The players will be billeted
on the campus in the Phi Delta
Theta fraternity house whose
members have agreed to move
out for three days.
Friday evening the University
of British Columbia and the Toronto Alumni Association will
give a banquet on the campus
lor the team.
RALLY
Also on Friday evening a giant
pep rally will be held in the
War Memorial Gymnasium in
conjunction with the UBC-St.
Martins basketball game.
The Toronto team will be introduced at  the game  and  the
(Continued on Page 3)
See   FOOTBALL
Top Bands
To Battle
For Dimes
"The Battle of the Bands" is
the order of the day as the Engineers' annual March of Dimes
Drive starts to roll today at noon.
The gals from the Home Ec
and Nursing faculties will be
playing their own inimitable
brand of football.
The red sweater boys are staging a pageant in remembrance
of the time they built Rome in
twenty-five hours. This takes
the form of a chariot race in
which Tiberious XXVLII (third
year bath building) offers to
drag away the mdumb be-damn-
ed Britons."
The music lovers have not
been forgotten. The infamous
"Campus Coolsters" have been
signed to a bout with the Engineers' "Lady Godiva" band.
WITH    A   TIMELY   MORAL
Love Tragedy In Two Acts
Act   one:   Eyes   burning
feverishly, UBC student Jo
Brown enters room in  private   house   and  speaks  to
elder brother:
John Brown:  "What a girl!
My god, 1 tliink I love her...
she's so warm,  so  unlike  the
usual   standoffish    woman.    I
must phone her."
Elder Brother: "Phone her'.'
Phone  wlio?"
John Brown: "Mary Smith.
J met her only two days almoin pjiysics. And she hall way
promised ot go to tho Mardi
tiras with inc. 1 KNOW I love
her. But she has lu break a
tentative date Willi lhal. Thug
Thompson   to  do it."
Elder Brother: "Say you've
got it bad. She must really be
something."
John Brown: "Something!
She's . . . she's. . . where's the
phone   book'.'"
Elder Brother: "Ye gods!
Don't you know her phone
number'.' Mow do you expect
to find a girl named Mary
Smith in the phone book?
Does she live  in   residence?"
John Brown: "Ooooh no.
No. Why, 1 don't even know
her lather's name. But 1 have
to reach her. By god I'll
phone every Smith in the'
phone   book,"
Elder Brother: "Ha! You
must be in love.'
(John Brown immediately
starts thumbing through the
phone book and phoning. He
phones. And phones. He is
disheveled as the curtain
closes.)
*t*       H*       ***
Act  two:  It   is  morning.
John  Brown,  haggard  and
sleepless, meets Mary Smith
in the quad. She speaks.
Mary Smith: "What happened to you last night? I was
forced to confirm my date
with . . ."
John Brown: "I tried, t . . . I
didn't know your number..."
Mary Smith: "But where
were you? I made Thompson
call back twice so I could
phone you."
John Brown: "I was home
all  night. All  night;"
(His voice rises.)
Mary Smith: "But your line
was busy. For at least three
hours."
John Brown: "Oh no! (He
staggers) "but how did you
know   my   number?"
Mary   Smith:   "I   used   my
student directory, of course!
(No sound is heard from
John     Brown    as     curtain
closes.)
THE END
Communists   Barred
From   Employment?
Dean Geoffrey C. Andrew has declined to comment on
charges of employment discrimination levelled against the
administration Monday by campus Communist leader Archie
McGugan.
Said Dean Andrew Tuesday: t\
"I have no comment to make."     | "l
McGugan first made his charges at a Student Christian Movement meeting accusing the University of refusing to hire professors with Communist ideals.
The Labor-Progressive party
leader reiterated his charges
Wednesday offering "proof" of
the accusation.
NO HELP WANTED
"In Canada it is the announced policy of the Association of
University Presidents not to hire
Communist teachers," he said.
McGugan said he knew of two
"qualified men" who cannot get
university appointments because of their political views.
"And there are others,' he stated.
He pointed to the absence of
avowed Marxists or Communist
professors on this University's
staff.
GUIDING LIGHT
"Marxist philosophy guides
the lives of one third of mankind
and has millions of supporters in
the rest of the world."
"It can be argued that it is
still a minority opinion here," he
continued, "but UBC has recently appointed a Catholic professor to its philosophy staff to
present the minority Thomist
view."
McGugan cited names of "distinguished Marxist scholars" on	
university  staffs  in  Great  Bri-0'*^een cloSSOS
ANDREWS—-No Commant
tain.
He mentioned J. B. S. Haldane
of London University, Thompson
of Birmingham, Farrington of
Cardiff, Hill of Oxford and Dobb
of Cambridge.
GENTLEMEN
McGugan attacked the "barring of qualified men by gentlemen's agreements if not actual
loyalty oaths."
Reverend Bob Ripley, SCM
head, said Wednesday it was unfortunate McGugan made hi.s
charges under their sponsorship.
McGugan's topic was "Man's
Place   in   the   Universe."
Politicos
Tangle
Shrum Visits East
Dr. Gordon M. Shrum returned to tiie Campus last Sunday November 14, after attending meetings of the National
Research Council in Ottawa.
Dr. Shrum left for Ottawa on
November 7.
PARLIAMENTARY   FORUM
will hold a panel debate on
"What's Your Line" by leaders
of all Campus Political Clubs.
on Thursday noon in Arts 100.
* #      *
MUSSOC   will   hold   a   Glee
Club rehearsal today at noon
in HM1. Names of all members
awarded lead roles will be announced.
* >(.      *
PRE - LAW     SOCIETY     will
sponsor Mr. Mussallem speaking
on "Juvenile Delinquency" today
noon   in   Physics   200.
* #      *
STADIUM CLUB will not hold
a meeting on Thursday, Nov. 18
but Sid Howe will address the
club  on  Friday.
(Continued  on  Page 3)
See CLASSES • ('
Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 18,;;l99$l,
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Mail subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published in Vancouver throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
the University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 1280
or Alma 1231.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Ray Logie News Editor Pat Carney
CUP Editor—Pete Paterson Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Associate Editor—Stan Beck      Executive Editor—Qeoff Conway
Senior Editor—JEAN WHITESIDE
Reporters and Desk—Norma Guftormssan, Jackie Trafford,
Ted Pizarski, Ann Rogers, Jim Carney, Peter Krosby, Pat Russell,
Nancy Seed, Jane Skeltop.
Sports: Neil McDonald, Peter Worthington, Maurice Gibbons.
No Assurance?
The possibility that UBC has adopted a policy of freezing out professors and lecturers who are communists is disturbing. The undesirability of such a situation in a university—which is supposedly the bastion of freedom of thought—
is beyond debate.
Liberals throughout North America and in Canada, and
in Canada particularly, have found the loyalty oath and
firing at American colleges deplorable in the extteme.
Yet Dean Andrews has declined to deny that communists are barred from the faculty here at UBC.
Perhaps he feels he should sccorn such a charge if it
comes from a communist. But we would point out that
such a charge could ultimately come only from a communist.
Moreover, such an atitude would hint strongly that discrimination against communists indeed exists at UBC.
Mr. McGugan's charges are far from fully substantiated.
But we hope Dean Andrew will yet set our minds at ease.
Lets   Be   Selfish
We are extremely suspicious of Lands and Forests
Minister R. E. Sommers' statement to a Hope audience, that
the Kaiser dam proposal wouldn't be carried through unless the U.S. bought natural gas from the Peace River.
Did the minister hope to convey the impression that our
government is getting us a good deal in the Arrow Lakes
! proposal by demanding! such an exchange.
The two are in almost no way related. Furthermore, our
'Peace River gas has been as good as sold for several weeks.
And Mr. Sommers knew this.
If the lands minister must resort to such tactics in order
to sell the Kaiser proposal'to the public, it is immediately
doutbful whether thet proposal has any merits of its own.
Attorney-General Robert Bonnerhas since gazed judicially at both the dam and pipeline proposals and argued that *
hydro-electric power is no different from natural gas: If we
export one, why not export the other?
And his argument is bolstered by the fact that natural
gas reserves are limited, while hydro-electric power is unlimited. It might be added also that, in the midst of the
present squabble, electricity is at this moment being exported to the State of Washington by the B.C. Electric.
Yet the objections to the proposed deal with the Kaiser
Aluminum Corporation, despite Mr. Bonner's argument, can
be supported by one assertion: As a business propdsition, it
isn't very good. We'd be selling ourselves down the Columbia River.
As far as we can make out the proposal, we are to turn
dyer a vast source of energy for perpetual U.S. use, in exchange for a one-fifth share and $250,000 per year.
It 'is well-known that the Kaiser corporation—along with
the entire American northwest—is starved for power. We
can dictate our own terms.
We should either force Kaiser to build a plant within
B.C., and therefore swell our own economy, or else jack the
price up—and make the deal effective for a limited time
only.
If neither are acceptable, we can wait and use the power
ourselves.
Selfish Again
New Zealand politicians aro reported as "shocked" at
the advance of the country's Social Credit party in the recent
national elections, in which one-eighth of the vote went to
the Socreds.
Canada's Social Credit party is unlikely to do as well
in the next federal election. But party members guarantee
they will win government control in a very few years. This
is a frightening thought, considering that the monetary
theory they intend to put into practise has been ridiculed
by almost every economist of note,
With a somewhat selfish and nationalistic outlook, we are
waiting for the Kiwi Socreds to beat the Canadians to it.
The New Zealand public will then be the guinea pig,
Compatability
United States' latest propaganda message about "Russia"
is that country's threat to our solar system.
This latest effort illustrates USA's propaganda predicament.   It is really very funny.
Their particular problem seems to be to convince the
average American that United States is no weak power militarily and simultaneously prove that Russia has caught up
—or is catching up.
They must generate nervousness or oven fear and at the
same time give assurance of certain victory in the event
of war.
Il may have been always thus but it strikes us that
the USA seems at limes to lack some propaganda co-ordination.
My Dog
Has Fleas
By   ROD   SMITH
And SANDY ROSS
Odds and ends again today:
First, a poem sent to us by
a Miss Elizabeth Ben tiey of
Agassiz. It is called the "Song
of the Horse-Chestnut Fairy,"
and we pass it along to you
without comment:
My conkers they  are shiny
things
And things of mighty joy,
And they are like the wealth
of Kings
To every little girl and boy;
I see the upturned face of each
Who stands around the tree;
He  sees  his  treasure  out  of
reach,
But does not notice me.
For love of conkers bright and
brown,
He pelts the tree all day.
With atones   and   sticks   he
knocks them down,
And thinks it jolly play.
But sometimes I, the elf, am
hit
Until I'm black and blue;
Oh laddies, only wait a bit.
I'll shake them down to you!
Isy Wolfe has been begging
us for a week to print his
nam.e So here it ls: Isy Wolfe.
m»       m*       mt
A mpn walked into a butcher store and said, ^'1 want a
pound of klddlles," to which
the    butcher    replied,    "You
mean   kidneys,    don't   you?"
The man drew himself up to
his full length and snarled, "I
said klddlles, diddle I?"
¥      ¥      ¥
We are Informed   that   in
England there grows a flower
which is known as Stitchwort.
Fortunately, continues our informant,   this   flower   has   a
prettier name—Starwort — but
it is not so often used.
The English are devoid of reason
When in spring the flower season
They    miss    an    incalculable
chance to grace
The vocabulary of our race
The stitchwort is called only
stitchwort
And though there is no vagueness whichwort
The English botanist then refers
to
I cannot think of anyone who
Would   not   rather   star   than
stitchwort
Or as the french say l'etoile-
wort
Pig  meat  has   been  renamed
pork
Pig and cow well mixed are
spork
Even   thc  grubber spade  has
doubled
A hole is never grubbed but
shoveled
Even   from   cliches   we   have
strayed
And no longer call a spade a
spade.
Remembering Mr. Keats whose
greek urn
Gives    romantic    hearts    the
heartburn
Should  we   not  then   beauty
seek
and call it AElowort like the
greek
Yes,  let us seek beneath the
hedgerows
Neath the toadflax and the wild
rose
Root   out   stitchwort   making
merry
Erase it from the dictionary
Call   up   Webster,   Funk   and
Wagnalls
Cambridg.   abridg.   all   verbal
know alls
Tell them stitch is now le* fleur
mort
Henceforth it is star not stitchwort
But:
Alas I confess though I despise
it.
No one I know can recognize it.
Excerpts from President
NAM MacKenzie's annual
radit report will appear on
this page Friday. The President made his report over
the Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation Tuesday night.
WriHifHand
Some Questions
Editor, The Ubyssey;
In a recent issue of your
newspaper you printed a frontpage s^ory telling of events consequent upon the "dismissal" of
a Mr. C. Pi Armour from the
position of Camp Porter at Acadia Camp. Your story left me
with the impression that Mr.
Armour's, dismissal might possibly have been at the unjust
instigation of a Dr. G. M.
Shrum.
Since the position of Acadia
Camp Porter is one of some
responsibility and since Dr.
Sbrum is certainly a very well-
known figure on this campus,
I was interested in this matter
and looked forward to the appearance of more facts on it.
However, in a more recent
edition of your newspaper I find
you have printed an apology to
Dr. Shrum for any embarrassment your story may have caused him. Specifically, you state
that Mr. Armour was not dismissed but that he was "retired" and that it was not Dr.
Shrum who retired him but that
it was the UBC Personnel Department.
Now these two things are not
very relevant to the question
of whether or not an injustice,
was done. If there ls a relevant implication at all, it is
the implication that, if there
was wsong done ,the responsibility lor that wrong lies with
the Personnel Department.
But I find it hard to believe
that you mean to imply that.
No. Your apology would appear to be essentially an apology for having reported the
facts incorrectly. If so, you owe
the apology not just to Dr.
Shrum but to all your other
readers as well. But you have
left the main questions unanswered. Regardless of whether or not your original story
was incorrect on details, the
main questions remain:
1. Was Mx. Armour's pre-
mature retirement unjust?
Or was it not?
2. If it was unjust then
upon whose recommendation
was the retirement made?
Wat it Dr. Shrum'.? Or
were others involved? Or
was no one involved at ell?
More briefly, just what the
h~- happened? If a wrong has
been done then let us discover
it. The function of a newspaper
is the funtion of Tiresias.
Yours truly,
Alexander Manson,
CLASSIFIED
■*■ i 'iii)'
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DOUBLE BREASTED TUXE-
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form, average size; 2 pair pants
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WANTED
RIDE WANTED, VICINITY'QF
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Ing electric typewriter;, Ciaifedn
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10th and Discovery AL. 1707
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TLOWERS LTD.
We Deliver COD or Charge
Broadway at Alroa
Double Duty
Prescription
CAMPBELL
CLEANERS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2460
Discount for Students
Till a few years ago customers
at the Bank of England could
help themselves from a bottle of
"cholera mixture" which the
bank kept on hand near the entrance. It all started with a Dr.
Alfred Smee, the bank's Medical
Officer in 1850, who made up the
original prescription. The doctor
was also the perpetrator of the
bank's ink which though not
quite the same thing, was near
enough to cause confusition. The
formula appeared to consist of
equal parts of toot, vinegar and
glue. To get rid of "the fur", the
bank's pens had to be agitated
in bowls containing lead shot.
You'll find neither cholera
mixture nor Smee's ink at any
branch of the Royal Bank, but
you WILL encounter a few things
of a more useful nature. Like
Savings Accounts, Money Orders.
Travellers Cheques and so on.
Another thing you'll find is
friendly, helpful service. There
are 33 branches of the Royal
Bank in Vancouver and the surrounding district. The Royal
Bank of Canada. 1
WHAT TO HINT FOR: A sturdy, sweet-looking, fast-typing Royal
portable! Has all the big machine features: Magic Margin*, Tabulator, Touch Control, Speed Selector, Line Meter, etc. In Tan of
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the new rugged
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THE WORLD OVER, MORE PEOPLE USE ROYAL
TYPEWRITERS THAN ANY OTHFR KiN&t
_. Thursday, ttovember 18,1D54
THE UBflTBSmr
Page Three
Clauses
To Stay
For Year
It Will be at least a year
before the three discriminatory
freter«ii4ies at UBC are able to
remove clauses from their constitutions.
%\e was revealed at Wednesday's meeting of the Committee
to Investigate Discrimination of
Alpha Tau Omega, Kappa Sigma and Sigma Chi fraternities.
the Undergraduate Societies
Committee, chaired by Jim Killeen,, heard Bill Emerton of Alpha' Tau outline how a motion
to remove the clauses was defeated at a national conference
of his fraternity last summer.
."Nothing can be done until
a year from now" he said.
Kappa Sigma alio reported
"solid opposition from the south'
ern block" at a summer convention.
A similar plea was brought
to the moisting by Sigma Chi
representative Ron Dickson.
"Pressure from inside each
fraternity is tbe only effective
means of ridding discrimination
Clauses ln national constitutions"
he said.
The three fraternities were
Balled on to present reports
on their efforts to remove discriminatory clauses.
11m committee was unable to
arrive at any definite conclusions at thi hearing.
FOOTBALL
(Continued isom Page 1)
opesing coaehes, Don Coryell
and Bob Masterson, will be interviewed on the floor. The Pep
Chib, replete with band and
cheer leaders, will be on hand
for the rally. A special student
rata or 25c has teen set.
.Saturday night after the game
the Frosh are sponsoring a gigantic -Cast-West dance in the Women's Gym. Adm to cabaret-
style   affair  is $2 per couple.
Sttwever, all students who at-
Md the game Saturday afternoon will be able to purchase
tickets at the Stadium for $1 per
couple.
The dbwntown blitz Is going
ahead as planned Friday afternoon. All students with or without cars who wish to take part
in the blitz are asked to be on
the Arts lawn at noon Friday.
Special student $2 tickets are
still on sale and may be purchased in the men's gym.
NFCUS
(Continued from Page 1)
ional Canadian University representation abroad.
Dip.th regards to NFCUS relations to the International Student Union, he said the present
policy is' one of "wait and see,"
•nd that NFCUS is quite removed from IUS at present.
Dick Underhill felt that
"NFCUS should be encouraged
both on the campus level and
on the national level" he said
"NFCUS deserved a broader justification than the mere return
of 50 cents worth per student."
Ron Bray declared that "from
a straight dollar and cents point
of view it is poor business proposition to belong to NFCUS."
CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
STUDENT     CHRISTIAN
Movement will sponsor Miss
Mory Rendarll, Field Secretary
of the Anglican Women's Training College, speaking on "Vocations for Women in the Church"
noon today in room 312 in the
Auditorium.
*r       *f*       v
LSE  general  meeting-by-clec-
tion  of PRO  and treasurer  on
Thursday, Nov.  18 at 12:30  in
Arts 204.
efs eft 9ft
NFCUS Committee Meeting
(organizational meeting in national scholarship campaign) on
Thursday at 2:30 in the Phrateres Room in Brock Hall.
*r *T* *f*
FILM SOCIETY presents a
full length feature attraction today at noon in the auditorium.
Alec Guiness is murdered ei.i>l)t
times in, "Kind Hearts nnd Coronets" Thursday, Nov. 18 at
12:30   p.m.
"COME WITH ME my' pretty, and I will even buy you a
ticket to the second half of "The Critc," presented Friday
noon in the auditorium to raise money for the Brock
roof," says the kneeling young man to the object of his
adoration. This scene, incidentally, is not in the play.
—Photo by John Robertson
Obviously,
art"  Or  was
my leg.
It   was   "modern
someone  pulling
Dig   Those   Crazy
Mixed-Up   Masters
By PAT CARNEY
My editor is on an art kick.
Usually his appreciation of such things is limited to the
use of form in Esquire and the color radiating from a fat
rosy bottle of rare vintage wine.
In line with the new editorial
policy, a lascivious, leering nude
was painted on the office wall,
and I was trotted offto the Art
Gallery to broaden my art appreciation.       '
I don't know much about art.
Neither does my editor, judging
his taste in nudes.
APPRECIATION?
But I picked up a lot of ap- j
preciation from fellow art lovers |
at the Avant Garde painting |
from Quebec currently exhibited j
in the University Art Gallery,   j
Like tiie little engineer. I ask- j
ed him if he was an art lover
too.
"Who, me? Personally I'm a
woman lover . . . but there's art
in women, too," he said, eyeball-
ing Sined's Sur la Terrace.
CONFUSED
"I don't understand it," said
one young co-ed to another, "but
..." She gazed uncertainly at
"Cyclamen,'" by Leon Bellefleur.
The exhibit had drawn the
cynics from the Law huts.
"Ridiculous," snorted one.
"Which comes first, the painting
or the name?"
"Great fun ... or indigestion,"
grumbled another, peering at
Sined's "Paysage cotier."
Another interpreted Dumou-
chel's "Le Criel Dechire de Cris"
as a malformed turkey in great
pain. His friend blamed Agnes
Lefort responsible for a "hundred dollar goldfish."
"Paysage cotier" also troubled a bewildered, young freshman."
"But the sky IS blue, isn't it?"
he wailed.
And then there were thc experts. One arty individual babbled about the "dominant lines
and transparent quality" of Bel-
lefleur's "Sarabande."
When he moved on, I surreptitiously turned it right side up.
EXPERIMENTAL DRAMA
Freddy  Wood   Overlooked
By SYLVIA SHORTHOUSE
Students and faculty are
passing u\? the opportunity to
see new, classical and experimental theatre on the campus.
This was emphasized by
temporary Frederic Wood Theatre production manager, Joy
Coghill, in a private interview
Tuesday.
"Unless we have the support
of the students and faculty
members, the theatre will become simply a training ground
for youjng aetojfs and actresses," Mfisa Coghill said.
EXPERIMENTAL
Dedicated to experimental
and box-office productions, the
campus Frederic Wood Theatre, Was converted from a
snack bar in 1049.
It was formed due largely to
the efforts of Dean Gage and
Dorothy Sommerset of the
English Department, in honor
of Frederic Wood, founder of
Canada's oldest continuous
theatrical group, the UBC
Players Club.
The theatre was established
primarily to give students and
faculty a chance to see experimental drama which they
could not see elsewhere, Miss
Coghill explained.
"I believe many don't even
know where or what the Frederic Wood Theatre is," she added.
BRAIN TRUST
The small one hundred seat
theatre was built through the
efforts and endowments of
fifty theatre minded faculty
member* and Vancouver citizens. Foremost among them
was the "Brain Trust" of President MacKenzie, Justice G.
V. Clyne, Chancellor Sherwood Lett, Dean Walter Gage
and Dean G. E. Andrews.
Under the supervision of
Dorothy Sommerset, the theatre had its opening success in
the presentation of Barle Bir-
ney's "Damnation of Vancouver."
BOOKS ond
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From    Germany.    France,
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Opportunities for Overseas Posting
Details and application forms at nearest Civil Service
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Quote No. 55*-174
VARSITY STUDENTS'
SPEC MM I
from 11 o.m. to 5 p.m.
Poodle Dogs
THE DOGIE WITH AN OVERCOAT
15C •«• or 2 *or 2i>C
'A MEAL FOR TWO BITS"
Marine Drive Inn
4496 N.W. Marine Dr. (Spanish Banks)
THE HOME OF TOPSY CONES
(Closed on  Mondays)
Miss Coghill, a graduate of
UBC, took over the managing
position of both the Children's
Holiday Theatre and Frederic
Wood Theatre when Dorothy
Sommerset left for England on
a Canadian government theatrical scholarship this year.
PROFESSIONALS
"This year's program is designed as Dorothy Sommerset
always intended it to be," Miss
Coghill said. "We are featuring
casts of professional actors
and actresses who will have a
chance to do experimental
work they wouldn't otherwise
have the opportunity to do. At
the same time, we are giving
training and experience to up
and coming- dramatists."
Seven adults and five children's plays are in the production plans of the theatre -this
year.
Charles Morgan's "The
Riverline", which concluded
October 30, will be followed by
jRodney Ackland's psychological thriller, "The Old Ladies"
-on November 30.
UBC Players' Club Alumni
presentation will start off next
term's program, followed by
"The Infernal Machine" by
Jean Cocteau, G. B. Shaw's.
"Heartbreak House," "The Enchanted" by Jean Giradoux
and "The Spook Sonata" by A.
Strindberg.
Holiday Theatre presenta-.
tion "Han_el and Gretel" ends
this week. "Beauty and the
Beast" will open November 27
to be followed by '.'Robert and
the Robot." and "The Space-
boy and the Goose."
In charge of sets is Charles
Stagman. Costumes are by
Jessie Richardson.
for AH Yout Baker? Heeme
tee ui at the
University Bakery
loth at Sasamat       AL 0100
browse at
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOK STORE
337 W. Pender
BEST IN BOOKS
Best Wishes to the University
JajMIs   $tvwm   $£Uuxtpi
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ALma 1551
WE'RE READY TO SERVE YOU WITH A WIDE
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THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 18,1954
Columns    Unlimited
Weatherman, Pull
Out  The  Cork
By KEN LAMB
While the tourist bureau fiddles and fumes at the nonstop precipitation the local area has been suffering for the
past few weeks, local football experts eye the falling rain
with mixed apprehension and hope.
They have good reason to b eapprehensive. Unless one of our
fair Western gales crops up between now and Saturday, to blow
the field at Johnny Owen Stadium dry, UBC's football faithful
will be watching the Bird's maiden performance as mudders.
Joyfully for their stock, this week the Birds' heavy practice
schedule has been staged in the slop, so no one can say we will
go to bat complete strangers to the stuff.
For a team that plays on the west coast of North America,
to pass the entire season without having to face a wet field is
rare indeed, but that dry state is just what the Birds have played
in all season. »*__.,
So much for apprehension of untried quantities.
RAIN? WE LOVE THE STUFF
Though the rain will be hard on spectators, it may improve
UBC's chances of a win. Part of Toronto's attack, which is one of
the East's most powerful, is usually launched in the air, so much
so, that in one game the passers clicked for 387 yards.
The pass defense'of the Birds has been shown over the season
to be only fair. A slippery ball would be quite an aid to that
defense.
But Toronto coach Bob Masterson has a simple formula for
his attack. If he fails to move his club via the airways he sends
them along the ground, a route which they find fairly open.
If Bob, who in his day was no mean ball player himself, has
to resort to the lower route, he will be forced to play our kind
of ball.
ON THE GROUND? LET 'EM COME
The ground defense of the Birds is solid. More than one coach
of the other conference teams has commented on the shaking
up his plunging shock troops suffered at the hands of the UBC
defenders.
Some of the hardrocks the Birds will face Saturday are among
the fair-haired boys of Eastern football. Half-back 'Steve One-
schuck is considered the finest itwo way and all-round ball player
in the league, and established a scoring record of 22 points against
McGill.
Fullback Phil Muntz is ticketed as the league's finest in
his department, and was the spark of Varsity's win over Queen's.
Last year his ground gained average was the league's highest.
Blue's kick runner and one of the East's fastest backs is John
Sopinka, whose name will go down in history as the scorer of
the touchdown that produced the East's first triple tie.
HORSES? IT'S THE WHIPS WE WORRY ABOUT
The big horses up front will be led by guards Bobby Waugh
and Baz Mackie, tackles Walt Radzick and Alec Macklin, and
centre John Prendergast, called one of the top defensive linebackers in the league.
Blues ends Fred Smith and Don Smale are part of the league's
top five. Smale, however, is out with three cracked ribs and probably will not see action.
Behind this impressive array, and operating out of the T or
even a spread formation, will be quarterbacks Bill Stevenson and
Harry Wilson. Masterson has been hard put to choose between
the two all season.
Stevenson is the long tosser and Wilson carries the rank of
field general.
This array hits town Thursday night. If they aren't wined
and dined out of shape by Saturday, we should be seeing the best
offense the East has to offer.
Birds Face
S. Martin's
Weekend
Jack Pomfret's Thunderbirds
get their first taste of American
competition Friday and Saturday, nights when they face the
St. Martin's College Rangers, a
team afflicted with the same
rookie-enitess that plagues the
Birds.
So far, Pomfret's new man problem has not bothered the Birds
too much. If the Rangers have
had as much success, the weekend series will be fairly close
though the Birds will enter as
favorites.
Birds will dress the same crew
ihat performed so well last week.
Coach Jake Connelly's Rangers will come out with only
one starter from last year, and
only four lettermen. But he has
promised some good ball from
his new stock.
Some of his trouble has been
solved by 67" centre Bob For-
bis, all-state in Aberdeen high-
school.
Jake, who ls also Athletic
Director at the Olympia school,
will be placing most of his hopes
on Skhp Olson, who sank 48
percent of his field goal attempts
last year in and is the only home
brew boy on the club.
Birds split with the Rangers
last year.
O'Connell
Only UBC
All-Star
UBC's only contribution to
the Evergreen Conference al-
star list, tackle Kevin O'Connell
will not be dressed for Saturday's game against the Blues.
The 19 year old star, playing
his first year of football, injured
his ankle November 6 against
Central, and will be in a cast
for some days.
O'Connell, in making the list
carried; as the Birds honor over
from last year when guard Bob
Brady made the first team and
halfback Jack Hutchinson,
though out half the season with
an injured leg, made the second
team.
No Victory  Hope
Rowers  Face  Washington
By PETE WORTHINGTON
While the colorful drama of
the "Little Grey Cup of the
West" is being enacted at UBC
Stadium on Saturday, November
20, Varsity's Rowing Club will
be "down-under" at Seattle, battling the world-rated University
of. Washington   crew.
This meet is definitely a "practice" round for Varsity. There
is virtually no hope of acually
defeating the Washington eight,
and it would be unfair to judge
the BEG champions on their
next Saturday's showing. Why?
... Because:
READ MISSING
One; UBC has been training
without the services of their
coach, Frank Read, for most of
the season, due to his broken
ankle.
Two; their "coach boat" has
been on the disabled list too,
and assistant coach, John Warren, has had to send the crew
out to train alone, or stick to
the   barges.
NO SHELL
Three; and thc main reason,
is lack of actual ".shell" rowing.
That is to say, time .spent in
their shell, coordinating and
smoothing their style. For example, prior to the Empire
Games, UBC rowed approximately   800   "shell"   miles.   In
ed but 10 to  15 miles. All the
rest have been in the barges.
Four; the conditions for practice are most awkward, to say
the least. When the fogs, rains
and other Vancouver climate
contortions permit, the fanatical rowers ply their blades at
a dastardly 5 a.m. at the rowing
club.
NO WRITE-OFF
So do not write UBC off as
BEG "flashes-in-the-pan" if they
fail to conquer Washington this
time. By next spring the crew
will bear little resemblance to
their present state. In fact if
UBC loses Saturday it will put
them in the pleasant role of
"dark-horses" in next summer's
races at California. A disguised
blessing.
In the "prelims" Saturday,
the Junior Varsity crew competes against Washington's JV,
and the University of Oregon's
eight.
The Rowing Club motto for
the week is: Wash Us Rinse
Washington,' and crew members
say this with heads bowed prior
to meals; especially Acadian
Camp  meals.
Probable starters for the
"Great Eight" of UBC, will be
Ken Drummond at stroke; Thomas Michael "Abbotsford's Own"
Harris; Tom Toynbee; Herman
"Joe" Zloklikovits; Laurie West;
Phil Kueber; Bill Hughes and
Bob    Wilson    at    bow.    Cox'n
All save Kueber and Hughes are
Vedder veterans.
:U
FILMSOC
Q
'J=-l\ For Students And Staff Onlv/
,\j '<]
~        TO-DAY
12:30
ALEC GUINNESS
in ...
KIND  HEARTS
and
CORONETS
. . . Alec Guinness
is murdered eight times.
AUDITORIUM 35c
BILL CALLAHAN
...of the Rangers
Chiefs Top
Orphans
57-50
UBC's basketball Jayvees produced their first win of the
season Tuesday night when they
staged a last quarter rally that
beat Ken "Hooker" Wright's
New Westminster Orphans 57-50.
In a game that was tight all
the way, UBC held a 34-31 half
time lead, were even 46 all at
three-quarter time, then broke
out to rack up their final period victory, with two field baskets and seven free tosses.
SHOWED WELL
Dick Penn's cl ib, losers of
their first game to the Eilers by
a 71-51 lacing, performed Tuesday in a manner calculated to
;,'ive them high early-suason
ratings.
Big men for the Chiefs were
George Seymour with 14 and
Gordy Gimple with 11.
BRAVES   LOSE
Braves meanwhile, were absorbing a 68-58 beating by
YMCA.
Marpole continued their dominance of the Junior circuit by
beating   Kivan   67-54.
preparation for next Saturday'.s j (UNTD talk), will be either Pete
Washington race they have row-1 Valentine or  "Mickey"  Rooney.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.   Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned and Operated by
Tbe University of B.C.
Ji
First   Frame  Slump
Costs  Birds  Win
A ghastly first period of confused disorganization cost
UBC's hockey Thunderbirds their first victory against Vancouver Velvets at the Forum Wednesday night.
Birds battled to the short end
of a 5-3 score, with the damage
being done in the opening session, when the Velvets pumped
in 3 goals.
DOWN 4-0
At the start of the second
period Birds showed little improvement, as Vancouver added
another marker that gave them
a 4-0 edge.
From that moment on coacb,
Ricardo Mitchell's wards sparked into life. Led by the rampaging rushes of Mike Giroday
on defence, they fought the
Velvets to a standstill.
McCULLOCH   STARRTED  IT
At 9.08 Hugh McCulloch blasted an angle shot into the net
for Varsity's first score. Five
minutes later Bob Geigerich deflected Nagle's shot nto the
cage to make the score 4-2.
One minute before the middle
frame ended, Vancouver's Mills
scored his second ^goal to make
the score 5-2.
DOMINATED FINALE
As the final period opened,
Birds launched from their proverbial last ditch to the attack.
FRANCES MURPHY
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At 1.06 Mo Cunningham scored
to make the count 5-3, which
held to the game's end.
During the final period UBC
dominated the ice with such
authority that Vancouver had
but 3 shots on goale Howie
Thomas, whose cool steady evening in the nets was a high*
light.
Apart from the fearsome first
period, where they resembled
mice against men, Birds were
the better squad in all departments, save the goal scoring
one.
League Lead
At Stake
Providing that the games are
not cancelled because of the
East-West football game, two
grasshockey contests will be
played over the weekend, with
Chiefs taking on India at Mem*
orial South and UBC playing
Vancouver on the campus, with
both games going at 2 p.m.,
Saturday.
Martin's Bakery
& Delicatessen
5784 University Blvd.
38 YEARS OF SIRVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
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PA. 5321
SUN LIFE OF CANADA
Beat The East, Game Time 2 p.m.

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