UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 31, 1921

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0123749.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123749.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0123749-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0123749-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123749-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0123749-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0123749-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0123749-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0123749-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0123749.ris

Full Text

 Sty? Ihg00£g
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 31, 1921
Number 20
Many Students
Receive Letters
'VARSITY HOLDS ITS FIRST
PRESENTATION DAY
The first annual "Presentation Day" at
the University of British Columbia took
place on Tuesday, at noon, and it was a
decided success. It is to be hoped that
it becomes an important yearly function.
Mr. J. R. Kingham, president of the
Men's Athletics, introduced the speakers,
and called upon Dr. Davidson to give a
short address on athletics.
Dr. Davidson paid special tribute to the
Rugby and the ice hockey teams, and
declared that good sportsmanship was
a priceless asset not only to the Univer-'
sity as a whole, but to us all individually.
The ice hockey cups were then presented
by Mr. Cunningham, president of the
Vancouver Amateur Hockey League. The
Savage Cup and the Godfrey Cup were
received by Messrs. Morrison and Hunter
on behalf oi the team. Mr. Martin presented loving cups to the individual members.
President Klinck made the presentation
of the World Trophy, which has been put
up for annual competition in Rugby between B. C. and any American colleges
which wish to enter. The Miller and the
Brown cups were also placed on the table
with the other cups. The Farrell Cup,
for the ladies' senior basketball, was presented by Mrs. Farrell, and the Faculty
and Arts '20 cups by Dr. Davidson.
Letters and shields for the players were
then presented, and ribbons won in the
track meet. The following were awarded
their letters:
Large block (to all members of the
senior Rugby, the only major sport at
'Varsity): H. Gwyther, A. Buchanan, H.
Ross, C. Jones, H. Hunter, G. Ternan, P.
Honeyman, R. Cameron, A. Bickell, G.
Gross, V. Gwyther, S. Plummer, R. Hodson, K. Carlisle and H. James.
Small block (to all members of senior
teams and tennis singles champion): H.
W. MacLean, L. Fisher, Cliffe Mathers,
L. Mark, H. Rushbury, C. Henderson, S.
R. Say and H. R. Cant.
Small block and shield (shield awarded
for second winning of small block): J. P.
MacLeod, E. Crute, J. B. Cant, R. M.
Jackson and J. R. Mitchell.
Small block and two shields: Sid Anderson.
Plain letters (to all members of second
and intermediate teams): F. M. Wallace,
G. Barnwell, H. Jones, W. Scott, J. Un-
(Continued on Page 7)
Officers Cfyosen
for Next Session
Elections of the presidents of the
undergraduate societies on Thursday last
attracted a little attention during the day.
The Arts men were unanimous in their
choice of Mr. John P. G. MacLeod, Arts
'22, for the presidency. On the other
hand, Miss Christine Urquhart, Arts '22,
had a hard fight for the leadership of the
Women's Undergrad. She was opposed
by Miss Isobel Miller and Miss Gwen
Robson, both members of this year's
Council. The Aggies sprang a good one
in their election, Dick Leckie pulling it
off a day before the slated date. He had'
forgotten how the calendar went. Mr.
G. H. Harris, Ag. '22, was elected by a
narrow majority of three votes in thirty-
seven over Mr. Bert Sweeting. The
Science men chose Mr. Stan. R. Say,
Science '23, for the position as president
of the Science Undergrad. He was
opposed by Mr. George F. Fountain,
Science '22.
All of these students are well known
around the college, and all have taken an
active part in college affairs. "Johnnie"
MacLeod is president of '22, and plays
soccer and basketball. Miss Urquhart
served this year as an associate editor of
the Annual. Mr. Harris is well known
among the Aggies, although perhaps
many in Arts and Science do not know
him. Stan. Say, the president-elect of
Science, is also a soccer player. He and
Wally Baker won the doubles championship in the tournament of the Tennis Club
last fall.
Mr. A. E. "Ab" Richards was the
unanimous choice for the position of
president of the Literary and Scientific
Department. Though he is an Aggie,
"Ab ' is very well known and very popular around the college. He was on the
international debating team which won
from Oregon last session, and this year
he served as debates secretary, and also
distinguished himself as a member of the
cast'of the spring play.
On Tuesday, Mr. Willan, Arts '23, was
elected president of the Men's Literary Society. The new president has taken an
active interest in the society, and has debated for his class.
Miss Eve Eveleigh, Arts '23, was, on
Tuesday, elected to the presidency of the
Women's Athletic Society, and thus becomes
a member of the Council-elect.
The literary editors wish to call
to the attention of the students the
fact .that the spring issue of the
Literary Supplement will appear
one week from to-day, and that all
material should be in their hands
by Monday morning. There is
still some room for contributions,
especially poetry.
Musical Society
Present Programme
ANNUAL  CONCERT  MAINTAINS
USUAL HIGH STANDARD
A large and interested audience listened
to the fifth annual concert of the Musical
Society on Wednesday evening,- March
25th, in the Hotel Vancouver ballroom.
The arrangements for the affair were in
the hands of the president, Mr. Jimmie
Mitchell, and Lieut. Parkin, director.
The major part of the programme was
devoted to Beethoven's cantata, "The
Ruins of Athens." In the opinion of
many the selection was a rather ambitious one, not exactly suited to the vocal limitations of some of the singers. It
was, nevertheless, sung in a manner
which showed an appreciation of the
artistic qualities of the piece. The
Women's Glee Club is especially to be
commended for its singing in the
choruses. The overture, played by the
whole orchestra, was splendid. The
choruses, in which the whole Glee Club
participated, were excellent in -their interpretative qualities, as well as in their
harmony. The Men's Glee Club, in singing the "Chorus of the Dervishes,' managed to create the proper atmosphere, and
the violins of the orchestra gave the required suggestion of wierdness. In the
final chorus all the members of the society covered themselves with glory.
Among the several soloists, Miss Kathleen Grant, who has a splendid mezzo-
soprano voice, distinguished herself. Mr,
Carmen Sing was also appreciated by the
audience.
However, it was in the glees that the
club was shown at its best. They were
sung heartily and with a vigor which
lasted throughout them all. "The Viking
Song' was much enjoyed, as well as the
"Franklyn's Dogge," which was sung,
perhaps, a little too seriously.
Of the several humorous selections
given by the male octette, the last was
rendered in a better manner than the
others. Mr. Jimmie Mitchell's voice was
very fine in them all, especially in "Who
Did?" where he took the solo parts.
Another interesting part of the programme was "The Water Wheel," written by Lieut. Parkin, and played by Miss
Blakey, piano; Mr. J. Dauphinee, violin;
Eugene Mahrer, 'cello, and Ralph Argue,
bass viol.
In sum, although the performance was
no better than in former years, it well
deserved the applause it received from the
enthusiastic audience. THE   UBYSSEY
March 31, 1921
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRAlSTVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
LIGHT LUNCHES
Try our Lobster Salad, our Sundaes and specials. You will find
they are  unsurpassed.
Corner Tenth and Heather.
Young Men's
Smart Shoes
Black and several shades of Brown
Calfskin, on the latest popular lasts
—perfect fitting—maximum service.
Price $10.00
Cluff Shoe Co.
Limited
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES
'VARSITY PLAYERS INVADE
NANAIMO
The city of Nanaimo was rudely
awakened on Wednesday afternoon when
the Players' Club announced its arrival
in town by a tuneful rendering of "Kitsilano," given from the main deck of the
Princess Pat. We were met on the wharf
by our business manager, Bob Hunter,
who had been in the city for a day and
so looked quite like a native. He conducted us through the tortuous windings
of the main street to our hotel, which
proved satisfactory to the most exacting,
especially in the culinary line.
At 8.15 the curtain arose before an
audience of men, women, and many
children. _ Even the latter were able to
show their appreciation of the play, although their method of applause was
hardly conventional. The parts in which
Dick was in a state of "matutinal inebriation" were especially appealing to the
inhabitants of the mining town.
After the performance we were entertained at a very delightful supper and
dance at the home of Mrs. Powers, former regent of the I.O.D.E. of Nanaimo.
One of the guests having an aptitude for
character reading, many interesting facts
were learned about the prominent mem-
'bers of the caste. We found out that
Kirsteen would choose her own husband
(Freshmen, beware!) and that Bruce was
by' nature a shy, retiring violet. Our
honorary president was told that he suffered from indigestion, but we could have
divined that ourselves at dinner-time.
On the whole, the trip was very successful, and everybody came away feeling
satisfied, except Garrett and Lacey, who,
owing to the tyranny of their roommates, were compelled to spend most of
the night underneath their bed.
MUSICAL SOCIETY OFFICERS
The final meeting of the Musical Society for the session was held in the
auditorium on Thursday last, when election of officers for next year took place.
The society has experienced one of the
most successful seasons of its history
this year, and, under the direction of
Lieut. J. D. Parkin, gave a very creditable performance last week. The officers
of the society for next year will be:
Honorary president, Professor E. H.
Russell; president, Miss Kathleen Grant,
Arts '22; vice-president, Ralph Argue,
Arts '22; secretary, Miss Marion Ather-
ton, Arts '22; treasurer, Stafford A. Cox,
Arts '22. Executive Committee: Ladies'
Glee Club, Miss M. Wilcox, Arts '23;
Men's Glee Club, J. A. C. Harkness,
Science '23.
Players' Club Receipts
Total receipts from the Players' Club
annual spring performance were $2,459.25,
according to the financial statement just
issued. This was made up as follows:
March 10, $811.25; March 11, $820.50;
March 12, $827.50. The expenses of the
performance totalled $786.09, made up as
follows: Business, $593.50; printing,
$33.36; advertising, $54.94; costumes,
$31.47; properties, $60.02; incidentals,
$12.80. The total profits, therefore, are
$1,691.16.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
^LV»7oiwwi«wwi«w^^wawwj'.v»^'.\»(;i.v
AFTER THE SHOW
Try the
IJelrtyorylao V-zajfe
704 ROBSON STREET
Seymour OOiJa
BIG TAX I  SIX
SERVICE
Ask   for
V.  YOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmulr Street
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
-of-
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment. March 31, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
IN OTHER COLLEGES
With pleasure we acknowledge the
spring numbers of McMaster University
Monthly, the Johnian, the Acadia Athenaeum, the Argosy, the Brandon College
Quill, the Trail, the Analecta, the Sun
Dodger, the Gateway. Two new additions
to our exchange list are eagerly awaited
—the Toronto Goblin and the Harvard
Lampoon.
* *      *
McMaster University Monthly offers a
welcome departure for those interested
in college magazines. It features each
month a Canadian painting from one of
the recent Canadian national exhibitions
The paintings are well chosen and excellently printed. The idea is rather gord;
one is apt to forget that Canadian art is
really worth while.
* *      *
H. G. Wells' "Outline of History" contains this: "Human history becomes more
and more a race between education and
catastrophe." At the present rate of
progress at Point Grey, it looks as if
catastrophe would win by a length.
* *      *
The other night while going home
Somewhat later than usual
I was waylaid
By a masked marauder
Who massaged my ribs
With a Colt .38
And asked me very politely
For my cash
But when I told him that I had
Been out with a co-ed
He handed me a five-dollar bill
And passed on silently.
—Gargoyle.
* *     *
Father—Isn't it time you entertained
the prospect of matrimony?
Daughter—Not quite; he doesn't come
until 8 o'clock.—"Trail."
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.  SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
The Sun-Dodger
The February issue of the Washington
"Sun Dodger" takes the form of a travesty on the "American Magazine" — as
typical of any American magazine. The
idea is brilliant—no less; and most convincingly worked out. On the cover is
the ubiquitous "Girls Head"; below it
the respect-inspiring figures, "More thin
0,006,000 circulation' ! (Do you recognize
the symptoms?)
It contains an article on "Woman" by
the eminent psychologist, Dr. Imbecile Q.
Fish. "Love in its Broadest Cents" has
all the earmarks of the story that makes a
magazine a success. Clarence F. Typewriter supplies illustrations in his own inimitable style. The educational value which
a magazine with such a circulation is bound
to have has not been neglected. It is
found in such soul-searching articles as
"Could You Earn Your Living If Your
Wife Had Millions?" (Could you?) "You
Can't Change the World, so Shortchange It," in which Dr. Wrecking
Crane expatiates on the worldly philosophy of "Bluff." "The Greatest Love
Thrill I Ever Had" is present in all its
glory, by Irvin S. Squab this time; and,
finally, an erudite solution for "Why Men
Marry." The autobiography of a famous
politician, "From Cradle to Congress on
a Stick of Gum," should inspire hope in
the hearts of many; such headings as
"Do You Part Your Hair in the Middle—
Or Are You Unbalanced, Too?' are
bound to open the eyes of the reader to
what he really is. Pertinent editorial
comment, and jokes of the pronounced
variety, complete what is a rival to many
of the current periodicals.
We have long wondered whether
Americans really knew what their popular magazines were like. Evidently some
do!
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid  Chairs
Re-tired
Charges Moderate
Agent for
C.C.M.   "RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386
BASEBALL
TENNIS        LACROSSE GOLF
FISHING: TACKLE
EVERYTHING FOR ATHLETES, SPORTSMEN AND
OUTDOOR PEOPLE
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
Fifteen or sixteen men will be allowed
to make the trip to Japan on the University of Washington baseball team for its
series of games with Waseda University
and other Japanese colleges next fall. To
make up for time lost from school during
the trip this fall, the members of the team
have promised to attend summer school.
Estimating eighteen days of voyage one
way, the team will probably be absent
two and a-half months.
* * *
"The recent action of the Legislature
in raising the tuition fee will seriously
handicap athletics at Washington," said
Coach Bagshaw in an address to the Big
"W" Club in the men's building last
night. "Athletes from outside the State
who would ordinarily come to the University will not pay the high tuition fee,
and it will be necessary for us to make
use of every available bit of athletic material here at home."—U. of W. Daily.
A CORRECTION
We regret that our editorial on the
point system last week contained some
misleading information. The following is
the law, as amended last session:
Class A—All members of the Students'
Council.
Class B—All members of the executives of major organizations (Literary
and Scientific Department, Athletic Association, and Undergraduate Societies)
and the following members of Publications: Senior editor, business manager,
associate editors, editor Annual, and the
chief reporter.
Class C—All other student offices.
Those in Class A shall hold only one
position; those in Class B shall hold only
two positions, and one of these must be
a C position; no student may hold more
than three C positions.
THE SPORTING
INSTINCT
If you men have any ideas on
sports, from fishing to football,
or if there are any points you
want to know, we're glad to
talk matters over any time.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor.  Robson and Granville Streets THE   UBYSSEY
March 31, 1921
PURDY'S ARE
PURE
Mr. Purdy did not follow the
routine of candymakers' recipes
when he started making candy.
He broke new ground all the
way. That is why Purdy's are
so original in every way—and
they're absolutely pure.
$1.25 pound
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
Easter Hosiery
======
Fine Grade Pure Silk Hose, well reinforced at heel and toe, and with
good garter top; in black, white, silver, mid and dark grey, brown, nigger,
navy and taupe.    Special $2.00
Very  fine  Pure  Silk  Hose,  with  high
spliced   heel   and   double   toe;    black,
white,   navy,   brown,   grey   or   green;
finished with black or white
clox      $2.75
High-grade Pure Silk Hose, full fashioned and with neat fitting ankle, extra   wide   tops,   in   shades   of   black,
white,  brown,  navy and
dove grey    $3.50
-4ffa£pvp4
(Member Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $2.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief.' P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
(A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors { S.  M. Scott
I Miss R. E. Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
(Miss A.  Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Bert Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
Miss P. Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss  P.  I.   Mackay
r ..            ,-.,.. ) A. L. Stevenson
Literary Editors \Q   G   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business ' Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Asst. Business  Manager. .J.   E.   Matheson, Arts '23
Advertising  Manager  . . H.   M.   Cassidy
1 D. A. Wallace
Assistants ■( H.   G.   Scott
I M. A.  Dyce
Circulation  Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the Week : S. M. Scott
DIRECT ACTION
The Legislature has practically completed its sitting, and the University has
not got the support it needs. What are
we going to do about it?
We are convinced that the majority of
the members at Victoria are personally in
favor of a better University. Yet the
Government leader, Premier Oliver, has
refused even to maintain the University
at its present standard; and the Opposition leader, Mr. Bowser, has not shown
in any emphatic way that his party disagrees with the action of the Premier.
The party leaders believe that a better
University is good policy, but bad politics. They believe that more votes are to
be lost by it than gained; they believe
that the North and the Interior are opposed to higher education.
The party leaders are wrong. A better
University is good politics; the people are
behind it; both the Interior and the North
are in favor of proper support being extended to higher education. The University knows this, and it is up to us to
convince the Government that we're right
and they're wrong. Until we do this it is
hopeless to expect any further aid from
them.
Direct action will convince them. Today there are a thousand of us in the
University; the corporate action of a
thousand people, each backed by at least
two votes, can accomplish a good deal.
Let's take that action. Next month a
thousand of us will be scattered all
through the Province — a thousand missionaries, not so much to preach the gospel of a better University (for that gospel
is already accepted), as to convert fifty
members of the Legislature to the belief
that the people want a better University,
and mean to have it. We can convince
them if we want to.   Let's do it.
It may be too late for this year; if so,
then it is just the right time to start for
next year. Next month the Alma Mater
Society should continue with increased
vigor the campaign it started last week.
After  the   term  closes,  any  U.B.C.   stu
dent, whatever his party, who does not
use his best effort and all his influence
for a better University, is not a loyal
supporter of his Alma Mater.
USE YOUR VOTE
At this time of the year we possess a
privilege that is also a duty. It is something which we cannot leave to others to
do for us; it is a personal matter. It is
the use of our franchise in college elections. Too many students last year, and
again this year, have not used their votes
in the Alma Mater elections. Surely it
is not a healthy sign when only 548 voters
out of 950 cast their ballots for the election of a president of the student body—
the highest honor that we can bestow.
When we do not use our vote, there results harm not only to ourselves, but to
the candidates, and to the cause of University activities. There is a lowering of
morale.
There are perhaps two reasons why
many people have not used their vote in
recent elections. First, many are not
personally acquainted with the candidates
and therefore do not take a great deal of
interest. Second, the authorities have not
taken care to see that prominent notices
were posted on election day. Both of
these causes can easily be remedied. If
you do not know the candidates personally, you can at least form some opinion
by asking those who are acquainted with
both. The authorities should make it their
special care to see that large notices are
posted about the halls on election day.
Use your vote!
TUUM EST
While the "Ubyssey" must share responsibility for perpetuating a fallacious
interpretation of our University motto,
this paper is relieved to find that it is not
the first to fall into the error. On an
average of once a week for the last three
years the phrase "Tuum Est" has appeared in these columns in a context
where it could have no other meaning
than "It's up to you."
Asked for his opinion on the propriety
of this rendering, an Authority in the Department of Classics first made it quite
clear that he had not been responsible for
the original choice of the motto, and then
confessed that to this day he was not
quite sure what it meant. He understood
that "It's up to you" had been the idea
the University was endeavoring to express. But such a translation of "Tuum
Est" is not justified by the laws of Latin
Grammar or by reference to Latin authors. The literal meaning, and the one
which presumably should be accepted, is,
"It is yours." A happier interpretation
may be justified by a reference to Horace. In the third ode of the fourth book
Horace expresses his gratitude to Melpomene, the muse of tragedy, crediting her
with his pre-eminence among Roman
poets. He concluded: "quod spiro et
placeo, si placeo, tuum est" — "Breath,
power to charm, if mine, are thy bestowing."
Whatever "Tuum Est" does mean, it
seems quite clear that it does not mean
"It's up to you.'' The use of our motto
in that sense might well be discontinued.
President Klinck will visit England
this summer to attend the Congress of
British Universities at London. March 31, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
©
orrcspoi>aet\ce
i>cu
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: Many indirect complaints have
been received by the Track Executive from
runners and officials in last Wednesday's
relay. All are concerned with the heavy
traffic on the course during the race. As
anyone who was lucky enough to follow the
race in a car could not help but notice, this
traffic not only in some cases directly interfered with the runners, but from start to
finish kept them in an atmosphere of gasoline or dust, or both. Again, city traffic laws
were at tin.es ignored, to the danger of both
pedestrians and occupants of cars. These
evils must be remedied if the annual relay
is to become a safe and sane success.
The Track Executive suggests two alternatives: Either the cars must be barred
from the course, or the relay must be run
on a track. The first would be at the expense of the spectators' interest. The second
seems the more commendable. For the race
could then be witnessed in its entirety and
without fear of handicapping the contestants. In addition, track relays are annual
events in other universities, and, if adopted
here, would open the way to inter-collegiate
meets.
This letter is written to bring the matter
before those interested. It invites communication from the donors of "The Arts '20
Challenge Cup."
TRACK EXECUTIVE.
Editor "Ubvssey."
Dear Sir: In response to the expressed
wish of the student body, and in fairness to
all concerned, the Fraternity Alpha Iota
offers the following information:
The whole purpose and end of our fraternity is, ir. the first place, to promote and
support all student activities sanctioned by
the Alma Mater Society; secondly, to give
an opportunity for closer friendship amongst
students of kindred aims; and, finally, to
perpetuate in after life the friendships
formed in college.
Prospective members must be graduates
in good standing in U.B.C, who have the
best interests of the University at heart, and
who are acceptable to every man in the
fraternity.
It has been alleged that the Alpha Iota
has chosen for its members those who have
a prominent part in student life, thus hoping
to secure power and influence. We would
point out, however, that our members are
chosen for their outstanding personal characteristics, and that the very qualities which
we desire in a man are those sought by the
students in choosing their executives. So,
while it is true that a number of the officers
at the University are members of Alpha Iota,
it is not true that they were elected to the
fraternity on account of their offices. We
have never taken any action to direct or
control student affairs, but have always encouraged our members to participate unselfishly in student activities of every kind.
We would further inform the student body
that at no meeting since the fraternity came
into existence have we ever even discussed
Alma Mater elections. Our constitution absolutely forbids any such procedure. Nor
have we at any time or in any way tried to
engineer a man into office, but have voted
for the man whom we considered best fitted
for the position, regardless of whether or
not he is a member of a fraternity.
The foregoing statements are given on the
word of honor of each individual member of
the Fraternity Alpha Iota, and we add, in
the same spirit, the assurance that our members will continue to support every policy of
our Alma Mater, and will do all things
within reason to work in harmony with our
fellow students.
We cannot speak for the other fraternities,
but have no doubt that they will forward
similar assurances.
FRATERNITY  ALPHA  IOTA.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—If history consists of a progressive statement of undistorted facts, then
history should not leave a false impression
upon the minds of its readers. If, however,
undue prominence be given to comparatively
minor incidents, then an entirely erroneous
conception of events may be conveyed. This
misconception is indubitably conveyed in the
chapter relating to the Great War in "Modern European History," by C. D. Hazen,
Professor of History in Columbia University,
which is being used as a text-book at the
present time in our University. From the
many instances in which he has over-emphasized the part played by the armed forces
of the United States, I need only point out
one or two of the most glaring.
As is well known, events which were of
the greatest importance, tactically and strategically, transpired on the Western front
during 1917. Among these were the Battle
of Arras, the Battle of the Aisne. and the
British offensive in Flanders. These he
summarily dismisses, on page 653, in a paragraph beginning: "Other events on the
Western front were the Battle of Arras,
fought by the British, from April to June,
and in the course of which the Canadians
distinguished themselves at Vimy Ridge:
the long-drawn-out Battle of the Aisne . . ."
In this fashion he deals with actions such
as the Battle of Arras, involving as it did
the capture of thousands of prisoners and
which left that crucially important key position, Vimy Ridge, in our hands. The long,
costly struggle for Passchendaele Ridge, that
dominating feature of northern Belgium, is
likewise relegated to a line or two. In view
of the above, the comparatively large amount
of space and wealth of detail devoted to the
unquestionably gallant but relatively unimportant exploits of certain American troops
in the vicinity of Cantigny is quite inexplicable, even in an American history. The
following extracts, from page 663, speak for
themselves:
"The Americans were beginning to count.
On June 2 (1918) the marines captured Cantigny and two hundred and forty prisoners
. . . advanced two-thirds of a mile and took
two hundred and seventy prisoners ..."
The present generation is, of course, proof
against such ill-advised text-book matter;
but those who come later will not be so
immune. It is the thin edge of that most
insidious wedge—propaganda, and, as such,
should be severely dealt with. F.
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and you follow
the Style
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College, Ltd.
The School of Certainties
Phone, Fairmont 2075
ON MAIN AT TENTH
VANCOUVER, B. C.
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing v ^
Monday, April 4th, 1921 ""
BLOSSOM SEELEY
With
BENNIE FIELDS
SAM  MILLER and  HARRY STOVER
In
MISS SYNCOPATION
LARRY COMER
An Intimate Song Revue
PROSPER & MARET
Popular College Athletes
NED NORWORTH
Assisted by
EVELYN WELLS
The Nuttiest of Nuts
FOUR GOSSIPS
A Winning Hand in  Songland
LA1LA— —BERT
SELBINI & NAGLE
Present
THE   BUTTERFLY   AND   THE   CAT
MISS LOLYA ADLER
and  Company in
THE BEAUTIFUL LADY
By Edward Harold Conway
Staged by Holbrook Blinss
British Weekly
Concert Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
,WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,   Etc.
QUark* Sc Stuart (Ha.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
March 31, 1921
Buy Your Notepaper
by the Pound
ENGLISH LINEN NOTE PAPER--A
good quality linen finish note paper,
put up in packets of 60 sheets (2 A
quires), at   30c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH — Are put
up in boxes of 60, for 30c
SCOTCH LINEN NOTE PAPER — A
very good grade of medium weight
linen finished writing paper, put up
in 1-lb. packets containing about 120
sheets   (5  quires) 35c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 75, at, per box 35c
SILK  VELVET  NOTE  PAPER—Good
quality pad finish note paper, put up
in packets of 60 sheets,
at,  per  packet 40c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 60, at, per box 40c
ENGLISH FABRIC NOTE PAPER—A
high-grade linen finish writing paper
in  a  plaid   effect,   put  up  in  pound
packets of about 100 sheets,
at,  per  lb 75c
ENVELOPES  TO MATCH—
Per packet of 25 20c
—Stationery Dept., Main Floor,
New Wing
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM   BAKERY        ICE  CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
SAPP'S IS
WELCH'S
I've  changed  the  name of the
store   to   that   of   my   partner.
My  own   seems   to  lend   itself
too well to the jokesmith.
So in future Sapp, Ltd., will be
WELCH'S
Candymaker
814   ROBSON   STREET
RHYME WITHOUT REASON
A Cautionary Tale
I am a lowly Freshman,
My Name is Bobby Jones,
And  I am justly famous
For my rolling of the bones;
I come from New Westminster,
That city far away,
Where   children   strangle   serpents
torical  illusion)
And hunt wild beasts of prey.
But ever since my childhood
I have followed games of chance;
At rummy am I famous,
All people look askance
When I stride down the avenue
With proud and haughty glance,
And a pair of iv ry pellets
In the pockets of my pants.
Now I met a man of Science,
And he said unto me:
"Come hither, worthy Freshman,
For I would roll with thee."
They took away my money,
Deprived me of my coat,
My watch, my fountain pen, my hat-
I surely was the goat.
They stripped me of my clothing,
Despite my frenzied moans;
But, worst of all, oh, deep disgrace,
They took away my bones!
(his-
A Co-Ed's Lament
What's the use of livin'?
Ain't no aim.
What's the use of lovin'?
Only pain.
What's the use of kissing?
He'd just tell.
What's  the use of any thin'?
Oh, hell! '
I know where the drys go in the winter
time;
Early in the morning, up the steps they
climb;
Fill their cans and trot away,
Come back at the break of day,
Pay their cash, and oh, what joy!
"One real drink for this old boy."
Then  back to the  States  they  travel  far
After drinking all the whiskey up in Vancouver.
So now you know where drys go
On a cold and thirsty morning.
I know a man who took a pad
Of paper fair to write on it,
Likewise a pen to bite on it;
And made a book that made a hit
That made the public purchase it
Though  full of soul-stuff most  unfit
For publication—do not start
He did it in the name of Art.
Jack and Jill went up the hill,
Some food they wished to get.
Jack pawned his safety razor and
Jill et.
—Goblin.
Ruth  rode  in  my new cycle  car
In the seat in back of me;
I took a bump at fifty-five
And drove on Ruthlessly.
—Record.
The
Students' Cafeteria
Do not forget when down town
to lunch at The Old Country Tea
Rooms,
641  Granville Street
Upstairs
Hall   to   rent   evenings,   accommodating 60 couples.
Banquets, dance suppers and refreshments of all kinds served anywhere in the city. Enquire the
Tally-Ho.
A.   WALTER,   Prop.   Phone   Sey.   2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY   PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS, Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two Blocks from Vancouver Hotel
When you compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville and  Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W. D. Wood Limited
MAURICE PERRIN,  Manager March 31, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAT YOUNG
CUTS
For
Newspapers, Magazines, Catalogues
and  General  Advertising  Purposes
DESIGNING
Original and Distinctive
518 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A  SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
KENMARE LINEN
SHOWS GOOD TASTE
Kenmare Linen is an inexpensive correspondence paper
that has a splendid crackle and
appearance.
It looks more expensive than
it is.
Ask for it.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers of School Supplies
VANCOUVER  AND VICTORIA,   B. C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET
CLUB SUSPENDS ACTIVITIES
A sparsely-attended meeting of the
Universities Service Club was held on
Thursday evening last. Dean Brock,
treasurer of the Leroy Memorial Scholarship Fund, reported that $5,524 had been
raised for the fund. More than $5,000 of
this has been credited to the capital
account. It was decided that the administration of the fund would be left in the
hands of the Fund Committee and the
Club Executive, acting under the chairmanship of Dean Brock. This joint
committee was empowered to turn over
the fund to the University at its own
discretion. In the meantime, any further
contributions will be gratefully received.
The club will now suspend its activities,
subject to the call of the present executive, which was authorized to continue in
office.
LETTERS AWARDED
(Continued from Page 1)
derhill, E. Solloway, P. Wooten, M.
Gregg, A. McVittie, F. G. Elliott, J. W.
McPherson, H. S. Johnston, H. O. Arkley and L. K. Bickell.
The following freshmen, though they
have won their letters, will not receive
the same until next fal!:
Big block: Garret Livingston (senior
champion, track meet) and R. D. Greg-
gor.
Small block: J. Lundie, W. Broadfoot,
J. Shields and J. H. Wilson.
Plain letters: D. Hatch, H. Purdy, E.
Peter, P. Palmer, A. H. Plummer and G.
Lewis.
The following ladies, who have played
on 'Varsity basketball or hockey teams,
were also awarded their letters:
Shields: Miss C. Fitch, Miss D. Herman, Miss Z. Smith, Miss E. Eveleigh,
Miss Bea Pearce, Miss Marg. Gordon and
Miss G. Weld.
Small block: Miss D. Gillespie, Miss
M. Jackson, Miss V. Turner, Miss M.
Briar, Miss H. Crawford, Miss H.
Walker, Miss E. Horner, Miss E. Jackson, Miss M. Lawrence, Miss H. Clark,
Miss Jean Strauss and Miss G. Smith.
Plain letters: Miss I. Russell, Miss D.
Lee, Miss N. Griffith, Miss B. McLennan and Miss I. McKinnon.
The assets of the Khaki University of
Canada are being divided among various
Canadian universities. U. B. C. will receive $12,000, the interest on which will
be used first for loans to returned soldier
students, and later for scholarships.
TURN YOUR IDEAS
INTO DOLLARS
LEARN   HOW   TO   WRITE
SHORT STORIES
Short-Story Writing
Illustrating
Bookkeeping
Journalism
Cartooning
Accounting
Write for particulars
Shaw Correspondence
School
1401   Standard   Bank   Building
VANCOUVER,  B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
March 31, 1931
SCIENCE WALKI$ AWAY
v
WITH RELAY CHAMPIONSHIP
The second annu^liirelay. race for the
Arts '20 challenge.fflip %W| huge success
—especially for the ■ Science* men. Our
budding engineers demonstrated to the
world at large that, besides their intimate
ability to manipulate slide-rules, juggle
B. T. U.'s, kilowatts and farads, they
are also endowed with the gift of being
able to flash a clean pair of heels at the
members of the other two faculties.
Contrary to all expectations, the two
teams from the Laurel Street building
walked off — walked is right — with the
first two places in; the annual classic.
Science '24 won first place after taking
the lead in the first lap and increasing it
as they went along. Science '23 were in
the rear until the seventh lap, when
Cliffe Mathers, with a sensational sprint,
overtook most of the field and finished
second. He was succeeded by Doug.
Rae, who did his best to catch Bickell,
but was prevented by a two-block lead.
The race was not very sensational.
After the first lap it was easily seen who
would win; but there was keen competition for the other places. Sharp at 3.30
Dr. Davidson fired the gun, and Rear, of
Science '24, took the lead. He was closely
followed by Blair, of Agriculture, and
Ramsell, of Arts '24. On the second lap,
where each year had placed its best distance man, Arkley increased the Science
'24 lead. Palmer, of Agriculture, finished
second, and McLeod, of Arts '22, third.
The third lap was a repetition of the
second, the leading teams maintaining
their positions. At the end of the fourth
the first two teams were unchanged, but
the Arts freshmen were running third.
On the fifth and sixth laps Science '24
increased its lead to about two blocks.
The Aggies were about half a block in
advance of the freshmen, when Mathers,
of Science '23, passed both teams and
placed his squad second. Bickell breasted
the tape in front of the Science building
36 minutes and 23 seconds after Rear had
left Point Grey. This shatters the record
set up last year by Arts '23, the former
time being 37 minutes 30 seconds. The
teams finished in the following order:
Science '24, Science '23, Agriculture, Arts
'24, Arts '23, Arts '22 and Arts '21.
The personnel of the winning team was
as follows: Rear, Arkley, Jones, N eider -
man,  Emery, Wallis, Napier and Bickell.
To Al Buchanan, president of the Track
Club, and to the other members of the
executive, with a place of honor to Dr.
Davidson, is due an expression of appreciation. All of these men were unsparing
in their efforts to make the event the
success that it was. It was due to their
untiring and efficient efforts that everything went off without a hitch.
GOOD FIGHT FOR MAINLAND
TROPHY
Any professor wishing a copy, or
any student wishing an extra copy
of the "Annual," should leave his
name and $2 with the Publications
Board by to-morrow night.
That which we expected would happen
(as Caesar used to say) did happen,
namely, that the University of British
Columbia soccer team met and was defeated by the classy aggregation of kickers known as St. Andrew's. But any one
who stayed in the house and studied on
Saturday afternoon missed one of the
finest events of the season. Our doughty
soccer squad stepped right out and played
the best soccer team in B. C. to a standstill, losing out 3-1. It was a great game,
and well worth attending.
Perhaps it was that famous jinx which
caused our squad to blow up for the short
space of five minutes well along in the
second half of the game. At any rate,
the score was 1-0 for us up to that time,
but suddenly the squad went to pieces and
the Saints bagged the net three times in
the short space of five minutes. Our
sterling defence settled down to work
again, and the forwards tried hard to
overcome the lead, but it was no use.
The first half found both teams playing an excellent game. The Saints' forward line showed up to advantage in this
period, as they had the down-hill slope
at Athletic Park and the sun behind
them. Their combination game was
steady and almost perfect. Occasionally
our forwards stepped out and showed the
visitors that we could dot it, too. But it
was our defence that really played the
game. Wolverton and Crute, at full, and
Say, at center half, also played a bang-up
defensive game. During the first half
these men were forced to clear time after
time under the heavy onslaughts of the
St. Andrew's team. Crowe was absolutely perfect in his goal-tending, turning
away shot after shot that looked like sure
counters. Our score came in this half
when a penalty kick was awarded. Crute
bagged the net in the neatest* possible
manner.
In the second half our fellows took the
offensive, having the down-hill run. The
play was fairly even, with the defence
men putting up the same excellent work
as featured the first half. After about
twenty minutes of play the U.B.C. men
blew up momentarily, and the Saints
bagged three with their wicked shots.
The second should not have been allowed,
as it was off side; but the third was a
beautiful shot that entered the goal in
the upper left-hand corner. After this
the 'Varsity boys seemed to lose heart,
but they threatened to even up the score
more than once in their dangerous rushes.
The 'Varsity squad looked like real
champs on Saturday, and we have every
reason to feel proud of the game they
played. MacLeod, on the left wing, and
Rex Cameron, on. the right, were the best
men on the forward line. Stan. Say
played an Al game at center half, while
Crute and Wolverton, at full-back, had
the opposing backs beaten a mile. Crowe
played his usual wonderful game, and it
was largely due to his efforts that the
score was not doubled.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
C U S I C K
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
Jfagfrtmt - (ilraft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0123749/manifest

Comment

Related Items