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The Ubyssey Nov 28, 1918

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 UBYSSEY
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University
of British Columbia
Volume 1
VANCOUVER, B.C., NOVEMBER 28th, 1918
Number 2
Jn ftnmriam
College Mourns Loss
of Dr. Wesbrook
Our Late President Highly
Esteemed by Faculty and
Students
Jfornk JrTatrrtjUJi WtBbraak, M.K <tt JH. MM.
Sura Ittlg 12% 1BB8 Btrfi ©rioter 19ity, lfllB
The breadth of the President's sympathy and his extremely lovable disposition
endeared him to everyone with whom he
came in contact He was personally
greatly interested in all the students and
was an ardent supporter of student organizations. Intensely patriotic, he took
an especial and personal interest in the
student-soldiers, and kept in close touch
with as  many as possible.
In his student days Dr. Wesbrook was
brilliantly successful in the classroom
and on the athletic field, and that success
did not forsake him in later years. His
undergraduate days were spent in the
University; and after taking the degree
of Master of Arts he proceeded to England and the Continent, where he was
engrossed in post-graduate studies in
medicine. Returning to his Alma Mater,
he was appointed Professor Of Path7
ology. His ability was soon recognized
in educational circles and he became
associated with the University of Minnesota, and in 1906 was made Dean of
the Faculty of Medicine. This position
he held until 1913, when he was asked
to become President of the University
pf British Columbia.
He came to us with visions of "a
Provincial University without provincial-
ism"—a broad and thorough institution
of learning, where the specialist might
delve into the mysteries of science,
where the man who sought culture
might find it, but most of all, where the
advantages of the higher education
might be extended to every young man
and  woman  in  the  Province.    The  de- UBYSSEY
November 28, 1918
SAY, BOYS!
If:When  you  are  around  this  way,
drpp  in  and  take  a  look  at  the
'        SHIRTS
we can sell you for a two-dollar
bill. They are IT in every way,
and we guarantee every shirt we
sell. We have all the newest
panal stripes in a galaxy of
colors.
Specially priced at $2.00.
U We are right there with
NECKWEAR
as well, '
The Ties we sell for 75c and
$1.00 are absolutely the best
value we can procure, for the
money; and they have the right
up-to-the-minute snap to them,
at  that.
RICKSON'S
APPAREL FOR MEN
820 GRANVILLE STREET
3?a0t|t0ti - (Eraft
FASHIONCRAFT
CLOTHES
are made not only to fill the needs
of mature men, but also special
care is taken to provide for the
young man, or youth, developing
into manhood
Prices   Moderate—Values   Positive
Gtyna, Joater $c Ota
Ctmttro
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
pression of the great war came just as
he was embarking upon his labors, but
heroically he kept his shoulder to the
wheel. ,>■■'"
By the untimely death of Dr. Wesbrook, the first President of our University, not only the Province, but
Canada as a whole has suffered a great
loss. Till recently he was in the full
vigor of life, and we expected for him
many years of service and leadership.
But it was willed otherwise.
In the few. years of his presidency,
however, he has done much—he has laid
a firm and sound foundation on which
others may rear to completion the
edifice which he planned.
Dr. Wesbrook had an almost unique
combination of qualities fitting him for
the position which he occupied. A large
mind, wide outlook, and great gifts of
administration were united in him, with
a sunny, genial humanity, a wealth of
sympathy, and an entire absence of self-
seeking which made him a peculiarly
attractive personality. His was a generous and vital nature. His fine presence radiated kindness and good-will to
all, and closer acquaintance proved how
genuine was his kindliness and how real
his interest in the welfare of his fellow-
men. In him natural goodness was
reinforced by conscious principle, and
he was in a real sense a "dedicated
spirit"—dedicated to the great task of
public service. In all his work, as
teacher and administrator, his ruling
motive was zeal for the welfare of his
fellows, and the ideal which he had ever
before him was that of a nation of
trained men working harmoniously for
the common good.
Such words as "co-operation, "coordination," "constructive policy" were
constantly on his lips and showed the
spirit of the man. He set great value
on "efficiency," but the efficiency wihch
he had in view was not of the ruthless,
self-assertive type, but; ever subordinated
to the claims of pity and justice.
One or two sentences of his own may
be quoted here as more truly characteristic of him than anything that can be
said by others: ''We have come to
recognize that the individual's fitness is
not only his prime business, but the
public's affair as well. In increasing
degree we are interfering with personal
liberty for the benefit of the  race."
Of his own profession he says: "Medicine is being increasingly socialized. We
are drifting perceptibly nearer to the
time when the doctor will be a public
servant, and not a member of a privileged class."
Nor was he blind to the deepest
aspects of life. "We have come," he
says,  "to  the  point  in  our development
Phone, Seymour 1391
H. F. Stony & Co.
Tailors
650 Granville Street
Up Stairs
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Sey. 474
GEO. B. KERFOOT
Men's Clothing  and  Furnishings
Suits Made to Measure
155   HASTINGS  STREET,   EAST
Vancouver,   B.  C.
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Birks   Building
Phone, Sey. 3430 Vancouver,  B.C.
Sey. 9387
955   NICOLA  ST.
Nicola High-class Ladies'
and Gent's Tailors
We Remodel Ladles and Gents'  Suits
and  Overcoats
Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed
Suits   turned   inside   out
Delicious Homemade Cakes
Served at
YE LITTLE BROWN INN
745  DUNSMUIR  STREET
(Around   the   corner   from   Drysdale's)
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea,  Supper
License  No.   10-2636
YAMAT0
Direct  Importers  of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Seymour 2288 November 28, 1918
UBYSSEY
exclusive Styles
in
Tor
Young men and
Young Women
*T»HE NEW STYLES IN FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly  handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the young man, the new
shades of tan, with leather or
Neolin soles; also smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Ingledew
Shoe Co,
666 Granville Street
''Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store"
when we must have trained statesmen,
publicists, journalists, social experts,
public hygienists, lawmakers, and last,
but not by any means least, spiritual
advisers and leaders. As man gets to
know more about himself and his environment, and learns to control in increasing degree the forces of the world,
he does not lose interest in whence he
came   and   whither   he   goes	
Physical efficiency is inexplicably interwoven with  mental and moral vigor."
In private, the late President was a
delightful companion, rich in talk and
humor, and adapting himself easily to all
kinds of men. Students and professors
alike went to him with their difficulties,
and found him invariably kind and
responsive.
The stimulus of his magnetic personality will be greatly missed, both in the
University and the Province; but the
memory of his fine nature and his life
consecrated to the things of the spirit
will be an abiding possession. "He rests
from his labors, and his works do follow
him."
Memorial to Frank Fairchild Wesbrook,
M.A., CM., M.D.
(From  Minnesota  Alumni Weekly,
October 28,  1918)
The Medical School of the University
of Minnesota receives with profound
sorrow the tidings of the death of its
former Dean, Frank Fairchild Wesbrook.
The men and women of the faculty
who worked with him and knew him
intimately for many years know that "a
master in Israel has fallen." They know
that a scientist in medicine who ranked
among the marked men of his day is
gone. But they know, too, that a leader
whom they gladly followed, an administrator who directed with intelligent
power the destinies of the school, a
counsellor in whom they trusted, a
friend of golden days gone by whom
they loved, has passed into the Great
Beyond. His going reminds them of the
strong man he was, of the great work
he did, of the worth of his friendship
and the joy of his companionship which
again, with renewed consciousness of
loss, they lose.
To Mrs. and Miss Wesbrook they
send the message of their sympathy and
the assurance that his memory will be
cherished in the hearts of his associates
who remain, and in the annals of the
school  he so greatly helped to upbuild.
With  the  death  of  their  old  Chief,  a
significant chapter in the history of the
Medical  School  of  Minnesota is closed.
RICHARD  OLDING BEARD,
Secretary.
E.  P.  LYON,  Dean.
Leckie Shoes
are   made   for   the   man   who   is
particular
Remember:    "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
''That's  a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers. .
What about  YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone, Fair. 1546
McLean & Powell Iron
Works
358-398  DUFFERIN   ST.,  WEST
Genera] Foundry and
Pattern Making
W. D. McDBAN L. S. POWELL,
Phone, Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our   Specialties:
Silks,  Kimonas,  Ladies'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C. UBYSSEY
November 28, 1918
YOUNG MEN'S STORE
WE have catered to the Young
Men's    trade    in    Vancouver
for nearly 29 years.
This Year's Models
are  the  most  up-to-date  we   have
produced for a long time.
Form-fitting
and   Better   Suits,
patch  pockets.
with   slash   or
French Overcoats
Also D.B. Ulsters, with convert-
able  collar;   Raglans,  etc.
We keep in touch with the markets and get the newest designs as
they come out.
Phone, Sey. 8380
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 to 315 Hastings  Street, West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company .of Canada
i* a good  Company  to Insure with
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692 BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital - - - $15,000,000
Reserve - - - $13,500,000
THRIFT  AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
including the  following,   which  are  in
the vicinity of the University:
Falrvlew—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kltsilano—Corner Fourth  Avenue  and
Yew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued    every    Thursday    by    the    Publications
Board   of the   University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,   $2.00  per   session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief I.   A.   Shaw
Senior   Editor A.    Rive
{Miss  E.   M.   Marwick
Miss  P.  Smith
R.   Adams
Chief   Reporter R.    Cribb
Military   Editor R.    Leckie
Exchange   Editor Miss  A.   Ure
BUSINESS  STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   J.   Allardyce
Advertising   Manager J.    L.   MacDonald
Circulation   Manager J.   G.   Fraser
THE DAWN OF PEACE
The world has begun a new page of
history. The dread days of war have
ended and peace has dawned. The page
of history which has been written during the past four years is one of which
we as a nation need not be ashamed.
The pen was dipped in blood and
wrote heroism, faith, radiant sacrifice
and victory on one side of the page,
and dishonor, brutality and defeat on
the other. Whatever errors we may
have committed during the progress of
the war, we have maintained our honor
unsullied, and won the highest respect
among the nations of the world as the
champion   of   freedom.
While those heroes in France have
laid down their lives that all that is
best in democracy might remain, it is
our privilege to help in completing
their work. We would be unworthy
of their generous sacrifice if we failed
to make adequate preparation to meet
the responsibilities of this new era of
peace. There can be heroes of peace
no less than of war, and they best
merit that name who are quietly preparing to face the great problems of the
future.
The watchword of this new era of
peace is "Service," and it should be
service wisely planned and generously
given. Physical fitness, a keen mind,
a broad vision, an alertness in performing the tasks that duty demands
of us—these are essentials without
which we cannot intelligently serve.
We are inspired to prepare for such
service by the magnificent example of
those heroes who lie slumbering under
the ravaged sod of France. Let us
not forget their sacrifice; let us be
wise master-builders in laying solid
foundations of peace, that our work
may be as enduring a monument of
our devotion to duty as any which has
been  built  during the  travail  of  war.
THE DEMAND
OF LEADERSHIP
At this time the question of leadership is indeed a momentous one, for at
no time in our nation's history has
there been such a demand for wise and
steady leadership as now, when the
subject of reconstruction is claiming
world-wide  attention.
How can we obtain the leaders who
will measure up to the demands made
upon their intellectual resources and
constructive skill? The question may
best be answered by viewing the lives
of some of the world leaders as to how
they prepared for leadership. When in
his youth Mr. Lloyd George visited the
British House of Commons, there
flashed upon him a vision of political
leadership, which lent purpose and direction to every act of his career. He
prepared for the realization of that
vision with , such thoroughness, such
consecration to duty, such courage in
facing conflicting issues, that when he
took over the reins of government the
nation had absolute confidence in him.
President Wilson began early to prepare himself for that wise leadership
and masterful diplomacy which has
been so deservedly recognized by Great
Britain, by her Allies, and by those
nations of Europe that are aspiring to
complete political freedom. His undergraduate years at Princeton University
must have been years of severe intellectual preparation; for many years
later, when he was president of the
same university, he stated that a student's first and foremost duty was the
duty   of   conscientious   study.
The study of the lives of such men
as the Premier of Great Britain and
the President of the United States
teaches us that diligent preparation for
leadership is not the work of a few
years of undergraduate study, but the
work of a lifetime. The price which
must be paid is a high one. It is true
today, as always, that the heights of
vision can only be reached through toil
and   sacrifice.
Western   Universities   Service   Club
A meeting of the club will be, held
on the evening of Tuesday, December
3rd, at eight o'clock, to make plans for
winter activities and to welcome the
men recently returned from the Front.
All are asked to be present who are
students or ex-students of the university and who have served with the
C.E.F. or any branch of His Majesty's
forces. November 28, 1918
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches, Play-parts,
Recitations Coached
Special   rate  on   single  lessons   to
U.B.C.  Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23, 709  Dunsmulr Street
Phone,  Sey. 6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly    Professor    of    Piano    and
Lecturer at McGill  University,   Montreal,  and  Midland Institute,   Birmingham, England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone, Seymour 8519L
Granville Stationery Co.,
Limited
540  GRANVILLE  STREET
Books,   Stationery,   Toys,   Photo
Supplies
Developing,   Finishing   and   Enlarging
FRANK WRIGLEY
Organist and Choirmaster
St. Andrew's Church
Pupils accepted for Piano, Organ,  etc.
Residence and  Studio:
1260  HARWOOD  STREET
Phone,  Sey.  6720
At the
J. N. HARVEY  CLOTHING
STORES
Becoming more popular
each season as
Young Men's Stores
Smart, New Styles in
Suits, Hats and
Furnishings
are now here awaiting you
J. N. HARVEY, Ltd.
Two  Reliable  Stores  for  Men in
British Columbia:
125-187  Hastings Street, West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Also 614-616 Yates St., Victoria
Look for the Big Red
Arrow Sign
THE PAUSE
Somewhere in the Rockies,
Sept. 28, 1918
Halts the long train;   the car's loud din
gives pause
To  the  long-born   stillness  of  the  pine-
laden  air:
And   through   the   woods,   made   golden
here and there
By Autumn's  finger,  the  mist  reluctant
draws
Its slow but tireless feet.    All that w as
Of yesterday lies behind—thoughts that
deter
The   onward   march   to   Life's   triumph,
days that wear
Love's     rosy    garland,     deeds    without
applause.
Before lie speechless  hopes, battles unborn,
Triumphs yet unattained, swift hours of
toil;
And    the    long    sore    disappointments
bravely   borne,
And  leaps  into  the    darkness—laughter,
too,
And   snatches   of   song  from   under   the
midnight blue,
And  cups  of  nectar  flushed  with   Life's
young morn.
R.  F. ADAMS,
Arts '20.
THE DEBTOR
My   streams   slip   free   from   mountains'
snowy keep;
They run exultant races to the shore,
In   ocean's    outstretched    arms   to   rest
once more—
Returning what she gave unto the deep.
Along these arteries, in daring leap,
My children's  birchen fleet these pulses
bore,
Until my mother sent a richer store
Of  blood,   through   veins   of  steel  from
deep to deep,
Where  bayonets   in  myriad  fires   divide
And scatter heaven's flame.   My mother
calls—■
The   "iron   stallions"  lead   down  to   the
tide
The   Life   which   strangely   dear  of  late
has grown.
Yet,   battle-voiced,   feply   the   booming
falls—
"Take, Mother, whom thou gavest—they
are thine own!
E. HARRIS.
Owing to the death of Dr. Wesbrook, all social college functions will
be  cancelled   until   after   Christmas.
New and Up-to-Date Models
Every Week
The
Elite Millinery
M. P. ELLIS
757 ROBSON STREET
Phone, Sey. 4210
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgman s Studio
will   help   you   with    pictures    of
established  reputation
At the  same address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'  Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320  SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite  C.P.R.  Depot)
Vancouver, B.C.
Fresh  Cut Flowers
Funeral   Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,   EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE   STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
November 28, 1918
u
THE NIKKO
Japanese Silk Store
Headquarters for
Christmas Gifts
n
846 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 3507
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
"Trade    Upstairs   and   Save
Your Dollars"
Our   New,   Modern,   Daylight
Upstairs
Clothes Shop
will    save    you    Dollars    on    your
next   Suit,   Overcoat   or   Raincoat.
TOver  3,000  garments,  in  the   new-
« est   and   smartest   styles   and   best
fabrics,     at     prices     considerably
lower   than   you   would   expect   to
pay.
$15.00 TO $50.00
Instead of $20.00 to $65.00
Arnold & Quigley
546—GRANVILLE—546
The Store That's Always Busy
DRAMATIC OUTLOOK
The dramatic outlook this season is
very pleasing. Since the University of
British Columbia opened its doors, we
have lived through three very lean years
of theatrical fare. In that time there
have not been more than a half-dozen
attractions that offered anything worth
while to the intelligent theatre-goer.
The old order is changing, however, if
the preliminary announcement of the
bookings for this winter speaks truly.
While the number of plays is hardly
metropolitan, there are some that should
prove very  interesting.
The two stars that will cast the
greatest brilliancy upon the present season are George Arliss and Miss Maude
Adams. The former is presenting a
play in which he, himself, had a hand in
writing. It bears the name of "Hamilton," and is a chronicle of some of the
stirring events in the life of that prominent figure in American history. A story
of the Revolutionary days, it is said to
hold the interest, and to present some
convincing portrayals of figures of that
time. Those who have seen this accomplished actor in such character plays as
"Disraeli" and "Paganini" will feel
well assured of a finished performance.
Miss Adams has not yet announced
which of the famous little Scotsman's
works she will enhance with the charm
of her acting this year. It is to be regretted that "Dear Brutus," the last of
Barrie's plays to reach the new-world
stage, is not one in which Miss Adams
can appear. Perhaps the fervent prayers of her many righteous admirers may
be answered, and we may again see her
in that most captivating of all her many
parts, the patient wife in "What Every
Woman Knows."
Among the plays that are offered
without the added attraction of a star as
interpreter, those presented by Messrs.
Cohan and Harris are, without doubt,
the most interesting. Although this trio
may not merit the boastful advertisement of "the greatest made-in-America
plays of the 20th Century," they come
to us with long New York runs to their
credit. Such a record is sometimes, in
these unregenerate days, sufficient to
condemn the offering in question; but it
is not so with these. "The Tailor-Made
Man" was one of the few genuine successes of the last New York season,
holding the boards through the whole
year. It is a high-class comedy, with
clear-cut characterization and dramatic
situations. A young man, serving his
time as a tailor's apprentice, has ambitious ideas. One night he,, dresses
himself in the evening garments left by
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       POWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
a customer for alterations. So transformed, he invades society, where
clothes make the man. The amusing
mishaps during his masquerade supply
the theme of one of the best comedies
of the last few years. Another of this
group is "The Little Teacher." This
story of the courage of a county school-
marm in a lumber section of Vermont
should have a special interest for audiences in this province for a somewhat
tragical reason. It is the last work of
Mr. Harry James Smith, who met with
a sudden death last fall just outside of
New Westminster. He had been sent
to the Pacific coast by the United States
Government to investigate the medicinal
mosses of this locality, and, whilst he
was on a tour of inspection, his motor
was run down by a Great Northern
train. The other member of this trio
is a musical farce, entitled "Going Up."
This is a bright little play, guaranteed
to interest more than the boys in
Science. The music is very catchy and
the wit entertaining.
Mr. John E. Kellerd, whose performances last season gave the only Shakespeare in several years, is due.in November, when we hope the U.B.C. students
will give him the hearty support that
was a feature of his former visit.
Two other plays that come to u!s
with the best of credentials from thie
"great white way" are "Happiness" and
"Friendly Enemies." Among the lighter
offerings there are two musical comedies
that are sure to draw well. "Furs and
Frills," with the lank humorist, Richard
Carle, is one, and "Her Regiment," a
Victor  Herbert opera, is the other. !
With an alluring programme of this
sort, it is possible that some of ' thp
favorite indoor recreations of college
students may suffer from occasional
neglect this winter, whilst their fickle
devotees transfer allegiance to the|
spoken drama instead. It may be thai
even the members of English '10 will
be  found  attending the  theatre.
BILLBOARD. :i November 28, 1918
UBYSSEY
Watch
this Space
next issue.
Interesting
news for
you.
&y%
POTTS &
SMALL
LIMITED
449  Granville  Street
Branch Stores:
57 Hastings Street, West
Phone, Sey. 2313
932 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 8723
Victoria Branch:
1232 Government Street
Phone 4742
U.Morimoto & Co.
Direct Importers of
Japanese Fancy Goods
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching by Measure
Manufacturers of
"Bamboo  Knitting  Needles"
Main Store:
673 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Seymour 6410
COLLEGE Y.M.C.A.
The Y.M.C.A. held their first meeting
of the season in the auditorium. Mr.
Webster, the president, first addressed
those assembled, and, outlining the
policy of the society for the year,
which is "to do the greatest good to
the greatest number," pointed out that
it was aiming to reach the manly man,
not the religious crank. Prof. Henderson, honorary president, spoke to the
students, encouraging them in their
work, and emphasized the fact that
Christianity is an important factor in
developing an all-round student. Professor Wood, in an impressive talk, the
subject of which was, "Does the Student Y.M.C.A. Justify Itself?" pointed
out the need for a high moral standard
which such an organization keeps before its members. He closed with a
stirring appeal to accept the challenge
of  the  poet—
"If ye  break faith  with  us who  die
We    shall    not    sleep,    though    poppies
blow
On   Flanders'   fields."
CLASS REPORTS
At a meeting of Arts '21 held recently, the resignation of Mr. Fred Thurston, who has gone over to Science, was
received and accepted. Mr. Ralph Argue
was duly elected to the office of treasurer. Messrs. Denham and Webster
were chosen to open hostilities of the
literary season in a debate against the
Freshman Year. We trust Arts '22 will
appreciate this flattering compliment
from Arts '21.
Miss McKay, president of the Arts
Women Undergraduate Society, called
a meeting of the women of Arts '22 for
the election of their officers. These are
as follows:
Mrs. A. F. B. Clark, Honorary president.
Miss   Ethel   Livingstone,  president.
Miss Cora Metz, secretary.
Miss Mae McMynn, treasurer.
Miss Kathleen Knowlton, class reporter.
Miss   Brown,  literary representative.
Friends of Cliffe Mathers, who enlisted in the Royal Air Force, will be
pleased to learn that he has recovered
from an attack of Spanish influenza,
contracted while training in the East.
Before joining up, Cliffe was a member
of Arts '21.
Economy in Value
THE LATEST STYLES
THE BEST FABRICS
THE MOST REASONABLE PRICES
are three distinct features of our
clothes
High-class  Furnishings  for Men
and Young Men
The  swellest  Ties  in  B.C.
The  JONAH PRAT  CO.
401    HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald. Marpole Co. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
Double the Value
of your Christmas Gifts by selecting a gift that is suitable for the
particular game the recipient excels   in.
We can supply you with Golf
Goods, Boxing Gloves, Exercisers,
Hockey Goods, Skis, Indian Clubs,
Footballs, Safety Razors and
Pocket   Knives.
I
COME AND LOOK OVER
OUR STOCK
TISDALLS
LIMITED
618-620   HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST
The Complete
Sporting Goods Store UBYSSEY
November 28, 1918
Students
—will find  this store can fill many of
their student needs:
CLASS PINS
PRIZE CUPS
TROPHIES
FOUNTAIN  PENS
Conklin's—Waterman's—Swan's
THE   "EVERSHARP"   PENCIL
in   Silver  Plate,   Sterling   Silver,
Gold-filled and Gold
Many other lines, of course,  in which
you will be  greatly interested
O.  B. ALLAN
"The  House of  Diamonds"
480-486   Granville   Street
at  Pender
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33-49 Hastings East
Vancouver, B. C.
£
NOT
Poor Service at Low Price
NOR
Luxurious Service at
High Price
BUT
Good Service at a
Fair Price
—that   is   what   you    want   and
what we want to give you
B. C. Electric
CLASS NOTES
AGRICULTURE DEPT.
This, article is written to satisfy the
curiosity of those students (chiefly of
Arts '23) who habitually congregate
about the door of the Arts Building to
watch our impressive departure.
Yes, we do belong to the University.
No, not to the Senate, nor to the Board
of Governors, though we do ride in a
big car occasionally. This is only one
of the privileges that might have been
yours had you elected to graduate in
Agriculture. Those who have never
journeyed to Point Grey by "P. P. and
J.," have never husked corn or weighed
potatoes on the University campus-to-
be, have missed half the joy of college
life.
Of course, we have a few lectures indoors, but even these are not of the
humdrum variety. In the first place, we
have an exciting hunt for a room. We
may have the large lecture-room, or a
tiny lab., where we sit perched on high
stools, or even our own lecture-room
No. 11. And then, at any time, may
come a knock and a more or less polite
request to take ourselves elsewhere-—
which we sometimes do.
*    *    *
The Agriculture Undergraduate Society commenced activities early this
year with a party at the home of its
honorary president, Mr. Boving. Here
the Freshmen held class elections, with
the following results: Honorary president, Prof. F. M. Clements; president,
Mr. W. Moore; vice-president, Mr. B.
Sweeting; secretary-treasurer, Miss M.
S. McKechnie.
The president of Agriculture '21 is
Mr. C. H. Lamb, and the vice-president
Mr. R. C. Woodward. The secretary,
Mr. F. F. McKenzie, left to join the
colors, and his successor has not yet
been  elected.
COST OF PRODUCING
NEWSPAPERS   SOARS
The cost of paper necessary for the
production of the newspaper has increased considerably since the war. Besides paper and ink, there are some 115
items of expense. Of these, 30 have
risen over 200 per cent., 35 others have
risen 150 per cent., 18 others have risen
over 75 per cent. Over 2,500 papers in
the United States and Canada have gone
out of existence. Over 300 have raised
their  selling prices.
If the war continues another year,
every paper in the country will have
raised its rates or quit business.
—Vancouver Daily Province.
The  Pioneer Union  Store
CLAMAN'S
Limited
153 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Home of
Hart,   Schaffner   &   Marx   Clothes
Young Fellows'
Suits
JWe have the spirited styles
which young fellows want. We
know, because   they   tell   us   so.
fl The rich, exclusive patterns and
colorings appeal very strongly to
them.
$15, $20, $25, $30
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
PRINTING   COMPANY
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None   but  Union   Mechanics  Employed

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